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HJERNENS GLIA-CELLER SKAL STUDERES NÆRMERE: Until now scientists mostly focus on neurons, when trying to understand how the brains work. In recent discoveries they found out that another cell – glial cells – were discovered to have repair and brain plasticity functions. Because previously these cells were not researched, we don't know how many types and functions they have. The researchers are planning on experimenting to understand how these cells react to different stimulus in different parts of the brain.

https://phys.org/news/2021-06-glial-cells-brain-implications.html

 

LATEST

Delta variant Covid symptoms 'include headaches, sore throat and runny nose'
Researchers warn that UK's most widely established variant may be mistaken for milder illness Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Headaches, a sore throat and a runny nose are the most common symptoms associated with the UK's most widely established Covid variant, researchers have said. The data, collected as part of the app-based Zoe Covid symptom study , suggests that
6h
Scientists Discover Giant Arc of Galaxies That Could "Overturn Cosmology"
Breaking the Standard Model Researchers may have discovered a giant arc of galaxies that would challenge the standard model of cosmology. The team of astronomers believe that the arrangement of galaxies, which they've dubbed "the Giant Arc," stretches 3.3 billion light years across space, according to Science News . If this is the case, it directly challenges the accepted notion that matter in th
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What Ilhan Omar Actually Said
By the time Republicans and centrist Democrats had united late last week to scold Representative Ilhan Omar for a tweet—one of the few pastimes that still draw the two parties together, and something those selfsame chiders would doubtlessly decry, under different circumstances, as cancel culture or censorship —it no longer mattered what, exactly, Omar had said. They had already managed to make a
7h
Ancient megalodon shark was even bigger than estimated, finds study
A new method estimates the ancient megalodon shark was as long as 65 feet. The megalodon was one of the largest fish that ever lived. The new model uses the width of shark teeth to estimate its overall size. A Florida student figured out a way to more accurately measure the size of one of the largest fish that ever lived – the extinct megalodon shark – and found that it was even larger than previ
5h
Radio sources in the galaxy cluster ClG 0217+70 inspected by astronomers
Using the LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR) and the Very Large Array (VLA), astronomers have conducted radio observations of a galaxy cluster known as ClG 0217+70 and obtained important information regarding giant radio sources in this cluster; one of them appears to be the most extended radio relic so far identified. The finding is reported in a paper published June 1 on arXiv.org.
7h
The sun's clock: New calculations support and expand planetary hypothesis
Solar physicists around the world have long been searching for satisfactory explanations for the sun's many cyclical, overlapping activity fluctuations. In addition to the most famous, approximately 11-year "Schwabe cycle", the sun also exhibits longer fluctuations, ranging from hundreds to thousands of years. It follows, for example, the "Gleissberg cycle" (about 85 years), the "Suess-de Vries cy
7h
Researchers discover key cause of energy loss in spintronic materials
A study led by University of Minnesota Twin Cities researchers uncovered a property of magnetic materials that will allow engineers to develop more efficient spintronic devices in the future. Spintronics focuses on using the magnetic "spin" property of electrons instead of their charge, which improves the speed and efficiency of devices used for computing and data storage.
6h
Vaccines are working – but these charts show why England is delaying reopening
Vaccines are reducing Covid deaths but data shows parts of the country remain unprotected Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Two-thirds of the population in England are insufficiently protected against the Delta coronavirus variant, exclusive data analysis by the Guardian can reveal. Despite promising signs that the vaccine is working – including record low hospital adm
11h
The Largest Structures in the Universe Started To Spin and We Don't Know Why
Tilt-a-Whirl Some of the gigantic filaments that make up the " cosmic web " — an unfathomably massive network of tendril-like structures linking the universe's galaxies together — seem to be spinning. A team of scientists made the shocking discovery that some cosmic filaments, which are the largest known structures in the entire universe, are rotating around their central axis like gigantic drill
4h
NASA to Build an Asteroid Hunting Space Telescope
Planetary Defense NASA has approved production of an infrared space telescope to detect asteroids that might threaten Earth. The agency is developing the Near-Earth Object Surveyor space telescope (NEO Surveyor) after a successful mission review, according to a post on the JPL website . The telescope is a part of NASA's "planetary defense efforts" to identify hazardous asteroids that come within
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'It was so nasty. He laughed in my face': How to love and trust again after a big romantic betrayal
When a long-term partner cheats on you it can be devastating, but it is possible to move on in time. Here, experts and Guardian readers explain how best to rebuild your life Sarah and her husband were anchored in a remote harbour – more than a year into their round-the-world sailing voyage, and decades into their relationship – when she read a message on his tablet that made her collapse to the f
13h
Corporations Want to Put Advertisements In Your Dreams
Targeted Dream Incubation Scientists have a stark warning for us: Companies want to target your dreams with advertisements — and they're already doing it. 40 sleep researchers have signed an open letter calling on legislators to regulate "targeted dream incubation (TDI)," according to Science Magazine . In it, warned that large corporations such as Coors' and Burger King were actively attempting
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Graphene Superconductors May Be Less Exotic Than Physicists Hoped
Three years ago, physicists discovered that two stacked sheets of carbon with a tiny, 1.1-degree twist between them could exhibit a dazzling array of behaviors. Most famously, when cooled to low temperatures, the material conducts electricity with zero resistance. Researchers raced to figure out why twisted bilayer graphene (as it's called) becomes a superconductor, with a form of… Source
6h
The Wreckage Donald Trump Left Behind
Somewhere in China, a company recently received an order for boxes and boxes of reusable face masks with G7 UK 2021 embroidered on them. Over the weekend in Cornwall, in southwest England, these little bits of protective cloth were handed to journalists covering the 2021 summit of some of the world's most powerful industrial economies—so they could write in safety about these leaders' efforts to
16h
Free School Lunch Linked To Better Health, Higher Salary
Providing schoolchildren with nutritious lunches for free seems to have outstanding benefits that last throughout their lives, according to a new study. A team of Swedish scientists decided to investigate the country's free lunch program to see what impacts it actually had on kids. Their research , which was published last month in the journal The Review of Economic Studies , found that students
2h
Photos From the 2021 Westminster Dog Show
The 145th annual Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show took place over the weekend, hosting about 2,500 dogs consisting of more than 200 different breeds or varieties. COVID-19 safety protocols prevented spectators, apart from dog owners and handlers, from attending. This year's Best in Show was awarded to a Pekingese named Wasabi. Below are images from the three-day competition and preliminary activi
4h
Experts Decide That Earth Has Five Oceans, Actually
Big Promotion Finally, experts in the National Geographic Society have determined that Earth actually has five oceans, not the four that it already officially recognized. Joining the crew is the Southern Ocean, the National Geographic publication reports , a circular body of water that envelops Antarctica. While the Southern Ocean was first named in the 1500s and scientists commonly refer to it i
4h
A Strangely Comforting Finding About Alien Rain
On rainy days, Kaitlyn Loftus likes to imagine herself somewhere else. Not on a sun-soaked beach, but on another world in the middle of its own rainstorm. Beneath the swirling storms of Jupiter or Saturn's hazy cloud tops, where helium drops from the sky. On Neptune, where it might drizzle diamonds. Maybe Titan, a moon of Saturn, where methane rain can fill entire lakes. Loftus is a planetary sci
5h
Earth's fifth ocean just confirmed
The Earth has finally attained popular recognition for its fifth ocean, with a decision by the National Geographic Society to add the Southern Ocean around Antarctica to the four it recognizes already.
5h
UK doctors urge public to get fully vaccinated as Delta variant spreads
Study finds Delta has nearly double risk of hospitalisation compared with previously dominant Alpha Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Doctors have urged the public to get two shots of coronavirus vaccine after research in Scotland showed that the Delta variant, which has spread across the UK, nearly doubles the risk of hospitalisation. Public health experts analysed da
8h
Inside the fight to reclaim AI from Big Tech's control
Timnit Gebru never thought a scientific paper would cause her so much trouble. In 2020, as the co-lead of Google's ethical AI team, Gebru had reached out to Emily Bender , a linguistics professor at the University of Washington, and the two decided to collaborate on research about the troubling direction of artificial intelligence. Gebru wanted to identify the risks posed by large language models
11h
Winners and Losers of the Work-From-Home Revolution
This year, two international teams of economists published papers that offer very different impressions of the future of remote work. The first team looked at an unnamed Asian tech company that went remote during the pandemic. Just about everything that could go wrong did go wrong. Working hours went up while productivity plummeted. Uninterrupted work time cratered and mentorship evaporated. Natu
11h
Inside a Dodge City Slaughterhouse
This article was published online on June 14, 2021. O n the morning of May 25, 2019 , a food-safety inspector at a Cargill meatpacking plant in Dodge City, Kansas, came across a disturbing sight. In an area of the plant called the stack, a Hereford steer had, after being shot in the forehead with a bolt gun, regained consciousness. Or maybe he had never lost it. Either way, this wasn't supposed t
12h
Quick action by medics was key to Christian Eriksen's survival
Footballer's cardiac arrest highlights importance of immediate use of CPR and defibrillation in saving lives Swift action was crucial to Christian Eriksen's survival when the midfielder collapsed during the first half of Denmark's opening game in the Euro 2020 championship against Finland. Denmark's team doctor, Morten Boesen, confirmed that the 29-year-old had gone into cardiac arrest on the pit
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Notes From the Editor in Chief: The Capitol Riot Was Prologue
Every month, our editor in chief will bring readers inside The Atlantic for a taste of how our journalism gets made, and the issues that concern us the most. Expect interviews with our writers, trips into our archives, stories you shouldn't miss, and more. Sign up to get this newsletter, Notes From the Editor in Chief, delivered to your inbox . The Capitol Riot Was Prologue Donald Trump's battle
2h
You Can't Escape the Attention Economy
Back in 2011, when Twitter was young, the artist and musician Leon Chang made a joke that you might remember even if you didn't see it: "slept over at a kids house once in third grade. saw him pour milk into bowl first, then cereal. never talked to him again. hes in jail now." Over the years, that joke has been stolen again and again, often retold with slightly different details. It still happens
9h
Scientists in Spain Just Got a Step Closer to Building a Practical Quantum Repeater
A quantum internet could play a key role in tying together many of the most promising applications for quantum technologies. The main impetus for quantum communication networks today is security, because a feature of messages encoded in quantum states is that reading them changes their content, alerting the receiver to any eavesdropping. But being able to share quantum states over large distances
8h
CDC Study: Teen Suicide Attempts Spiked During the Pandemic
The CDC published a study on Friday that revealed suicide attempts rose sharply amongst teenage girls over the course of the pandemic. The study leveraged data from emergency rooms across 49 states, and found that suspected suicide attempts spiked during the first few months of the pandemic amongst teens aged 12 to 17, according to CBS News . The data indicates that most of the victims were girls
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A New Type of COVID Vaccine Is 90 Percent Effective
The pharmaceutical company Novavax announced that its COVID-19 vaccine is 90 percent effective, potentially making it a powerful additional tool in the global fight to stop the coronavirus pandemic. Novavax uses a different kind of technology than the Moderna and Pfizer vaccines that have already been distributed to much of the country, The Verge reports . Instead of using mRNA to instruct the im
5h
Prehistoric giant 'river boss' crocodile identified by Queensland scientists
The reptile, named Gunggamarandu maunala, is thought to have grown up to seven metres long A prehistoric species of crocodile that roamed the waterways of south-east Queensland, and is thought to be the largest to have lived in Australia, has been identified by researchers at the University of Queensland. Gunggamarandu maunala , whose name means "river boss" and incorporates words from the langua
16h
The False Hope of the Progressive-Prosecutor Movement
The public's growing familiarity and frustration with America's criminal legal system has brought a new type of prosecutor to power. These so-called progressive prosecutors promise to end mass incarceration and bring fairness to the criminal legal system—by doing things such as declining to prosecute certain low-level offenses, expanding diversion programs, and replacing hard-line assistants with
11h
A $26-Billion Plan to Save the Houston Area From Rising Seas
Lawmakers may soon decide the fate of a massive proposal to protect the coast around Houston from rising seas and climate change-amplified hurricanes. The centerpiece of the plan is a set of 82-foot-high gates across the main channel to Galveston Bay. But if the barrier is built, what exactly will it deliver?
12h
The Supreme Court Molded Joe Biden
Joe Biden became president in no small part because he'd been vice president. Had he become neither, he would have been remembered for something else entirely: the fate of Robert Bork and Clarence Thomas, two of the most divisive Supreme Court nominees in living memory. Now Biden has a chance to leave his most distinct imprint on a Court that shaped his legacy every bit as much as he influenced i
12h
UK health inequalities made worse by Covid crisis, study suggests
Data from major studies shows disadvantaged groups have faced greatest disruption to medical care Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The coronavirus crisis has disrupted routine healthcare disproportionately across society with women, older people and minority ethnic groups most likely to report cancelled or delayed appointments, prescriptions and procedures, researcher
17h
Starwatch: solstice brings longest day to northern hemisphere
This year, the precise moment of the solstice is 04.32 BST on 21 June, about 20 minutes before the sun rises at Stonehenge The northern hemisphere's summer solstice arrives at the end of this week. It marks the moment at which the Sun reaches its most northerly point in the sky. As a result, the northern hemisphere experiences its longest period of daylight in a single 24-hour period. Sunrise tak
13h
Modeling the friction between pages in a book
It all started with a shaky washing machine. Pedro Reis, head of the Flexible Structures Laboratory at EPFL's School of Engineering, rolled up a piece of fabric and placed it under the machine to stop it from moving. After he saw how well the rolled-up fabric worked as a vibration damper, he got to thinking. He spoke with Samuel Poincloux, a postdoc at his lab, about his idea and they soon realize
10h
Can you solve it? Ace of spades
Head-scratchers for headbangers UPDATE: To read the solutions click here In the immortal words of Lemmy from Motörhead: "I don't share your greed, the only card I need is the ace of spades." Whether or not this was in response to the following puzzle is for you to decide. Continue reading…
15h
A step closer to a hydrogen-fueled economy using an efficient anode for water splitting
In the recent past, there has been a paradigm shift towards renewable sources of energy in order to address the concerns pertaining to environmental degradation and dwindling fossil fuels. A variety of alternative green energy sources such as solar, wind, hydrothermal, tidal, etc., have been gaining attention to reduce global carbon footprints. One of the key challenges with these energy generatio
4h
Go Read This Essay on Managing Video Game Addiction
Video game addiction has been a touchy, controversial subject among experts (and gamers) in the field since it was first introduced and described as a formal condition. It's especially difficult to navigate because the definitions and mechanisms of gaming addiction are a bit fuzzier than chemical addictions, leaving gamers wondering whether their favorite pastime is somehow bad for them, freelanc
7h
The Guardian view on delaying lockdown easing: sadly unavoidable | Editorial
The exponential spread of the Delta variant, and the uncertainties surrounding it, mean pausing the roadmap is justified Since February , when Boris Johnson unveiled a four-step roadmap to ending all Covid restrictions in England, progress has been steady and at times relatively serene compared with the periods of abject confusion and chaos that went before. The successful rollout of the vaccinat
3h
New combination of materials provides progress toward quantum computing
The future of quantum computing may depend on the further development and understanding of semiconductor materials known as transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs). These atomically thin materials develop unique and useful electrical, mechanical, and optical properties when they are manipulated by pressure, light, or temperature.
2h
England's Covid lockdown lifting: is a four-week delay enough?
Analysis: Even a short pause is expected to reduce the number of people going to hospital as more people are vaccinated PM announces delay to lockdown easing What we know about the delay The roadmap out of lockdown – England's strategy to return to a life more normal – was heavy on dates from the start. The first three steps, in March, April and May, passed so smoothly that a crucial point was ea
4h
New super-resolution technique allows for more detailed brain imaging
A new imaging technique has the potential to detect neurological disorders — such as Alzheimer's disease — at their earliest stages, enabling physicians to diagnose and treat patients more quickly. Termed super-resolution, the imaging methodology combines positron emission tomography (PET) with an external motion tracking device to create highly detailed images of the brain.
21h
We're winning the war on cancer
A new study projects that cancer deaths will decrease in relative and absolute terms by 2040. The biggest decrease will be among lung cancer deaths, which are predicted to fall by 50 percent. Cancer is like terrorism: we cannot eliminate it entirely, but we can minimize its influence. As the #2 leading cause of death , cancer takes the lives of about 600,000 Americans each year. In comparison, he
9h
Wedding Season 2021 Is a Perfect Storm
With the promise of a delightfully normal summer in the United States comes the resumption of the summer wedding season . Late spring through early fall is historically the most popular time for couples to get married. This year, however, widespread vaccination in the U.S. and the ensuing easement of gathering restrictions, after more than a year of the coronavirus pandemic, are making for a wedd
7h
Hawaii Cops Spent COVID Relief Funds on Robot Dog
New Toy The Honolulu Police Department seems to have taken some creative liberties with the extra cash it got through the CARES Act : It seems unlikely that the supporters of the federal pandemic relief bill had the department's new $150,000 Boston Dynamics robot dog "Spot" in mind when they wrote and signed it into law. "Toys, toys, toys," one anonymous officer told the Honolulu Civil Beat , whi
2h
A full picture of the origin and nature of ocean litter
A new study published in Nature Sustainability provides the first complete diagnosis of the origin and nature of the litter dumped into the ocean. The collaboration between research institutions such as Wageningen University and Research and NGOs from 10 countries has allowed the identification of the most polluting products for the main aquatic ecosystems on a global scale. This is a much-needed
7h
More interaction with humans means smaller brains for cows
A team of researchers at the University of Zurich has found that domestication of cows has led to reduction in cow brain size. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes comparing the skulls of extinct aurochs to modern cows.
7h
White boys growing up with Black neighbors more likely to vote for Democrats
A team of researchers from Harvard University and Boston University has found evidence showing that white boys who grew up with Black neighbors are more likely to be registered as Democrats as adults. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes comparing data from the 1940 Census to voter rolls many years later.
8h
Taxing digital advertising could help break up big tech
For the past several years, economists, and government leaders have regularly sounded alarms about the dangers of big tech monopolies. On her 2020 campaign website, for example, Senator Elizabeth Warren said " big tech companies have too much power, too much power over our economy, our society, our democracy." In the months since the election, politicians on both the left and right have expressed
5h
Boundary of heliosphere mapped
For the first time, the boundary of the heliosphere has been mapped, giving scientists a better understanding of how solar and interstellar winds interact.
41min
Making a meal of DNA in the seafloor
While best known as the code for genetic information, DNA is also a nutrient for specialized microbes. An international team of researchers has discovered several bacteria in sediment samples from the Atlantic Ocean that use DNA as a food source. One bacterium newly named by the team in fact is a true expert in degrading DNA.
41min
Experts Beg World Leaders To Actually Learn Lessons From Pandemic, Please
An international panel of experts warns that political leaders around the world seem to have ignored the lessons of the coronavirus pandemic. The Independent Panel for Pandemic Preparedness and Response, as it's called, is a World Health Organization initiative to figure out what went wrong with the response to the COVID-19 pandemic and make recommendations on how to do better next time, accordin
50min
A third dose of COVID-19 vaccine increased antibody levels in organ transplant recipients with a sub
A case series published in Annals of Internal Medicine found that a third dose of vaccine increased antibody levels in organ transplant recipients who had suboptimal response to standard vaccination. These findings suggest that clinical trials are warranted to determine whether booster doses should be incorporated into clinical practice for transplant patients, just as they have been for hepatitis
58min
Insulators turn up the heat on quantum bits
Physicists have long suspected that dielectric materials may significantly disrupt ion-trap quantum computers. Now, researcher have developed a new method to quantify this source of error for the first time. For the future operation of quantum computers with very many quantum bits, such noise sources need to be eliminated already during the design process if possible.
1h
New app tracks human mobility and COVID-19
To understand just how COVID-19 affected human movement on a global scale, researchers in the University of Miami College of Arts and Sciences Department of Geography and Sustainable Development developed COVID-19 vs. Human Mobility, an innovative and interactive web application that shows the connections between human mobility, government policies, and cases of COVID-19.
1h
Eco-friendly technology to produce energy from textile waste
A team of scientists from Kaunas University of Technology and Lithuanian Energy Institute proposed a method to convert lint-microfibers found in clothes dryers into energy. They not only constructed a pilot pyrolysis plant but also developed a mathematical model to calculate possible economic and environmental outcomes of the technology. Researchers estimate that by converting lint microfibers pro
1h
The evolution of good taste
Does evolution explain why we can't resist a salty chip? Researchers found that differences between the elemental composition of foods and the elemental needs of animals can explain the development of pleasing tastes like salty, umami and sweet.
1h
Understanding the impact of patient empowerment and remote management in rheumatoid arthritis
Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an inflammatory autoimmune disease that causes pain, swelling and stiffness in the joints. It can also cause fatigue, and the underlying inflammation may affect other body systems. In people with RA, low empowerment is associated with worse health. Interventions to improve empowerment may include helping people to master their pain, increase physical function, and impr
1h
Telemedicine program improves access to sleep care for rural veterans
More veterans are receiving important sleep care, especially those living in rural areas where access to sleep medicine specialists can be difficult. The Veterans Health Administration's TeleSleep Program launched telehealth services in 2017 to support the testing, diagnosis, and treatment of obstructive sleep apnea and other sleep disorders. More than one million veterans who received care from V
1h
Does zinc inhibit or promote growth of kidney stones? Well, both
A funny thing happened on the way to discovering how zinc impacts kidney stones—two different theories emerged, each contradicting the other. One: Zinc stops the growth of the calcium oxalate crystals that make up the stones; and two: It alters the surfaces of crystals which encourages further growth. Now it can be told—both theories are correct as reported in the American Chemical Society journal
2h
Pollutant concentration increases in the franciscana dolphin
The concentration of potentially toxic metals is increasing in the population of the franciscana dolphin—a small cetacean, endemic to the Rio de la Plata and an endangered species— according to a study led by a team of the Faculty of Biology and the Biodiversity Research Institute (IRBio), published in the journal Science of the Total Environment.
2h
Peering inside 2D crystal synthesis
Theorists simulate the molecular transitions that take place inside a furnace to create 2D molybdenum disulfide, a semiconductor that could find a home in next-generation electronics.
2h
Postop chylothorax treated with intranodal lymphangiography, ethiodized oil
According to AJR, high-dose intranodal lymphangiography with ethiodized oil is a safe and effective procedure for treating high-output postsurgical chylothorax with chest tube removal in 83% of patients. Previously, no data were available on the safety or benefits of injecting higher doses of ethiodized oil to treat patients with refractory postoperative chylothorax. No early or late clinically re
2h
A frozen leap forward
Scientists at UC Santa Barbara, University of Southern California (USC) and biotechnology company Regenerative Patch Technologies LLC (RPT) have reported new methodology for preservation of RPT's stem cell-based therapy for age-related macular degeneration (AMD).
2h
Harmful protein waste in the muscle
An international research team identified the cause of a rare muscle disease. According to these findings, a single spontaneously occurring mutation results in the muscle cells no longer being able to correctly break down defective proteins. The condition causes severe heart failure in children, accompanied by skeletal and respiratory muscle damage. The study also highlights experimental approache
2h
Study reveals COVID-19 risk factors for those with IDD
A study of nearly 550 adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities receiving residential services in New York City found that age, larger residential settings, Down syndrome and chronic kidney disease were the most common risk factors for COVID-19 diagnosis, and heart disease was most associated with COVID-19 deaths.
2h
A 'pump' gene's surprising role in early brain formation
In polymicrogyria, the cortex of the brain has irregular, small folds and disorganization in its cell layers, leading to intellectual/developmental disability and epilepsy. This study of four patients with polymicrogyria caused by a mutation in the gene ATP1A3 revealed surprises about the role of a common ion channel pump in early brain development.
2h
Study finds survival is more important than a chronic medical condition in prioritizing medical care
The concept of rationing medical resources during the height of COVID-19 pandemic created tremendous anxiety in the patient and healthcare communities. In planning for that possibility Massachusetts created a triage scoring system focusing on an acute survival score that considers chronic life-limiting medical conditions of the patient, but it does not provide specifics about how to value those co
3h
Biodiversity 'hotspots' imperiled along California's streams
A study of woodland ecosystems that provide habitat for rare and endangered species along streams and rivers throughout California reveals that some of these ecologically important areas are inadvertently benefitting from water that humans are diverting for their own needs. Though it seems a short-term boon to these ecosystems, the artificial supply creates an unintended dependence on its bounty,
3h
How do social media influence ethnic polarization?
Those who deactivated their Facebook profiles report a lower regard for other ethnic groups, and this effect was more prevalent among people living in more ethnically homogenous areas, shows a new study of users in Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH). The findings run counter to a commonly held view that social media usage exacerbates societal polarization.
3h
Dying stars hint at how they spread 'seeds' for new planets
Researchers have observed, in unprecedented detail and spatial resolution, organic molecules in planetary nebulae, or the aftermath of dying stars. Their work sheds new light on how stars form and die. Using the Atacama Large Millimeter Array, or ALMA, the researchers observed radio emissions from hydrogen cyanide, formyl ion, and carbon monoxide in five planetary nebulae: M2-48, M1-7, M3-28, K3-
3h
Using machine learning and radar to better understand storm surge risk
The types of land around us play an important role in how major storms will unfold—flood waters may travel differently over rural versus urban areas, for example. However, it's challenging to get an accurate picture of land types using only satellite image data because it is so difficult to interpret.
3h
Food home delivery companies need up to 8,000 daily services to be profitable in a big city
Various platforms which offer food home delivery services through courier services, such as riders or other types of distributors, have proliferated very quickly in recent years, especially in big cities. Due to this boom in last-mile delivery or logistics, UOC experts have studied the operation of the main food home delivery platforms, such as Just Eat, Glovo and Deliveroo, which work in the city
3h
RNA: A new method to discover its high-resolution structure
The structure of a biomolecule can reveal much about its functioning and interaction with the surrounding environment. The double-helical structure of DNA and its implications for the processes of transmission of genetic information form an obvious example. In a new study by SISSA (Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati), published in Nucleic Acids Research, experimental data were combi
4h
1 'laughing gas' session relieves severe depression quickly
A single inhalation session with 25% nitrous oxide gas can rapidly relieve symptoms of treatment-resistant depression, according to new research. The new study, published in Science Translational Medicine , also shows that the effects last much longer than previously suspected, with some participants experiencing improvements for upwards of two weeks. The findings bolster the evidence that non-tr
4h
Scientists expose the cold heart of landfalling hurricanes
Hurricanes are powerful weather events born in the open sea. Fueled by moisture from the warm ocean, hurricanes can intensify in strength, move vast distances across the water, and ultimately unleash their destruction upon land. But what happens to hurricanes after they've made landfall remains an open question.
4h
Potential new treatment target for Alzheimer's disease
A new study not only sheds light on how the APOE4 gene may cause some of the pathologies associated with Alzheimer's disease, but also suggests a new treatment target that might help people who carry the APOE4 gene in early and late stages of the disease. Researchers found that APOE4 is associated with the activation of an inflammatory protein that causes a breakdown in the blood-brain barrier whi
4h
Lab peers inside 2D crystal synthesis
Scientific studies describing the most basic processes often have the greatest impact in the long run. A new work by Rice University engineers could be one such, and it's a gas, gas, gas for nanomaterials.
4h
The path toward discovering a new species of Cicada
The 17-year cicadas emerging dramatically by the billions in 15 U.S. states from Georgia to New York and west to Illinois are making quite a racket—a uniquely North American phenomenon—but thousands of other cicada species on the planet also spend most of their lives underground, many of them emerging below the radar of human perception. Because most cicada species don't emerge simultaneously like
4h
Ultrasound neuromodulation: Integrating medicine and engineering for neurological disease treatment
Announcing a new article publication for BIO Integration journal. In this article the authors Yuhao Chen, Yue Li, Meng Du, Jinsui Yu, Fei Gao, Zhen Yuan and Zhiyi Chen from The Third Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, China, University of South China, Hunan, China and University of Macau, China discuss ultrasound neuromodulation: integrating medicine and engineering fo
4h
Consumers will pay more for ready-to-eat meals made with fewer ingredients
Most consumers care about the technology and the ingredients used to make their microwavable dinners and other shelf ready meals, according to a new study led by Washington State University researchers. The study found that many consumers are willing to pay a premium for ready-to-eat meals with a 'clean label' showing few ingredients.
4h
Easy, inexpensive, efficient: Researchers improve efficacy of new malaria drug
Artemisone is a promising substance in the fight against malaria. However, the active ingredient has yet to be used due its instability and because it is not easily absorbed by the body. A team has now pushed this a bit further. They have developed a very simple method for preparing the active ingredient that makes it easier to administer and store.
4h
The sun's clock
Not only the 11-year cycle, but also all other periodic solar activity fluctuations can be clocked by planetary attractive forces. With new model calculations, they are proposing a comprehensive explanation of known sun cycles for the first time. They also reveal the longest fluctuations in activity over thousands of years as a chaotic process.
4h
New glial cells discovered in the brain: Implications for brain repair
Neurons, nerve cells in the brain, are central players in brain function. However, a key role for glia, long considered support cells, is emerging. A research group has now discovered two new types of glial cells in the brain, by unleashing adult stem cells from their quiescent state. These new types of glia may play an important role in brain plasticity and repair.
4h
Malaysia registers first hepatitis C treatment developed through South-South cooperation
New treatment combination for hepatitis C virus (HCV) is an additional affordable option for millions still waiting for access to lifesaving treatments in middle-income countries. Combination is safe and effective, including for hard-to-treat cases and people with HCV and HIV. New drug ravidasvir is the first HCV drug to be developed through South-South collaboration and with support from non-prof
4h
Gaps to fill: Income, education may impact inequalities in seeking dental care
A University of Tsukuba study examined a massive national claims dataset in search of regional and socioeconomic inequalities in the use of dental care services in Japan. This examination of millions of pieces of data found periodontal care and outreach services showed the widest regional inequalities. People in areas with lower education and income were more likely to seek treatment after dental
4h
A step closer to a hydrogen-fuelled economy using an efficient anode for water splitting
Researchers from Niigata University, Japan along with their collaborators from Yamagata University have developed a novel and highly efficient nickel sulphide nanowires/carbon nitride based anode for electrocatalytic water splitting applications. The nickel sulphide based anode material has aided in drastically reducing the overpotential of the oxygen evolution reaction. This study holds immense p
4h
Domesticated foxes display increased size in brain regions
By analyzing MRI scans of the foxes, Hecht and her colleagues showed that both the foxes bred to be tame and those bred for aggression have larger brains and more grey matter than the brain of the control group (the foxes not bred for any particular behavior). These findings run in contrast to studies on other animals that have shown domesticated species have smaller brains with less grey matter,
4h
Meet Dr. Jennifer Doudna: she's leading the biotech revolution
This article was originally published on our sister site, Freethink. Last year, Jennifer Doudna and Emmanuelle Charpentier became the first all-woman team to win the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their work developing CRISPR-Cas9, the gene-editing technology. The technology was invented in 2012 — and nine years later, it's truly revolutionizing how we treat genetic diseases and even how we produce
5h
Engineers devise novel approach to wirelessly power wearable devices
Researchers have come up with a way to use one single device – such as a mobile phone or smart watch – to wirelessly power up to 10 wearables on a user. This novel method uses the human body as a medium for transmitting power. Their system can also harvest unused energy from electronics in a typical home or office environment to power the wearables.
5h
Many prolonged sick leaves for COVID-19
Nearly 12,000 people in Sweden received sickness benefit from the Swedish Social Insurance Agency for COVID-19 during the first wave of the pandemic. The median duration of sick leave in this group was 35 days, but for many it was considerably more long-drawn-out, according to a University of Gothenburg study.
5h
New theranostic approach joins radiopharmaceuticals and nanoparticles to kill cancer cells
Researchers have successfully developed a novel cancer treatment approach that utilizes Cerenkov radiation energy to target and destroy cancer cells more effectively. The approach uses light from decaying radiopharmaceuticals, known as Cerenkov luminescence, as an energy source to activate semiconducting polymer nanoparticles that kill cancer cells. This research was presented at the Society of Nu
5h
A new model of Alzheimer's progression
Diego Mastroeni of the NDRC teamed up Forest White and Douglas Lauffenburger, to explore how protein and signaling pathways change in patients with Alzheimer's disease. Their work creates a new model of disease progression, taking advantage of the heterogeneity that is inherent to human studies.
5h
Study shows high rates of kidney disease among adults with diabetes
Research carried out by academics at NUI Galway and clinicians at University Hospital Galway Diabetes Centre, involving more than 4,500 patients in the west of Ireland, suggests that, despite careful medical management, a relatively high proportion of people with diabetes in Ireland are developing chronic kidney disease over time and are at risk of kidney failure and other complications of poor ki
5h
RUDN University scientists in pharmaceutical technology proved effectiveness of new dosage form
RUDN University scientists together with colleagues from Switzerland proved in a clinical trial the effectiveness of a new dosage form — amorphous solid dispersion. This is the first such study in humans to show the mechanism of action of this form of drug release. In the future, it will help to increase the effectiveness of drugs and use new active substances for the treatment
5h
Understanding what drives cell typing
Scientists know that developing cells in a healthy embryo will transform into a variety of cell types that will make up the different organ systems in the human body, a process known as cell differentiation. But they don't know how the cells do it.
6h
New model for stability of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac
In 2007, the American housing boom ended, and there was heightened risk of a housing crisis. Private securitizers withdrew from purchasing high-risk mortgages, while government-sponsored enterprises, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, dramatically increased their acquisitions of risky mortgages. By 2008, the agencies reversed course, decreasing their high-risk acquisitions.
6h
USC study reveals potential new treatment target for Alzheimer's disease
A new USC study not only sheds light on how the APOE4 gene may cause some of the pathologies associated with Alzheimer's disease, but also suggests a new treatment target that might help people who carry the APOE4 gene in early and late stages of the disease. USC researchers found that APOE4 is associated with the activation of an inflammatory protein that causes a breakdown in the blood-brain bar
6h
Understanding what drives a liver cell to be a liver cell and not another cell type
Medical University of South Carolina researchers have discovered a gatekeeper protein that destines developing cells in an embryo to become liver cells. It exposes the genetic material of the cells and marks them as 'ready' for differentiation, i.e., transformation into liver cells, when developmental conditions are right. The findings, published in Cell Reports, could help scientists to better un
6h
Improving dialysis through design
A multidisciplinary team from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the university's McKelvey School of Engineering have devised a new way to design grafts that decreases the risk of clotting, ultimately relieving people of the pain, inconvenience and disruption of this critical treatment.
6h
Study finds that inflammatory processes are altered in the brains of people with OUD
Prevalence rates of opioid use disorder (OUD) have increased dramatically, accompanied by a surge of overdose deaths–nearly 50,000 in the U.S. in 2019. While opioid dependence has been extensively studied in preclinical models, an understanding of the biological alterations that occur in the brains of people who chronically use opioids and who are diagnosed with OUD remains limited.
6h
Elon Musk Says Tesla Will Accept Bitcoin Again, on One Condition
Mr. Musk's Wild Ride Elon Musk has once again reversed his position on Tesla and Bitcoin, announcing that the electric automaker would accept the cryptocurrency as payment but only after a specific condition is met. Specifically, Musk said that the Bitcoin mining industry needs to clean up its act and stop powering the extremely energy-intensive operations with fossil fuels, according to CNBC , a
6h
Kirigami-inspired stent offers new drug delivery method for tubular organs
To improve drug delivery for diseases that affect tubular organs, like eosinophilic esophagitis and inflammatory bowel disease, a multidisciplinary team from Brigham and Women's Hospital, Massachusetts General Hospital and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) designed a stretchable stent based on the principles of kirigami that is capable of supporting rapid deposition of drug depots.
6h
COVID-19 PCR tests can be freeze dried
In fighting COVID-19, it's not just the vaccines that require complicated cold supply chains and refrigerated storage. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests also have enzymes and reagents that need to be frozen. Northwestern University researchers have discovered that commercially available PCR tests can withstand the freeze-drying process, making them shelf-stable for up to 30 days and 50 degrees
6h
Smartphone images identify acne and mouth bacteria
A new method that uses smartphone-derived images can identify potentially harmful bacteria on the skin and in the mouth, research shows. The approach can visually identify microbes on skin contributing to acne and slow wound healing, as well as bacteria in the oral cavity that can cause gingivitis and dental plaques. Researchers combined a smartphone-case modification with image-processing method
6h
Black holes help with star birth
Research combining systematic observations with cosmological simulations has found that, surprisingly, black holes can help certain galaxies form new stars. On scales of galaxies, the role of supermassive black holes for star formation had previously been seen as destructive—active black holes can strip galaxies of the gas that galaxies need to form new stars. The new results, published in the jou
7h
Scientists recommend proactive response to invasive plants
Many invasive plants are expanding their growing range in response to climate change, making early detection and rapid response more critical than ever. Limited resources, though, can make it impossible to track and manage every range-shifting species.
7h
How do electrons behave in quantum critical ferromagnets?
In a classical second-order phase transition, condensed matter systems acquire long-range order upon cooling below the transition temperature, and the properties near the transition are driven by thermal fluctuations. These behaviors have been long explained by the Landau theory of phase transitions, which leads to the notion of universality, whereby systems with very different microscopic constit
7h
Anomalous weak values via a single photon detection
In the field of quantum measurement, weak values, introduced in 1988 by Aharonov, Albert and Vaidman (AAV), represent a most intriguing and puzzling paradigm, with many properties in sharp contrast to traditional (projective) quantum measurements.
7h
Opto-mechanical non-reciprocity in fiber
The internet era that we live in depends completely on the transfer of vast amounts of information over optical fibers. Optical fibers are literally everywhere. In fact, the overall length of optical fibers installed on our planet is sufficient to reach planet Uranus and back. However, the transfer of information from point A to point B is not enough. The information that we send and receive must
7h
Nyttigare kranvatten när biprodukter renas bort
Under vår livstid dricker vi en ansenlig mängd kranvatten. Men en del av de produkter som används för att rena vattnet kan påverka vår hälsa. Det beror på något som kallas för desinfektionsbiprodukter. Klorering används för att förhindra att sjukdomar sprids via dricksvatten, och för att bibehålla vattenkvalitén i hela ledningsnätet. Svenska vattenverk arbetar hårt för att kvaliteten på vattnet s
7h
The power of authority: how easily we do what we're told
In the 1960s, Stanley Milgram was sure that good, law-abiding Americans would never be able to follow orders like the Germans in the Holocaust. His experiments proved him spectacularly wrong. They showed just how many of us are willing to do evil if only we're told to by an authority figure. Yet, parts of the experiment were set up in such a way that we should perhaps conclude something a bit mor
7h
Taste evolved to make sure animals eat the right stuff
Researchers have discovered that differences between the elemental composition of foods and the elemental needs of animals can explain the development of pleasing tastes like salty, umami, and sweet. Taste tells us a lot about foods before they are swallowed and digested, and some tastes correspond with the elemental composition of foods. For example, an aged steak lights up the umami taste recep
7h
How electrons behave in quantum critical ferromagnets?
Quantum critical points are often observed in antiferromagnetic materials, but until recently they were thought to not occur in ferromagnets. CeRh6Ge4 is a recent exception to this paradigm, sparking the search for the origin of this phenomenon. The team from Zhejiang University characterized the electronic structure of CeRh6Ge4 using different techniques, and their findings of localized Ce 4f-ele
7h
Why do we continue to see outbreaks of SARS-CoV-2 in care homes?
To gain a better understanding of SARS-CoV-2 outbreaks involving care homes with fully vaccinated residents, Charité researchers used an outbreak at a Berlin-based facility to analyze virus-related data and the immune responses of elderly residents following vaccination. The data confirm vaccine effectiveness in the elderly, but also indicate a delayed and slightly reduced immune response. The res
7h
Improving bone marrow transplants in mice to help fight disease
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba have designed a cell culture medium that supports the growth and genetic manipulation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells without requiring expensive lab equipment. This technique also eliminates the need to irradiate mice prior to transplantation of these cells, making it less toxic to the animals and improving data generation. This method will be
7h
Setting the pace for sustainable energy research
If you have a good strong trellis, are a bit of a gambler and have a love of kiwifruit, there's no reason not to grow your own crop. As vigorous as they are, though, don't expect to plop these vines into the ground and stand back.
7h
Effects of Fenton-like reactions of ferric oxalate on atmospheric oxidation processes and radiative forcing
The Fenton reaction is a chemical transition involving hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and iron ions, which act as a catalyst. This process is used to destroy hazardous contaminants in wastewater through oxidation. In the atmosphere, a similar reaction, or "Fenton-like" reaction, occurs continuously with ferric oxalate([Fe(III)(C2O4)3]3-) and aerosols suspended in the air. This is the most frequent chemi
7h
NASA approves development of asteroid-hunting Near-Earth Object Surveyor space telescope
NASA has approved the Near-Earth Object Surveyor space telescope (NEO Surveyor) to move to the next phase of mission development after a successful mission review, authorizing the mission to move forward into Preliminary Design (known as Key Decision Point-B). The infrared space telescope is designed to help advance NASA's planetary defense efforts by expediting our ability to discover and charact
7h
New study aims to better utilize community-developed data
In recent years, community science—also known as citizen science—has become a global phenomenon, engaging millions of people through wildlife observation platforms like iNaturalist and contributing unparalleled amounts of data on the natural world. Despite this, however, community science data remains widely underutilized by the scientific community due to its perception as being less reliable tha
7h
Hope for infertile men: Mice could hold the secret
Male infertility affects more than 20 million men globally and is a contributing cause to around 50% of infertility in couples. Frequently, male infertility is the result of defects in the sperm tail, the flagellum, which allows the sperm to swim toward an egg. Males with severe infertility can experience multiple sperm malformations, including flagella that are shortened, irregular, coiled or eve
7h
What happens in brain cells affected by Alzheimer's disease?
In addition to plaques that accumulate outside of nerve cells in the brain, Alzheimer's disease is also characterised by changes inside these cells. Researchers from the Cell Signalling research group at the Chair of Molecular Biochemistry at RUB, headed by Dr. Thorsten Müller, have been studying what exactly happens in these cells. They determined that various proteins and protein components accu
7h
What mission could detect oceans at Uranus' moons?
Exploration of ocean worlds has become a hot topic of late, primarily due to their role as a potential harbor for alien life. Moons that have confirmed subsurface oceans garner much of the attention, such as Enceladus and Europa. But they may not be the only ones. Uranus' larger moons—Miranda, Ariel and Umbriel could potentially also have subsurface oceans even farther out into the solar system. W
8h
Too many forewing eyespots is bad for butterflies
Many butterfly species bear distinct circular markings known as eyespots on their wings, and the functions of these rings of contrasting colors vary. A long-standing theory is that they serve as anti-predator defenses—small eyespots along the wing margin can protect butterflies by directing predators to attack less important parts of the body, such as the hindwings, enabling them to escape.
8h
Trees, plants and soil could help cities cut their carbon footprints, but mainstreaming use requires better data
Cities and nations around the globe are shooting for carbon neutrality, with some experts already talking about the need to ultimately reach carbon negativity. In construction, carbon footprint declarations are used to ease product selection for low carbon building, but these standards don't yet exist for green elements like soil, bushes and plants. A new study led by Aalto University is the first
8h
Study: How red rot attacks sugarcane
The fungus Fusarium verticillioides is one of the causes of red rot, the most serious sugarcane disease. Losses average around USD 1 billion per harvest in Brazil alone.
8h
När datorer lär sig människospråk måste regler brytas
Datorers styrka ligger i att de alltid följer regler i form av de instruktioner de är programmerade med. Detta är också deras svaghet när det kommer till att bearbeta människors språk, enligt en avhandling vid Umeå universitet. – Vi människor använder språk på ett inte alltid helt entydigt sätt, men givet sammanhanget tenderar vi att förstå varandra ändå. För en dator är vi dock i grunden helt ob
8h
Breakthrough in brain imaging may offer future alternative to functional MRI
Researchers from the Keck School of Medicine of USC and the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), with the help of patients recovering from traumatic brain injury, have now demonstrated an alternative way to produce highly detailed images of the human brain. Their work, published in Nature Biomedical Engineering, yielded the first pictures of human brain function ever produced using functi
8h
Young adults who lost and then restored heart health had lower risk of heart attack, stroke
A long-term analysis of young adults in Korea found that those with poor heart health had higher rates of cardiovascular disease at a younger age. Young adults with poor cardiovascular health who improved their cardiovascular health over time reduced their chances of heart attack, stroke or heart failure later in life. Those who maintained good cardiovascular health from a young age had the lowest
8h
PCF-based 'parallel reactors' unveils collective matter-light analogies of soliton molecules
Optical solitons can form bound states known as "soliton molecules" that exhibit intriguing matter-light analogies. Reminiscent of chemical reactions, synthesis and dissociation of soliton molecules have attracted wide interest. Scientists has recently created a unique optomechanical lattice using a PCF-based optoacoustically mode-locked laser, to host highly-controlled, massively-parallel synthes
8h
Future falls risk detected by a simple bone density scan
The build-up of calcium in a major blood vessel is linked with a 39% higher risk of serious falls in older women, new Edith Cowan University research has found. This calcium build-up, known as abdominal aortic calcification, is a hardening of the abdomen's largest artery, which can be identified early on a commonly used bone density machine scan.
8h
Diversity in research identifies more genomic regions linked to diabetes-related traits
A large-scale ethnically diverse genetic study involving USC researchers has expanded what is known about potential causes of type 2 diabetes. The genome-wide meta-analysis has identified more regions of the genome that are linked to blood glucose and insulin levels, features that contribute to the risk of type 2 diabetes. The findings demonstrate that a significant minority of genes linked to glu
8h
A spatiotemporal symphony of light
Using an ultrafast transmission electron microscope, researchers from the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology have, for the first time, recorded the propagation of combined sound and light waves in atomically thin materials. The experiments were performed in the Robert and Ruth Magid Electron Beam Quantum Dynamics Laboratory headed by Professor Ido Kaminer, of the Andrew and Erna Viterbi Fac
8h
Irish potato famine pathogen still harms plants worldwide
Researchers continue to track the evolution of different strains of the plant pathogen that caused the Irish potato famine in the 1840s, which set down roots in the United States before attacking Europe. Plant pathologists studied the genomes of about 140 pathogen samples—historic and modern—from 37 countries on six continents to track the evolution of differing strains of Phytophthora infestans
9h
China's Mars Rover Snaps Incredible Selfie While Exploring
China became only the second country to operate a rover on Mars last month when the six-wheeled Zhurong robot rolled down the ramp onto the red planet. Now, the rover has beamed back the first images taken as it rolls around the surface . One of the new pics is a selfie, showing both the rover and the landing platform. However, it doesn't use the same trick as NASA's Mars rovers to snap selfies.
9h
A white-knuckle ride of open COVID drug discovery
Nature, Published online: 14 June 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01571-1 In early 2020, a spontaneous global collaboration came together to design a new, urgent antiviral treatment. There are lessons in what happened next.
9h
Daily briefing: Unusual avalanche caused mysterious flood in India
Nature, Published online: 11 June 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01612-9 An avalanche of rock and ice caused a flood that killed at least 200 people in February. Plus, the month's best science images and mixed evidence of whether adult vaccination against COVID-19 protects children.
9h
Some recurrent miscarriages may have genetic cause
New research identifies a genetic cause for a patient's recurrent pregnancy loss, 16 miscarriages and no full-term pregnancies over a 15-year period. Recurrent miscarriage affects 2 to 5% of couples trying to conceive. The causes vary widely and are sometimes impossible to find. As a result, nearly 50% of couples do not receive a satisfactory explanation of the causes of their recurrent pregnancy
9h
New EnVision Mission Will Study Venus Alongside NASA Probes
Planets like Mars and Jupiter have been the target of numerous high-profile robotic missions in the last few years, but Venus is starting to get the attention it deserves. Just a week after NASA announced a pair of missions to study Earth's sister planet, the European Space Agency (ESA) has announced a mission of its own . The EnVision spacecraft won't head off to Venus for about a decade, but on
9h
Många utdragna sjukskrivningar för covid-19
Närmare 12 000 personer i Sverige fick sjukpenning från Försäkringskassan för covid-19 under pandemins första våg. Mediantiden för sjukskrivning i denna grupp var 35 dagar, men för många blev det betydligt mer långdraget. Det är en forskargrupp inom rehabiliteringsmedicin på Göteborgs universitet som har studerat sjukskrivningsmönster. Studien inkluderade alla personer som erhöll sjukpenning från
9h
Hope for infertile men; mice could hold the secret
Male infertility affects around 8-12% of men globally, with over 20 million cases known. Now, researchers at Guangzhou Women and Children's Medical Center, China, led by Na Li and Ling Sun, may be able to offer infertile men a glimpse of hope, after discovering a new protein that controls male fertility in mice. These findings, published in the journal Development, pinpoint a new potential target
9h
The "it's banned in Europe" fallacy
The title of this post is written somewhat in jest because this is not a formally recognized fallacy; nevertheless, it is a very common line of reasoning that is logically flawed and very closely aligned with multiple fallacies. The argument, in a nutshell, asserts that something is dangers or likely dangerous simply because it is … Continue reading ""
10h
Se listen: Her rammer sygeplejerskernes strejke
Natten til lørdag ventes mindst 5.000 sygeplejersker at gå i strejke efter, at et flertal i Dansk Sygeplejeråd officielt har stemt nej til den nye overenskomst. I Region Nordjylland ventes 25 hospitalsafsnit at blive ramt. Patienter berørt af konflikten får direkte besked, understreger regionsdirektør.
10h
If You Consider Your Pet Family, These Are the Experts You Need
Eighty-five million. That's how many families— 67 percent of U.S. households —have a pet. If you're one of the many, you probably love your pet an immeasurable amount (maybe you've even considered cloning them) and treat them like family. You want the best for them, from food to bedding to pet insurance , and you'll do just about anything for them. Chewy cares about your pet almost as much as you
10h
A simple nudge isn't enough to tackle fake news, but these tactics could help
One high-profile theory of why people share fake news says that they aren't paying sufficient attention. The proposed solution is therefore to nudge people in the right direction. For example, "accuracy primes"—short reminders intended to shift people's attention towards the accuracy of the news content they come across online—can be built into social media sites.
10h
Experts urge global reform, before deadlier pandemic emerges
An international panel is offering a suite of recommendations to prevent the next pandemic—including a new global body of heads of state—but the effort's leaders said more urgent than any single item is concerted international action before the window of opportunity pried open by COVID-19 closes.
10h
Image: Hubble sees a spiral in good company
This image, taken with Hubble's Wide Field Camera 3, features the spiral galaxy NGC 4680. Two other galaxies, at the far right and bottom center of the image, flank NGC 4680. NGC 4680 enjoyed a wave of attention in 1997, as it played host to a supernova explosion known as SN 1997bp. Australian amateur astronomer Robert Evans identified the supernova and has identified an extraordinary 42 supernova
10h
How COVID-19 exposed the systemic ageism at the heart of Britain
The UK public cares deeply about injustices. In the first few months of 2021, thousands of people took to the streets demanding much-needed social changes, from Black Lives Matter to Kill the Bill protests against the government's proposed new crime legislation, the vigil for Sarah Everard and massive demonstrations against Israel's bombing of Gaza. Why then, haven't the deaths of 138,163 people f
10h
Toward a daily-use deep UV light source for sterilization and disinfection
Researchers from the Graduate School of Engineering and the Center for Quantum Information and Quantum Biology at Osaka University unveiled a new solid state second-harmonic generation (SHG) device that converts infrared radiation into blue light. This work may lead to a practical daily-use deep ultraviolet light source for sterilization and disinfection.
10h
Sex organs of baobab flowers solve puzzle of trees that bear more fruit
Baobabs are the mainstay of rural communities in some parts of Africa—they provide food in the form of leaves that are cooked like spinach, and large oval fruit which are rich in vitamin C. Oils are extracted from the crushed seeds (used in the cosmetic industry), and bark may be used for making rope.
10h
'A costly mistake' prompts retraction of paper on hair loss
A "costly mistake" has led to the retraction of a paper by a team of dermatology researchers in West Virginia who failed to obtain permission to use the data in their study for the specific purpose for which it was used. The article, "Association Between Alopecia Areata and Natural Hair Color Among White Individuals," which … Continue reading
12h
A long-term perspective on immunity to COVID
Nature, Published online: 14 June 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01557-z Determining the duration of protective immunity to infection by SARS-CoV-2 is crucial for understanding and predicting the course of the COVID-19 pandemic. Clinical studies now indicate that immunity will be long-lasting.
12h
Technology is going to be so advanced in the near future, yet nothing will change whatsoever
Advances in technology have helped the world a lot, but it's also hurt the world more than we ever realized. Companies control entire world economies, and have made the lower class and poverty so much more widespread. All the promises tech makes are just lies. The only people that benefit are the top 10% of society. They get the self driving, the solar panels, the work from home, the virtual real
12h
Strong interaction between interlayer excitons and correlated electrons in WSe2/WS2 moiré superlattice
Nature Communications, Published online: 14 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23732-6 Heterobilayers of transition metal dichalcogenides host moiré superlattices that give rise to strong electron interactions. Here, the authors study the photoluminescence from interlayer excitons in a WS2/WSe2 heterobilayer to reveal the onset of various correlated insulating states.
13h
Tight docking of membranes before fusion represents a metastable state with unique properties
Nature Communications, Published online: 14 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23722-8 Proteins need to overcome energy barriers to induce intermediate steps in membrane fusion. Using lipid vesicles in which progression to hemifusion is arrested, the authors show that the metastable intermediate is enhanced by divalent cations and is characterized by the absence of proteins and local membrane thic
13h
A large multiethnic GWAS meta-analysis of cataract identifies new risk loci and sex-specific effects
Nature Communications, Published online: 14 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23873-8 The genetic basis of cataract is not well understood. Here, the authors perform a genome-wide association multiethnic meta-analysis of cataract, finding 37 new loci and replicating known and new loci. They additionally perform sex-specific analyses, identifying new associations specific to women.
13h
P32-specific CAR T cells with dual antitumor and antiangiogenic therapeutic potential in gliomas
Nature Communications, Published online: 14 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23817-2 Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy has been proposed as a promising approach for treating glioblastoma. Here the authors show that p32 is expressed in murine and human glioma and that p32-directed CAR-T cells promote anti-tumor responses in preclinical models by targeting glioma cells and tumor deriv
13h
Laser-excited elastic guided waves reveal the complex mechanics of nanoporous silicon
Nature Communications, Published online: 14 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23398-0 Assessing mechanics of nanoporous silicon is challenging, but important for new applications. Here, the authors use non-destructive laser-excited elastic guided waves detected contactless, to study dry and liquid-infused single-crystalline porous silicon, revealing its complex mechanics and significant deviation
13h
Ultra-strong bio-glue from genetically engineered polypeptides
Nature Communications, Published online: 14 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23117-9 Biomedical glues often face a challenge in providing strong adhesion and providing remodelling capabilities. Here the authors report on the development of a biocompatible and biodegradable protein-based coacervate adhesive and demonstrate application in haemostasis and wound healing using pig models.
13h
Light-emitting metalenses and meta-axicons for focusing and beaming of spontaneous emission
Nature Communications, Published online: 14 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23433-0 Controlling radiation emission using metamaterials is of interest for light sources and other applications. Here, the authors develop generalized phased-array metasurface equations and design metasurface axicons and lenses to collimate and focus the spontaneous emission, respectively.
13h
Population-scale peach genome analyses unravel selection patterns and biochemical basis underlying fruit flavor
Nature Communications, Published online: 14 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23879-2 Longhua Shui Mi (LHSM) is a representative of the Chinese Cling peaches that have been central in global peach genetic improvement. Here, the authors assemble the genome of LHSM and show convergent selection for sweetness yet divergent selection for acidity in eastern vs. western cultivars through population gen
13h
How Guardian-reading over-70s are staying active | Letters
Sheila Hunt, Patrick Russell, Michael Shipman and Bob Hely respond to Christian Wolmar's letter on his non-locked-down life Re Christian Wolmar's letter (8 June), at 84 my daily activity both during and after lockdown has been an hour's walk with my dog. I am able to enjoy this partly because of knee replacements 15 years ago and partly because of a walk around where I live that is accessible to
13h
"Depopulation" by COVID-19 vaccines?
COVID-19 and antivaccine conspiracy theorists like Joe Mercola, Michael Yeadon, and Peter McCullough are spreading the conspiracy theory that COVID-19 vaccines are intended as a tool for "global depopulation". This is nothing more than an old antivaccine conspiracy theory repurposed for the pandemic. As ridiculous as it might seem, it is nonetheless very appealing to antivaxxers. The post first
15h
Nästa: Venus
Esa meddelar att de kommer att skicka iväg en ny rymdsond, Envision, om ungefär tio år. Uppdraget är att undersöka hur det kommer sig att Venus har utvecklats till att bli så olik jorden trots att de är ungefär lika stora och har en liknande sammansättning. Venus yta är dold bakom en ogenomskinlig atmosfär med tjocka moln av svavelsyra, och är fortfarande ganska outforskad.
15h
Omvänd bevisbörda
Vem ska bevisa vad? Ibland kan man dras in i en diskussion med någon som påstår något spektakulärt eller rent av absurt. Det kanske kan vara att Bigfoot eller Loch … Continued Inlägget dök först upp på Vetenskap och Folkbildning .
16h
Juridisk sværvægter med et kamera i baglommen
PLO's nye direktør er dr.jur. og vant til forhandlinger, politik og interessevaretagelse for slet ikke at tale om kolleger og samarbejdspartnere med tårnhøj faglighed. Nu mangler han blot at få opdateret sin viden om sundhedsvæsenet.
18h
How far will future FPS games be willing to go to make their games more realistic?
Graphics, game mechanics, character movements, and sound are all improving. But will we be playing games where it will feel and look like you are killing a real human being? The mindless muscle-memory focus of current FPS games saves the gameplay of any trauma that would come from shooting a human being in high-tense situations. As game-development programs and technology improve, we will reach a
20h
If you make a copy of your consciousness would you still experience it?
I'm not sure if this gets asked often, so sorry if it does. I'm just having a hard time understanding this. I understand that identity is just your memories and Neurons and all that and that it's ever changing. But if I die, will I be really able to experience the copy of my consciousness? I have no way of knowing whether I am a clone of my original self at this moment, but my original clone is s
20h
Oil spill drifts away from Corsica coast
Fears two oil slicks would pollute eastern Corsica's holiday beaches eased Saturday after French officials prepared for the worst and naval boats armed with clean-up equipment arrived off the Mediterranean island.
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