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To survive in cold temperatures, living organisms have developed anti freezing protein, but as a surprise for scientists, two unrelated groups of fish have the same gene. Scientists have confirmed that it is not through crossbreeding.

 

The new microscope uses quantum entanglement to replace light used to examine biological systems. The light used is so strong that it destroys the cells in a few seconds, the new microscope has overcome this barrier. The quantum entanglement now could be integrated in other technologies as well. 

OM 30 ÅR VIL VERDENS KORALLER STOPPE MED AT OPHOBE KALK OG VOKSE, FORUDSER FORSKERE. 30 YEARS FROM NOW: NO MORE CORAL GROWTH. By analyzing coral growth research and observations made over decades long periods and gathering information on coral reefs, researchers have come to the conclusion that the calcification or growth of corals will stop by approximately the year 2050.

https://scitechdaily.com/worlds-coral-reefs-may-cease-calcifying-around-2054/
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Elon Musk Mocks "Anonymous" For Threatening Him
Tesla CEO Elon Musk isn't afraid of Anonymous — or, at least, of folks on the internet who claim to be associated with the hacktivist organization Anonymous. Over the weekend, an account that claimed to be associated with the group uploaded a video to social media that accused the billionaire of destroying lives by playing the crypto markets. "You may think that you are the smartest person in the
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AstraZeneca vaccine linked to slightly higher risk of blood disorder
Analysis in Scotland finds small increase in risk of treatable condition called idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Data from Scotland's Covid vaccination programme has revealed a possible small increase in the risk of a treatable and often mild bleeding disorder after the first dose of the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine. Doctors examined
17h
New York Times Publishes Then Deletes Article Claiming Watermelons Were Found on Mars
The New York Times is having a strange day. This afternoon, the prominent newspaper published an article making a surprising claim about exobiology: that watermelons had been discovered on Mars. "Authorities say rise of fruit aliens is to blame for glut of outer space watermelons," read the story, which was deleted less than an hour later, according to a partial cache of its contents on Google Ne
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IRS Leak Shows Elon Musk Paid $0 in Federal Income Tax in 2018
According to Internal Revenue Service data obtained by ProPublica , some of the wealthiest people in the world have paid extremely little in federal income taxes in recent years. In fact, several billionaires managed to whittle down their federal income tax return to zero dollars. Tesla CEO Elon Musk managed to do so in 2018. Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos, now the world's richest man, paid zero dollars i
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McDonald's Replaces Drive-Thru Human Workers With Siri-Like AI
Burger Bots Next time you hit up a McDonald's drive-thru, you might find yourself leaning out your window to bark your order to a robot rather than a pimply teenager. The fast food giant has been testing out a Siri-like voice-recognition system at ten drive-thru locations in Chicago, CEO Chris Kempczinski revealed during a Wednesday investor conference attended by Nation's Restaurant News . The s
14h
The Fundamental Question of the Pandemic Is Shifting
During a pandemic , no one's health is fully in their own hands. No field should understand that more deeply than public health, a discipline distinct from medicine. Whereas doctors and nurses treat sick individuals in front of them, public-health practitioners work to prevent sickness in entire populations. They are expected to think big. They know that infectious diseases are always collective
21h
For canaries, the sight of other sick birds is enough to set off an immune response
A team of researchers from Oklahoma State University, the University of Central Oklahoma and the University of Arkansas has found that the mere sight of sick birds of their own kind is enough to set off an immune response in healthy canaries. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, the group describes experiments they conducted with caged birds in their lab.
17h
Asteroid 16 Psyche might not be what scientists expected
The widely studied metallic asteroid known as 16 Psyche was long thought to be the exposed iron core of a small planet that failed to form during the earliest days of the solar system. But new University of Arizona-led research suggests that the asteroid might not be as metallic or dense as once thought, and hints at a much different origin story.
12h
The four most urgent questions about long COVID
Nature, Published online: 09 June 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01511-z Scientists are starting to get insights into the lingering disorder that affects some people infected with SARS-CoV-2 — but many mysteries remain unsolved.
22h
How To See The 'Ring Of Fire' On Thursday
Early risers across the Northern Hemisphere will be able to see an eclipse Thursday morning when the moon passes between the Earth and the sun. (Image credit: Stan Honda/AFP via Getty Images)
16h
Leading biologist dampens his 'smoking gun' Covid lab leak theory
Nobel laureate David Baltimore says he overstated case, and the origins of the virus are still unknown Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage A Nobel prize-winning US biologist, who has been widely quoted describing a "smoking gun" to support the thesis that Covid-19 was genetically modified and escaped from a Wuhan lab, has said he overstated the case. David Baltimore, a d
20h
20 years after the human genome was first sequenced, dangerous gene myths abound | Philip Ball
Misleading rhetoric has fuelled the belief that our genetic code is an 'instruction book' – but it's far more interesting than that Twenty years ago, the science journal Nature published the first draft of the human genome: the sequence of chemical "letters" on the gene-bearing DNA of our chromosomes. The Human Genome Project (HGP) had laboured for a decade to read this coded information. In a Wh
22h
NASA Is Investigating a Bizarre Explosion on the Sun
Solar Forensics NASA is probing a bizarre, three-in-one explosion that erupted out of the surface of the Sun back in 2016 — in hopes that it will unlock the secrets of the Sun's volatile activity. The explosion contained elements of three different types of solar eruptions : Bubble-like coronal mass ejections, beam-like jets, and partial eruptions that collapse onto themselves. Those eruptions al
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The Disturbing New Hybrid of Democracy and Autocracy
In 2015, Daniel Obajtek was the county commissioner of Pcim, a tiny district south of Kraków and north of the Polish-Slovak border. "County commissioner" is perhaps a grand-sounding title, but I can't find a better one. In Polish, the term for the job he held is wójt , an old-fashioned word that means something like "village headman." It signifies that you run something very small. Pcim, populati
22h
Scientists Say Dark Matter Could Be Hiding Inside an Extra Dimension
Extra Dimension According to a team of researchers at the University of California, Riverside, an extra dimension in space-time could be hiding dark mater — the stuff that appears to make up 85 percent of the mass in the universe, yet remains undetectable by scientific equipment. "We live in an ocean of dark matter, yet we know very little about what it could be," said Flip Tanedo, assistant prof
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DNA Jumps Between Animal Species. No One Knows How Often.
To survive in the frigid ocean waters around the Arctic and Antarctica, marine life evolved many defenses against the lethal cold. One common adaptation is the ability to make antifreezing proteins (AFPs) that prevent ice crystals from growing in blood, tissues and cells. It's a solution that has evolved repeatedly and independently, not just in fish but in plants, fungi and bacteria. It isn't…
17h
Princeton Dumbs Down Classics
My Atlantic colleague John McWhorter and I must have received the same high-frequency language-nerd alert, audible only to the types of people whose idea of fun is Esperanto grammar. We both recently learned that Princeton's classics department had ceased requiring its students to study Latin and Greek, and we reacted in predictable horror. A classics department without Latin and Greek is like a
21h
The Psychological Benefits of Commuting to Work
This article was published online on June 9, 2021. B ack when commuting was a requirement for going to work, I once passed through a subway tunnel so filthy and crowded that the poem inscribed on its ceiling seemed like a cruel joke. " Overslept, / so tired. / If late, / get fired. / Why bother? / Why the pain? / Just go home / do it again ." "The Commuter's Lament," which adorns a subterranean p
22h
There's a Large New Coronavirus Outbreak in China
Guangzhou, the capital of China's most populous province Guandong, is experiencing a flare up of coronavirus cases, as CNBC reports . It's a sign that the highly transmissible Delta variant of the coronavirus, which was first detected in India, may lead to flare ups even in parts of the world that have had a robust public health response to COVID, like China. The city of over 15 million reported
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NASA Releases Breathtaking Panorama From New Rover
360 Degrees NASA's Perseverance Mars rover took a stunning 360-degree panorama of its surroundings while parked at the "Van Zyl Overlook" in the Jezero Crater, a region believed to be the dried up bed of an ancient lake. The six-wheeled rover was parked at the Overlook while its tiny helicopter companion, NASA's ingenuity Mars helicopter, completed its first flights between April 15 and 26. The g
12h
Bill Gates Was Reportedly Horrible to His Employees
Bad Bosses As more details emerge about Melinda and Bill Gates' relationship leading up to their recent divorce announcement, it's becoming increasingly clear that Bill's carefully-crafted public persona of an earnest geek who wants to save the world is in reality much more complicated. As that affable persona shatters, more people are speaking up about Gates' tendencies to pursue extramarital af
13h
Quantum leap for medical research as microscope zooms in on tiny structures
Australian scientists develop a microscope that works with 35% more clarity, raising hope for improvements in medical imaging Australian researchers have developed a microscope that can image tiny biological structures that were previously not visible in what has been described as a significant step for quantum technology. It is believed to be the first time that quantum technology has improved o
15h
Neuroscientists Have Discovered a Phenomenon That They Can't Explain
Carl Schoonover and Andrew Fink are confused. As neuroscientists, they know that the brain must be flexible but not too flexible. It must rewire itself in the face of new experiences, but must also consistently represent the features of the external world. How? The relatively simple explanation found in neuroscience textbooks is that specific groups of neurons reliably fire when their owner smell
15h
What happened before the Big Bang?
Science can allow us to determine what happened trillionths of a second after the Big Bang. But it likely never will be possible to know what brought about the Big Bang. As frustrating as it might be, some things are entirely unknowable. And that's a good thing. Let's face it: to think that the universe has a history that started with a kind of birthday some 13.8 billion years ago is weird. It re
16h
Covid distancing may have weakened children's immune system, experts say
End of social distancing and mask-wearing could leave children vulnerable to common bugs Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Scientists are concerned that measures to combat Covid-19 have weakened the immune systems of young children who have not been able to build up resistance to common bugs, leaving them vulnerable when mask-wearing and social distancing eventually en
18h
NASA Head Says He's Talked to Pilots Who Encountered UFOs
More Questions In an interview with CNN , newly-minted NASA administrator Bill Nelson chimed in on the topic of UFOs ahead of the release of a long-awaited report on the strange sightings. "Well, I have talked to those Navy pilots, and they are sure that they saw something," Nelson told CNN . "And of course we've seen their video from their jets." Know Nothing But despite having been briefed on t
18h
Scientists Sequence DNA Found in Pink Snow That Covered Mountains
Do Not Eat A team of European scientists has trekked up the Alps to investigate the garish pink snow caused by colorful blooming algae that mix with the fresh snowfall to create a colorful alien landscape that can be seen among the mountaintops increasingly often. Unfortunately, the pink snow, sometimes called "blood snow" or a slightly less nauseating "strawberry snow," is potentially disastrous
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Joe Manchin Can't Have It Both Ways
Democrats did not like the Fifteenth Amendment. In the late 1860s, as Congress debated the proposal to bar disenfranchisement on the basis of "race, color, or previous condition of servitude," Democratic senators and representatives charged Republicans with imposing a vile despotism on the southern states by enfranchising Black men. "I now come to this point to say that to deprive any citizen of
12h
Tesla Accused of Secretly Selling Part of Bitcoin Hoard
Tesla's sales seem to have rebounded from a seriously weak April, showing surprisingly strong revenues in the month of May. With the values of Bitcoin slipping even further , that wild ride is leading some to suspect the electric car company may have sold off some of its considerable Bitcoin holdings. According to Bloomberg columnist Liam Denning , the plummet, in addition to pressure from all si
16h
Amazon Caught Selling Fake COVID Vaccination Cards
Amazon was found to be selling fake COVID-19 vaccination cards on its platform by watchdog Media Matters for America. Now Amazon is selling counterfeit COVID-19 vaccination cards https://t.co/GgqaopXqyy pic.twitter.com/B9mcHhao4f — Olivia Little (@OliviaLittle) June 7, 2021 The news comes after Media Matters senior researcher Olivia Little discovered that handmade and vintage goods platform Etsy
17h
A Crumpled, Dried-Out Relic of the Pandemic
I left a lot of things at my desk in March 2020: a toothbrush, shoes, several varieties of tea, a mug full of plastic utensils, at least three jars of peanut butter. But one of my colleagues left behind a less shelf-stable treasure: one Envy apple, coquettishly perched atop a pile of fact-checking notes. For the first few weeks of The Atlantic 's work-from-home odyssey, this colleague was curious
21h
This is the first new close-up picture of Jupiter's moon Ganymede in more than 20 years
NASA has just released the first pictures of Jupiter's largest moon, Ganymede, taken during a flyby by the Juno probe. Juno passed Ganymede on June 7, making its closest approach at just around 1,000 kilometers from its surface while traveling at 66,800 kilometers per hour. It's the closest any probe has come to the moon since Galileo in 2000. The image above was taken by the JunoCam, capturing n
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Engineers Build Drones That Hunt Screaming Humans
Peekaboo! A team of German engineers is hard at work building a particularly terrifying drone technology — but, they say, for an extremely good reason. For years, drone developers have argued that one of their best use cases is to quickly and easily navigate or monitor areas that are hard for humans to reach . So it's no surprise that a team from Germany's Fraunhofer Institute for Communication,
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Rock Band Pleads for Elon Musk to Send Them to Space for Concert
Rock Stars The rock band The Flaming Lips has been a mainstay for decades, but the group still has its sights set on bigger and better things. Namely, frontman Wayne Coyne said on Audacy that he wants to be the first band to perform in space, adding that he hoped SpaceX CEO and notorious launcher of things Elon Musk was listening so he could help them out. "I still hold out hope with the likes of
12h
NASA Head Slams United States for "Shameful" Space Junk
For Shame According to NASA administrator Bill Nelson, the issue of space junk is about to become a lot more relevant as we spend more and more time in Earth's orbit — and, he admitted, it's partially the fault of the United States. "It's dangerous, and shameful for anybody — including the US — that has allowed space debris to be up there," Nelson told CNN in an interview on Tuesday. In fact, wit
13h
Hollywood's New Crown Prince of Musicals
Photographs by Jake Michaels Even before he signed on to the Hollywood adaptation of Wicked , Jon M. Chu helped his characters defy gravity. In a scene from the director's forthcoming musical film In the Heights , a torrent of emotions literally sweeps the lovebirds Nina and Benny off their feet. As they sing the ballad "When the Sun Goes Down," the fire escape on which they're perched tilts, and
19h
New Battery Tech Could Finally Make Flying Taxis Economically Feasible
Becoming Realistic Flying taxis, more technically known as electric vertical take-off and landing (eVTOL) vehicles, might actually — finally — become a feasible technology thanks to a new development in battery technology. Ironically, the hardest part of designing and building eVTOLs isn't the vehicle itself . Instead, it's solving the challenging energy situation that eVTOLs face: Any battery th
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NASA Spacecraft Takes Gorgeous Pictures of Jupiter's Largest Moon
NASA's Juno spacecraft took two stunning images of Jupiter's largest moon Ganymede during a June 7 flyby. It's the closest flyby of the moon in more than two decades, according to NASA , a rare and tantalizing glimpse at the largest moon in the entire solar system — which also happens to be one of the best places to look for signs of life thanks to its icy crust. The flyby could also allow scient
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Graphene Hard Drives Store Ten Times as Much Data
Graphene Drives A team of scientists led by the University of Cambridge has developed a new ultra-high density hard drive that they say has ten times the data storage of other leading drives — thanks to an ultra-thin coating of graphene. Graphene, which is a material made of a one-atom-thick layer of carbon, is a bit of a buzzy darling in the material sciences community, to the point that it's ne
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Richard Branson Is Reportedly Racing to Go to Space Before Jeff Bezos
Space Virgin Rumors are spreading that Virgin Galactic CEO Richard Branson will attempt to beat rival and Blue Origins CEO Jeff Bezos to space this summer. According to Parabolic Arc , which cited an anonymous source, the billionaire is looking to fly to the edge of space aboard his space company's SpaceShipTwo rocket over the July 4 holiday weekend. It's a sign that the space tourism industry is
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Skeletons of Viking men to be reunited in Danish exhibition
DNA tests on ancient bones show men were related and died following violent incidents The skeletons of two Viking age men who were related but died on opposite sides of the North Sea are to be reunited in an exhibition in Copenhagen this month. DNA tests on the ancient bones suggest the men were either half-brothers or a nephew and an uncle, according to Prof Eske Willerslev, a Danish evolutionar
14h
Scientists Resurrect Creature That's Been Frozen for 24,000 Years
Wakey Wakey! A lot was happening about 24,000 years ago. Humanity may have been busy first arriving and settling in North America while enjoying hot new trends like artistic pottery and counting . Meanwhile, somewhere in Siberia, a microscopic critter called a bdelloid rotifer succumbed to the extreme cold of the ongoing Ice Age and went into a state of cryogenic sleep in the permafrost — where i
15h
Key to carbon-free cars? Look to the stars
For nearly half a century, astrophysicists and organic chemists have been on the hunt for the origins of C6H6, the benzene ring—an elegant, hexagonal molecule comprised of 6 carbon and 6 hydrogen atoms.
16h
A study shows the unexpected effect of black holes beyond their own galaxies
At the heart of almost every sufficiently massive galaxy there is a black hole whose gravitational field, although very intense, affects only a small region around the center of the galaxy. Even though these objects are thousands of millions of times smaller than their host galaxies, our current view is that the Universe can be understood only if the evolution of galaxies is regulated by the activ
16h
Cabling for Large Hadron Collider upgrade project reaches halfway mark
The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has passed the halfway mark in the multi-year process of fabricating crucial superconducting cables as part of a project to upgrade the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. This upgrade, now in progress, will greatly increase the facility's collision rate and its scientific productivity.
19h
New research shows that Siberian Neanderthals ate both plants and animals
Neanderthals, extinct cousins of modern humans, occupied Western Eurasia before disappearing and although it was once thought that they traveled as far east as Uzbekistan, in recent years an international research team with the participation of the University of Valencia discovered that they reached two thousand kilometers further East, to the Altai Mountains of Siberia. An international research
20h
This Pandemic Isn't Over
In the years after the Civil War, smallpox spread throughout the South, mainly infecting Black people. The story of an outbreak of a disease long since eradicated may seem remote from our own times. But the smallpox epidemic of the 1860s offers us a valuable, if disconcerting, clue about how epidemics end. Terms such as pandemic and epidemic are biomedical explanations designed to define sufferin
20h
Not That Innocent
I f you want to believe that Roger Coleman was the man who raped and murdered 19-year-old Wanda McCoy, his sister-in-law, on the night of March 10, 1981, in her small home in the coal-mining town of Longbottom , Virginia, you have to accept that Coleman managed to park his truck, ford a creek, scramble up some 300 yards of hillside, and commit the entire grisly crime in the span of 30 minutes —al
21h
Coronavirus live news: Malaysia's intensive care beds 'are all full', says health chief
Malaysian pandemic is 'critical' after daily cases top 9,000; Guangzhou orders closure of cinemas, theatres and nightclubs; Melbourne lockdown lifted Euro 2020 fans must have vaccine or test for Wembley games Can the G7 vaccinate the world against Covid by the end of 2022? What could delay in easing mean for Britain? See all our coronavirus coverage 7.29am BST Also worth noting, the UK has not be
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The Price of Ubers and Airbnbs Is About to Get Jacked Up
Bubble: Burst Unfortunately for everyone who got used to booking suspiciously-cheap rides across town or taking affordable vacations while living in a stranger's home, companies like Airbnb and Uber are emerging from the pandemic much more expensive than they were before. On average, Lyft and Uber rides cost 40 percent more now than they did last year, the average Airbnb is 35 percent more expens
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It Sounds Like the Apple Car Is in Serious Trouble
Shrinking Teams Rumors of an Apple car have been floating around for years now. The project has always been under tight wraps ,with very few details making it out to the public. But despite some reports that the tech company is working with manufacturers to realize its first passenger vehicle, the project may now be in serious trouble before even really getting started, as Bloomberg reported last
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Rapamycin changes the way our DNA is stored
Our genetic material is stored in our cells in a specific way to make the meter-long DNA molecule fit into the tiny cell nucleus of each body cell. An international team of researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Biology of Aging, the CECAD Cluster of Excellence in Aging Research at the University of Cologne, the University College London and the University of Michigan have now been able to sh
14h
Anthony Weiner May Sell Infamous Nude Tweet as an NFT
Cashing In Anthony Weiner, the former US Representative who resigned in 2011 after accidentally tweeting a sexually explicit images of himself, is considering new ways to capitalize on his numerous sex scandals. Weiner, who also spent 18 months in federal prison for sexting and sending more pictures of himself to a then 15-year-old, suggested to New York Times columnist Ben Smith that he may hop
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Swearing on rise but parents still don't want kids hearing it, report finds
Third of people say they use strong language more than they did five years ago, according to BBFC survey Swearing in everyday life is on the rise, according to research, but parents do not want to see it increase in the film and television their children watch. The British Board of Film Classification (BBFC) published a report on Thursday into attitudes towards swearing and whether people want a
25min
Scientists create unique instrument to probe the most extreme matter on Earth
Laser-produced high energy density plasmas, akin to those found in stars, nuclear explosions, and the core of giant planets, may be the most extreme state of matter created on Earth. Now scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), building on nearly a decade of collaboration with the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the DOE's Lawrence Livermor
1h
Researchers take quantum encryption out of the lab
In a new study, researchers demonstrate an automated, easy-to-operate quantum key distribution (QKD) system using the fiber network in the city of Padua, Italy. The field test represents an important step toward implementing this highly secure quantum communication technology using the type of communication networks already in place in many regions around the world.
1h
Ceramics provide insights into medieval Islamic cuisine
Organic residues on ceramic pottery are a valuable resource for understanding medieval cuisines of Islamic-ruled Sicily, according to a study published June 9, 2021 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Jasmine Lundy of the University of York, UK and colleagues.
2h
Democracy Needs India
When the G7 group of rich democracies assemble this weekend in southwest England, they will discuss issues including COVID-19, taxes, and climate change. One item overhanging the formal agenda, however, will be the global deterioration of democracy itself, and the nation on which this question may hinge won't be any of the hosts, but a guest invited to this year's confab: India. Democracy's fate
3h
Higher alcohol content beer popularity growing, as overall beer consumption down
Americans are consuming more higher alcohol-content craft beer but are drinking less beer by volume, according to a new analysis led by epidemiologists at the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health. The study looked at beer purchased in stores between 2004 and 2014 and is the first to examine trends not only in the volume of beer purchased, but the "beer specific" alcohol conten
4h
Molecular changes in white blood cells can help diagnose 'the bends' earlier in divers
Despite knowing about decompression sickness – or 'the bends' – for more than a century, researchers are still mystified about how this condition occurs. A new study published by the open access journal Frontiers is the first to explore the genetic changes that occur in humans with the bends. It reveals that genes involved in white blood cell activation and inflammation are upregulated in divers w
4h
As indigenous languages die out, will we lose knowledge about plants?
There are more than 7,000 languages spoken on Earth, but by the end of the century, 30% of these could be lost. This week, research warns that knowledge of medicinal plants is at risk of disappearing as human languages become extinct. Phoebe Weston speaks to Rodrigo Cámara Leret about the study, and the links between biological and cultural diversity. Help support our independent journalism at the
4h
Our Little Life Is Rounded with Possibility – Issue 102: Hidden Truths
If you could soar high in the sky, as red kites often do in search of prey, and look down at the domain of all things known and yet to be known, you would see something very curious: a vast class of things that science has so far almost entirely neglected. These things are central to our understanding of physical reality, both at the everyday level and at the level of the most fundamental phenome
6h
Do You Want AI to Be Conscious? – Issue 102: Hidden Truths
People often ask me whether human-level artificial intelligence will eventually become conscious. My response is: Do you want it to be conscious? I think it is largely up to us whether our machines will wake up. That may sound presumptuous. The mechanisms of consciousness—the reasons we have a vivid and direct experience of the world and of the self—are an unsolved mystery in neuroscience, and so
6h
Data Crunchers to the Rescue – Issue 102: Hidden Truths
The boy was only a month old but had developed the amount of health problems that other people don't acquire in a lifetime. He was constantly suffering from bacterial infections, battling unexplained inflammation, not gaining weight, and—scariest of all—having bloody diarrhea, a puzzling symptom that made some doctors think he had a pediatric version of an irritable bowel disease. Artemio Miguel
6h
We Already Know How to Stop SolarWinds-Like Hacks – Facts So Romantic
Orion, a SolarWinds product, was designed to monitor the users' networks to make sure they were functioning properly and, ironically, kept safe. Photograph by Camilo Concha / Shutterstock Last year, hackers made headlines after they breached SolarWinds, a software company that specializes in network monitoring software. About 33,000 organizations, including the Pentagon, the U.S. State Department
6h
We're the Engineering team involved in bringing Canada's first Hybrid Electric Gas Turbine to life – Ask us Anything!
Hi r/Futurology ! ENMAX recently introduced Canada's first Hybrid Electric Gas Turbine at our Crossfield Energy Centre north of Calgary, Alberta. This unique technology provides enhanced flexibility in how electricity is provided to market while significantly lowering greenhouse gas emissions. By combining an existing natural gas-fueled turbine with a new 10 MW / 4.3 MWh lithium-ion battery energ
8h
Access to GPs' patient data key to new treatments, researchers say
Group of scientists contest privacy concerns that they say are hampering research into illnesses such as long Covid Researchers have said they could struggle to find new treatments for conditions dealt with by GPs, from long Covid to depression, if they cannot get access to the patient data held by GPs because of concerns over privacy. Related: Why has the NHS patient data-sharing scheme been pus
9h
Breakthrough study shows defining traits are forged the moment we're born
A new study published by the open access publisher Frontiers is the first to research the link between functional brain network connectivity and behavioral temperament in newborns and one-month-old babies. The findings, which show that functional brain connectivity networks with behavioral relevance are already present in young infants, help further bridge the research gap between the human brain
9h
Targeted therapy pralsetinib safely effectively treats lung and thyroid cancers with RET alterations
Results from the multi-cohort Phase I/II ARROW clinical trial, conducted by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center researchers, showed that a once-daily dose of pralsetinib, a highly selective RET inhibitor, was safe and effective in treating patients with advanced RET fusion-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and RET-altered thyroid cancer.
10h
NASA's Ingenuity Mars Helicopter Completes 7th Flight
The Perseverance rover will no doubt make monumental contributions to science during its mission on Mars, but the ride-along Ingenuity helicopter is stealing the show right now. NASA's ambitious flying drone has now completed its seventh flight on the red planet, and NASA confirms the robot encountered no issues as it traveled to yet another new landing zone in Jezero Crater. Not bad for a "demo"
10h
Jeff Bezos Has Reached His Final Form
Jeff Bezos founded his spaceflight company two decades ago, at the turn of the millennium. You may not have known that, because Blue Origin spent years developing its rocket technology in secret. But by now you've probably heard, because Bezos wants everyone to know: Blue Origin is sending passengers to space, and he's going on the inaugural trip himself. He shared the news this week on Instagram
11h
GEM simplifies the internal structure of protons and their collisions
Inside each proton or neutron there are three quarks bound by gluons. Until now, it has often been assumed that two of them form a 'stable' pair known as a diquark. It seems, however, that it's the end of the road for the diquarks in physics. This is one of the conclusions of the new model of proton-proton or proton-nucleus collisions, which takes into account the interactions of gluons with the s
11h
Breast cancer risk in African-Americans tied to genetic variations
Two gene variants found in African American women may explain why they are more likely to be diagnosed with triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) than white women of European ancestry, according to Weill Cornell Medicine and NewYork-Presbyterian investigators. The study findings may have implications for developing better risk assessment tools for TNBC in African-American women and for understandin
11h
A link between childhood stress and early molars
Research shows that children from lower-income backgrounds and those who go through greater adverse childhood experiences get their first permanent molars sooner. The findings align with a broader pattern of accelerated development often seen under conditions of early-life stress.
11h
Brain connections mean some people lack visual imagery
New research has revealed that people with the ability to visualize vividly have a stronger connection between their visual network and the regions of the brain linked to decision-making. The study also sheds light on memory and personality differences between those with strong visual imagery and those who cannot hold a picture in their mind's eye.
11h
Study confirms safety and effectiveness of COVID-19 vaccination in people with cancer
In a review published in the journal Cancer Cell of 200 patients with a wide spectrum of cancer diagnoses, researchers found that after full vaccination, 94%of patients overall demonstrated seroconversion, which was determined by the presence of antibodies to the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein. Response rates were very high among patients with solid tumors and were lower in people with certain blood can
11h
Högre havsnivåer får stora konsekvenser för Europa
Europa kan få en havsnivåhöjning på en meter eller mer under en period av 100 år. Konsekvenserna blir stora, inte bara för kuststäderna. Det kommer att få enorma följdeffekter för våra samhällen, menar forskare i de europeiska vetenskapsakademiernas rådgivande organ. Kontinenten kommer även att drabbas av omfattande kusterosion och påverkan på hela ekosystem. Det framgår av en rapport som nyligen
12h
How catalysts age
Researchers have developed a new tomography method with which they can measure chemical properties inside catalyst materials in 3-D extremely precisely and faster than before. The application is equally important for science and industry.
12h
Origin of fairy circles: Euphorbia hypothesis disproved
The fairy circles of the Namib are one of nature's greatest mysteries. Millions of these circular barren patches extend over vast areas along the margins of the desert in Namibia. An early hypothesis by G.K. Theron was that poisonous substances from Euphorbia damarana leaves induced fairy circles. Now new research found the original experiment and, 40 years later, the researchers are able to concl
12h
There's a Huge Problem With Buying Used Electric Vehicles
Buying Used The secondhand market for electric vehicles has a serious issue, Vice reports : it's nearly impossible to figure out the health of any given electric car's battery. The shortcoming represents a major challenge for automakers. To truly take over the market, they're going to have to persuade secondhand customers that their vehicles are just as reliable used — and, unfortunately, there's
12h
Engineers apply physics-informed machine learning to solar cell production
Organic photovoltaics max out at 15%-20% efficiency. Lehigh University researchers are using physics-informed machine learning to improve this efficiency. Their findings suggest a machine learning model, trained on coarse grained molecular models, can identify the optimal parameters for manufacturing in much less time than traditional methods. The researchers are currently exploring alternative ma
12h
Normal breathing sends saliva droplets 7 feet; masks shorten this
The World Health Organization and the Centers for Disease Control recommend keeping a certain distance between people to prevent the spread of COVID-19. These social distancing recommendations are estimated from a variety of studies, but further research about the precise mechanism of virus transport from one person to another is still needed.
12h
X-ray scanner spots cancers and analyzes drugs in minutes
Engineers at Duke University have demonstrated a prototype X-ray scanning machine that reveals not just the shape of an object but its molecular composition. With unprecedented resolution and accuracy, the technology could revolutionize a wide range of fields such as cancer surgery, pathology, drug inspection and geology.
12h
Casey Races the Time Bandit to the Cannery! | Deadliest Catch
Stream Full Episodes of Deadliest Catch: discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/deadliest-catch Discovery ► https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DeadliestCatch https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/DeadliestCatch https://twitter.com/D
12h
An atomic look at lithium-rich batteries
An international team of collaborators has made the first direct observation of the anionic redox reaction in a lithium-rich battery material. The research opens up pathways for improving existing battery cathodes–and designing new ones.
12h
A new culprit in antibacterial resistance: Cysteine persulfide
Scientists have developed a new, highly sensitive analytical method that can detect degraded beta-lactam antibacterial agents used in the treatment of bacterial infections. With this method, researchers found that reactive sulfur species produced by bacteria degrade and inactivate beta-lactam antibiotics.
12h
Machine learning speeds up simulations in material science
Research, development, and production of novel materials depend heavily on the availability of fast and at the same time accurate simulation methods. Machine learning, in which artificial intelligence autonomously acquires and applies new knowledge, will soon enable researchers to develop complex material systems in a purely virtual environment. How does this work, which applications will benefit?
12h
Panama expands the limits of the Coiba protected area
On June 8, World Oceans Day, the President of Panama, Laurentino Cortizo, signed an executive decree that expands the limits of the Cordillera de Coiba protected area, a step that will double the amount of Panamanian marine surface that is under some degree of protection. The scientific basis for this initiative was a multidisciplinary effort led by marine biologist Hector M. Guzman, from the Smit
13h
NASA's Roman Space Telescope selects 24 flight-quality heat-vision 'eyes'
NASA's Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope team recently flight-certified all 24 of the detectors the mission needs. When Roman launches in the mid-2020s, these devices will convert starlight into electrical signals, which will then be decoded into 300-megapixel images of large patches of the sky. These images will allow astronomers to explore a vast array of celestial objects and phenomena, bringin
13h
SNAPSHOT USA: First-ever nationwide mammal survey published
How are the squirrels doing this year? The bears? The armadillos? How would you know? A new paper published June 8, 2021 sets up the framework for answering these questions across the United States by releasing the data from the first national mammal survey made up of 1,509 motion-activated camera traps from 110 sites located across all 50 states.
13h
Läkemedel mot epilepsi kan utvecklas från kåda
Forskare har utvecklat molekyler med utgångspunkt i naturliga hartssyror som finns i gran och tall. Flera av molekylerna har visat sig verksamma mot epilepsi. Vid epilepsi är nervcellerna i hjärnan överaktiva, vilket utlöser epileptiska anfall. De nya molekylerna har lovande egenskaper för att kunna utvecklas till läkemedel mot epilepsi, menar forskarna vid Linköpings universitet. – Över 60 miljo
13h
The next Venus missions will tell us about habitable worlds elsewhere
When the DAVINCI+ and VERITAS missions to Venus were given the green light by NASA last week , the scientific community was stunned. Most had expected that NASA, which hadn't launched a dedicated mission to Venus in 30 years, would be sending at least one mission to the second planet from the sun by the end of the decade. Two missions, however, blew everyone's mind. Maybe NASA anticipated somethi
13h
Involvement of Scratch2 in GalR1-mediated depression-like behaviors in the rat ventral periaqueductal gray [Neuroscience]
Galanin receptor1 (GalR1) transcript levels are elevated in the rat ventral periaqueductal gray (vPAG) after chronic mild stress (CMS) and are related to depression-like behavior. To explore the mechanisms underlying the elevated GalR1 expression, we carried out molecular biological experiments in vitro and in animal behavioral experiments in vivo. It…
14h
Fifty million years of beetle evolution along the Antarctic Polar Front [Evolution]
Global cooling and glacial–interglacial cycles since Antarctica's isolation have been responsible for the diversification of the region's marine fauna. By contrast, these same Earth system processes are thought to have played little role terrestrially, other than driving widespread extinctions. Here, we show that on islands along the Antarctic Polar Front,…
14h
The intra-S phase checkpoint directly regulates replication elongation to preserve the integrity of stalled replisomes [Genetics]
DNA replication is dramatically slowed down under replication stress. The regulation of replication speed is a conserved response in eukaryotes and, in fission yeast, requires the checkpoint kinases Rad3ATR and Cds1Chk2. However, the underlying mechanism of this checkpoint regulation remains unresolved. Here, we report that the Rad3ATR-Cds1Chk2 checkpoint directly targets…
14h
Characterizing public perceptions of social and cultural impacts in policy decisions [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
Social scientists and community advocates have expressed concerns that many social and cultural impacts important to citizens are given insufficient weight by decision makers in public policy decision-making. In two large cross-sectional surveys, we examined public perceptions of a range of social, cultural, health, economic, and environmental impacts. Findings suggest…
14h
Opinion: How to ensure regulations don't stymie much-needed COVID-19 point-of-care testing [Chemistry]
The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has raged for more than a year in the United States, upending life as we knew it. Nevertheless, we have seen incredibly rapid advances in vaccines, therapeutics, and diagnostic testing technology. There is tremendous need and economic interest in reopening our businesses and schools…
14h
HIF-1{alpha} is a negative regulator of interferon regulatory factors: Implications for interferon production by hypoxic monocytes [Immunology and Inflammation]
Patients with severe COVID-19 infection exhibit a low level of oxygen in affected tissue and blood. To understand the pathophysiology of COVID-19 infection, it is therefore necessary to understand cell function during hypoxia. We investigated aspects of human monocyte activation under hypoxic conditions. HMGB1 is an alarmin released by stressed…
14h
To save migrating birds, turn off some lights
Darkening just half of a building's windows can make a big difference for migrating birds, a new study shows. Every night during the spring and fall migration seasons, thousands of birds are killed when they crash into illuminated windows, disoriented by the light. Using decades' worth of data and birds collected by Field Museum scientists at Chicago's McCormick Place convention center, researche
14h
How to combine nanocrystals that don't like each other
Researchers have developed a blueprint for designing new materials using difficult combinations of nanocrystals. The work could lead to improvements in nanocrystals already used in displays , medical imaging , and diagnostics, and enable new materials with previously impossible properties. Researchers can make materials with new and interesting properties by bringing together nanocrystals of diff
14h
Curtin study finds aspirin takes the headache out of restoration
New Curtin research has shown how a readily available, cheap and safe-to-use product found in the medicine cabinet of most homes could be the key to better ecological restoration practices with major benefits for the environment and agriculture.The study revealed that aspirin, which naturally occurs in the bark of the willow tree and other plants, can improve the survival of grass species importan
14h
Gender differentiates how facial expressions are processed in the brains of alcoholics
Should treatment of alcoholics be different based on gender? Yes, according to a new study that shows that alcoholic men and women respond differently to their disease resulting in different levels of brain activity and brain abnormalities. Research indicates that they distinguish facial expressions differently and that this is an important clue as to how treatment strategies might be tailored.
14h
Elemental copper and iron found within the brains of deceased Alzheimer's patients
A new study unexpectedly identified tiny deposits of elemental copper and iron within the brains of two deceased people with Alzheimer's disease. The findings could help scientists better understand how these elemental metals, which were uncovered in the cores of amyloid plaques, contribute to neurodegenerative diseases and could point to a target for alternative Alzheimer's therapies.
14h
Historic drought threatens Brazil's economy
The worst drought in nearly a century to hit two key regions in Brazil is wreaking havoc on hydroelectric dams and crops—and threatening the nascent pandemic recovery of Latin America's biggest economy.
14h
Scientists explore lipid metabolism with simulations and experiments
In humans and animals, fat cells produce and store fat in special organelles, which are specialized subunits within the cell, called lipid droplets. The lipid droplets make up the largest part of the volume of these fat cells, also known as adipocytes. Adipocytes fulfill vital tasks protecting our organs, as well as parts of the body that are sensitive to cold, and they serve as a source of reserv
14h
Postpartum women in bad relationships face more health risks
Postpartum women in bad romantic relationships are not only more likely to suffer symptoms of depression, but are also at greater long-term risk of illness or death, according to a new study. Researchers examined how relationships and partner behavior are linked to depression and heart rate variability (HRV) in women between the third trimester of pregnancy and one year postpartum. "The quality o
14h
Direct correlation of oxygen adsorption on platinum-electrolyte interfaces with the activity in the oxygen reduction reaction
The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) on platinum catalysts is essential in fuel cells. Quantitative predictions of the relative ORR activity in experiments, in the range of 1 to 50 times, have remained challenging because of incomplete mechanistic understanding and lack of computational tools to account for the associated small differences in activation energies (
14h
Hoxa10 mediates positional memory to govern stem cell function in adult skeletal muscle
Muscle stem cells (satellite cells) are distributed throughout the body and have heterogeneous properties among muscles. However, functional topographical genes in satellite cells of adult muscle remain unidentified. Here, we show that expression of Homeobox-A (Hox-A) cluster genes accompanied with DNA hypermethylation of the Hox-A locus was robustly maintained in both somite-derived muscles and
14h
Development of next-generation tumor-homing induced neural stem cells to enhance treatment of metastatic cancers
Engineered tumor-homing neural stem cells (NSCs) have shown promise in treating cancer. Recently, we transdifferentiated skin fibroblasts into human-induced NSCs (hiNSC) as personalized NSC drug carriers. Here, using a SOX2 and spheroidal culture-based reprogramming strategy, we generated a new hiNSC variant, hiNeuroS, that was genetically distinct from fibroblasts and first-generation hiNSCs and
14h
Stable but not rigid: Chronic in vivo STED nanoscopy reveals extensive remodeling of spines, indicating multiple drivers of plasticity
Excitatory synapses on dendritic spines of pyramidal neurons are considered a central memory locus. To foster both continuous adaption and the storage of long-term information, spines need to be plastic and stable at the same time. Here, we advanced in vivo STED nanoscopy to superresolve distinct features of spines (head size and neck length/width) in mouse neocortex for up to 1 month. While LTP-
14h
Endogenous agonist-bound S1PR3 structure reveals determinants of G protein-subtype bias
Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) regulates numerous important physiological functions, including immune response and vascular integrity, via its cognate receptors (S1PR1 to S1PR5); however, it remains unclear how S1P activates S1PRs upon binding. Here, we determined the crystal structure of the active human S1PR3 in complex with its natural agonist S1P at 3.2-Å resolution. S1P exhibits an unbent con
14h
Postmelting hydrogen enrichment in the oceanic lithosphere
The large range of H 2 O contents recorded in minerals from exhumed mantle rocks has been challenging to interpret, as it often records a combination of melting, metasomatism, and diffusional processes in spatially isolated samples. Here, we determine the temporal variations of H 2 O contents in pyroxenes from a 24-Ma time series of abyssal peridotites exposed along the Vema fracture zone (Atlant
14h
Biogenic metallic elements in the human brain?
The chemistry of copper and iron plays a critical role in normal brain function. A variety of enzymes and proteins containing positively charged Cu + , Cu 2+ , Fe 2+ , and Fe 3+ control key processes, catalyzing oxidative metabolism and neurotransmitter and neuropeptide production. Here, we report the discovery of elemental (zero–oxidation state) metallic Cu 0 accompanying ferromagnetic elemental
14h
Differential recognition of oligomannose isomers by glycan-binding proteins involved in innate and adaptive immunity
The recognition of oligomannose-type glycans in innate and adaptive immunity is elusive due to multiple closely related isomeric glycan structures. To explore the functions of oligomannoses, we developed a multifaceted approach combining mass spectrometry assignments of oligomannose substructures and the development of a comprehensive oligomannose microarray. This defined microarray encompasses b
14h
Sparse ab initio x-ray transmission spectrotomography for nanoscopic compositional analysis of functional materials
The performance of functional materials is either driven or limited by nanoscopic heterogeneities distributed throughout the material's volume. To better our understanding of these materials, we need characterization tools that allow us to determine the nature and distribution of these heterogeneities in their native geometry in 3D. Here, we introduce a method based on x-ray near-edge spectroscop
14h
Global tropospheric ozone responses to reduced NOx emissions linked to the COVID-19 worldwide lockdowns
Efforts to stem the transmission of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) led to rapid, global ancillary reductions in air pollutant emissions. Here, we quantify the impact on tropospheric ozone using a multiconstituent chemical data assimilation system. Anthropogenic NO x emissions dropped by at least 15% globally and 18 to 25% regionally in April and May 2020, which decreased free tropospheric oz
14h
The gene regulatory system for specifying germ layers in early embryos of the simple chordate
In animal embryos, gene regulatory networks control the dynamics of gene expression in cells and coordinate such dynamics among cells. In ascidian embryos, gene expression dynamics have been dissected at the single-cell resolution. Here, we revealed mathematical functions that represent the regulatory logics of all regulatory genes expressed at the 32-cell stage when the germ layers are largely s
14h
Skillful prediction of summer rainfall in the Tibetan Plateau on multiyear time scales
Skillful near-term climate predictions of rainfall over the Tibetan Plateau (TP), the Asian water tower, benefit billions of people. On the basis of the state-of-the-art decadal prediction models, we showed evidence that although the raw model outputs show low predicted ability for the summer Inner TP (ITP) rainfall due to low signal-to-noise ratios in models, we can produce realistic predictions
14h
The stability of R-spine defines RAF inhibitor resistance: A comprehensive analysis of oncogenic BRAF mutants with in-frame insertion of {alpha}C-{beta}4 loop
Although targeting BRAF mutants with RAF inhibitors has achieved promising outcomes in cancer therapy, drug resistance remains a remarkable challenge, and underlying molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. Here, we characterized a previously unknown group of oncogenic BRAF mutants with in-frame insertions (LLR ins506 or VLR ins506 ) of αC-β4 loop. Using structure modeling and molecular dyn
14h
Dopaminergic organization of striatum is linked to cortical activity and brain expression of genes associated with psychiatric illness
Dopamine signaling is constrained to discrete tracts yet has brain-wide effects on neural activity. The nature of this relationship between local dopamine signaling and brain-wide neuronal activity is not clearly defined and has relevance for neuropsychiatric illnesses where abnormalities of cortical activity and dopamine signaling coexist. Using simultaneous PET-MRI in healthy volunteers, we fin
14h
Broadband infrared photodetection using a narrow bandgap conjugated polymer
Photodetection spanning the short-, mid-, and long-wave infrared (SWIR-LWIR) underpins modern science and technology. Devices using state-of-the-art narrow bandgap semiconductors require complex manufacturing, high costs, and cooling requirements that remain prohibitive for many applications. We report high-performance infrared photodetection from a donor-acceptor conjugated polymer with broadban
14h
What fuels the fly: Energy metabolism in Drosophila and its application to the study of obesity and diabetes
The organs and metabolic pathways involved in energy metabolism, and the process of ATP production from nutrients, are comparable between humans and Drosophila melanogaster . This level of conservation, together with the power of Drosophila genetics, makes the fly a very useful model system to study energy homeostasis. Here, we discuss the major organs involved in energy metabolism in Drosophila
14h
Testicular germ cell-specific lncRNA, Teshl, is required for complete expression of Y chromosome genes and a normal offspring sex ratio
Heat shock factor 2 (HSF2) regulates the transcription of the male-specific region of the mouse Y chromosome long arm (MSYq) multicopy genes only in testes, but the molecular mechanism underlying this tissue specificity remains largely unknown. Here, we report that the testicular germ cell–specific long noncoding RNA (lncRNA), NR_038002 , displays a characteristic spatiotemporal expression patter
14h
Mesenchymal growth hormone receptor deficiency leads to failure of alveolar progenitor cell function and severe pulmonary fibrosis
Recent studies have identified impaired type 2 alveolar epithelial cell (ATII) renewal in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) human organoids and severe fibrosis when ATII is defective in mice. ATIIs function as progenitor cells and require supportive signals from the surrounding mesenchymal cells. The mechanisms by which mesenchymal cells promote ATII progenitor functions in lung fibrosis are in
14h
Computational modeling of tau pathology spread reveals patterns of regional vulnerability and the impact of a genetic risk factor
Neuropathological staging studies have suggested that tau pathology spreads through the brain in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other tauopathies, but it is unclear how neuroanatomical connections, spatial proximity, and regional vulnerability contribute. In this study, we seed tau pathology in the brains of nontransgenic mice with AD tau and quantify pathology development over 9 months in 134 brai
14h
Combined tumor-directed recruitment and protection from immune suppression enable CAR T cell efficacy in solid tumors
CAR T cell therapy remains ineffective in solid tumors, due largely to poor infiltration and T cell suppression at the tumor site. T regulatory (T reg ) cells suppress the immune response via inhibitory factors such as transforming growth factor–β (TGF-β). T reg cells expressing the C-C chemokine receptor 8 (CCR8) have been associated with poor prognosis in solid tumors. We postulated that CCR8 c
14h
The Guardian view on the super-rich: a billion reasons for a wealth tax | Editorial
When America's richest are paying proportionately less in tax than those struggling from paycheck to paycheck, the tax system demands a radical overhaul This week, Jeff Bezos announced his plan to become the first billionaire in space . Next month, on the 52nd anniversary of the launch of Apollo 11, he will fly about 100 km above the rest of us, see the curve of the Earth and experience a few min
14h
Understanding how catalysts age could optimize industrial use
PSI researchers have developed a new tomography method with which they can measure chemical properties inside catalyst materials in 3D extremely precisely and faster than before. The method has applications for science and industry. The researchers published their results today in the journal Science Advances.
14h
Name the emotion you want drone video to capture
A new model lets a drone shoot a video based on a desired emotion or viewer reaction. It takes skill to fly a drone smoothly and without crashing. Once someone has mastered flying, there are still camera angles, panning speeds, trajectories, and flight paths to plan. A team of researchers imagined that with all the sensors and processing power onboard a drone and embedded in its camera, there mus
15h
Young clownfish on coastal reefs dying faster due to exposure to artificial light, study finds
Researchers say species exposed for long periods to light pollution near the shore were less likely to survive than those living farther away Young clownfish on coastal reefs are dying faster as a result of exposure to artificial light at night, according to new research. An international team of scientists studying reefs on Moorea, a tiny island of French Polynesia, have found that orange-fin an
15h
SARS-CoV-2 protease cuts human proteins; possible link to COVID-19 symptoms
The SARS-CoV-2 papain-like protease (PLpro) plays an essential role in processing viral proteins needed for replication. In addition, the enzyme can cut and inactivate some human proteins important for an immune response. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Infectious Diseases have found other targets of PLpro in the human proteome, including proteins involved in cardiovascular function, blood clott
15h
Acoustical evolution increases battle between predator, prey
In the battle between hunter and hunted, sound plays an integral part in success or failure. In the case of bats vs. moths, the insects are using acoustics against their winged foes. During the 180th ASA Meeting, Thomas Neil from the University of Bristol will discuss how moth wings have evolved in composition and structure to help them create anti-bat defenses. The session, "Moth wings are acoust
15h
Urine test detects new or returning bladder cancer
A new urine screening test can detect new or recurrent cases of bladder cancer, researchers report. The test uses a protein called keratin 17 as a cancer biomarker. Accurate detection of bladder cancer, or urothelial carcinoma (UC), is often difficult, expensive, and involves invasive testing. Going forward, this new method, based on the detection of K17 in urine specimens, could improve diagnost
15h
The power of group identity: 22 percent of Americans remain skeptical of vaccines
New research found that 22 percent of Americans identify as somewhat or fully resistant to vaccination. Researchers used two social psychology theories to explore the causes of vaccine resistance. The more one identifies with an anti-vaccine group, the harder it is to dissuade them from their ideas. Vaccine hesitancy is top of mind for global public health officials, and the reasons for this resi
15h
Picks From This Stock Advisor Have an Amazing Average Return of 562%
These days, there is an endless number of ways to invest money in the stock market. However, there aren't an endless number of resources to ensure you're investing wisely. Especially, if you don't want to get stuck paying a financial advisor. Most advisors' fees are based on how much of your money they're managing. Typically, that yearly fee can range anywhere from 0.25-to-1 percent of what you'r
15h
The Atlantic Daily: America Isn't Split in Half. It's Divided Into Four.
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox. To understand America, you must first assemble the pieces. In the latest issue of our magazine, my colleague George Packer argues that the country has fragmented into four groups, each informed by
16h
When AI becomes child's play
Despite their popularity with kids, tablets and other connected devices are built on top of systems that weren't designed for them to easily understand or navigate. But adapting algorithms to interact with a child isn't without its complications—as no one child is exactly like another. Most recognition algorithms look for patterns and consistency to successfully identify objects. But kids are not
16h
Corals' natural 'sunscreen' may help them weather climate change
Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute scientists are one step closer to understanding why some corals can weather climate change better than others, and the secret could be in a specific protein that produces a natural sunscreen. As their name implies, Hawaiian blue rice corals sport a deep blue pigment, which is created by chromoprotein and filters out harmful ultraviolet (UV) radiation from
16h
The impact of double-cropping
From 1980 to 2016, grain production in Brazil increased more than fourfold, and the country now stands as the world's largest soybean exporter and the second largest exporter of corn. The two main drivers of this increase in food production were cropland expansion and double-cropping, harvesting two crops, such as corn and soybeans, from the same field in a single year.
16h
Hope for critically endangered gorillas in eastern DRC
A new study led by the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) has updated the global population estimate for the Critically Endangered Grauer's gorillas (Gorilla beringei graueri)—the world's largest gorilla subspecies—to 6,800 individuals from a previous global estimate of 3,800 individuals. This revised estimate comes from recent field surveys conducted in one of this animal's largest remaining str
16h
Meiosis: Mind the gap
Scientists from the lab of Franz Klein from the Department of Chromosome Biology at the Max Perutz Labs, a joint venture of the University of Vienna and the Medical University of Vienna, have now discovered that cells sometimes liberate DNA fragments at sites of paired, or double, DSBs. Whilst this presents an obvious risk of germline mutations as a consequence of erroneous repair or of integratio
16h
Study: Important contribution to spintronics has received little consideration until now
The movement of electrons can have a significantly greater influence on spintronic effects than previously assumed. This discovery was made by an international team of researchers led by physicists from the Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU). Until now, a calculation of these effects took, above all, the spin of electrons into consideration. The study was published in the journal Phys
16h
Innovation projects can reinvent the UN
Researchers at the University of Geneva (UNIGE) demonstrate that innovative projects spearheaded by United Nations (UN) country offices are remodeling the institution and expanding its role. Digital initiatives, particularly those scaled through headquarters, were shown to have the strongest impact, changing ways of working, embedding new skills, and restructuring teams across the UN. These findin
16h
Measuring sound diversity of quietness
The world is filled with myriad sounds that can overwhelm a person with relentless acoustics. Noise is so prevalent in everyday life that the concept and achievement of comfortable quiet is hard to define.
16h
A Marvel Series That Cares Little for Marvel's Universe
This article contains mild spoilers for the first two episodes of Loki . For 13 years, the Marvel Cinematic Universe built up the Infinity Stones as objects of grand power, capable of manipulating all existence when united. In Avengers: Infinity War , they turned half of the cosmos to dust; in Avengers: Endgame , the surviving heroes chased them down across time. In Loki , the Disney+ series rele
16h
Annular Eclipse Brings 'Ring of Fire' to Northern Hemisphere on June 10
On June 10, much of the northern hemisphere will be treated to an annular eclipse. An annular eclipse occurs when the Moon is far enough away from the Earth that it cannot completely cover the Sun. The fact that eclipses look the way they do from Earth is essentially luck. The Moon is about 400x smaller than the Sun, but the Sun is roughly 400x farther away. As a result, the size of the moon and
16h
A graphical guide to ischaemic heart disease
Nature, Published online: 09 June 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01450-9 Globally, 9 million people die each year from ischaemic heart disease. Despite falling rates of heart disease, tackling it is still a stubborn challenge.
16h
Heart health
Nature, Published online: 09 June 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01449-2 Research is revealing the causes of heart disease and what can be done to tackle the world's biggest killer.
16h
Observation of first and second sound in a BKT superfluid
Nature, Published online: 09 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03537-9 First and second sound are experimentally observed in a two-dimensional superfluid, and the temperature-dependent sound speeds reveal the predicted jump in the superfluid density at the infinite-order Berezinskii–Kosterlitz–Thouless transition.
16h
Quantum-enhanced nonlinear microscopy
Nature, Published online: 09 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03528-w A quantum microscope obtains signal-to-noise beyond the photodamage limits of conventional microscopy, revealing biological structures within cells that would not otherwise be resolved.
16h
Representational drift in primary olfactory cortex
Nature, Published online: 09 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03628-7 All odours elicit a unique pattern of neuronal activity in primary olfactory cortex but these patterns drift over time, posing a problem for the perceptual constancy of odours.
16h
Tracing the origin of hair follicle stem cells
Nature, Published online: 09 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03638-5 Live imaging and single-cell transcriptomics of mouse hair follicles reveal their development from 2D concentric zones in the placode to 3D longitudinal compartments, one of which is a stem cell compartment.
16h
A graph placement methodology for fast chip design
Nature, Published online: 09 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03544-w Machine learning tools are used to greatly accelerate chip layout design, by posing chip floorplanning as a reinforcement learning problem and using neural networks to generate high-performance chip layouts.
16h
Concerted cutting by Spo11 illuminates meiotic DNA break mechanics
Nature, Published online: 09 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03389-3 A small proportion of Spo11-dependent DNA double-strand breaks are 'double cuts'—adjacent breaks that occur in concert—revealing that gap repair during meiosis includes that of DNA gaps generated by Spo11 itself.
16h
Defining genome architecture at base-pair resolution
Nature, Published online: 09 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03639-4 Micro Capture-C allows physical contacts to be determined at base-pair resolution, revealing that transcription factors have an important role in the maintenance of the contacts between enhancers and promoters.
16h
A 4D road map for the formation of hair follicles
Nature, Published online: 09 June 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01482-1 Combined imaging and gene-expression analyses reveal that the arrangement of cells in concentric rings in the disc-like structures that give rise to hair follicles predetermines their eventual fate and location in mature follicles.
16h
A base-pair view of interactions between genes and their enhancers
Nature, Published online: 09 June 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01494-x A technique reveals how folded chromosomal DNA interacts in the nucleus, providing information at the level of single base pairs. The achievement offers an unprecedented level of detail about how gene activity is regulated.
16h
AI system outperforms humans in designing floorplans for microchips
Nature, Published online: 09 June 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01515-9 A machine-learning system has been trained to place memory blocks in microchip designs. The system beats human experts at the task, and offers the promise of better, more-rapidly produced chip designs than are currently possible.
16h
Ranking the risk of heart disease
Nature, Published online: 09 June 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01452-7 By accounting for the additive effect of multiple genetic variants, researchers can develop a system that improves their ability to identify the most vulnerable.
16h
Squeezed light improves sensitivity of microscopy technique
Nature, Published online: 09 June 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01514-w Vibrational signals from molecules can provide contrast in bioimaging techniques, but are difficult to detect. Light in a 'squeezed' quantum state has been used to reveal molecular vibrational signals previously obscured by noise.
16h
Women's heart health is not just about hormones
Nature, Published online: 09 June 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01458-1 Heart-disease risk increases as women get older but explanations that centre on changes after menopause don't tell the full story.
16h
Inflammation in heart disease: do researchers know enough?
Nature, Published online: 09 June 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01453-6 Anti-inflammatory therapies for cardiovascular disease are nearing the clinic. But whether scientists understand how inflammation contributes to fatty-deposit build-up well enough to target it effectively is open to debate.
16h
COVID's cardiac connection
Nature, Published online: 09 June 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01456-3 Coronavirus infections might cause lasting harm to the heart, even in those who have never had symptoms.
16h
After Past Glitches, Mars Helicopter Nails Flight Number Seven
Lucky Seven Ingenuity, the four-pound helicopter that NASA shipped up to Mars with its Perseverance rover, just took its seventh flight on the Red Planet. And unlike its prior flight, this one went off without a single issue, according to Space.com , showing that the little aircraft can still continue its soul-searching journey across Mars long after NASA suspected it might stop working. "From a
17h
Face masks really work even with some leaks
New research confirms that surgical face masks effectively reduce outgoing airborne particles from talking or coughing, even after allowing for leakage around the edges of the mask. Wearing masks and other face coverings can reduce the flow of airborne particles that are produced during breathing, talking, coughing, or sneezing, protecting others from viruses carried by those particles such as SA
17h
Single-Shot COVID-19 Vaccine Generates Robust Immune Responses Against COVID-19 Variants
In a new study published in Nature, Dan Barouch, MD, PhD, Director of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center's Center for Virology and Vaccine Research, and colleagues report on the antibody and cellular immune responses generated by the Ad26.COV2.S vaccine against the original viral strain and against SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern. The team found that this vaccine induced immune responses against
17h
Assessing feasibility concerns in climate mitigation scenarios
What drives the feasibility of climate scenarios commonly reviewed by organizations like the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)? And can they actually be extrapolated to the real world? A new systematic framework can help understand what to improve in the next generation of scenarios and explore how to make ambitious emission reductions possible by strengthening enabling conditions.
17h
Scientists discover new exoplanet with an atmosphere ripe for study
Scientists have discovered a new, temperate sub-Neptune sized exoplanet with a 24-day orbital period orbiting a nearby M dwarf star. The recent discovery offers exciting research opportunities thanks to the planet's substantial atmosphere, small star, and how fast the system is moving away from the Earth.
17h
Brain alterations detected in obese children
The alterations detected link obesity to a brain condition similar to obsessive-compulsive disorder, which affects the same areas of the brain. Researchers analysed images of the brains of 230 children obtained by functional magnetic resonance imaging. This was the first study of these features in children. They believe the findings underscore the need for early intervention in child obesity, in o
17h
Discovery of the oldest plant fossils on the African continent
The analysis of very old plant fossils discovered in South Africa and dating from the Lower Devonian period documents the transition from barren continents to the green planet we know today. Cyrille Prestianni, a palaeobotanist at the EDDy Lab at the University of Liège (Belgium), participated in this study, the results of which have just been published in the journal Scientific Reports.
17h
Localized the gene for blue plum skin
The presence and accumulation of the antioxidant pigment anthocyanin dictates fruit hue in plums, and the synthesis of this compound is known to be regulated by the MYB10 genes. Now, researchers from the Center for Research in Agricultural Genomics (CRAG) and the Institute of Agrifood Research and Technology (IRTA) have found the gene that determines Japanese plum skin color. In a study published
17h
Gulf Stream intrusions feed diatom hot spots
The Gulf Stream, which has reliably channeled warm water from the tropics northward along the East Coast of North America for thousands of years, is changing. Recent research shows that it may be slowing down, and more and more often, the current is meandering into the Mid-Atlantic Bight—a region on the continental shelf stretching from North Carolina to Massachusetts and one of the most productiv
17h
Researchers realize unconventional coherent control of solid-state spin qubits
A research team led by Prof. Guo Guangcan from the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), together with Prof. Adam Gali from Wigner Research Centre for Physics, realized robust coherent control of solid-state spin qubits using anti-Strokes (AS) excitation, broadening the boundary of quantum information processing and quantum sensing. This stu
17h
The iron jaws of the bristle worm
Bristle worms are found almost everywhere in seawater, they have populated the oceans for hundreds of millions of years. Nevertheless, some of their special features have only now been deciphered: Their jaws are made of remarkably stable material, and the secret of this stability can now be explained by experiments at TU Wien in cooperation with Max Perutz Labs.
17h
New study presents tip-induced nano-engineering of strain, bandgap, and exciton funneling in 2D semiconductors
A research team, led by Professor Kyoung-Duck Park in the Department of Physics at UNIST has succeeded in investigating and controlling the physical properties of naturally-formed nanoscale wrinkles in two-dimensional (2D) semiconductors. This is thanks to their previously-developed hyperspectral adaptive tip-enhanced photoluminescence (a-TEPL) spectroscopy. This will be a major step forward in de
17h
Not just a phase for RNAs
A phenomenon in which an RNA named NORAD drives a protein named Pumilio to form liquid droplets in cells, much like oil in water, appears to tightly regulate the activity of Pumilio. A new study led by UT Southwestern scientists suggests that such RNA-driven 'phase separation,' in turn, protects against genome instability, premature aging, and neurodegenerative diseases, and may represent a previo
17h
Artificial light harming clownfish
Young clownfish living closest to shore are dying faster than those further offshore because they are being exposed to artificial lighting, says an international research team.
17h
Coordination polymers with up to 99.99% antibacterial efficiency
An RUDN University chemist with his colleagues from Portugal has developed two types of coating based on new coordination polymers with silver. Both compounds were successfully tested against four common pathogens. The results are published in ACS Publications (ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces).
17h
A rice fish model of a rare metabolic disorder
Human cells are kept healthy by the activity of millions of proteins. These proteins are modified in different ways, such as by adding sugar molecules to them, which can be crucial for them to function properly. Given this importance, defects in the sugar-adding process are often lethal at the very early stages of development. In rare cases, however, patients can develop sugar-adding deficiencies
17h
He has celebrated deserts all his life. Now he's sounding the alarm
If you have any questions about how the plants and animals of Southern California's deserts are faring as the Earth gets hotter and drier, Jim Cornett is a good bet to have the answers. Roadrunners, palm trees, snakes, Joshua trees—Cornett has studied them all and written more than 40 books.
17h
The buck stops where? Longest-ever deer distance
Why did the deer cross the road? According to new research, to keep going and going and going. Researchers have discovered the longest distance ever recorded by an adult male white-tailed deer–300 kilometers, or close to 200 miles, in just over three weeks. The finding has important implications for population management and the transmission of disease, especially chronic wasting disease, a fatal
17h
Identifying the main culprit of the COVID-19 disaster
A research team led by Professor Jianping Huang from Lanzhou University explored the periodicity and mutability in the evolutionary history of the COVID-19 pandemic and investigated the principle mechanisms behind them. The evolution of the COVID-19 pandemic features the alternation of the abrupt rise and periodic oscillations. The oscillations are attributable to seasonal modulations and reportin
17h
MIT Develops New Method of Generating Power With Carbon Nanotubes
3d Carbon nanotubes on dark background. Credit: enot-poloskun/Getty Images (Image by enot-poloskun/Getty Images) Engineers at MIT have discovered a new way to generate electricity, and you can thank our old friend, carbon nanotubes. These microscopic tubes of carbon atoms were the hottest thing in material science for a few years, and they could be making a comeback. By grinding up nanotubes and
17h
Depressed brains don't have the regular response to stress
A new study identifies a novel biomarker indicating resilience to chronic stress. This biomarker is largely absent in people suffering from major depressive disorder, and this absence is further associated with pessimism in daily life, the study finds. Researchers used brain imaging to identify differences in the neurotransmitter glutamate within the medial prefrontal cortex before and after stud
18h
Food for thought: Eating soft foods may alter the brain's control of chewing
Researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) have found that eating a soft diet during development leads to altered electrical activity and movement in the jaw muscles of rats in response to stimulation of the anterior cortical masticatory area. Their findings suggest that reduced chewing function may be at least partly improved by simple treatments that involve increasing the diffi
18h
DNA methylation changes and characteristics in neurons of bipolar disorder patients
A research collaboration based in Kumamoto University, Japan has revealed the DNA methylation status of gene transcriptional regulatory regions in the frontal lobes of patients with bipolar disorder (BD). The regions with altered DNA methylation status were significantly enriched in genomic regions which were reported to be genetically related to BD. These findings are expected to advance the unde
18h
Turning the heat on: A flexible device for localized heat treatment of living tissues
Combining thermotherapy with other treatment modalities can improve the treatment's effectiveness. However, there is a dearth of suitable heat-generating wireless devices that can be implanted in the patient's body enabling greater flexibility and ease of treatment. Recently, researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) have invented a unique induction-based flexible heating device th
18h
Researchers create intelligent electronic microsystems from 'green' material
A research team has created an electronic microsystem that can intelligently respond to information inputs without any external energy input, much like a self-autonomous living organism. The microsystem is constructed from a novel type of electronics that can process ultralow electronic signals and incorporates a device that can generate electricity 'out of thin air' from the ambient environment.
18h
Alarming rising trends in suicide by firearms in young Americans
Researchers explored suicide trends by firearms in white and black Americans ages 5 to 24 years from 1999 to 2018. From 2008 to 2018, rates of suicide by firearms quadrupled in those ages 5 to 14 years and increased by 50% in those ages 15 to 24 years. Suicide deaths by firearms were more prevalent in white than black Americans — a marked contrast with homicide by firearms, which are far more pre
18h
Study finds COVID-19 vaccines safe for IBD patients
Patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) do not appear to have increased risk of side effects from the Pfizer or Moderna COVID-19 vaccines, according to a recent Cedars-Sinai study published online and upcoming in print in the American Journal of Gastroenterology. In fact, those being treated with advanced immune-modifying therapies may experience them less often than the general population
18h
COVID-19 lockdowns lead Aussie and UK women to drink more
Feelings of anxiety, pessimism and depression during the COVID-19 pandemic led middle-aged women in both Australia and the UK to stock up on alcohol, which was associated with drinking more, a new Flinders University-led study has found. The research also found women in the UK were more likely to drink at risky levels than their Australian counterparts during lockdown, and were more likely to have
18h
NASA Is Returning to Venus, Where It's 470°C. Will We Find Life When We Get There?
NASA has selected two missions, dubbed DAVINCI+ and VERITAS, to study the " lost habitable " world of Venus. Each mission will receive approximately $500 million for development and both are expected to launch between 2028 and 2030. It had long been thought there was no life on Venus, due to its extremely high temperatures. But late last year, scientists studying the planet's atmosphere announced
18h
ATLAS experiment searches for 'charming' decay of the Higgs boson
Key to understanding the Higgs boson and its role in the Standard Model is understanding how it interacts with matter particles, i.e. quarks and leptons. There are three generations of matter particles, varying in mass from the lightest (first generation) to the heaviest (third generation). Although hints of second-generation lepton interactions have started to appear, physicists have only experim
18h
Protecting temperate old-growth rainforest is key for a sustainable future
On the west coast of Vancouver Island, British Columbia, red and yellow cedar trees over 1,000 years old are being cut down for lumber. The logging company, Teal-Jones, has a provincially granted tree farm license that gives them exclusive rights to log a 230-square-mile area in the southwest of the island, which is home to a globally rare zone of temperate rainforest. The loss of these giant tree
18h
Study reveals structural changes of a key protein involved in DNA repair
Researchers of the University of Oulu, Finland, have for the first time uncovered the molecular structure of a key protein, PARP2, when bound to damaged DNA. PARP2 is one of the key enzymes protecting and maintaining our genomes that continuously get damaged by chemicals and radiation from our environment. The new study shows in detail the structure of an activated PARP2 enzyme in complex with oli
19h
Using a mineral 'sponge' to catch uranium
A team of researchers from Sandia, Lawrence Berkeley and Pacific Northwest national laboratories tested a "sponge-like" mineral that can "soak up" uranium at a former uranium mill near Rifle, Colorado.
19h
Inside the Irish lough that offers a window into the deep sea
Deeper than most scuba divers can safely work and above where most underwater robots are designed to descend lie some of the most poorly studied ecosystems in the world. Between 30 and 150 meters down is the ocean's mesophotic zone, meaning middle-light. Communities of life exist here at the limit of where photosynthesis can occur. On rocky surfaces in the cold water, seaweeds slowly give way to s
19h
Gray whale off coast of Namibia swam halfway around the world to get there
A combined team of researchers from Durham University and Sea Search Research and Conservation NPC, has found that a gray whale spotted off the coast of Namibia traveled halfway around the globe to get there. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, the group describes collecting a tissue sample from the whale and comparing its DNA with other whales in other parts of the world.
19h
For a low-carbon cement recipe, scientists look to Earth's cauldrons
Concrete has given us the Pantheon in Rome, the Sydney Opera House, the Hoover Dam and countless blocky monoliths. The artificial rock blankets our cities and roadways, underlies wind farms and solar panel arrays—and will be poured by the ton in infrastructure projects supported by COVID recovery investments in the United States and abroad.
19h
Improved climate resilience through better seasonal forecasts
Lack of water, floods, or crop losses: As a result of climate change, pronounced periods of drought and rainfall are occurring more frequently and more intensively all around the world, causing human suffering and major economic damage. The more precise seasonal forecasts for the coming months are, the more effectively these consequences can be mitigated. A research team from Karlsruhe Institute o
19h
Physicists achieve significant improvement in spotting accelerator-produced neutrinos in a cosmic haystack
How do you spot a subatomic neutrino in a "haystack" of particles streaming from space? That's the daunting prospect facing physicists studying neutrinos with detectors near Earth's surface. With little to no shielding in such non-subterranean locations, surface-based neutrino detectors, usually searching for neutrinos produced by particle accelerators, are bombarded by cosmic rays—relentless show
19h
Bacteria-sized robots take on microplastics and win by breaking them down
Small pieces of plastic are everywhere, stretching from urban environments to pristine wilderness. Left to their own devices, it can take hundreds of years for them to degrade completely. Catalysts activated by sunlight could speed up the process, but getting these compounds to interact with microplastics is difficult. In a proof-of-concept study, researchers reporting in ACS Applied Materials & I
19h
SARS-CoV-2 protease cuts human proteins responsible for immune response
The SARS-CoV-2 papain-like protease (PLpro) plays an essential role in processing viral proteins needed for replication. In addition, the enzyme can cut and inactivate some human proteins important for an immune response. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Infectious Diseases have found other targets of PLpro in the human proteome, including proteins involved in cardiovascular function, blood clott
19h
Researchers tame silicon to interact with light for next-generation microelectronics
Skoltech researchers and their colleagues from RAS Institute for Physics of Microstructures, Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod, ITMO University, Lomonosov Moscow State University, and A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute have found a way to increase photoluminescence in silicon, the notoriously poor emitter and absorber of photons at the heart of all modern electronics. This disc
19h
Honeybees' hairy abdomens show how to save energy, reduce wear on materials
Watching honeybees buzz among flowers, it's easy to see how the expression "busy as a bee" arose. One of many movements a bee's body makes is the repetitive curving and straightening of its abdomen. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces have found that tiny hairs reduce friction from these motions, saving energy for the industrious insects' daily activities while reducin
19h
Technique characterizes phases of superfluids changing to supersolids and back
A team of researchers from the Institute for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information and the University of Innsbruck, has developed a technique for characterizing the phases a superfluid undergoes as it changes to a supersolid and then back again. The group has written a paper describing their technique and have uploaded it to the arXiv preprint server.
19h
Researchers monitor mRNA to help time its great escape to perfection
The ease by which mRNA-based drugs are taken up by cells in tissues is crucial to their therapeutic effectiveness. Now, a new detection method developed by researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, and AstraZeneca could lead to faster and better development of the small droplets known as lipid nanoparticles, which are the main method used to package mRNA for delivery to the cells.
19h
Personalized soundscape could help people with dementia with time, place recognition
Designing a soundscape to improve quality of life for an individual is centered on putting their perception at the heart of the process. During the 180th ASA Meeting, Arezoo Talebzadeh from Ghent University will show how a personalized soundscape can help those with dementia by providing clues regarding time of day and place. The session, "Soundscape design for people with dementia; the correlatio
19h
Ångest driver vittnen att ingripa vid mobbning
Hundratusentals skolelever kommer dagligen i kontakt med mobbning – som offer, mobbare eller vittnen. Man vet att omgivningens reaktioner har stor betydelse, men vad är det som avgör om andra elever kommer till offrets undsättning eller inte? Enligt en grupp Lundaforskare är vittnets egen ångest en pådrivande faktor.
19h
More than 70% of world's sharks died 19M years ago
Researchers have discovered a massive die-off of sharks roughly 19 million years ago. It came at a period in history when there were more than 10 times as many sharks patrolling the world's oceans than there are today. For now, researchers don't know the cause of the shark die-off. "We happened upon this extinction almost by accident," says Elizabeth Sibert, a postdoctoral associate in Yale Unive
19h
Researchers develop guide to measure evolution of plants that benefit from others
Plants that facilitate the survival and reproduction of other species can also make them evolve, something that has been ignored in most studies on the subject. Researchers from the Desertification Research Center (CIDE, CSIC-UV-GVA), together with scientists from Mexico and Switzerland, have established a guide to study the evolutionary changes of plants that benefit from other plants.
19h
Rice fish model of a rare metabolic disorder
A mutation from a human patient with a rare metabolic disorder has been replicated in the Japanese rice fish. Researchers from the Centre for Organismal Studies Heidelberg, Germany, have developed a fish model to study disorders caused by a deficiency in the process of adding sugar molecules to proteins. These findings, published in the journal Development, provide a system to study the causes of
19h
Natural rainbow colorants microbially produced
A research group at KAIST has engineered bacterial strains capable of producing three carotenoids and four violacein derivatives, completing the seven colors in the rainbow spectrum. The research team integrated systems metabolic engineering and membrane engineering strategies for the production of seven natural rainbow colorants in engineered Escherichia coli strains. The strategies will be also
19h
How a rubber hand could treat OCD
It is easy to trick your brain into believing that a rubber hand belongs to your body. OCD is a crippling condition afflicting 1 in 50 people. The "rubber hand illusion" could offer a novel strategy to treat this condition. I feel anchored "here and now" in my body. But this sense of embodiment which we take for granted is an illusion created by the brain. In fact, in just five minutes, I can mak
19h
The digestive system of cows influences human's vitamin B12 intake
Milk is the main source of vitamin B12 consumption for Canadians. A glass of cow's milk contains about 46% of the daily-recommended dietary intake of vitamin B12 for adults. But what factors influences the concentration of B12 in a glass of milk? Turns out, what cows eat and how they digest it can impact human's B12 intake.
20h
New light on making two-dimensional polymers
An international research team with members from Linköping University, the Technical University of Munich and the Deutsches Museum among others, has developed a method to manufacture two-dimensional polymers with the thickness of a single molecule. The polymers are formed on a surface by the action of light. The discovery paves the way to new ultrathin and functional materials, and has been publis
20h
Solar eclipse chaser: What to expect from this week's partial eclipse
In December 2020, in the middle of a pandemic, I made the somewhat questionable decision to fly 11,200km from where I live in Belfast, Northern Ireland to Santiago, Chile. Then, I boarded a connecting two-hour flight and drove for a further two hours, just to experience two minutes and 20 seconds of darkness.
20h
Sticky fingerprints reveal true origins of honey
DNA testing Australian honey can reveal where it was produced and its main floral sources, according to research published today by Australia's national science agency, CSIRO, and partners at the University of Melbourne and Curtin University.
20h
Novel compound reveals fundamental properties of smallest carbon nanotubes
Chemical rings of carbon and hydrogen atoms curve to form relatively stable structures capable of conducting electricity and more—but how do these curved systems change when new components are introduced? Researchers based in Japan found that, with just a few sub-atomic additions, the properties can pivot to vary system states and behaviors, as demonstrated through a new synthesized chemical compo
20h
Transformation toughening of ceramics made crystal clear
Ceramic materials that are resistant to cracking are used in a variety of industries from aerospace engineering to dentistry. Toughening them to improve their efficiency and safety is therefore an important area of investigation. Researchers from the University of Tsukuba have used time-resolved X-ray diffraction to observe transformation toughening in zirconia ceramics during dynamic fracture. Th
20h
Scientists use public databases to leap over scourge of publication bias
Scientists have leapt over the emerging problem of publication bias within genetic research by performing a meta-analysis of publicly available databases of 'transcriptomes," or the full range of messenger RNA molecules produced by an organism. Researchers from Hiroshima University applied the technique to their own field—the study of the genes that are activated when an organism experiences low-o
20h
New chemical method makes it easier to extract pollutant pesticides from water
Researchers from the Department of Analytical Chemistry and the Institute of Materials Science (ICMUV) of the University of Valencia (UV) have developed a method for the detection in water of PFRs (organophosphate flame retardants), compounds used in pest control that cause serious health and environmental problems due to their accumulation.
20h
Making packaging materials recyclable
If it is up to UT-Ph.D. student Jiaying Li, we will no longer have a 'silver' layer in food packages like crisps bags. In her latest publication, she describes a relatively easy method to create recyclable coatings for food packages. Her research paves the way for food packages that—given the right conditions—can be recycled in water. She recently published her work in the scientific journal ACS A
20h
Laptops, cell phones, e-games defied slump as COVID-19 dented 2020's electronics sales: UN
COVID-19 caused a 30% fall in electronic and electrical equipment sales in low- and middle-income countries but only a 5% fall in high-income countries, intensifying the north-south digital divide, the UN says. Sales of heavy appliances like refrigerators fell hardest (6-8%) while laptops, cell phones and gaming equipment defied the general trend, rising in high-income countries and on a global ba
20h
I Halsnæs griber de børn i mistrivsel, før det er for sent
Tidligere blev børn i mistrivsel ofte tabt i systemet, fordi de hverken hørte hjemme i psykiatrien eller blev fanget af PPR, oplevede praktiserende læge Christina Andersen. Men for tre år siden besluttede de sig for at gøre noget ved det i hendes hjemkommune Halsnæs, så praktiserende læger kan henvise direkte til PPR. En løsning, PLO efterlyser i en kommende 10-årsplan for psykiatrien.
20h
Become A Video Star With Camtasia 2021
Online video drives the world in weird and wonderful ways — making a nine-year-old a millionaire , turning playing video games into a day job, and making video a crucial marketing channel for anyone — whether you're building your personal brand or promoting the company you work for. Camtasia makes it easy to create effective video for the internet, and if you act fast, you can get Camtasia 2021 w
21h
500 miljoner år av meteoritbombardemang kartlagt
Forskare har tidigare trott att meteoritflödet mot jorden varit kopplat till dramatiska kollisioner i asteroidbältet. Men endast en av de 70 stora asteroidkollisioner som ägt rum under de senaste 500 miljoner åren har lett till ett ökat flöde av meteoriter till jorden. Ända sedan 1800-talet har forskare studerat den geologiska lagerföljden för att rekonstruera hur djurliv, växtlighet och klimat f
21h
Pandemic effects on small companies
Everyone the world over has been left unaffected by the emergence of a novel coronavirus, named SARS-CoV-2 in late 2019, which led to the current COVID-19 pandemic. Our lives have been disrupted enormously by the medical, social, and economic implications of this lethal disease. Writing in the World Review of Intermodal Transportation Research, a team from Finland offers a view from the small busi
21h
Is AI really that intelligent?
Robots are not as clever as billed, but they could be. Three new books argue that the challenge is making these powerful new technologies work for us
21h
XRISM telescope filter wheel, calibration system sent to Japan for assembly
On June 9, SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research sends its contributions to the XRISM X-ray telescope to Japan, where space agency JAXA will mount it on the satellite. SRON has been working on a filter wheel plus calibration system for the past few years. In 2023, XRISM will be launched into space, where it will observe phenomena such as black holes and supernovae.
22h
Researchers achieve synergetic effects between spin-orbit coupling and Stark effect
Each electron carries one negative elementary charge, whose collective motion generates electric currents that drive the operation of lights, transistors and all kinds of electronic devices. However, as being an elementary particle, electron also possesses an intrinsic angular momentum, i.e. spin of 1/2. It has been a tempting goal to manipulate electron spins for developing faster and more energy
22h
Lunar IceCube passes critical testing at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center
The Lunar IceCube CubeSat successfully passed essential environmental testing at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. The spacecraft, pictured above, will fly aboard the upcoming Artemis I mission to the moon as a secondary payload to investigate the amount and distribution of water ice on the moon.
22h
Achieving UV nonlinearity with a wide bandgap semiconductor waveguide
The field of ultrafast nonlinear photonics has now become the focus of numerous studies, as it enables a host of applications in advanced on-chip spectroscopy and information processing. The latter in particular requires a strongly intensity-dependent optical refractive index that can modulate optical pulses faster than even picosecond timescales and on sub-millimeter scales suitable for integrate
22h
New defence against superbugs
For the first time, Australian scientists have confirmed a link between the role of regular fish oil to break down the ability of 'superbugs' to become resistant to antibiotics. The discovery, led by Flinders University and just published in international journal mBio, found that the antimicrobial powers of fish oil fatty acids could prove a simple and safe dietary supplement for people to take wi
22h
Nya vanor förklarar minskad brottslighet bland unga
Ungdomsbrottsligheten har stadigt minskat de två senaste decennierna. Att unga förändrat sina aktivitetsvanor är den faktor som har starkast samband med utvecklingen. Sedan slutet av 90-talet har brott som skadegörelse, stölder och olika typer av våldsbrott där unga är gärningspersoner, stadigt minskat. – Utvecklingen är inte unik för Sverige utan ser likadan ut i de flesta andra länder. Den har
22h
Joe Biden Worries That China Might Win
A few months into Joe Biden's presidency, it certainly seems like foreign policy has taken a back seat to domestic policy. The president's top priorities are clearly tackling the pandemic and multitrillion-dollar infrastructure and economic-stimulus plans. However, this should not obscure a significant shift in U.S. foreign policy, not just from Biden's predecessor, Donald Trump, but also from hi
22h
How wearable AI could help you recover from covid
Angela Mitchell still remembers the night she nearly died. It was almost one year ago in July. Mitchell—who turns 60 this June—tested positive for covid-19 at her job as a pharmacy technician at the University of Illinois Hospital in Chicago. She was sneezing, coughing, and feeling dizzy. The hospital management offered her a choice. She could quarantine at a hotel, or she could recover and isola
22h
Social psychology in the age of retraction
We're pleased to present an excerpt from chapter 10, "The Replication Crisis," of Augustine Brannigan's The Use and Misuse of the Experimental Method in Social Psychology (Routledge 2021), with permission from the publisher. Contemporary social psychology has been seized over the past years by a loss of credibility and self-confidence associated with scientific fraud and … Continue reading
22h
Kan jag få din livmoder, mamma?
I Sverige kan kvinnor utan livmoder få en genom transplantation från en levande donator, inom ramen för forskningsprojekt. Hittills har tolv barn fötts med hjälp av metoden i Sverige. I dagsläget behöver den som vill delta i forskningen dock hitta en egen donator. Rekommendationen är av medicinska skäl en släkting. Den som donerar kan befinna sig på endera sida av klimakteriet. Men även om yngre k
22h
Limited application of reflective surfaces can mitigate urban heat pollution
Nature Communications, Published online: 09 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23634-7 Reflective surfaces have been recommended to mitigate urban heat pollution but can be expensive to apply at a large scale. This work shows that applying them to only the upstream half of a neighborhood can lead to disporportionately high cooling benefits relative to cost.
23h
Time trajectories in the transcriptomic response to exercise – a meta-analysis
Nature Communications, Published online: 09 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23579-x Regular exercise promotes overall health and prevents non-communicable diseases, but the adaptation mechanisms are unclear. Here, the authors perform a meta-analysis to reveal time-specific patterns of the acute and long-term exercise response in human skeletal muscle, and identify sex- and age-specific changes.
23h
Discovery and characterization of a new type of domain wall in a row-wise antiferromagnet
Nature Communications, Published online: 09 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23760-2 Antiferromagnets (AFM) exhibit faster magnetization dynamics, and have immunity to stray fields, making AFMs attractive for spintronic devices. Here, the authors investigate the behaviour of domain walls in AFMs, and find a new type domain wall, a superposition of two adjacent rotational domains.
23h
Probing the biogenesis pathway and dynamics of thylakoid membranes
Nature Communications, Published online: 09 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23680-1 Cyanobacterial thylakoid membranes host the molecular machinery for the light-dependent reactions of photosynthesis and respiratory electron flow. Here, the authors show that newly synthesized thylakoids emerge between the plasma membrane and pre-existing thylakoids and describe the time-dependent assembly proce
23h
Brain network dynamics during working memory are modulated by dopamine and diminished in schizophrenia
Nature Communications, Published online: 09 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23694-9 Working memory requires the brain to switch between cognitive states and activity patterns. Here, the authors show that the steering of these neural network dynamics is influenced by dopamine D1- and D2-receptor function and altered in schizophrenia.
23h
Observation of domain wall bimerons in chiral magnets
Nature Communications, Published online: 09 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23845-y Domain wall skyrmions have been proposed but the experimental observation has been difficult. Here, the authors report experimental discovery of domain wall bimerons due to the interplay between magnetic anisotropy and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction in chiral magnet Co-ZnMn(110) thin films.
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Activation of PARP2/ARTD2 by DNA damage induces conformational changes relieving enzyme autoinhibition
Nature Communications, Published online: 09 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23800-x Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 2 (PARP2) is activated by 5′-phosphorylated DNA breaks but the molecular mechanism is not fully understood. Here, the authors report a crystal structure of PARP2 bound to an activating DNA fragment, providing insights into the structural changes that lead to PARP2 activation.
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Clinical and molecular characteristics of COVID-19 patients with persistent SARS-CoV-2 infection
Nature Communications, Published online: 09 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23621-y Some patients with COVID-19 fail to clear the viral infection quickly, yet our understanding for the underlying immune characteristics is still lacking. Here the authors use single-cell RNA sequencing and other data form such patients to show that persistent infection is associated with immune suppression and re
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Many adults with cardiovascular disease know the risks, yet still don't stop smoking
Nearly 30% of adults with a history of heart attack, heart failure, stroke or other cardiovascular disease reported ongoing use of cigarettes or other tobacco products at the start of a large, nationally representative study spanning 2013-2018.At the end of the five-year study, approximately one in five of the study participants was still smoking.Cigarettes were the tobacco product used most often
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The Covid-19 Pseudoscience Suffocating Brazil
Proponents of tratamento precoce, or "early treatment" — which include Brazil's President Jair Bolsonaro — lean on discredited or skewed experiments to trumpet the regimen's effectiveness, even after several of the pills were proven to not work against Covid-19 in conclusive clinical trials last year.
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This company delivers packages faster than Amazon, but workers pay the price
Early on the morning of October 12, 2020, 27-year-old Jang Deok-joon came home after working his overnight shift at South Korean e-commerce giant Coupang and jumped into the shower. He had worked at the company's warehouse in the southern city of Daegu for a little over a year, hauling crates full of items ready to be shipped to delivery hubs. When he didn't come out of the bathroom for over an h
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The Lab Leak Theory
A lab leak theory of the COVID-19 origins has enough circumstantial evidence and historical basis to support the urgent need for an independent and unbiased investigation. But until recently, scientists dismissed lab leak as a conspiracy theory. In public at least.
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The buck stops where? Research records longest-ever deer distance
Why did the deer cross the road? According to research from the University of New Hampshire to keep going and going and going. Researchers have discovered the longest distance ever recorded by an adult male white-tailed deer—300 kilometers, or close to 200 miles, in just over three weeks. The finding has important implications for population management and the transmission of disease, especially c
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Serenading Lusitanian toadfish drowned out by water traffic
During spring, Lusitanian toadfish (Halobatrachus didactylus) suitors form choirs in Portugal's Tagus estuary to serenade the females, vibrating their swim bladders to produce a call, known as a boatwhistle, which sounds like a vibrating cell phone. The males also listen in on each other to check whether anyone is intruding on their territory. But sadly, their performances are no longer conducted
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is the reason we can't build high speed international rail systems beyond cost, is the insane amount of eminent domain required and how many setbacks that could cause?
the cost of building rail from say L.A. to new york would be astronomical, along with the amount of time such a thing would take. the problem of eminent domain comes into play because it could cause tons of hefty legal battles, because people either refuse to sell their land for a certain price, or just refuse to sell it at all. and thats just from one place to another, to have a vast network spa
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Developing the novel joint technique for copper alloy
The oxide dispersion strengthened copper alloy (ODS-Cu) is superior in thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity and heat resistance. Although the ODS-Cu can be expected to have various industrial applications, its joint with other materials is extremely difficult because of its intrinsic poor weldability. The research group has developed an extremely novel joint technique that enables us to f
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Study examines care received by patients with knee osteoarthritis
New research reveals that only a minority of U.S. Medicare beneficiaries with knee osteoarthritis in 2005-2010 used non-surgical care such as physical therapy and knee injections, and few were treated by rheumatologists, physiatrists, or pain specialists. The study, which is published in Arthritis & Rheumatology, also found that non-surgical care was more common in regions with low rates of knee r
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A new bacteria, made in Belgium (and UCLouvain)
Researchers from University of Louvain have discovered a new bacterium in the human intestine, they called Dysosmobacter welbionis.The UCLouvain scientists have also discovered positive effects of this bacterium on type 2 diabetes, obesity and inflammation.The originality of this discovery? It is extremely rare that a single research team identifies, cultivates, names a bacterium and then reveals
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How to Do Anything Better
When we think about the things we do every day—driving, working, parenting—we realize that even with tasks we are generally good at, there is always room for improvement. As always,… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Monarchs raised in captivity can orient themselves for migration
Researchers found monarchs raised in captivity can successfully migrate if given time to orient themselves. They discovered this by equipping the butterflies with tiny radio transmitters and monitoring them for 200 km, debunking previous research that found the butterflies couldn't orient themselves. Monarchs released into the wild flew in the proper direction because they were exposed to natural
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Cleaning up mining pollution in rivers
Mining involves moving a lot of rock, so some mess is expected. However, mining operations can continue to affect ecosystems long after activity has ended. Heavy metals and corrosive substances leach into the environment, preventing wildlife and vegetation from returning to the area.
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Senolytics reduce COVID-19 symptoms in preclinical studies
Mayo Clinic researchers and colleagues at the University of Minnesota showed that COVID-19 exacerbates the damaging impact of senescent cells in the body. In preclinical studies, the senolytic drugs discovered at Mayo significantly reduced inflammation, illness, and mortality from COVID infection in older mice. The findings appear in the journal Science.
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This At-Home Gut Health Test Could Be the Key To Strengthening Your Immune System
Thanks to recent scientific breakthroughs, we know your stomach is more important to your overall health than we ever imagined. According to Dan Peterson, assistant professor of pathology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine , a preponderance of your immune system health actually occurs in your gastrointestinal tract. This is because the sole purpose of many cells that live in the l
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Get Over 200 Apps For Your Mac With A One-Year Setapp Subscription
While Apple continues to push the boundaries of tech with augmented reality and self-driving cars , for many people, it's the Mac that matters most to them. Setapp is an easy way to turn your Mac into a productivity machine, by giving you access to a hand-selected library of apps for every need. If you act fast, you can get a year-long subscription for nearly half off its total value. The fundame
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Solving the structural mystery of glass
The detailed structure of glass has always been a mystery in science. A research team has now discovered that the amorphous and crystalline metallic glass have the same structural building blocks. And it is the connectivity between these blocks that distinguishes the crystalline and amorphous states of the material.
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