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SAMME ANTIFROST-PROTEIN PÅVIST HOS UBESLÆGTEDE FISKEARTER: To survive in cold temperatures, living organisms have developed anti freezing protein, but as a surprise for scientists, two unrelated groups of fish have the same gene. Scientists have confirmed that it is not through crossbreeding.

https://www.quantamagazine.org/dna-jumps-between-animal-species-no-one-knows-how-often-20210609/#comments
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ERSTATNING FOR LYSMIKROSKOPET: The new microscope uses quantum entanglement to replace light used to examine biological systems. The light used is so strong that it destroys the cells in a few seconds, the new microscope has overcome this barrier. The quantum entanglement now could be integrated in other technologies as well. 
https://phys.org/news/2021-06-quantum-microscope-impossible.html
 
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Coming Soon To An Atlas Near You: A Fifth Ocean
National Geographic has recognized the Southern Ocean as the fifth official ocean. The cartographic update doesn't surprise researchers who study the importance of the waters surrounding Antarctica. (Image credit: Alexander Gerst/ESA via Getty Images)
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Deep learning with SPECT accurately predicts major adverse cardiac events
An advanced artificial intelligence technique known as deep learning can predict major adverse cardiac events more accurately than current standard imaging protocols, according to research presented at the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging 2021 Annual Meeting. Utilizing data from a registry of more than 20,000 patients, researchers developed a novel deep learning network that has t
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Gymnastics Doesn't Know What to Do With Simone Biles's Dominance
Simone Biles is the greatest athlete in the world today. For me, this isn't a debate. It's a statement of fact. On Sunday, she won a record seventh United States gymnastics championship , continuing her jaw-dropping winning streak in every all-around competition she's entered since 2013. The 24-year-old hasn't lost in eight years. Typical gymnasts her age aren't beating all their rivals by the bi
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Physicist Warns That Contacting Aliens Could End All Life on Earth
Extreme Danger Despite the Pentagon's best efforts, we still have no idea what explains a series of Navy pilot encounters with UFOs that seemingly crossed the sky at hypersonic speeds and defied the laws of physics. And if the latest rumors are to be believed , an upcoming report by the government isn't going to give us any more answers than we already have. The theory that extraterrestrials coul
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Democracy Is Already Dying in the States
While Senator Joe Manchin is demanding that both parties agree on any further federal voting-rights legislation, a new study quantifies how completely Republicans have excluded Democrats from the passage of the restrictive voting laws proliferating in red states. In places such as Florida, Georgia, Arizona, Iowa, Kansas, and Montana, the most restrictive laws approved this year have passed on tot
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New discovery shows human cells can write RNA sequences into DNA
Cells contain machinery that duplicates DNA into a new set that goes into a newly formed cell. That same class of machines, called polymerases, also build RNA messages, which are like notes copied from the central DNA repository of recipes, so they can be read more efficiently into proteins. But polymerases were thought to only work in one direction DNA into DNA or RNA. This prevents RNA messages
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South African worker honeybees reproduce by making near-perfect clones of themselves
A team of researchers from the University of Sydney, the ARC-Plant Protection Research Institute and York University, has found that workers in a species of honeybee found in South Africa reproduce by making near-perfect clones of themselves. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes their study of the bees and what they learned about them.
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An omega-3 that's poison for tumors
3D tumors that disintegrate within a few days thanks to the action of a well-known omega-3 (DHA, found mainly in fish) — this is a promising discovery. Hungry for fatty acids, tumor cells in acidosis gorge themselves on DHA but are unable to store it correctly and literally poison themselves. The result? They die.
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Astronomers find blinking giant star near heart of Milky Way
Huge star, 25,000 light years away, dims by 97% then slowly returns to former brightness Astronomers have spotted a giant blinking star, 100 times the size of the sun, lurking near the heart of the Milky Way. Telescope observations revealed that over a few hundred days the enormous star, which lies more than 25,000 light years away, dimmed by 97% and then slowly returned to its former brightness.
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Archeologists Discover 1000-Year-Old Egg, Accidentally Break It
Archeologists in Israel made an incredibly rare discovery in the ancient industrial zone of Yavneh, a central Israeli city: a 1,000 year old chicken egg. Astonishingly, the egg lay underground, preserved for all those years — until, tragically, they accidentally broke it in a lab run by archeologists from the Israel Antiquities Authority, as Haaretz reports . It's a scientific loss, but also a po
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Scientists Found Hundreds of New Mysterious Signals From Deep Space
We Get Signal A years-long study using the CHIME telescope in Canada has uncovered over 500 new fast-radio bursts (FRBs), mysterious and fleeting signals emitted from the far reaches of space. The scientists found that there are some key differences between different FRBs, some of which were one-off bursts and some of which rapidly repeated, according to CNN . That lead them to believe that the d
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Delta variant causes more than 90% of new Covid cases in UK
Variant first discovered in India is thought to spread more easily and be more resistant to vaccines Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage More than 90% of Covid cases in the UK are now down to the coronavirus Delta variant first discovered in India, data has revealed, as the total number of confirmed cases passed 42,000. Also known as B.1.617.2, the Delta variant has been
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Australian researchers discover why only two of echidna's four penis heads become erect at one time
The major blood vessel of the penis splits into two main branches which each supply two of the four penile heads The penis of an echidna has four heads but only two become erect at any one time. Now, Australian researchers have uncovered why. Scientists discovered the mammal has unusual reproductive anatomy that causes male echidnas to ejaculate from only two of their four penile heads at one tim
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The Moral Catastrophe Unfolding in Afghanistan
One of the last times I saw my interpreter Ali, we were driving through a valley in southeastern Afghanistan when a vehicle in our convoy struck an IED. An ambush followed. Muzzle flashes lit up the rocky hillside as we pried the bodies of four Afghan soldiers out of their mangled vehicle, including Mortaza, a friend of Ali's. I remember the two of us putting pieces of him in a vinyl body bag. Af
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New Facility Will Use Volcano to Power Bitcoin Mining Operation
Volcano Powered El Salvador recently became the first sovereign nation in the world to make Bitcoin legal tender. Now, the small country's president Nayib Bukele has an even wilder plan to realize his crypto dreams: volcano-powered cryptocurrency mining. It's yet another wild turn for a country that has chosen to go all in on the wildly volatile digital currency — recent tumbles in price be damne
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The Mystery at the Heart of Physics That Only Math Can Solve
Over the past century, quantum field theory has proved to be the single most sweeping and successful physical theory ever invented. It is an umbrella term that encompasses many specific quantum field theories — the way "shape" covers specific examples like the square and the circle. The most prominent of these theories is known as the Standard Model, and it is this framework of physics that has..
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Solar eclipse 2021: spectacle visible across UK and Ireland
Skygazers – with appropriate eye protection – could see much of sun being obscured on Thursday morning Solar eclipse 2021: the crescent sun – in pictures A celestial phenomenon is underway, with observers in the UK able to see a crescent sun while viewers in the Arctic enjoy an annular solar eclipse. An annular eclipse occurs when the sun and moon are exactly in line with the Earth, but the appar
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Trumpists Are America's Jacobites
"He loved authority and business. He had a high sense of his own personal dignity," one commentator observed . "He was not altogether destitute of a sentiment which bore some affinity to patriotism … His second wish was to be feared and respected abroad. But his first wish was to be absolute master at home." He came to power, succeeding a popular head of state who had tried to restore normalcy, a
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Rapid Covid tests used in mass UK programme get scathing US report
Innova tests' performance not proven and they should be returned to manufacturer or thrown in bin, says FDA Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The US Food and Drug Agency (FDA) has raised significant concerns about the rapid Covid test on which the UK government has based its multibillion-pound mass testing programme . In a scathing review , the US health agency suggest
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I study UFOs – and I don't believe the alien hype. Here's why | Mick West
This month the Pentagon will release its much-awaited UFO report. Extraterrestrial buffs think they'll be vindicated – but they've gotten a bit ahead of themselves There is a tidal wave of interest building up around an imminent Pentagon report on the subject of UFOs, or, as they are often referred to now, UAPs (Unidentified Aerial Phenomena). A sense of heady enthusiasm has swept over the UFO co
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Medieval fashion for pointy shoes linked to rise in bunions
Cambridge research suggests foot problem was more common after Blackadder-style shoe became popular From waist-squeezing corsets to crinoline skirts, fashion has rarely been about comfort – or safety. Now researchers have revealed that even in medieval times, men and women could become martyrs to fashion, linking a trend in pointy shoes to a rise in the prevalence of bunions. Bunions – or hallux
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A Pivotal Mosquito Experiment Could Not Have Gone Better
Adi Utarini had her first of two bouts of dengue fever in 1986, when she was still a medical student. Within a few hours, she spiked a temperature of 104 degrees Fahrenheit and couldn't stand up, because her knee was shaking so badly. Within a few days, she was in the hospital. That experience is common in Utarini's home city of Yogyakarta, Indonesia: It has one of the highest rates of dengue in
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Why Canada Won't Open Its Doors
I f you ask Roger Dow, what's happening at the border is "monstrous"—a prolonged disaster that gets worse by the day. "It is a crisis," he told me by phone last week. Dow is the CEO of the U.S. Travel Association, and he wasn't talking about the thousands of migrants surging illegally across the southern border with Mexico or the unaccompanied children detained in overcrowded shelters. Dow was ta
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The Essential Ed Yong Reading List
In a series of definitive pieces that earned him the 2021 Pulitzer Prize for explanatory reporting, The Atlantic 's Ed Yong anticipated the course of the coronavirus pandemic, clarified its dangers, and illuminated the American government's disastrous failure to curb it. Yong, who has been a staff writer at The Atlantic since 2015, began warning readers about the fragility of America's pandemic p
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England's lockdown easing on 21 June likely to be delayed by up to four weeks
Monday's announcement will come as coronavirus case are rising at fastest rate since second wave Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The lifting of all lockdown restrictions in England is likely to be delayed for up to a month from the planned date of 21 June, government sources have told the Guardian. It comes as coronavirus cases in England are rising at their fastest
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The Human Genome Is—Finally!—Complete
When the human genome was first deemed "complete" in 2000, the news was met with great international fanfare. The two rival groups vying to finish the genome first—one a large government-led consortium, the other an underdog private company—agreed to declare joint success. They shook hands at the White House. Bill Clinton presided. Tony Blair beamed in from London . "We are standing at an extraor
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Congressman Asks If Changing the Moon's Orbit Could Fight Climate Change
Lasso the Moon Congressman Louie Gohmert suggested an unusual approach to tackling climate change during a recent hearing: somehow altering the orbit of the Moon in order to change the weather down here on Earth. Gohmert, a steadfast opponent of climate change measures, was questioning Forest Service associate deputy chief Jennifer Eberlien during a House Natural Resources Committee hearing, acco
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Google's DeepMind Says It Has All the Tech It Needs for General AI
Solid Foundation In order to develop artificial general intelligence (AGI), the sort of all-encompassing AI that we see in science fiction, we might need to merely sit back and let a simple algorithm develop on its own. Reinforcement learning, a kind of gamified AI architecture in which an algorithm "learns" to complete a task by seeking out preprogrammed rewards, could theoretically grow and lea
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China Is About to Launch Astronauts to Its New Space Station
Space Visitors China is set to launch the first astronauts to its new Earth-orbiting space station. A Long March 2F rocket rolled out onto the launch pad on Wednesday, as SpaceNews reports, to send three astronauts to the Tianhe core module of China's space station, which launched into orbit in April of this year. There's a lot we don't know yet, including the exact launch date and the identities
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These 1,000 hexagons show how global wealth is distributed
On these maps, each hexagon represents one-thousandth of the world's economy. That makes it easy to compare the GDP of regions and nations across the globe. There are versions for nominal GDP and GDP adjusted for purchasing power. Shanghai's skyline at night. According to the GDP (PPP) map, China is the world's largest economy. But that oft-cited statistic says more about the problems of PPP as a
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It Wasn't Just Another Nightclub
E very December, when Christmas rolls around, I hear Mariah Carey's "All I Want for Christmas Is You" and I think of the Pulse nightclub shooting in Orlando, five years ago in the middle of June—literally as far from Christmas as you can get. I had volunteered to fly to Florida to cover the massacre for NPR. Each time my producer and I climbed into our rental car, she plugged in her phone and the
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High risk of autumn Covid surge in Europe despite drop in infections, says WHO
Organisation urges governments to be cautious as societies open up and Delta variant advances Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Covid-19 infections, hospitalisations and deaths are falling fast across Europe, but the risk of a deadly autumn resurgence remains high as societies open up and the more transmissible Delta variant advances, the World Health Organization (WHO
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The Lie We Tell Ourselves About Going to Bed Early
" How to Build a Life " is a weekly column by Arthur Brooks, tackling questions of meaning and happiness. F or many people, the cruelest part of daily life is the transition between wakefulness and sleep. When you should be sleeping, you want to be awake; when you should be awake, you want to stay asleep. It is easy to regard sleep as a torment: hard to attain and then hard to give up, day after
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The War on Bollywood
India's Hindu-nationalist prime minister, Narendra Modi ( upper right ), and three of Bollywood's biggest Muslim stars ( left to right ): Salman Khan, Shah Rukh Khan, and Aamir Khan ( Illustration by Geoff Kim; Raveendran / AFP; Visual China Group / Getty; Chirag Wakaskar / Getty; Manoj Verma / Hindustan Times / Getty ) This article was published online on June 10, 2021 and updated at 10:15 a.m.
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Photos: California's Growing Drought Disaster
After two of the driest years in decades, many of California's reservoirs are expected to reach record-setting lows this summer, four years after exiting the state's most recent drought emergency. Lake Oroville, the second-largest reservoir in California, stands at about 37 percent of its capacity. Governor Gavin Newsom has declared a drought emergency for most of the state, while farmers are wor
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Connecting a star's chemical composition and planet formation
Researchers from Penn's Department of Physics and Astronomy have developed a new method for better understanding the relationship between a star's chemical composition and planet formation. The study was led by recent graduate Jacob Nibauer for his senior thesis with Bhuvnesh Jain and was co-supervised by former Penn postdoc Eric Baxter. The researchers found that the majority of stars in their da
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Trump's DOJ Was More Dangerous Than We Knew
Sometimes, the actions a government takes look bad at the time, but posterity treats them kindly . Other times, a president might look good in the moment but see his reputation sink in retrospect . Then there's the Trump administration, and especially its Justice Department, which looked bad when it was in power and now looks even worse. Late yesterday, The New York Times reported that the Justic
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In space, nobody can hear Jeff Bezos. So can Richard Branson go too? | Marina Hyde
News that the Amazon overlord is about to jet off has got the Virgin boss clamouring to get there first. You can do it, Richard! It's famously impossible to take a bathroom break during a rocket launch, meaning Jeff Bezos will soon experience what it's like to be one of his warehouse workers . Or, as the Amazon boss put it last week: "To see the Earth from space … changes your relationship with h
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The Drug That Could Break American Health Care
Earlier this week, the Food and Drug Administration overruled—to much criticism—its own scientific advisory committee and approved the Alzheimer's treatment Aduhelm. The agency made this decision despite thin evidence of the drug's clinical efficacy and despite its serious side effects, including brain swelling and bleeding. As a result, a serious risk now exists that millions of people will be p
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Scientists link intense exercise with MND risk in some people
Those with a certain genetic makeup more likely to develop motor neurone disease, study confirms Regular strenuous exercise raises the risk of developing motor neurone disease (MND) in people who are genetically predisposed to the condition, researchers say. Scientists at the University of Sheffield found a causal relationship between high intensity physical activity and the disorder among those
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These creepy fake humans herald a new age in AI
You can see the faint stubble coming in on his upper lip, the wrinkles on his forehead, the blemishes on his skin. He isn't a real person, but he's meant to mimic one—as are the hundreds of thousands of others made by Datagen, a company that sells fake, simulated humans. These humans are not gaming avatars or animated characters for movies. They are synthetic data designed to feed the growing app
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We Choose Our Cults Every Day
Way back in January, I was idly thumbing through Instagram when I received a message that shook me like a nascent martini. "Did you hear that Taking Cara Babies donated to Trump ?" a friend wrote. This sentence likely makes no sense to you, unless you've had a baby sometime in the past few years. Taking Cara Babies is the brand name for Cara Dumaplin, a neonatal nurse turned baby-sleep expert who
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China Releases New Photos From the Surface of Mars
China released a series of new photos from its Zhurong Mars rover this morning. The images, debuted on state media , are indeed breathtaking — but they came alongside braggadocious verbiage that emphasized the mission's "complete success," as well as the significance of the Chinese flag flying on the Red Planet. "The images were unveiled at a ceremony in Beijing, signifying the complete success o
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The First Cruise Ship Since the Pandemic Already Has a COVID Outbreak
Everyone give a warm "welcome back!" to the Royal Caribbean cruise line, which is back in operation after a year of pandemic shutdown and already up to some of its old tricks. Stop us if you've heard this one before , but that trick is taking a tropical vacation and turning it into a potential superspreader event: WIC News reports that two guests on the company's first cruise have already tested
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Edgar Allan Poe's Other Obsession
Illustration by Kensuke Koike; Bettmann / Getty This article was published online on June 11, 2021. I n the early and macabre days of coronavirus shutdowns, Edgar Allan Poe was trending . " The Masque of the Red Death ," his Gothic tale from 1842, became in March of 2020 a go-to source for allegory: A prince whose state is overrun with something like hemorrhagic fever invites 1,000 noble friends
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ESA rover replica goes for test drive at Mars simulator in Italy
Operators of Rosalind Franklin rover practise controlling it in preparation for Martian landing in June 2023 A precise replica of the European Space Agency's ExoMars Rosalind Franklin rover has begun a series of test drives at the Aerospace Logistics Technology Engineering Company's Mars terrain simulator in Turin, Italy. Rover operators will practise controlling the rover in preparation for its
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Photos of the Week: Jovian Moon, Sunrise Piper, Sea Snot
An optical illusion at the Eiffel Tower, scenes from the French Open, a surfing competition in El Salvador, a presidential election in Peru, Olympic qualifying skateboarding trials in Italy, a giant sinkhole in Mexico, a sunrise annular eclipse seen in New York City, a platypus health check in Australia, and much more
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My UFO experience
Extraordinary claims, such as that UFOs have visited our planet or that aliens exist, require extraordinary evidence. Personal testimonies are simply insufficient to conclude that UFOs and aliens are real. Good luck having a rational conversation about it with anyone on Twitter. If you were hoping, based on the title, that I was going to describe the time I saw strange lights moving at inexplicab
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Mystery object caused by spontaneous symmetry breaking revealed
Hiromitsu Takeuchi, a lecturer at the Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University, and a researcher at the Nambu Yoichiro Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics (NITEP), has theoretically identified the nature of a mysterious topological defect produced by the recently discovered non-equilibrium time evolution of spontaneous symmetry breaking (SSB). Since the SSB realized in this
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Novel materials: Sound waves traveling backward
Acoustic waves in gases, liquids, and solids usually travel at an almost constant speed of sound. So-called rotons are an exception: their speed of sound changes significantly with the wavelength, and it is also possible that the waves travel backward. Researchers at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) are studying the possibilities of using rotons in artificial materials. These computer-desig
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The IVF Cases That Broke Birthright Citizenship
Ethan and Aiden Dvash-Banks are twin brothers—born just four minutes apart on the same September day in the same hospital room in Ontario, Canada. But shortly after their birth in 2016, the U.S. State Department decided that the two boys were very different in the eyes of American law: Aiden was a U.S. citizen but Ethan, the brother with whom he'd shared a womb, was not. The reasoning, as it were
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The coming productivity boom
The last 15 years have been tough times for many Americans, but there are now encouraging signs of a turnaround. Productivity growth, a key driver for higher living standards, averaged only 1.3% since 2006, less than half the rate of the previous decade. But on June 3, the US Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that US labor productivity increased by 5.4% in the first quarter of 2021. What's bett
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Check Out This Huge Hole That China's Mars Rover Blasted Into the Ground While Landing
New Crater Dedicated Mars watchers will recall that this morning, China released new photos from the Red Planet that showed off its lander, rover, and the beautiful landscape of the Utopia Planitia. Space journalist Jonathan O'Callaghan pointed out something interesting about one of the photos : you can see a deep hole that the lander punched in the Martian ground — a fun observation, but also a
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Sustainable Bitcoin Mining Group Disavows Elon Musk
Officially Sidelined The Bitcoin Mining Council, a voluntary group of crypto miners and enthusiasts, formally announced its debut on Friday. But it seems to be leaving an important figure behind: Elon Musk. "Elon Musk has no role at the BMC," reads part of the group's launch statement . "The extent of his involvement was joining an educational call with a group of North American companies to disc
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A Farmer Is Using Cow Turds to a Power Bitcoin Mining Operation
Brown Energy Bitcoin mining operations are shockingly energy-intensive due to stacks of processors working away in an attempt to extract some crypto. That's led to growing concerns about cryptocurrencies being bad for a planet already being hit by the impacts of climate change — Bitcoin alone already consumes more energy than several countries — so one farmer is taking an unusual approach to clea
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ALMA discovers earliest gigantic black hole storm
Researchers using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) discovered a titanic galactic wind driven by a supermassive black hole 13.1 billion years ago. This is the earliest example yet observed of such a wind to date and is a telltale sign that huge black holes have a profound effect on the growth of galaxies from the very early history of the universe.
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Waymo Self-Driving Trucks Will Soon Start Moving Freight Across Texas
Last month, self-driving technology company TuSimple shipped a truckload of watermelons across the state of Texas ten hours faster than normal. They did this by using their automated driving system for over 900 miles of the journey. The test drive was considered a success, and marked the beginning of a partnership between TuSimple and produce distributor Guimarra. This is one of the first such pa
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Watch President Biden Get Attacked by a Brood X Cicada
Cicadas Rising On Tuesday, a White House press plane was grounded by a swarm of Brood X cicadas that had recently emerged from their 17 year slumber. The tiny critters managed to get into the engine, preventing the plane from leaving ahead of Biden on his first trip overseas as president, The Wrap reports . In fact, the attack got so bad, one particularly adventurous cicada appears to have manage
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China Arrests Over 1,100 People for Laundering Crypto
Bitcoin Bust Authorities in China just arrested over 1,100 people accused of laundering cryptocurrency, according to an announcement from the Ministry of Public Security. The various arrests, which targeted 170 gangs throughout the country, was the latest chapter in a broader crackdown on fraud and other financial crimes, Gizmodo reports . Chinese President XI Jinping called for a greater focus o
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The Guardian view on the Covid lab-leak theory: act on what we know | Editorial
This pandemic's precise origins may never be certain. We must address both zoonotic transmission risks and lab security When something goes terribly wrong, it is human instinct to look for the human hand – perhaps to reassure ourselves that life is not wholly beyond our control. As the flu pandemic reached the US just over a century ago, some blamed German agents . So it wasn't surprising when pe
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Ronald Cresswell obituary
Pharmaceutical researcher with a flair for business who brought a string of vital drugs to market In 1960 the chemist Ronald Cresswell, who has died aged 86, had a lucky break. As a result of travelling from Glasgow to take up a post in New York he attended a conference of the American Chemical Society, met the biochemist George Hitchings, and they bonded over their mutual interest in folic acid.
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Global weight of all active SARS-CoV-2 viruses is between 0.1 and 10 kilograms
A combined team of researchers from the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel and the California Institute of Technology in the U.S. has calculated the weight of all the SARS-CoV-2 viruses infecting people around the world at any given time. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes how they made their calculations and explain how their work
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In the Heights Knows the Second-Generation American's Dilemma
This article contains spoilers for In the Heights. In The Heights , the director Jon M. Chu's Hollywood adaptation of the groundbreaking Broadway musical, is ostensibly a tale about the aspirational young. Its focus stays mostly on some dreamers (and a "Dreamer") living in the Upper Manhattan neighborhood of Washington Heights. They form an ensemble cast of working-class Latino characters—immigra
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New globular cluster exhibiting extreme kinematics detected
Astronomers from the Andrés Bello National University, Chile, and elsewhere, have discovered a new nearby globular cluster (GC) with extreme kinematics. The newly found cluster, designated VVV-CL160, has an unusually large proper motion when compared to other galactic GCs. The finding is reported in a paper published on arXiv.org.
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Don't Fall for These Lab-Leak Traps
After months of getting very little coverage, the lab-leak theory for the origins of COVID-19—which holds that the virus emerged from a research setting—is now a source of endless chatter. Vanity Fair has a new, 12,000-word investigative feature on the subject, while lab-leak op-eds continue their exponential spread across the pages of The Washington Post , The Wall Street Journal , and The New Y
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TikTok changed the shape of some people's faces without asking
"That's not my face," Tori Dawn thought after opening TikTok to make a video in late May. The jaw reflected back on the screen was wrong: slimmer and more feminine. And when they waved their hand in front of the camera, blocking most of their face from the lens, their jaw appeared to pop back to normal. Was their skin also a little softer? On further investigation, it seemed as if the image was b
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Europe Is Also Sending a Spacecraft to Explore Venus, a Blazing Hellhole
The European Space Agency (ESA) has announced that it's also planning to take a trip to Venus. It'll be joining NASA, which recently announced two missions to our closest planetary neighbor, a planet that NASA hasn't visited in over 30 years. The rush of interest in Venus shows that scientists are itching to study the second planet from the Sun, which shares plenty of qualities with our own — des
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Scientists Puzzled by Star That Appears to Be Blinking on and Off
There are a lot of stars in the universe — and while there are many different types, pretty much all of them shine consistently. That's why scientists were so puzzled to discover an "exceptionally rare" star, located toward the center of our own galaxy, that appears to be blinking on and off. The star in question, which is 100 times the size of our own Sun and which has been dubbed VVV-WIT-08 — t
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Dinosaurs lived in greenhouse climate with hot summers
Paleoclimatologist Niels de Winter and colleagues developed an innovative way to use the clumped isotope method to reconstruct climate in the geological past on the seasonal scale. They show that dinosaurs had to deal with hotter summers than previously thought. The results suggest that in the mid latitudes, seasonal temperatures will likely rise along with climate warming, while seasonal differen
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What makes the Delta covid-19 variant more infectious?
Covid cases are on the rise in England, and a fast-spreading variant may be to blame. B.1.617.2, which now goes by the name Delta, first emerged in India, but has since spread to 62 countries, according to the World Health Organization. Delta is still rare in the US. At a press conference on Tuesday, the White House's chief medical advisor, Anthony Fauci, said that it accounts for just 6% of case
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Fast heart, slow heart: Changes in the molecular motor myosin explain the difference
The human heart contracts about 70 times per minute, while that of a rat contracts over 300 times; what accounts for this difference? In a new study publishing 10th June in the open-access journal PLOS Biology, led by Michael Geeves and Mark Wass of the University of Kent and Leslie Leinwand from the University of Colorado Boulder, reveal the molecular differences in the heart muscle protein beta
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The Atlantic's Ed Yong Wins 2021 Pulitzer Prize for Explanatory Reporting
The Atlantic staff writer Ed Yong has won the 2021 Pulitzer Prize for Explanatory Reporting. He was awarded journalism's top honor for his defining coverage of the coronavirus pandemic and how America failed in its response to the virus. This is The Atlantic 's first Pulitzer Prize. Yong anticipated the course of the pandemic, clarified its dangers, and illuminated the American government's disas
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The Joy of a Younger Friend in Old Age
Each installment of " The Friendship Files " features a conversation between The Atlantic 's Julie Beck and two or more friends, exploring the history and significance of their relationship. This week she talks with two amateur surfers who formed a close friendship despite their age gap. They discuss "surf etiquette," how the solitary sport created a rich community for them in Hawaii, and the val
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Plant-based vaccines can change the vaccine landscape
Vaccines are absolutely crucial to keeping the entire planet healthy. None of us is safe until all of us are safe. But low- and middle-income countries have a difficult time acquiring and distributing them. Plant-derived vaccines can be stored by harvesting and freeze-drying the leaves. They may help solve the problem of global vaccine distribution. Vaccines are the mainstay of the efforts to que
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Elon Musk Plays Cyberpunk 2077 on Tesla's In-Car Console
Grand Reveal Tesla CEO Elon Musk finally made good on a big promise he'd made at the beginning of the year : that the Tesla Model S Plaid would be able to play the notoriously graphics-intensive game " Cyberpunk 2077 ." Now, half a year later, Musk briefly showed off the vehicle's onboard infotainment console running the game, as spotted by The Verge . During a livestreamed demo event , Musk comp
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Vanadium-dependent nitrogenase can bind two CO molecules simultaneously
Through the biological fixation of the element nitrogen by the enzyme nitrogenase, organisms gain access to molecular nitrogen (N2) in the Earth's atmosphere, which is essential for building cellular structures. In addition, a vanadium-dependent variant of nitrogenase can reduce the toxic gas carbon monoxide (CO) to hydrocarbons. These reductions of N2 and CO are among the most important processes
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Observing quantum coherence from photons scattered in free-space
Quantum coherence is a key ingredient of many fundamental tests and applications in quantum technology, including quantum communication, imaging, computing, sensing and metrology. However, the transfer of quantum coherence in free-space has so far been limited to direct line-of-sight channels, as atmospheric turbulence and scattering degrade the quality of coherence severely.
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Searching for heavy new particles with the ATLAS Experiment
Since discovering the Higgs boson in 2012, the ATLAS Collaboration at CERN has been working to understand its properties. One question in particular stands out: why does the Higgs boson have the mass that it does? Experiments have measured its mass to be around 125 GeV—yet the Standard Model implies it has much larger mass and requires a very large correction to the mathematics in order to align t
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Over 40% of workers are considering quitting their jobs
Junior members of the workforce, including Generation Z, are facing digital burnout. 41 percent of workers globally are thinking about handing in their notice, according to a new Microsoft survey. A hybrid blend of in-person and remote work could help maintain a sense of balance – but bosses need to do more. More than half of 18 to 25 year-olds in the workforce are considering quitting their job.
6h
NASA selects new science investigations for future moon deliveries
As NASA continues plans for multiple commercial deliveries to the moon's surface per year, the agency has selected three new scientific investigation payload suites to advance understanding of Earth's nearest neighbor. Two of the payload suites will land on the far side of the moon, a first for NASA. All three investigations will receive rides to the lunar surface as part of NASA's Commercial Luna
10h
Furious FDA Advisors Resign to Protest Approval of Alzheimer's Drug That They Say Doesn't Work
The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently approved aducanumab , the first new Alzheimer's disease medication to given the honor in 18 years. But, raining on that parade, three of the scientists from the agency's independent advisory panel have already resigned in protest of its approval. The experts say the clinical data on the drug that they reviewed was far too flimsy to justify the dr
3h
Clinical trials are better, faster, cheaper with big data
Clinical trials have never been more in the public eye than in the past year, as the world watched the development of vaccines against covid-19, the disease at the center of the 2020 coronavirus pandemic. Discussions of study phases, efficacy, and side effects dominated the news. The most distinctive feature of the vaccine trials was their speed. Because the vaccines are meant for universal distr
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More research funding needed to avoid drug-resistant pandemic, warns report
Smaller firms are developing most antibiotics targeting superbugs but often at risk of bankruptcy Small drugmakers and biotech firms that are developing the bulk of new antibiotics need far more financial support, according to a new report, which warned that without these life-saving medicines there could be a pandemic of drug-resistant infections, worse than Covid-19. The Access to Medicine Foun
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Machine learning aids in materials design
A long-held goal by chemists across many industries, including energy, pharmaceuticals, energetics, food additives and organic semiconductors, is to imagine the chemical structure of a new molecule and be able to predict how it will function for a desired application. In practice, this vision is difficult, often requiring extensive laboratory work to synthesize, isolate, purify and characterize ne
11h
Variable emission from the Milky Way's supermassive black hole
At the center of our Milky Way lies a supermassive black hole (SMBH) called Sagittarius A* (SgrA*). Supermassive black holes reside at the centers of most galaxies, and when they actively accrete gas and dust onto their surrounding hot disks and environments, they radiate across the electromagnetic spectrum. The mass of SgrA* is about 4 million solar masses, much smaller than the billions of solar
9h
A technique for labeling and retrieving DNA data files from a large pool could help make DNA data storage feasible
On Earth right now, there are about 10 trillion gigabytes of digital data, and every day, humans produce emails, photos, tweets, and other digital files that add up to another 2.5 million gigabytes of data. Much of this data is stored in enormous facilities known as exabyte data centers (an exabyte is 1 billion gigabytes), which can be the size of several football fields and cost around $1 billion
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New method to untangle 3D cancer genome
Northwestern Medicine scientists have invented a new method for resolving rearranged chromosomes and their 3D structures in cancer cells, which can reveal key gene regulators that lead to the development of tumors, published in Nature Methods.
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Say goodbye to your camera bump: uOttawa researchers miniaturize optics by discovering counterpart to lens
Can you imagine one day using a telescope as thin as a sheet of paper, or a much smaller and lighter high-performance camera? Or no longer having that camera bump behind your smartphone? In a paper published in Nature Communications, researchers from the University of Ottawa have proposed a new optical element that could turn these ideas into reality by dramatically miniaturizing optical devices,
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Queen's birthday list honours key figures in UK Covid vaccine drive
Taskforce chief Kate Bingham gets damehood and Oxford research leaders also rewarded Key figures in the battle against Covid-19 and Britain's vaccine success have been rewarded in the Queen's birthday honours list, with vaccines taskforce chair Kate Bingham getting a damehood. Honours are also bestowed on two leaders of the research teams at the Oxford Vaccine Centre who developed and manufacture
1h
Modular construction: Using Lego-like blocks to build structures of the future
Modular construction involves building the components of a habitable structure in a factory, and then assembling those components on-site. The history of modular construction stretches back centuries, and it became briefly popular in the U.S. after World War II, but it's never quite caught on. Construction firms like iMod Structures, which constructs buildings that can be modified and relocated,
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Printing flexible wearable electronics for smart device applications
The demand for flexible wearable electronics has spiked with the dramatic growth of smart devices that can exchange data with other devices over the internet with embedded sensors, software, and other technologies. Researchers consequently have focused on exploring flexible energy storage devices, such as flexible supercapacitators (FSCs), that are lightweight and safe and easily integrate with ot
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Injectable microspheres to repair failing hearts
Biodegradable microspheres can be used to deliver heart cells generated from stem cells to repair damaged hearts after a heart attack, according to new findings by UCL researchers. This type of cell therapy could one day cure debilitating heart failure, which affects an estimated 920,000 people in the UK and continues to rise as more people are surviving a heart attack than ever before.
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The 'Global Britain' Conundrum
A s Boris Johnson prepares to host Joe Biden and the leaders of the world's other G7 democracies this weekend, Britain appears to have recovered something of its old self. After years of stasis, slump, and division culminating in last year's catastrophic COVID-19 response, the country can legitimately count itself in a vanguard of powers leading the globe out of the pandemic. And yet, when compar
17h
Deforestation is driven by global markets
The world is at a crossroads, as humanity tries to mitigate climate change and halt biodiversity loss, while still securing a supply of food for everyone. A recent study in Nature Communications shows that global demands for commodities, especially in connection with agricultural development, are the main drivers of land use change in the global south.
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Indigenous mortality following Spanish colonization did not always lead to forest regrowth
A new study, published now in Nature Ecology and Evolution, draws on pollen records from tropical regions formerly claimed by the Spanish Empire in both the Atlantic and the Pacific to test the significance and extent of forest regrowth following widespread mortality among Indigenous populations after European contact in the 15th and 16th centuries. By analyzing microscopic pollen grains preserved
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Particles at the ocean surface and seafloor aren't so different
Although scientists often assume that random variations in scientific data fit symmetrical, bell-shaped normal distributions, nature isn't always so tidy. In some cases, a skewed distribution, like the log-normal probability distribution, provides a better fit. Researchers previously found that primary production by ocean phytoplankton and carbon export via particles sinking from the surface are c
8h
Infectious disease and the bitter Koch-Pasteur vaccine rivalry
Robert Koch proved that microbes cause infectious diseases and famously identified the etiological agents of anthrax, tuberculosis, and cholera. Louis Pasteur proved that life does not spontaneously generate from non-living material, made a significant advance in chemistry, invented pasteurization, and revolutionized vaccines. Koch and Pasteur had a bitter rivalry over the invention of the anthra
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An algorithm to make CRISPR gene editing more precise
Researchers from Aarhus University and University of Copenhagen have developed a new method, which makes CRISPR gene editing more precise than conventional methods. The method selects the molecules best suited for helping the CRISPR-Cas9 protein with high-precision editing at the correct location in our DNA, the researchers explain.
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Uber Offers Drivers Health Insurance, Then Says Oops Nevermind
Whoopsie-Daisy Uber just accidentally played a cruel bait-and-switch on a portion of its drivers by erroneously offering healthcare to drivers before yanking it away. The rideshare company refuses to provide healthcare benefits to its drivers outside of California, Motherboard reports , so it was probably a pleasant surprise when drivers in other states got an email with the subject line "It's a
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Children cannot understand sadness and happiness in people wearing facemasks
The research team led by Monica Gori at the IIT- Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia has recently published a study, which shows for the first time how children aged from 3 to 5 years old have problems in recognising the emotions of people wearing surgical masks. This collateral effect of the preventive measures linked to the Covid-19 health emergency could influence the correct development of childre
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This Drone Bus Will Carry 40 Passengers Between Cities for the Price of a Train Ticket
Multiple companies are working on new aerial modes of transportation, be they taxis that fly , drones that drive , or cars that drive and fly . What most of these vehicles have in common is that they're intended for just a few people to ride in at once, like airborne Ubers. But a New York-based startup is thinking bigger, quite literally: Kelekona is developing an electric vertical takeoff and la
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Building the engine that drives digital transformation
Digital transformation has long been a well-established strategic imperative for organizations globally. The effects of covid-19—which have transformed the world into a (perhaps permanently) dispersed collection of individual broadband-connected consumers, partners, and employees—have not disrupted or wholly redefined this trend, instead they have created additional emphasis on digital transforma
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What is the Milky Way?
Find out all the science of the Milky Way, including the size of our home galaxy, who discovered it and how it's on a collision course with another galaxy.
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There never was a male fertility crisis
A new review of a famous study on declining sperm counts finds several flaws. The old report makes unfounded assumptions, has faulty data, and tends toward panic. The new report does not rule out that sperm counts are going down, only that this could be quite normal. Several years ago, a meta-analysis of studies on human fertility came out warning us about the declining sperm counts of Western me
6h
Could flickering lights fight Alzheimer's? Early research looks promising
For the past few years, Annabelle Singer and her collaborators have been using flickering lights and sound to treat mouse models of Alzheimer's disease, and they've seen some dramatic results. Now they have results from the first human feasibility study of the flicker treatment, and they're promising. "We looked at safety, tolerance, and adherence, and several different biological outcomes, and t
8h
Researchers build first modular quantum brain sensor, record signal
A team of scientists at the University of Sussex have for the first time built a modular quantum brain scanner, and used it to record a brain signal. This is the first time a brain signal has been detected using a modular quantum brain sensor anywhere in the world. It's a major milestone for all researchers working on quantum brain imaging technology because modular sensors can be scaled up, like
9h
World-first discovery could fuel the new green ammonia economy
Scientists have developed a new technique using phosphonium salts that can help drive the future production of green ammonia. This process could reduce the impact of ammonia production on global carbon emissions. Each metric ton of ammonia produced today contributes to roughly 1.9 metric tons of greenhouse emissions.
21h
Big data: IPK researchers double accuracy in predicting wheat yields
The enormous potential of Big Data has already been demonstrated in areas such as financial services and telecommunications. An international team of researchers led by the IPK Leibniz Institute has now tapped the potential of big data for the first time on a large scale for plant research. To this end, data from three projects were used to increase the predictive accuracy for yield in hybrid vari
5h
Solar eclipse 2021: crescent sun wows skygazers across northern hemisphere – video
Observers in north America and Europe were able to witness a morning solar eclipse, as the moon passed between the Earth and the sun. While those in Canada, Greenland and northern Russia were treated to an annular eclipse, creating a 'ring of fire', skygazers elsewhere saw a partial eclipse, creating a crescent sun Solar eclipse 2021: spectacle visible across UK and Ireland Continue reading…
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Sealed, signed and delivered
A team of archaeologists from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU) made a rare discovery when they unearthed a small clay seal impression dating back some 7000 years. The impression, with two different geometric stamps imprinted on it, was discovered in Tel Tsaf, a prehistoric village located in Israel's northern Beit She'an Valley.
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Do crystallographic XFEL data support binding of a water molecule to the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II exposed to two flashes of light? [Physical Sciences]
X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) crystallography could revolutionize mechanistic studies of photosystem II (PSII) by providing three-dimensional structures of its reaction intermediates that cannot be obtained using traditional crystallographic techniques. However, care must be taken to ensure that the XFEL data are interpreted correctly. Here, we challenge the conclusion that…
4h
Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy {beta}-cardiac myosin mutation (P710R) leads to hypercontractility by disrupting super relaxed state [Biochemistry]
Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common inherited form of heart disease, associated with over 1,000 mutations, many in β-cardiac myosin (MYH7). Molecular studies of myosin with different HCM mutations have revealed a diversity of effects on ATPase and load-sensitive rate of detachment from actin. It has been difficult to…
4h
Superelastic oxide micropillars enabled by surface tension-modulated 90{degrees} domain switching with excellent fatigue resistance [Applied Physical Sciences]
Superelastic materials capable of recovering large nonlinear strains are ideal for a variety of applications in morphing structures, reconfigurable systems, and robots. However, making oxide materials superelastic has been a long-standing challenge due to their intrinsic brittleness. Here, we fabricate ferroelectric BaTiO3 (BTO) micropillars that not only are superelastic but…
4h
Reply to Wang et al.: Clear evidence of binding of Ox to the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II is best observed in the omit map [Physical Sciences]
Wang et al. (1) performed their own analysis of our crystallographic data (2) and questioned our, and similar previous (3–5), results that a newly inserted water (Ox) in the catalytic center of photosystem II (PSII) can be uniquely identified in the room temperature crystal structures taken at various time points…
4h
Unifying deterministic and stochastic ecological dynamics via a landscape-flux approach [Ecology]
The frequency distributions can characterize the population-potential landscape related to the stability of ecological states. We illustrate the practical utility of this approach by analyzing a forest–savanna model. Savanna and forest states coexist under certain conditions, consistent with past theoretical work and empirical observations. However, a grassland state, unseen in…
4h
Starvation induces shrinkage of the bacterial cytoplasm [Microbiology]
Environmental fluctuations are a common challenge for single-celled organisms; enteric bacteria such as Escherichia coli experience dramatic changes in nutrient availability, pH, and temperature during their journey into and out of the host. While the effects of altered nutrient availability on gene expression and protein synthesis are well known, their…
4h
Bird-like morphing wings could stabilize drones in flight
Wings that can vary their shapes as freely as birds' wings could have advantages for small aircraft in built environments, a new study suggests. Researchers found that wings that can morph in continuous 3D shapes could help keep drones stable in gusts of wind and perhaps help them land in tighter spaces. "These are just two uses that we identified, but another part that makes me really excited is
4h
Are we genetically 'grounded'?
Scientists found that the ability to fly is embedded in birds' spinal cords. The team closely examined the neural networks of chicken and mice embryos and discovered that the genetic coding of the ephrin-B3 molecule in birds is fundamentally different than those of mammals and reptiles.
4h
Molecular-scale spatio-chemical control of the activating-inhibitory signal integration in NK cells
The role of juxtaposition of activating and inhibitory receptors in signal inhibition of cytotoxic lymphocytes remains strongly debated. The challenge lies in the lack of tools that allow simultaneous spatial manipulation of signaling molecules. To circumvent this, we produced a nanoengineered multifunctional platform with molecular-scale spatial control of ligands, which was applied to elucidate
4h
High-throughput functional screening for next-generation cancer immunotherapy using droplet-based microfluidics
Currently, high-throughput approaches are lacking in the isolation of antibodies with functional readouts beyond simple binding. This situation has impeded the next generation of cancer immunotherapeutics, such as bispecific T cell engager (BiTE) antibodies or agonist antibodies against costimulatory receptors, from reaching their full potential. Here, we developed a highly efficient droplet-base
4h
Vitamin D deficiency exacerbates UV/endorphin and opioid addiction
The current opioid epidemic warrants a better understanding of genetic and environmental factors that contribute to opioid addiction. Here we report an increased prevalence of vitamin D (VitD) deficiency in patients diagnosed with opioid use disorder and an inverse and dose-dependent association of VitD levels with self-reported opioid use. We used multiple pharmacologic approaches and genetic mo
4h
Hyaluronic acid conjugates for topical treatment of skin cancer lesions
Skin cancer is one of the most common types of cancer in the United States and worldwide. Topical products are effective for treating cancerous skin lesions when surgery is not feasible. However, current topical products induce severe irritation, light-sensitivity, burning, scaling, and inflammation. Using hyaluronic acid (HA), we engineered clinically translatable polymer-drug conjugates of doxo
4h
Childhood cross-ethnic exposure predicts political behavior seven decades later: Evidence from linked administrative data
Does contact across social groups influence sociopolitical behavior? This question is among the most studied in the social sciences with deep implications for the harmony of diverse societies. Yet, despite a voluminous body of scholarship, evidence around this question is limited to cross-sectional surveys that only measure short-term consequences of contact or to panel surveys with small samples
4h
Pol{theta} reverse transcribes RNA and promotes RNA-templated DNA repair
Genome-embedded ribonucleotides arrest replicative DNA polymerases (Pols) and cause DNA breaks. Whether mammalian DNA repair Pols efficiently use template ribonucleotides and promote RNA-templated DNA repair synthesis remains unknown. We find that human Pol reverse transcribes RNA, similar to retroviral reverse transcriptases (RTs). Pol exhibits a significantly higher velocity and fidelity of deo
4h
Diversification dynamics of total-, stem-, and crown-groups are compatible with molecular clock estimates of divergence times
Molecular evolutionary time scales are expected to predate the fossil evidence, but, particularly for major evolutionary radiations, they can imply extremely protracted stem lineages predating the origin of living clades, leading to claims of systematic overestimation of divergence times. We use macroevolutionary birth-death models to describe the range of total-group and crown-group ages expecte
5h
Asymmetric mating behavior of isogamous budding yeast
Anisogamy, the size difference between small male and large female gametes, is known to enable selection for sexual dimorphism and behavioral differences between sexes. Nevertheless, even isogamous species exhibit molecular asymmetries between mating types, which are known to ensure their self-incompatibility. Here, we show that different properties of the pheromones secreted by the MAT a and MAT
5h
Multidecadal poleward shift of the southern boundary of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current off East Antarctica
The southern boundary (SB) of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, the southernmost extent of the upper overturning circulation, regulates the Antarctic thermal conditions. The SB's behavior remains unconstrained because it does not have a clear surface signature. Revisited hydrographic data from off East Antarctica indicate full-depth warming from 1996 to 2019, concurrent with an extensive polewar
5h
Unlocking big data doubled the accuracy in predicting the grain yield in hybrid wheat
The potential of big data to support businesses has been demonstrated in financial services, manufacturing, and telecommunications. Here, we report on efforts to enter a new data era in plant breeding by collecting genomic and phenotypic information from 12,858 wheat genotypes representing 6575 single-cross hybrids and 6283 inbred lines that were evaluated in six experimental series for yield in
5h
Quantitative description of a contractile macromolecular machine
Contractile injection systems (CISs) [type VI secretion system (T6SS), phage tails, and tailocins] use a contractile sheath-rigid tube machinery to breach cell walls and lipid membranes. The structures of the pre- and postcontraction states of several CISs are known, but the mechanism of contraction remains poorly understood. Combining structural information of the end states of the 12-megadalton
5h
Polarized endosome dynamics engage cytoplasmic Par-3 that recruits dynein during asymmetric cell division
In the developing embryos, the cortical polarity regulator Par-3 is critical for establishing Notch signaling asymmetry between daughter cells during asymmetric cell division (ACD). How cortically localized Par-3 establishes asymmetric Notch activity in the nucleus is not understood. Here, using in vivo time-lapse imaging of mitotic radial glia progenitors in the developing zebrafish forebrain, w
5h
Ice-shelf retreat drives recent Pine Island Glacier speedup
Speedup of Pine Island Glacier over the past several decades has made it Antarctica's largest contributor to sea-level rise. The past speedup is largely due to grounding-line retreat in response to ocean-induced thinning that reduced ice-shelf buttressing. While speeds remained fairly steady from 2009 to late 2017, our Copernicus Sentinel 1A/B–derived velocity data show a >12% speedup over the pa
5h
Chromatin architectural proteins regulate flowering time by precluding gene looping
Chromatin structure is critical for gene expression and many other cellular processes. In Arabidopsis thaliana , the floral repressor FLC adopts a self-loop chromatin structure via bridging of its flanking regions. This local gene loop is necessary for active FLC expression. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the formation of this class of gene loops is unknown. Here, we report the chara
5h
Combining generative artificial intelligence and on-chip synthesis for de novo drug design
Automating the molecular design-make-test-analyze cycle accelerates hit and lead finding for drug discovery. Using deep learning for molecular design and a microfluidics platform for on-chip chemical synthesis, liver X receptor (LXR) agonists were generated from scratch. The computational pipeline was tuned to explore the chemical space of known LXRα agonists and generate novel molecular candidat
5h
A microbial eukaryote with a unique combination of purple bacteria and green algae as endosymbionts
Oxygenic photosynthesizers (cyanobacteria and eukaryotic algae) have repeatedly become endosymbionts throughout evolution. In contrast, anoxygenic photosynthesizers (e.g., purple bacteria) are exceedingly rare as intracellular symbionts. Here, we report on the morphology, ultrastructure, lifestyle, and metagenome of the only "purple-green" eukaryote known. The ciliate Pseudoblepharisma tenue harb
5h
Evaluating the long-term effect of space radiation on the reproductive normality of mammalian sperm preserved on the International Space Station
Space radiation may cause DNA damage to cells and concern for the inheritance of mutations in offspring after deep space exploration. However, there is no way to study the long-term effects of space radiation using biological materials. Here, we developed a method to evaluate the biological effect of space radiation and examined the reproductive potential of mouse freeze-dried spermatozoa stored
5h
Natural loss of function of ephrin-B3 shapes spinal flight circuitry in birds
Flight in birds evolved through patterning of the wings from forelimbs and transition from alternating gait to synchronous flapping. In mammals, the spinal midline guidance molecule ephrin-B3 instructs the wiring that enables limb alternation, and its deletion leads to synchronous hopping gait. Here, we show that the ephrin-B3 protein in birds lacks several motifs present in other vertebrates, di
5h
An inside look at a biofilm: Pseudomonas aeruginosa flagella biotracking
The opportunistic pathogen, Pseudomonas aeruginosa , a flagellated bacterium, is one of the top model organisms for biofilm studies. To elucidate the location of bacterial flagella throughout the biofilm life cycle, we developed a new flagella biotracking tool. Bacterial flagella were site-specifically labeled via genetic code expansion. This enabled us to track bacterial flagella during biofilm
5h
Engineered bridge protein with dual affinity for bone morphogenetic protein-2 and collagen enhances bone regeneration for spinal fusion
The revolutionizing efficacy of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein (rhBMP-2) for clinical spinal fusion is hindered by safety issues associated with the high dose required. However, it continues to be widely used, for example, in InFUSE Bone Graft (Medtronic). Here, we developed a translational protein engineering–based approach to reduce the dose and thereby improve the safety of rhBMP
5h
Podcast: Is It Over?
Though the coronavirus continues to spread around the world, the end appears to be in sight in the United States. And with that hopeful end, this will mark the last episode of Social Distance . James Hamblin, Maeve Higgins, and returning co-host Katherine Wells gather to say goodbye to the show, reflect on what we've learned these past 15 months, and listen to voicemails from past guests. Listen
5h
International travelers carry 'superbug' stowaways
Carried like stowaways in the guts of international travelers, new and potentially deadly strains of antimicrobial resistant superbugs may be coming to a community near you, according to a new study. "Even before the COVID-19 pandemic, we knew that international travel was contributing to the rapid global increase and spread of antimicrobial resistance," says Alaric D'Souza, an MD/PhD student at
5h
Så vattnar man rätt – och klarar maten i ett varmare klimat
Ju varmare det blir, desto viktigare blir det att vattna på rätt sätt med rätt mängd i rätt tid – utan att slösa på vattnet som resurs. Forskare bygger på system som ska göra det enklare för jordbrukarna. I framtiden kommer det bli allt viktigare att ta hänsyn till sambandet mellan vatten, energi och mat för att säkra tillgång till livsmedel, både i Sverige och globalt. Begreppet "vatten-energi-m
5h
Sleep troubles now linked to cognitive troubles later
If you have trouble falling asleep, problems remembering or concentrating are likely to occur more than a decade later, according to new research. Trouble sleeping was the only symptom that predicted poor cognitive performance 14 years later when compared with other symptoms of insomnia, the study shows. There is growing evidence linking insomnia and cognitive impairment in older adults, but inte
6h
Murder Nova vs. Kye Kelley | Street Outlaws: America's List
Stream Full Episodes of Street Outlaws: America's List: discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/street-outlaws-americas-list Discovery ► https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/street-outlaws-americas-list/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https
6h
Despite Mixed Evidence, FDA Approves New Alzheimer's Drug
On Monday, the FDA approved the use of a new Alzheimer's drug called aducanumab, developed by the pharmaceutical company Biogen. Whether the drug works remains contested, and the approval decision has set off a fierce debate over the ways that commerce and advocacy might influence which drugs reach market.
7h
Promising ovarian cancer treatment proves effective and efficient
Preclinical trials of a new radiopharmaceutical to treat ovarian cancer have produced successful results, dramatically limiting tumor growth and decreasing tumor mass. Designed specifically for ovarian cancers that are resistant to traditional therapies, the new radiopharmaceutical can be produced in 25 minutes at low cost, which leads to better efficiency compared with alternative methods. This r
7h
The Books Briefing: A Better Way to Raise Sons
Peter Turnley / Corbis / Getty When the psychologist Michael Reichert became a father to sons, he aimed to avoid putting his boys into narrow masculine boxes, an effort that he details in his book, How to Raise a Boy . Still, he sometimes slipped. For example, in a 2019 Atlantic interview, Reichert recalled forcing his young son to face off against bullies rather than offering him a refuge. "I ha
7h
Study sheds light on treatment options for devastating childhood brain cancer
Research suggests that children with average risk medulloblastoma can receive radiation to a smaller volume of the brain at the end of a six-week course of treatment and still maintain the same disease control as those receiving radiation to a larger area. But the dose of preventive radiation treatments given to the whole brain and spine over the six-week regimen cannot be reduced without reducing
8h
A queer journey from shame to self-love | Crystal Rasmussen
If you've sanded down your edges to fit in, it's time to bring them back — there's power, value and beauty there, says Crystal Rasmussen. With candor and humility, Rasmussen shares their experience navigating shame, how it manifests in ourselves and the world and the ways drag revealed a path toward self-love and acceptance. A talk for anyone struggling with becoming exactly who they're meant to
8h
Asteroid 16 Psyche may be less metallic than expected
The widely studied metallic asteroid known as 16 Psyche might not be as metallic or dense as once thought, researchers report. The asteroid was long thought to be the exposed iron core of a small planet that failed to form during the earliest days of the solar system. The new hint at a much different origin story. Scientists are interested in 16 Psyche because if its presumed origins are true, it
8h
Forget me not: Novel target shows promise in treating Alzheimer's and related dementias
Researchers have identified a previously unknown early driver of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD). They report high levels of cis P-tau, a pathogenic protein, in human AD and VaD brains as well as preclinical disease models. Treatment with an antibody to the toxic protein prevented disease progression and reversed disease symptoms and restored cognitive function in older mice.
8h
Music listening near bedtime disruptive to sleep
Most people listen to music throughout their day and often near bedtime to wind down. But can that actually cause your sleep to suffer? When a sleep researcher realized he was waking in the middle of the night with a song stuck in his head, he saw an opportunity to study how music — and particularly stuck songs — might affect sleep patterns.
8h
Plant functional traits may better explain liana species distributions
Plant functional traits are morphological, physiological or phenological properties that affect plant growth, survival, and reproduction. They hold the promise to explain plant species distribution patterns. However, few studies have linked multiple traits to multiple niche dimensions (i.e., light, water, and nutrients).
8h
Why do people support fish species conservation in European rivers?
An important element for the protection of biodiversity is the willingness of the public to support restoration efforts. Using a longitudinal survey design with 1,000 respondents each in France, Germany, Norway and Sweden, scientists led by the Leibniz Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) investigated which values, beliefs and norms promote conservation-oriented behavior towa
8h
How you and your kids can enjoy a 'half-vaxxed' summer
Although COVID-19 vaccines offer relief from some of the risks and worries of the past 18 months, parents with young children find themselves in a delicate gray zone. "One of the hardest parts about being a parent right now is feeling like even though you're vaccinated and ready to celebrate that, you're still living with one foot in the unvaccinated world," says Keri Althoff , an epidemiologist
8h
Mandë Holford: Could Snail Venom Someday Save Your Life?
Cone snails are deadly sea predators; their venom can kill fish and even humans. But chemical biologist Mandë Holford says that powerful venom can actually be used for good — to treat human diseases. (Image credit: Courtesy of TED)
8h
Bionic reconstruction: New foot for 'Mia' the bearded vulture
With Oskar Aszmann and his team at the Department of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery, MedUni Vienna has long been regarded as a world leader in bionic limb reconstruction. It was only last year that the world's first fully integrated bionic arm prosthesis was developed at MedUni Vienna. This is ready-to-use and is described as "Plug and Play." Although all bionic aids have so far bee
8h
MRI spots heart inflammation in athletes who had COVID-19
A cardiac MRI of college athletes who had COVID-19 is seven times more effective in detecting inflammation of the heart than symptom-based testing, according to a new study. The study of 1,597 COVID-19 positive athletes in the Big Ten Conference who had cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) screening found 2.3% were diagnosed with myocarditis and most didn't exhibit symptoms of the rare disease, a lea
9h
Study of Hurricane Harvey flooding aids in quantifying climate change
Researchers used a hydraulic model to consider the degree to which human-caused climate change may have affected flooding in Houston in 2017 during Hurricane Harvey. Resources were used to quantify the increase in Houston flood area and depth and to host a portal where other scientists and the public can access and explore the resulting data.
9h
Classical nova explosions involve jets of oppositely directed hot gas, plasma
Scientists at the University of Oxford have discovered that classical nova explosions are accompanied by the ejection of jets of oppositely directed hot gas and plasma, and that this persists for years following the nova eruption. Previously, such jets had only been encountered emanating from very different systems such as black holes or newly collapsing stars.
9h
Discovery of shackled skeleton in a ditch: Slavery in Roman Britain
A body found buried in a ditch by construction workers in the village of Great Casterton, in the east Midlands of England, has shed new light on Roman slavery in Britain. A new analysis of the skeleton and the burial has revealed that the male body was probably that of slave from third century.
9h
Funding front-line action for the world's forgotten frogs
Frogs have been around for about 140 million years, since dinosaurs roamed the Earth, and are found in most moist corners of the world. IUCN has assessed 6,340 species of these tailless and smooth-bodied amphibians, and almost one in ten of them are classified as Critically Endangered.
9h
The Atlantic Daily: The Right to Vote Is Under Assault
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox. The right to vote in America is under assault, and Democrats may be botching their best chance to fight back. On the state level, Republicans continue to back a wave of voter-suppression laws. As
9h
New clues to pathogen's switch from yeast to hypha
New research identifies a factor that may let the fungus Candida albicans "shape-shift." As the fungus grows, it can multiply as single, oval-shaped cells called yeast or propagate in an elongated form called hypha, consisting of thread-like filaments. This dual nature can help the pathogen survive in the body, where it can cause disease, including dangerous hospital-acquired infections. In a stu
9h
Better understanding air pollution mechanisms
Earth's atmosphere has a budget, and when expenses outpace savings, secondary aerosols form in areas of excessive pollution. Greenhouse gases enter the atmosphere, and free radicals bond to the molecules, rendering them inert. But when there are more pollution molecules than free radicals, they are left to recombine and form ozone and visible particulate matter—smog and haze.
10h
More Mysterious Fast Radio Bursts Detected, With Possible Answer in Sight
There are uncountable mysteries in the universe, some of which may require the work of future generations to solve. Others we might be able to unravel in the not-too-distant future. For example, scientists are zeroing in on fast radio bursts, or FRBs. These anomalous pulses of energy were discovered in 2007, and a new data set covering hundreds of FRBs is being made available. This could be the a
10h
A Pre-Made Survival Kit Will Help Ensure Your Family Is Ready For Anything
It's as true now as it's ever been: You never know what's going to happen tomorrow. You can't prevent the worst from happening, but you can make sure you and everyone else in your household is prepared for whatever is coming around the next bend with a Judy Kit survival kit , available in your choice of four different bundles that pack a wealth of different survival goods into one accessible pack
10h
Texas must address groundwater future, says expert
Long-term water security is essential for the future of Texas, and the state acutely needs a common law system that can balance world-scale agricultural activity, industrial development and urban growth while also protecting private property rights, according to new research from Rice University's Baker Institute for Public Policy and Texas State University's The Meadows Center for Water and the E
10h
How regional climate variability affects animals in North American drylands
As the visual evidence of climate change continues to shine a glaring light on a huge problem around the globe, scientists studying at several National Science Foundation (NSF) Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) sites are tackling the issue in part by examining long-term changes in the diversity and abundance of small mammals to understand their vulnerabilities to climate change.
10h
New method makes generic polymers luminescent
Researchers from Hokkaido University have successfully developed a new method to give luminescent properties to generic polymers, such as polystyrene and polyethylene. The technique, which was published in the journal Angewandte Chemie International Edition, makes it possible to easily prepare luminescent polymers without using complicated organic synthetic methods.
10h
'Bad fat' suppresses killer T cells from attacking cancer
Researchers have identified how tumors cause immune cells to lose their ability to fight cancer, by producing harmful fats the energy-hungry immune cells ingest, impairing their functionality. The understanding opens new avenues for novel immunotherapies for cancer.
10h
Google Deploys AI to Build Better AI Hardware Accelerators
Google reports that it is now using AI to build its future Tensor Processing Units. The company has published some work in this area about a year ago, but today's announcement indicates the technology has matured. Alexis Mirhoseini led the project. The semiconductor industry has invested in various tools that automate parts of the design process for decades. Back when a CPU had 10,000 to 100,000
10h
Get Ready For The Future With The Modern Fertility Hormone Test
As we learn more about the body, hormones are offering new insights into not just how we become adults, but how we gain or lose weight, our fertility, and even how we age . Understanding your hormonal balance now can help you plan for the future, so the Modern Fertility Hormone Test makes it easy to learn about your fertility easily, safely, and privately. Rated Fast Company's number one healthca
11h
Black- and Latinx-owned small businesses and liquid wealth
Small business ownership is commonly thought to not only be a vehicle for financial stability and wealth building, but also a way to close the racial wealth gap. Small businesses are known to be a key component of the small business owner's financial wellbeing (Gentry and Hubbard 2004), but it is not at all clear from current evidence that small business ownership alone closes the wealth gap. In f
11h
How long (if ever) for the care professions to be mostly automated
Healthcare, childcare, elder care. Probably some others I'm forgetting about. If you look at where the job growth is forecasted to be its in these, tech (including renewables), management and marketing. I wanted to ask specifically about care in this thread because people demand a high level of fidelity for interactions that close. So I imagine robot caregivers will be further out, although I thi
12h
Prylarna som speglar Blågults historia
Visste ni att landslaget enfärgade gul-blå dräkt gjorde premiär i OS 1912? Och att Sverige spelat flest landskamper i världen? Fotbollsforskaren Torbjörn Andersson har dammsugit Sverige på prylar som berättar om blågult och Sveriges 130 år långa fotbollshistoria. – Mycket har slängts. Jag hoppas att man tar tillvara på det som finns kvar, och att även fotbollens historia ges en plats på våra muse
12h
Abstracts flagged because conferences — including one in Wuhan in late 2019 — may not have happened
A journal has issued an expression of concern after learning that it may have published abstracts from meetings that appear not to have taken place. As many journals do, Basic & Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology, a Wiley title, occasionally publishes meeting supplements. But according to the journal, it recently learned from several authors that a … Continue reading
13h
Nätverk för kvinnliga skogsägare präglas av maskulina ideal
Skogsindustrin är av tradition männens värld. En studie undersöker hur kvinnliga skogsägare agerar utifrån normer om vad som anses vara kvinnligt och manligt. Skogsproduktionen är manligt kodad – det är utgångspunkten i Emmeline Laszlo Ambjörnssons forskning. Genom intervjuer och observationer vill hon förstå hur kvinnliga skogsägare som deltar i egna nätverk agerar utifrån normer om vad som anse
13h
Asymmetric Rydberg blockade of giant excitons in Cuprous Oxide
Nature Communications, Published online: 11 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23852-z Previous research showed the existence of Rydberg excitons with large principle quantum numbers in Cu2O. Here, by using two-color pump-probe optical spectroscopy, the authors demonstrate the generation and control of long-range correlations between these giant Rydberg excitons, leading to exciton blockade.
13h
Electrochemical energy storage performance of 2D nanoarchitectured hybrid materials
Nature Communications, Published online: 11 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23819-0 The fast-growing interest for two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials is undermined by their natural restacking tendency, which severely limits their practical application. Novel porous heterostructures that coordinate 2D nanosheets with monolayered mesoporous scaffolds offer an opportunity to greatly expand the libr
13h
Chemoenzymatic modular assembly of O-GalNAc glycans for functional glycomics
Nature Communications, Published online: 11 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23428-x O-GalNAc glycans are essential in many biological and pathological processes, but difficult to access due to their structural complexity and synthetic challenges. Here, the authors report an efficient chemoenzymatic modular assembly strategy to construct structurally diverse O-GalNAc glycans, use the synthesised
13h
Benchmarking microbiome transformations favors experimental quantitative approaches to address compositionality and sampling depth biases
Nature Communications, Published online: 11 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23821-6 Here, the authors use simulated quantitative gut microbial communities to benchmark the performance of 13 common data transformations in determining diversity as well as microbe-microbe and microbe-metadata associations, finding that quantitative approaches incorporating microbial load variation outperform compu
13h
Reliable identification of protein-protein interactions by crosslinking mass spectrometry
Nature Communications, Published online: 11 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23666-z Cross-linking mass spectrometry (MS) can identify protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks but assessing the reliability of these data remains challenging. To address this issue, the authors develop and validate a method to determine the false-discovery rate of PPIs identified by cross-linking MS.
13h
The study of the determinants controlling Arpp19 phosphatase-inhibitory activity reveals an Arpp19/PP2A-B55 feedback loop
Nature Communications, Published online: 11 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23657-0 Progression of the cell division cycle requires feedback loops including those of phosphorylation and dephosphorylation; however the precise regulation of phosphorylation kinetics of Arpp19, an inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A, is unclear. Here, the authors report that feedback between phosphorylation states
13h
The functional organization of excitatory synaptic input to place cells
Nature Communications, Published online: 11 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23829-y Hippocampal place cells contribute to navigation and memory formation. Here, the authors use in vivo glutamate imaging to reveal patterns of excitatory input received by place cell dendrites and find more spatially tuned and functionally organized inputs arriving in the place field.
13h
Dynamic self-assembly of compartmentalized DNA nanotubes
Nature Communications, Published online: 11 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23850-1 A major goal in Engineering Biology and Materials Science is the development of active, autonomous scaffolds that mimic those present in biological cells. Here the authors report a toolkit for programming the dynamic behaviour of nucleic acid scaffolds in minimal cell-like compartments.
13h
Hälsovinst att cykla till jobbet – även bland avgaser
Att cykla till jobb och skola, även om man gör det bland avgaser, är en hälsovinst. Faktum är att effekterna man får av träning är extra betydelsefulla för den som bor i områden med mycket luftföroreningar. Att förmå pendlare att ställa bilen och ta cykeln ger en dubbel hälsovinst. Dels minskar avgaserna, dels förbättras hälsan för pendlarna själva. Även i områden med mycket luftföroreningar är f
14h
Lægeforeningen: 21 forslag, der kan løfte psykiatrien markant
Lægeforeningen vil med sit nye udspil 'Giv psykiatrien et langsigtet løft' gøre op med mange års underprioritering af psykiatrien og de alvorlige konsekvenser, det har haft for danskere med psykiske lidelser. »Psykiatrien er desværre et område, som politisk er kendetegnet ved mange års underprioritering, og ved en mangel på klart definerede målsætninger,« lyder det fra lægeformand.
14h
Queqiao: The bridge between Earth and the far side of the moon
China's Chang'e-4 probe marked the first soft-landing of a spacecraft on the far side of the Moon, which always faces away from Earth. To communicate with ground stations, Chang'e-4 relies on Queqiao, a relay communication satellite that orbits a point behind the Moon and bridges Earth and Chang'e-4. In a recent review, researchers explain the design of Queqiao and depict the future of lunar relay
15h
Guldet i hverdagen
Det virker helt malplaceret, at det offentlige sundhedsvæsen, betalt af danskernes skattekroner, ikke har mere fokus på, om de metoder, der har vundet indpas gennem årene, rent faktisk er pengene værd.
19h
Evidensen i sundhedsvæsenet halter
Det vrimler med anbefalinger, guidelines og retnings­linjer i sundhedsvæsenet. Men faktisk er der meget ringe evidens for store dele af aktiviteten, fortæller tre overlæger, ligesom ressourcespildet vurderes til at være stort. Danske Regioner planlægger topmøde om forskning.
19h
Kultur er en genvej til bornholmsk integration
Siden direktør på Bornholms Hospital Annemarie Hellebek flyttede til solskinsøen for tre et halvt år siden, har hun brugt de lokale kulturtilbud som et redskab til at forstå bornholmerne og den historie, de er rundet af. Men hun ser også kultur som en nøgle til fællesskab.
19h
Pinpointing how cancer cells turn aggressive
As deadly as it is, cancer metastasis is a poorly understood process. A new study describes a cutting-edge tool for tracing the lineage and gene expression of thousands of individual metastatic cancer cells. Their findings open new angles for investigating the processes that drive metastasis.
21h
Cause, scope determined for deadly winter debris flow in Uttarakhand, India
The Uttarakhand region of India experienced a humanitarian tragedy on Feb. 7, 2021, when a wall of debris and water barreled down the Ronti Gad, Rishiganga and Dhauliganga river valleys. This debris flow destroyed two hydropower facilities and left more than 200 people dead or missing. A self-organized coalition of 53 scientists came together in the days following the disaster to investigate the c
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Botany: Scent of death attracts coffin flies to pipevine flowers
Plant researchers have discovered an unusual and previously unknown reproductive strategy in plants: the Greek pipevine species 'Aristolochia microstoma' produces a unique mixture of volatiles that resembles the smell of dead and decaying insects to attract the pollinating fly genus 'Megaselia' (also known as 'coffin flies') to its trap-flowers.
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The rocky road to accurate sea-level predictions
The type of material present under glaciers has a big impact on how fast they slide towards the ocean. Scientists face a challenging task to acquire data of this under-ice landscape. Choosing the wrong equations for the under-ice landscape can have the same effect on the predicted contribution to sea-level rise as a warming of several degrees, according to researchers.
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Recommendation and Discussion on This Book "A Thousand Brains: A New Theory of Intelligence by Jeff Hawkins"
Hi everyone, I had recently ( maybe 20 days ago ) read this book and his ideas were really fascinating. He is asserting that the neocortex is composed of cortical columns which generate internal representation of outside world according to what sensory input they get. So each column generate its own model of the world. His whole idea is based on reference frames. He keeps going on explaining his
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Soot from heaters and traffic is not just a local problem
Soot particles from oil and wood heating systems as well as road traffic can pollute the air in Europe on a much larger scale than previously assumed. The evaluation of the sources during a measuring campaign in Germany showed that about half of the soot particles came from the surrounding area and the other half from long distances. This underlines the need to further reduce emissions of soot tha
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Reduction of carbon monoxide through nitrogenase
Through the biological fixation of the element nitrogen by the enzyme nitrogenase, organisms gain access to molecular nitrogen (N2) in the Earth's atmosphere, which is essential for building cellular structures. In addition, a vanadium-dependent variant of nitrogenase can reduce the toxic gas carbon monoxide (CO) to hydrocarbons. These reductions of N2 and CO are among the most important processes
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How to beat the heat: Memory mechanism allows plants to adapt to heat stress
Researchers have found that plants adapt to heat stress via a specific 'memory' mechanism. The JUMONJI family of proteins can control small heat shock genes, allowing plants to become heat tolerant for better adaptation to future heat stress. This research is applicable to a broad range of scientific fields and understanding this mechanism could contribute to maintaining the food supply under glob
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Cells construct living composite polymers for biomedical applications
Biomedical engineers have demonstrated that a class of interwoven composite materials called semi-interpenetrating polymer networks (sIPNs) can be produced by living cells. The approach could make these versatile materials more biologically compatible for biomedical applications such as time-delayed drug delivery systems.
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Memory biomarkers confirm aerobic exercise helps cognitive function in older adults
Until now, systemic biomarkers to measure exercise effects on brain function and that link to relevant metabolic responses were lacking. A study shows a memory biomarker, myokine Cathepsin B (CTSB), increased in older adults following a 26-week structured aerobic exercise training. The positive association between CTSB and cognition, and the substantial modulation of lipid metabolites implicated i
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Solutions for fighting pollution in the oceans
Maritime litter is among the most urgent global pollution issues. Marine scientist have published an overview study of solutions for prevention, monitoring, and removal. They found that reducing ocean pollution requires more support, integration, and creative political decisiveness.
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New family of atomic-thin electride materials discovered
An exploratory investigation into the behavior of materials with desirable electric properties has resulted in the discovery of a structural phase of two-dimensional (2D) materials. The new family of materials are electrides, wherein electrons occupy a space usually reserved for atoms or ions instead of orbiting the nucleus of an atom or ion. The stable, low-energy, tunable materials could have po
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Butterflies and moths have difficulty adjusting to a rapidly changing climate
Climate change exerts great pressure for change on species and biodiversity. A recent study conducted by the University of Helsinki and the Finnish Environment Institute indicates that the few moth and butterfly species (Lepidoptera) capable of adjusting to a changing climate by advancing their flight period and moving further north have fared the best in Finland. In contrast, roughly 40% of Lepid
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How do plants balance microbial friends and foes?
Plants are constantly exposed to microbes: Pathogens that cause disease, commensals that cause no harm or benefit, and mutualists that promote plant growth or help fend off pathogens. For example, most land plants can form positive relationships with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi to improve nutrient uptake. How plants fight off pathogens without also killing beneficial microbes or wasting energy on
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Cloud computing expands brain sciences
People often think about human behavior in terms of what is happening in the present — reading a newspaper, driving a car, or catching a football. But other dimensions of behavior extend over weeks, months, and years.
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Machine learning model doubles accuracy of global landslide 'nowcasts'
Every year, landslides—the movement of rock, soil, and debris down a slope—cause thousands of deaths, billions of dollars in damages, and disruptions to roads and power lines. Because terrain, characteristics of the rocks and soil, weather, and climate all contribute to landslide activity, accurately pinpointing areas most at risk of these hazards at any given time can be a challenge. Early warnin
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Study shows how permafrost releases methane in the warming Arctic
Researchers from Skoltech have designed and conducted experiments measuring gas permeability under various conditions for ice-containing sediments mimicking permafrost. Their results can be useful both in modeling and testing techniques for gas production from Arctic reservoirs and in tracing methane emission in high latitudes. The paper was published in the journal Energy & Fuels.
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Novel materials: Sound waves traveling backwards
Acoustic waves in gases, liquids, and solids usually travel at an almost constant speed of sound. Rotons are an exception: their speed of sound changes significantly with the wavelength, it is also possible that the waves travel backwards. Researchers are studying the possibilities of using rotons in artificial materials. These metamaterials might be used in the future to manipulate or direct soun
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Discovery of ray sperms' unique swimming motion and demonstration with bio-inspired robot
It is generally agreed that sperms 'swim' by beating or rotating their soft tails. However, a research team has discovered that ray sperms move by rotating both the tail and the head. The team further investigated the motion pattern and demonstrated it with a robot. Their study has expanded the knowledge on the microorganisms' motion and provided inspiration for robot engineering design.
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Music listening near bedtime disruptive to sleep, Baylor study finds
Most people listen to music throughout their day and often near bedtime to wind down. But can that actually cause your sleep to suffer? When sleep researcher Michael Scullin, Ph.D., associate professor of psychology and neuroscience at Baylor University, realized he was waking in the middle of the night with a song stuck in his head, he saw an opportunity to study how music — and particularly stu
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Case study shows patient on ketogenic diet living fully with IDH1-mutant glioblastoma
Ketogenic metabolic therapy has been shown to successfully starve cancer cells of the glucose and glutamine they need to survive. In a new case study, a British man who rejected the standard of care to treat his glioblastoma has lived for more than 80 months with the typically fatal tumor after adopting a ketogenic diet, researchers report in the journal Frontiers in Nutrition
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What happens in the brain when people make music together?
Inspired by people around the world who made music together while social distancing during the COVID-19 pandemic, researchers from Bar-Ilan University and the University of Chicago fused the latest advances in social neuroscience and the field of music to highlight five key functions and mechanisms of the brain that contribute to social connection through music. The findings illustrate that music
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Book traces long history of Black women doing yoga
A new book highlights how Black women have historically used yoga to practice self-care. The pandemic has emphasized the importance of taking care of yourself amid anxiety, uncertainty, and stress. For Black women, who often face a disproportionate burden in society, self-care can also be a tool to counter the effects of systemic racism and trauma. Black Women's Yoga History: Memoirs of Inner Pea
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Abrar Choudhury (UCSF): Understanding Meningioma Biology
www.iBiology.org Abrar Choudhury describes how he studied DNA methylation to understand the biology of meningioma and identify a novel candidate therapy. Meningioma is the most common intracranial tumor, with limited treatment options. In order to identify new therapies for meningioma, it is important to understand their underlying biology. In this Share Your Research talk, Dr. Abrar Choudhury de
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A metabolic regulon reveals early and late acting enzymes in neuroactive Lycopodium alkaloid biosynthesis [Biochemistry]
Plants synthesize many diverse small molecules that affect function of the mammalian central nervous system, making them crucial sources of therapeutics for neurological disorders. A notable portion of neuroactive phytochemicals are lysine-derived alkaloids, but the mechanisms by which plants produce these compounds have remained largely unexplored. To better understand how…
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Saliva can be more effective than nasopharyngeal swabs for COVID-19 testing
Saliva samples are easier to collect than nasopharyngeal swabs for COVID-19 testing but can be mixed with mucus or blood, and some studies have found they produce less accurate results. A team of researchers has found that an innovative protocol that processes saliva samples with a bead mill homogenizer before real-time PCR (RT-PCR) testing results in higher sensitivity compared to NPS samples. Th
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Dinosaurs lived in greenhouse climate with hot summers, study shows
Researchers have developed an innovative way to use the clumped isotope method to reconstruct climate in the geological past on the seasonal scale. They show that dinosaurs had to deal with hotter summers than previously thought. The results suggest that in the mid latitudes, seasonal temperatures will likely rise along with climate warming, while seasonal difference is maintained. This results in
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Largescale brain epigenetics study provides new insights into dementia
The team looked in different regions of the brain, which are affected in Alzheimer's disease before looking for common changes across these cortical regions. They identified 220 sites in the genome, including 84 new genes, which showed different levels of DNA methylation in the cortex in individuals with more severe Alzheimer's disease, which weren't seen in the cerebellum.
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More sustainable mortars and concrete with optimal thermal and mechanical efficiency
The consumption of raw materials has increased notably in industry in general, and in the construction industry in particular, amidst growing concerns over sustainability issues. Concrete and mortar are the most commonly used materials in construction, and many studies are currently underway to try to reduce the harmful effects of their manufacture. Concrete and mortar are made by mixing water, sa
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How butterflies make transparent wings: MBL scientists see the invisible
Many animals have evolved camouflage tactics for self-defense, but some butterflies and moths have taken it even further: They've developed transparent wings, making them almost invisible to predators. A team led by Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) scientists studied the development of one such species, the glasswing butterfly, Greta oto, to see through the secrets of this natural stealth techno
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Chamoli disaster could happen again
Some four months ago, a devastating flood ravaged the Chamoli district in the Indian Himalayas, killing over 200 people. The flood was caused by a massive landslide, which also involved a glacier. Researchers at the University of Zurich, the WSL and ETH Zurich have now analyzed the causes, scope and impact of the disaster as part of an international collaboration.
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Combating maritime litter: Innovative solutions for fighting pollution in the oceans
Plastic bottles drifting in the sea; bags in the stomachs of turtles; COVID-19 masks dancing in the surf: Few images are as unpleasant to look at as those that show the contamination of our oceans. And few environmental issues are as urgent and as present in the public awareness. "Most people have an emotional connection to the sea. They think of ocean pollution as an attack on a place they long f
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Inhibitors of bacterial H2S biogenesis targeting antibiotic resistance and tolerance
Emergent resistance to all clinical antibiotics calls for the next generation of therapeutics. Here we report an effective antimicrobial strategy targeting the bacterial hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S)–mediated defense system. We identified cystathionine -lyase (CSE) as the primary generator of H 2 S in two major human pathogens, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa , and discovered small mo
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Cell size controlled in plants using DNA content as an internal scale
How eukaryotic cells assess and maintain sizes specific for their species and cell type remains unclear. We show that in the Arabidopsis shoot stem cell niche, cell size variability caused by asymmetric divisions is corrected by adjusting the growth period before DNA synthesis. KIP-related protein 4 (KRP4) inhibits progression to DNA synthesis and associates with mitotic chromosomes. The F BOX-LI
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Spatiotemporal imaging of 2D polariton wave packet dynamics using free electrons
Coherent optical excitations in two-dimensional (2D) materials, 2D polaritons, can generate a plethora of optical phenomena that arise from the extraordinary dispersion relations that do not exist in regular materials. Probing of the dynamical phenomena of 2D polaritons requires simultaneous spatial and temporal imaging capabilities and could reveal unknown coherent optical phenomena in 2D materi
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Nitrogen reduction to ammonia at high efficiency and rates based on a phosphonium proton shuttle
Ammonia (NH 3 ) is a globally important commodity for fertilizer production, but its synthesis by the Haber-Bosch process causes substantial emissions of carbon dioxide. Alternative, zero-carbon emission NH 3 synthesis methods being explored include the promising electrochemical lithium-mediated nitrogen reduction reaction, which has nonetheless required sacrificial sources of protons. In this st
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Observation of a prethermal discrete time crystal
Extending the framework of statistical physics to the nonequilibrium setting has led to the discovery of previously unidentified phases of matter, often catalyzed by periodic driving. However, preventing the runaway heating that is associated with driving a strongly interacting quantum system remains a challenge in the investigation of these newly discovered phases. In this work, we utilize a tra
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Very weak bonds to artificial atoms formed by quantum corrals
We explored the bonding properties of the quantum corral (a circle of 48 iron atoms placed on a copper surface) reported by Crommie et al. in 1993, along with variants, as an artificial atom using an atomic force microscope (AFM). The original corral geometry confines 102 electrons to 28 discrete energy states, and we found that these states can form a bond to the front atom of the AFM with an en
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Spiral morphology in an intensely star-forming disk galaxy more than 12 billion years ago
Spiral galaxies have distinct internal structures, including a stellar bulge, a disk, and spiral arms. It is unknown when in cosmic history these structures formed. In this study, we analyzed observations of BRI 1335–0417, an intensely star-forming galaxy in the distant Universe, at a redshift of 4.41. The [C ] gas kinematics shows a steep velocity rise near the galaxy center and has a two-armed
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Release of stem cells from quiescence reveals gliogenic domains in the adult mouse brain
Quiescent neural stem cells (NSCs) in the adult mouse ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ) undergo activation to generate neurons and some glia. Here we show that platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta (PDGFRβ) is expressed by adult V-SVZ NSCs that generate olfactory bulb interneurons and glia. Selective deletion of PDGFRβ in adult V-SVZ NSCs leads to their release from quiescence, uncov
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Using large-scale experiments and machine learning to discover theories of human decision-making
Predicting and understanding how people make decisions has been a long-standing goal in many fields, with quantitative models of human decision-making informing research in both the social sciences and engineering. We show how progress toward this goal can be accelerated by using large datasets to power machine-learning algorithms that are constrained to produce interpretable psychological theori
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Substrate and product complexes reveal mechanisms of Hedgehog acylation by HHAT
Hedgehog proteins govern crucial developmental steps in animals and drive certain human cancers. Before they can function as signaling molecules, Hedgehog precursor proteins must undergo amino-terminal palmitoylation by Hedgehog acyltransferase (HHAT). We present cryo–electron microscopy structures of human HHAT in complex with its palmitoyl–coenzyme A substrate and of a product complex with a pa
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Evolution of a virus-like architecture and packaging mechanism in a repurposed bacterial protein
Viruses are ubiquitous pathogens of global impact. Prompted by the hypothesis that their earliest progenitors recruited host proteins for virion formation, we have used stringent laboratory evolution to convert a bacterial enzyme that lacks affinity for nucleic acids into an artificial nucleocapsid that efficiently packages and protects multiple copies of its own encoding messenger RNA. Revealing
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Nicotinamide mononucleotide increases muscle insulin sensitivity in prediabetic women
In rodents, obesity and aging impair nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD + ) biosynthesis, which contributes to metabolic dysfunction. Nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) availability is a rate-limiting factor in mammalian NAD + biosynthesis. We conducted a 10-week, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial to evaluate the effect of NMN supplementation on metabolic function in postmenop
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The world of two-dimensional carbides and nitrides (MXenes)
A decade after the first report, the family of two-dimensional (2D) carbides and nitrides (MXenes) includes structures with three, five, seven, or nine layers of atoms in an ordered or solid solution form. Dozens of MXene compositions have been produced, resulting in MXenes with mixed surface terminations. MXenes have shown useful and tunable electronic, optical, mechanical, and electrochemical p
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Analysis of multispectral imaging with the AstroPath platform informs efficacy of PD-1 blockade
Next-generation tissue-based biomarkers for immunotherapy will likely include the simultaneous analysis of multiple cell types and their spatial interactions, as well as distinct expression patterns of immunoregulatory molecules. Here, we introduce a comprehensive platform for multispectral imaging and mapping of multiple parameters in tumor tissue sections with high-fidelity single-cell resoluti
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Exit time as a measure of ecological resilience
Ecological resilience is the magnitude of the largest perturbation from which a system can still recover to its original state. However, a transition into another state may often be invoked by a series of minor synergistic perturbations rather than a single big one. We show how resilience can be estimated in terms of average life expectancy, accounting for this natural regime of variability. We u
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Time-resolved structured illumination microscopy reveals key principles of Xist RNA spreading
X-inactive specific transcript (Xist) RNA directs the process of X chromosome inactivation in mammals by spreading in cis along the chromosome from which it is transcribed and recruiting chromatin modifiers to silence gene transcription. To elucidate mechanisms of Xist RNA cis-confinement, we established a sequential dual-color labeling, super-resolution imaging approach to trace individual Xist
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Do student social media posts count as free speech?
When students post on social media from off of school property, are those posts protected as free speech? The US Supreme Court will issue a ruling that decides that question before adjourning for the summer. When Brandi Levy, a junior varsity cheerleader at a Pennsylvania high school, learned that she didn't make the varsity cheerleading team, she did what any teenager might—she blew off some ste
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Researchers have turned transparent calcite into artificial gold
In a breakthrough in metamaterials, for the first time in the world, researchers at Tel Aviv University have developed an innovative nanotechnology that transforms a transparent calcite nanoparticle into a sparkling gold-like particle. In other words, they turned the transparent particle into a particle that is visible despite its very small dimensions. According to the researchers the new materia
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New method to measure milk components has potential to improve dairy sustainability
Present in blood, urine, and milk, the chemical compound urea is the primary form of nitrogen excretion in mammals. Testing for urea levels in dairy cows helps scientists and farmers understand how effectively nitrogen from feed is used in cows' bodies, with important economic implications for farmers in terms of feed costs, physiological effects for cows such as reproductive performance, and envi
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Then there were 3: NASA to collaborate on ESA's new Venus mission
On June 10, 2021, the European Space Agency (ESA) announced the selection of EnVision as its newest medium-class science mission. EnVision will make detailed observations of Venus to understand its history and especially understand the connections between the atmosphere and geologic processes. As a key partner in the mission, NASA provides the synthetic aperture radar, called VenSAR, to make high-
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BU researchers create novel curriculum assessment tool to improve medical education about sexual and gender minority (LGBTQI) populations
Medical education aspires to mitigate bias in future professionals by providing a robust curriculum that includes perspectives and practices for caring for sexual and gender minority (SGM) populations, including lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTQI) persons. To provide medical schools with a more systematic, uniform approach to teaching these topics in their curriculum, the Ass
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Combating maritime litter
Maritime litter is among the most urgent global pollution issues. Marine scientist Nikoleta Bellou and her team at Helmholtz-Zentrum Hereon have published an overview study of solutions for prevention, monitoring, and removal in the renowned scientifically journal Nature Sustainability. They found that reducing ocean pollution requires more support, integration, and creative political decisiveness
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For 'greener' concrete, use volcanic rock?
Replacing just one of concrete's main ingredients with volcanic rock could slash carbon emissions from manufacturing the material by nearly two-thirds, according to a new study. Concrete has given us the Pantheon in Rome, the Sydney Opera House, the Hoover Dam, and countless blocky monoliths. The artificial rock blankets our cities and roadways, underlies wind farms and solar panel arrays—and wil
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AMP recommends minimum set of pharmacogenetic alleles to guide clinical CYP2D6 genotype testing, pro
AMP has published consensus recommendations to aid in the design and validation of clinical CYP2D6 assays, promote standardization of testing across different laboratories and improve patient care. The manuscript, "Recommendations for Clinical CYP2D6 Genotyping Allele Selection: A Joint Consensus Recommendation of the Association for Molecular Pathology, College of American Pathologists, Dutch Pha
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First AI-based tool for predicting genomic subtypes of pancreatic cancer from histology slides
AP-HP Greater Paris University Hospitals and Owkin announced the recent results of their ongoing strategic collaboration at ASCO 2021. Their abstract demonstrates the first AI-based tool for predicting genomic subtypes of pancreatic cancer (PDAC) developed from machine learning applied to histology slides. The tool, a trained and validated AI model, is usable in clinical practice worldwide and ope
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COVID-19 creates hearing, balance disorders, aggravates tinnitus symptoms
Evidence suggests auditory and vestibular effects should be added to the growing list of physiological impacts of COVID-19. During the 180th Meeting, Colleen Le Prell from the University of Texas at Dallas will talk about hearing and balance disorders associated with coronavirus infection and how pandemic-related stress and anxiety may aggravate tinnitus symptoms. Her presentation, "Hearing disord
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Sämre matematik i redan utsatta skolor
Elever med sämre socioekonomiska förutsättningar får sämre möjligheter att lära sig matematik. Undervisningen täcker in färre delar av kunskapsinnehållet – och fler lärare uppger att de inte är väl förberedda när de ska undervisa. Det visar en avhandling i pedagogik vid Göteborgs universitet har jämfört, vars författare efterlyser åtgärder för att skapa en mer likvärdig skola. – Det är en ojämlik
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Endangered blue whales are singing in the Indian Ocean
Endangered blue whales are present and singing off the southwest coast of India, research shows. The findings suggest conservation measures should include this region, which is considering expanding tourism. Analysis of recordings from late 2018 to early 2020 in Lakshadweep, an archipelago of 36 low-lying islands west of the Indian state of Kerala, detected whales with a peak activity in April an
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Recent advances in the optimization of dispersed platinum catalysts
Highly dispersed platinum catalysts provide new possibilities for industrial processes, such as the flameless combustion of methane, propane, or carbon monoxide, which has fewer emissions and is more resource efficient and consistent than conventional combustion. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, a team of researchers reports on which platinum species are active in high-temperature oxidations and
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For bay oysters, protection plus restoration creates healthiest reefs
Actively restoring oyster reefs—beyond simply protecting them from harvest—can create big payoffs for habitat quality and the other species that flock to them. A new study from the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center (SERC), published June 3 in the journal Marine Ecology Progress Series, compared restored, protected and harvested areas using photos and video footage from roughly 200 sites.
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New study gives clue to the cause, and possible treatment of Parkinson's Disease
This study will benefit scientists and experts in brain research where new discoveries of biomarkers are needed to form part of routine clinical practice protocols. The study relies on zebrafish Parkinson's Disease model, showing how cytosolic dsDNA of mitochondrial origin can accumulate in brains cells thereby contributing to PD pathogenesis. The evidence presented in this manuscript illustrates
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Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine protective against SARS-CoV-2 variants
The Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine is protective against several SARS-CoV-2 variants that have emerged, according to new research presented this week in the journal mBio, an open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology. While this is good news, the study also found that the only approved monoclonal antibody therapy for SARS-CoV-2 might be less effective against SARS-CoV-2 variants in labo
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Active platinum species
Highly dispersed platinum catalysts provide new possibilities for industrial processes, such as the flameless combustion of methane, propane, or carbon monoxide, which has fewer emissions and is more resource efficient and consistent than conventional combustion. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, a team of researchers reports on which platinum species are active in high-temperature oxidations and
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LIM domain only 1: One gene, many roles in cancer
The scientific world has been delving ever deeper into cancer, scourging for even the tiniest biomolecule that could amp up the cure for the deadly disease. A recent discovery in this regard is the gene LIM domain only 1, whose coded protein has a role in tumor formation. In a new article in Chinese Medical Journal, researchers have reviewed studies detailing molecular features of this gene for po
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Shi En Kim
Contributor is a science writer and a final-year Ph.D. student in molecular engineering at the University of Chicago. Outside the lab, she freelances for various publications, including National Geographic, Scientific American, Science News, Slate and others. Follow her at @ goes_by_kim . Author social media Twitter
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ESA flying payloads on wooden satellite
The world's first wooden satellite is on the way, in the shape of the Finnish WISA Woodsat. ESA materials experts are contributing a suite of experimental sensors to the mission as well as helping with pre-flight testing.
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Want Your Brain To Reach Its Full Potential? These Advanced Nootropics Have You Covered.
Want your brain to function at maximum capacity every day? Well, there are two ways you can do it. The first is to exercise for at least an hour every day, eat a perfectly balanced diet of low-fat sugar-free foods packed with essential vitamins and minerals, get eight hours of high quality sleep every night, and practice mindfulness and meditation to reduce stress and anxiety. Do all those things
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Here's what scientists learn from studying dangerous pathogens in secure labs
There are about 1,400 known human pathogens—viruses, bacteria, fungi, protozoa and helminths that can cause a person's injury or death. But in a world with a trillion individual species of microorganisms, where scientists have counted only one one-thousandth of one percent, how likely is it researchers have discovered and characterized everything that might threaten people?
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Depression in old age: Smoking and other risk factors less decisive
Smoking, high blood pressure, diabetes, and other risk factors for cardiovascular diseases also increase the likelihood of suffering from depressive mood or depression. Until now, however, it was unclear whether this influence changes over the course of life or is independent of age. A study by the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences shows: Among those over 65, these risk f
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Headphones, earbuds impact younger generations' future audio health
As more people are taking advantage of music on the go, personal audio systems are pumping up the volume to the detriment of the listener's hearing. During the 180th ASA Meeting, Daniel Fink from The Quiet Coalition and Jan Mayes will talk about current research into personal audio system usage and the need for public health hearing conservation policies. Their session, "Personal audio system use
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Rapid measurement of aerosol volatility using a deep learning-based portable microscope
Exposure to particulate matter (PM) has been associated with adverse health effects. A large fraction of these particles consists of volatile or semi-volatile materials, such as emissions generated from cooking, automobiles and tobacco products. The dynamics of the evaporation process of such volatile particles has been an active area of research since the 19th century. However, existing measureme
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Four mission ideas to compete for Earth Explorer 11
As part of ESA's commitment to develop and build satellite missions that push the boundaries of satellite technology and Earth science, four new mission ideas—Cairt, Nitrosat, Seastar and Wivern—have been selected to enter pre-feasibility study and compete to be the eleventh Earth Explorer mission.
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Genetics influences physical fitness of tilapia
Wageningen University & Research scientists have demonstrated that genes influence swimming fitness of tilapia. As there are indications that fitter fish are also healthier and more resilient, the researchers recommend including fitness in selective breeding programs for farmed fish. Nile tilapia is the second most cultivated fish species in the world after carp and provide cheap protein and essen
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After net zero, we will need to go much further and clean up historic emissions
As the G7 summit gets underway, all the group's members are now firmly committed to achieving net zero by 2050. This is quite a turnaround from just two years ago when the UK became the first major economy to make such a pledge. At the time of writing 121 countries are signed up to the UNFCCC's Climate Ambition Coalition and 35 of the 38 members of the OECD (to name and shame the laggards, they ar
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Extremophiles could hold clues for climate change-tackling technologies
Microscopic organisms known as extremophiles inhabit some of the last places on Earth you might expect to find life, from the extreme pressures of the ocean floor to freezing ice caps. Understanding how these microbes survive by interacting with different metals and gases is opening up new knowledge about Earth's elements and their potential uses.
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Could neutrophils be the secret to cancer's Achilles' heel?
A study published in the June 10, 2021 issue of Cell describes a remarkable new mechanism by which the body's own immune system can eliminate cancer cells without damaging host cells. The findings have the potential to develop first-in-class medicines that are designed to be selective for cancer cells and non-toxic to normal cells and tissues.
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Combination targeted therapy provides durable remission for patients with CLL
A combination of ibrutinib and venetoclax was found to provide lasting disease remission in patients with newly diagnosed chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), according to researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Findings from the single-institution Phase II study were published today in JAMA Oncology and provide the longest follow-up data on patients treated with this drug
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NYUAD study offers new insight into one of the mysteries of natural immunity to malaria
The team studied blood samples from children from two ethnic groups in remote rural areas of Burkina Faso, Gouin and Fulani, to see how they responded to the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. The team discovered an elevation of immune-dampening steroid molecules and a strong immunosuppressive signature in Gouin children. Studying the enigmatic less malaria-susceptible Fulani ethnic group rev
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In Cell commentary, NIH outlines commitment to addressing structural racism in biomedicine
Earlier this year, the US National Institutes of Health (NIH) acknowledged the impact of structural racism on biomedical science and committed to doing more to dismantle it. Now, in a commentary appearing June 10 in the journal Cell, NIH Director Francis Collins and colleagues describe the NIH's UNITE initiative and how it differs from the agency's previous diversity, equity, and inclusion efforts
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Chemist proposes eco-friendly synthesis of fluorescent compounds for medicine
An RUDN and Shahid Beheshti University(SBU) chemist proposed an eco-friendly method for the synthesis of pyrrole and pyrazole derivatives with a wide range of applications in medicine: from antidepressants to anticancer. Moreover, the synthesized compounds possess interesting fluorescence features, and the bioactive scaffolds might attract great interest in the fields of clinical diagnostics and b
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Study of Harvey flooding aids in quantifying climate change
How much do the effects of climate change contribute to extreme weather events? It's hard to say—the variables involved are plentiful, each event is unique, and we can only do so much to investigate what didn't happen. But a new paper from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) climate scientist Michael Wehner investigates the question for one particular element of one significant st
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Ion and lipid transporters specialize for their niche
Cell viability requires that a variety of functions at the cell membrane are maintained properly. P-type ATPases translocate substrates across the membrane, and they have evolved into different types taking care of specific substrates within a diverse range. Now, key structural aspects have been described on how two different types of P-type ATPases—a Ca2+ transporting Ca2+ -ATPase and a lipid tra
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Scientists describe a possible disease-causing mechanism in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy
Scientists at the Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares (CNIC) have described a potential disease-causing mechanism in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), the most frequent hereditary disease of the heart. The study, published in the journal ACS Nano, provides the first description of an association between this disease and mechanical alterations to a component of the contractile mach
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When physics meets financial networks
Generally, physics and financial systems are not easily associated in people's minds. Yet, principles and techniques originating from physics can be very effective in describing the processes taking place on financial markets. Modeling financial systems as networks can greatly enhance our understanding of phenomena that are relevant not only to researchers in economics and other disciplines, but a
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The survivability of animal species depends on the number of offspring
Researchers from Tel Aviv University took part in a new international study proposing an amendment to the widely accepted theory on the extinction of animal species—by moving the focus from the animal's body size to its reproductive capacity. The researchers found gaps and incompatibilities between mammals and amphibians in the relation between body size and extinction risk: Whereas large mammals
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