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Researchers are using an enzyme that automatically reacts with atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) to create calcium carbonate crystals, which mimic concrete in structure, strength, and other properties, and can fill cracks before they cause structural problems creating self-healing concrete that is four times more durable than traditional concrete, extending the life of concrete-based structures and eliminating the need for expensive repairs or replacements.  
Graphene can be used to detect COVID-19 quickly, accurately
Researchers at the University of Illinois Chicago have successfully used graphene—one of the strongest, thinnest known materials—to detect the SARS-CoV-2 virus in laboratory experiments. The researchers say the discovery could be a breakthrough in coronavirus detection, with potential applications in the fight against COVID-19 and its variants.
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LATEST

Largest structures in the universe show clear light-shifted signal of rotation
By mapping the motion of galaxies in huge filaments that connect the cosmic web, astronomers at the Leibniz Institute for Astrophysics Potsdam (AIP), in collaboration with scientists in China and Estonia, have found that these long tendrils of galaxies spin on the scale of hundreds of millions of light years. A rotation on such enormous scales has never been seen before. The results published in N
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Study: Half of US cosmetics contain toxic chemicals
More than half the cosmetics sold in the United States and Canada likely contain high levels of a toxic industrial compound linked to serious health conditions, including cancer and reduced birth weight, according to a new study.
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Negev Desert archaeological site illuminates an important chapter in modern humans' origin
The Boker Tachtit archaeological excavation site in Israel's central Negev desert holds clues to one of the most significant events in human history: the spread of modern humans, Homo sapiens, from Africa into Eurasia, and the subsequent demise of Neanderthal populations in the region. Researchers from the Weizmann Institute of Science and the Max Planck Society, led by Prof. Elisabetta Boaretto,
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Self-healing concrete could multiply lifespans of structures
Researchers at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) are using an enzyme found in red blood cells to create self-healing concrete that is four times more durable than traditional concrete, extending the life of concrete-based structures and eliminating the need for expensive repairs or replacements. The work, published in the peer-reviewed journal Applied Materials Today, uses an enzyme that autom
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The electron merry-go-round: Researchers find new mechanism for classical behavior of many-particle quantum systems
Photoemission is a property of metals and other materials that emit electrons when struck by light. Electron emission after light absorption was already explained by Albert Einstein. But since this effect is a highly complex process, scientists have still not been able to fully elucidate its details. Prof. Dr. Bernd von Issendorff and his team at the University of Freiburg's Institute of Physics h
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Disrupted osteocyte connectivity and pericellular fluid flow in bone with aging and defective TGF-{beta} signaling [Cell Biology]
Skeletal fragility in the elderly does not simply result from a loss of bone mass. However, the mechanisms underlying the concurrent decline in bone mass, quality, and mechanosensitivity with age remain unclear. The important role of osteocytes in these processes and the age-related degeneration of the intricate lacunocanalicular network (LCN)…
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Potency boost of a Mycobacterium tuberculosis dihydrofolate reductase inhibitor by multienzyme F420H2-dependent reduction [Microbiology]
Triaza-coumarin (TA-C) is a Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) inhibitor with an IC50 (half maximal inhibitory concentration) of ∼1 µM against the enzyme. Despite this moderate target inhibition, TA-C shows exquisite antimycobacterial activity (MIC50, concentration inhibiting growth by 50% = 10 to 20 nM). Here, we investigated the mechanism…
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Proteasomal conformation controls unfolding ability [Biochemistry]
The 26S proteasome is the macromolecular machine responsible for the bulk of protein degradation in eukaryotic cells. As it degrades a ubiquitinated protein, the proteasome transitions from a substrate-accepting conformation (s1) to a set of substrate-processing conformations (s3 like), each stabilized by different intramolecular contacts. Tools to study these conformational…
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Helicobacter pylori's historical ȷourney through Siberia and the Americas [Evolution]
The gastric bacterium Helicobacter pylori shares a coevolutionary history with humans that predates the out-of-Africa diaspora, and the geographical specificities of H. pylori populations reflect multiple well-known human migrations. We extensively sampled H. pylori from 16 ethnically diverse human populations across Siberia to help resolve whether ancient northern Eurasian populations…
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Lipophilic statin use linked to increased risk of dementia
In patients with mild cognitive impairment, taking lipophilic statins more than doubles their risk of developing dementia compared to those who do not take statins. According to research presented at the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging 2021 Annual Meeting, positron emission tomography (PET) scans of lipophilic statin users revealed a highly significant decline in metabolism in th
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Scientists convert used plastic bottles into vanilla flavouring
Production of chemical could help make recycling more attractive and tackle global plastic pollution Plastic bottles have been converted into vanilla flavouring using genetically engineered bacteria, the first time a valuable chemical has been brewed from waste plastic. Upcycling plastic bottles into more lucrative materials could make the recycling process far more attractive and effective. Curr
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Third of UK hospital Covid patients had 'do not resuscitate' order in first wave
Study found increase in people with DNACPR decisions compared with before pandemic Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Almost a third of patients admitted to hospital with suspected Covid-19 during the first wave of the pandemic had a "do not resuscitate" decision recorded before or on their day of admission, research suggests. This is higher than the rates reported in p
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The Covid Delta variant: how effective are the vaccines?
Analysis: what protection do they offer against infection, hospital admission and death? Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage As lockdown easing in England is delayed from 21 June to a possible date of 19 July amid concerns of a substantial wave of hospitalisations due to the Delta variant of coronavirus, we take a look at the latest data on the protection offered by vacc
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Astronomer: Aliens Will Most Likely Resemble AI if We Ever Make Contact
If we ever make contact with an extraterrestrial civilization, we're unlikely to find a group of little green Martians running around. That's at least according to Seth Shostak, senior astronomer and director at the Center for SETI (Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) Research. In a recent opinion piece for The Guardian , Shostak argues that we are far more likely to encounter beings that r
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It's Official: Tesla Model S Plaid Fastest Production Car Ever Made
A Winner As seen on a recent episode of "Jay Leno's Garage," the former late night host hit the drag strip at Pomona Raceway in California with Tesla's latest Model S refresh dubbed "Plaid." Leno covered the quarter mile in just 9.247 seconds, speeding up to 152.09 mph, numbers confirmed by representatives from the National Hot Rod Association, who were present during the sprint, as CleanTechnica
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The Materials Scientist Who Studies the Innards of Exoplanets
Out in the vast universe, unknown billions of strange worlds drift around other stars. Many of them are quite unlike anything in our solar system. While astronomers hope to use immense upcoming observatories to get a better look at their outsides, Federica Coppari has been using the world's largest laser to investigate their insides. Coppari compresses familiar substances… Source
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A Google AI Designed a Computer Chip as Well as a Human Engineer—But Much Faster
AI has finally come full circle. A new suite of algorithms by Google Brain can now design computer chips —those specifically tailored for running AI software —that vastly outperform those designed by human experts. And the system works in just a few hours, dramatically slashing the weeks- or months-long process that normally gums up digital innovation. At the heart of these robotic chip designers
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America's 'Great Chief Justice' Was an Unrepentant Slaveholder
John Marshall is America's most important jurist. Biographers are universally laudatory of the "Great Chief Justice." A recent documentary about him (in which I am interviewed) is subtitled The Man Who Made the Supreme Court . This icon of jurisprudence is central to America's constitutional development. For nearly three and a half decades, longer than any other chief justice, he led the Court an
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Vaccines and oxygen run out as third wave of Covid hits Uganda
Vaccine thefts reported and hospitals unable to admit patients as cases leap 2,800% in a month Uganda has all but run out of Covid-19 vaccines and oxygen as the country grapples with another wave of the pandemic. Both private and public medical facilities in the capital, Kampala and in towns across the country – including regional hubs in Entebbe, Jinja, Soroti, Gulu and Masaka – have reported ru
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A third of care home staff in some London areas have not had Covid jab
Figures come as ministers are poised to make it mandatory for staff to get jab Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage A third of staff in older adult care homes in some areas of London have not received a single vaccine nearly six months after they were made a top priority, in a development that has left more than a 1,000 care workers still unprotected in just four boroughs
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New drug cuts deaths among patients with no Covid antibodies
Oxford University trial reports cocktail of manmade antibodies reduces fatalities by a fifth Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage A new drug has been found to cut Covid deaths by a fifth among the sickest patients in hospital and may change official practice so that every patient with coronavirus will have an antibody test before they are admitted. The Recovery trial base
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Elon Musk: "Decided to Sell My Last Remaining House"
No House Just weeks after news emerged Tesla CEO Elon Musk paid zero dollars in federal income tax over several years, the billionaire has decided to cash in and sell the last of his homes, according to a recent tweet. "Decided to sell my last remaining house," Musk tweeted on Monday. "Just needs to go to a large family who will live there. It's a special place." Earlier this month, Musk revealed
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More countries restrict travel from UK over Delta variant fears
Ireland to double to 10 days its quarantine period for UK travellers who are not fully vaccinated Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Ireland is to double to 10 days its quarantine period for travellers from the UK who are not fully vaccinated, joining a growing list of countries imposing stricter travel rules on British arrivals due to concerns over the rapid spread of
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Crayfish behave more boldly after exposure to antidepressants – study
Traces of drugs found in water can make crustaceans more outgoing – but also vulnerable to predators Antidepressant drugs in water can alter the behaviour of crayfish, making them bolder and more outgoing, and therefore more vulnerable to predators, researchers have found. Low levels of antidepressants – excreted by humans or disposed of incorrectly – are found in many water bodies. Researchers f
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Elon Musk Shares New Pic of Giant Starship Rocket Booster
Booster Butt SpaceX has made big progress towards building the first flightworthy prototype of its Starship booster called Super Heavy . An image shared by SpaceX CEO Elon Musk early Tuesday morning shows just how tall the booster prototype already is, towering above the intrepid billionaire inside High Bay, a 265 feet tall vertical assembly structure at the company's South Texas testing faciliti
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Is ignorant bliss better than knowledgable gloom?
The long-running series in which readers answer other readers' questions on subjects ranging from trivial flights of fancy to profound scientific and philosophical concepts Happier people live longer, more pleasant lives. Informed people are weighed down with the woes of the world. So, is ignorant bliss better than knowledgable gloom? Mary Shider, Macclesfield Post your answers (and new questions
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Extremism Has Spread Into the Mainstream
In the two decades since September 11, the U.S. has fought terrorism and extremism by concentrating on law-enforcement and intelligence readiness, with experts focused on disrupting fringe groups before they carry out violence. This Band-Aid approach is ill-suited to combatting modern far-right extremism, which has spread well beyond fringe groups and into the mainstream. The extremism we're now
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Top Gun Is an Infomercial for America
Illustration by Paul Spella; images by Mary Evans / Ronald Grant / Everett Collection This article was published online on June 15, 2021. I n 1983 , the Swedish aerospace and auto company Saab ran an ad with an old premise—sports cars are sexy—and a new twist: Saab's cars, the ad suggests, are as sexy as its fighter jets. The spot makes its case by splicing slo-mo shots of a car and a plane emerg
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Gove 'pretty confident' end of Covid lockdown in England will not be delayed again
Minister says government trying not to impose 'imprisonment' of restrictions longer than necessary Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Ministers are "pretty confident" that the final lifting of Covid restrictions in England, delayed until 19 July, will not be pushed back again, Michael Gove has said. The Cabinet Office minister sought to reassure people the government wa
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Rare superconductor may be vital for quantum computing
Research led by the University of Kent and the STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory has resulted in the discovery of a new rare topological superconductor, LaPt3P. This discovery may be of huge importance to the future operations of quantum computers.
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China set to administer 1bn Covid vaccine doses by end of this week
Cash incentives and gifts offered to fulfil target of vaccinating 40% of population by end of month Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage China is on track to administer 1bn vaccine doses by the end of this week, after bolstering production and distribution networks in an ambitious drive to vaccinate 40% of the population by this month. Chinese authorities have been encour
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The Atlantic Daily: What We Know About the Delta Coronavirus Variant
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . A new variant of the coronavirus is raising alarms globally. What does it mean for Americans? The bad news: Delta, a scary new variant of the coronavirus, is spreading both stateside and abroad.
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China prepares to send astronauts to new space station
Crew reportedly getting ready to blast off this week to the Tiangong on China's longest crewed space mission to date The first crew for China's new space station has reportedly begun final preparations to blast off this week. The mission is China's first crewed spaceflight in nearly five years, and a matter of prestige for the government as it prepares to mark the 100th anniversary of the ruling
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Report: SpaceX Ignored FAA Warnings Before Massive Starship Explosion
Despite last-minute warnings from the Federal Aviation Administration, SpaceX went ahead and launched its first high-altitude Starship prototype in December, a launch that ended in a gigantic explosion , The Verge reports . The prototype, dubbed SN8, violated the company's launch license, as issued by the FAA, according to documents obtained by The Verge . Explosion or not, SpaceX seems to have g
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Here's How Quickly Aliens Could Conquer the Galaxy
Risk: Galaxy Edition Colonizing the Milky Way is an unfathomable task for us mere Earthlings, but for an extraterrestrial civilization capable of hopping from one star system to the next, it's shockingly doable. Based on reasonable technological constraints, the researchers suggest it would take an ambitious alien race about one billion years to conquer and colonize the entire inner portion of th
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Ultra-thin film could one day turn regular glasses into night vision goggles, researchers say
Developed by Australian and European researchers, the film works by converting infrared light into light visible to the human eye A transparent metallic film allowing a viewer to see in the dark could one day turn regular spectacles into night vision googles. The ultra-thin film, made of a semiconductor called gallium arsenide, could also be used to develop compact and flexible infrared sensors,
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New Data: COVID Reached the US Earlier Than We Thought
After well over a year of living through this pandemic, it's hard to remember what things were like back in January 2020. But if you try to think back, you might recall that was a particularly stressful time in the United States. The government had just identified the country's first COVID-19 infection on the 21st and, with how little we understood about the coronavirus at the time, very few peop
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Autonomous killer robots may have already killed on the battlefield
Autonomous weapons have been used in war for decades, but artificial intelligence is ushering in a new category of autonomous weapons. These weapons are not only capable of moving autonomously but also identifying and attacking targets on their own without oversight from a human. There's currently no clear international restrictions on the use of new autonomous weapons, but some nations are calli
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Tailored messaging increases understanding of climate change in Republicans
A team of researchers at Yale University's Yale Program on Climate Change Communication has found that the use of tailored advertising can increase awareness among Republicans of the dangers posed by climate change. In their paper published in the journal Nature Climate Change, the group describes field experiments they conducted with tailored advertising in competitive districts in the U.S. and w
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The Delta variant doubles the risk of hospitalization—but the vaccines still work
The risk of being hospitalized with the Delta covid-19 variant is roughly double that associated with the original Alpha strain, according to a study published in The Lancet . The study: The researchers analyzed data from 5.4 million people in Scotland, where the Delta variant is now dominant, from April 1 to June 6. After adjusting for age and comorbidities, the Delta variant approximately doubl
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Malicious content exploits pathways between platforms to thrive online, subvert moderation
Malicious COVID-19 online content—including racist content, disinformation and misinformation—thrives and spreads online by bypassing the moderation efforts of individual social media platforms, according to new research published in the journal Scientific Reports. By mapping online hate clusters across six major social media platforms, researchers at the George Washington University show how mali
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Covid outbreaks in Chinese ports could cause global goods shortages
Combination of rise in demand for products as some countries reopen and lockdowns in some port cities mean prices could climb An outbreak of Covid-19 in southern China has combined with the rapid reopening of the world economy and a shortage of shipping containers to cause a surge in transport costs that could fuel inflation and cause shortages of goods across the globe. China reported 21 new cor
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The People of the Soil Have Won
Updated at 6:05 a.m. ET on June 16, 2021. I grew up in a hidden city. Not a forgotten city, or a faraway city—a hidden city. My hometown, Nizhny Novgorod, lies east of Moscow along the Volga River. It was a center of international trade before the Russian Revolution but was bombed by the Nazis during World War II; to preserve crucial industries housed there, the Soviet authorities effectively clo
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Help Name NASA's Moon-Bound Manikin
Crash Test Dummy NASA is gearing up for its Artemis I mission, but the space agency overlooked one crucial detail — and it's asking the public for help. The upcoming mission, expected to launch in early November, is essentially a test run for the following crewed launches that will send actual humans to the Moon. So, to prepare, NASA is sending a yet-unnamed manikin around the Moon in an Orion sp
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Oh No, Oil Companies Are Paying Social Media Influencers Now
SponCon In retrospect, we have known that it was only a matter of time before giant oil companies like Shell started to sponsor influencers' posts on social media — because here we are. Surely, you may be telling yourself, surely no one is buying into an eco-friendly cross-country trip sponsored by big oil. But that's exactly what's happening, Earther reports . Just look at this disturbingly iron
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Coronal mass ejections and cosmic ray observations at Syowa Station
Solar activities, such as CME(Coronal Mass Ejection), cause geomagnetic storms that disturb the Earth's magnetosphere. Geomagnetic storms can affect GPS positioning, radio communication, and power transmission system. Solar explosions also emit radiation, which can cause satellite failures, radiation exposure to aircraft crew, and space activity. Therefore, it is important to understand space weat
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Observations detect a brown dwarf orbiting the star TOI–1278
An international team of astronomers reports the discovery of a companion to the M dwarf star known as TOI–1278. The newly found object turns out to be a brown dwarf nearly 20 times as massive as Jupiter. The finding is detailed in a paper published June 8 on the arXiv pre-print server.
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How stem cells synchronize to repair the spinal cord in axolotls
The spinal cord is an important component of our central nervous system: it connects the brain with the rest of the body and plays a crucial part in coordinating our sensations with our actions. Falls, violence, disease—various forms of trauma can cause irreversible damage to the spinal cord, leading to paralysis, sometimes even death.
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The 'grand tour' Atlantic Ocean water takes around the world
Scientists at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego and colleagues have created an estimate of the journey water makes around the world ocean basins. They used information from more than 1 billion points of data collected over 25 years.
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The Cost of Trump After Trump
When Joe Biden meets with Vladimir Putin tomorrow, huge numbers of news outlets will cover the story. One, however, stands to be part of the story. Russia's effort to expel Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty (which is funded by, though editorially independent of, the United States government) from the country has received widespread attention. As the two presidents prepare to converge on Lake Geneva
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Whether Covid came from a leak or not, it's time to talk about lab safety | Gregory D Koblentz and Filippa Lentzos
We studied biosecurity at the world's most sophisticated laboratories, and found their policies often left much to be desired Dr Gregory D Koblentz is an associate professor at George Mason University, and Dr Filippa Lentzos is senior lecturer in science and international security at King's College London The debate on the origins of the Covid-19 pandemic has recently focused on the potential for
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Investigating carbonate mineral chemical variations to improve oil recovery
Dr. Igor Ivanishin, a postdoctoral researcher in the Harold Vance Department of Petroleum Engineering at Texas A&M University, has firsthand experience with the frustrations of oil production. He spent nine years as a hydraulic fracturing engineer with operating and service companies in Russia. A few years ago, he came to Texas A&M to get his doctoral degree while delving into a recurring recovery
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Bending light for safer driving; invisibility cloaks to come?
Optical cloaking allows objects to be hidden in plain sight or to become invisible by guiding light around anything placed inside the cloak. While cloaking has been popularized in fiction, like in the "Harry Potter" books, researchers in recent years have started realizing cloaks that shield objects from view by controlling the flow of electromagnetic radiation around them.
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A Hint About How Life Made It Onto Land
Mangrove rivulus fish hate enforced water aerobics. Despite her best efforts, Giulia Rossi, a biologist who recently received her doctorate from the University of Guelph, cannot coax the fish to swim against a current in a laboratory tank. "They refuse to exercise in water," she told me. "They just let themselves hit the back mesh." When plucked out of water, however, the stubborn swimmers quickl
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Why America Doesn't Really Make Solar Panels Anymore
Every week, our lead climate reporter brings you the big ideas, expert analysis, and vital guidance that will help you flourish on a changing planet. Sign up to get T he Weekly Planet , our guide to living through climate change, in your inbox . You wouldn't know it today, but the silicon photovoltaic solar cell—the standard, black-and-copper solar panel you can find on suburban rooftops and sola
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Uyghurs outside China are traumatized. Now they're starting to talk about it
Mustafa Aksu had a bad track record with therapists. Growing up in China, he was bullied by his Han Chinese classmates for being Uyghur. This made him constantly anxious, and his stomach often hurt, so much that sometimes he threw up. A concerned teacher referred him to counseling, but Aksu was skeptical it could help. "I was always waiting for the time when I could go out and live somewhere that
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Eradicating polio is finally within reach. Why is the UK taking its foot off the pedal? | Anne Wafula Strike
Instead of cutting the aid budget – including 95% from the plan to stamp out the disease – Britain should take a global lead Despite the Covid pandemic, there have been just two recorded cases of wild polio in 2021 – in Afghanistan and Pakistan, the two remaining hiding places for the disease. But eradication is not guaranteed. Polio is virulent and spreads quickly. Even one case poses a threat t
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Research papers that omit 'mice' from titles receive misleading media coverage
There is increasing scrutiny around how science is communicated to the public, but what is the relationship between how scientists report their findings and how media reports it to the public? A study published in PLOS Biology by Marcia Triunfol at Humane Society International, in Washington, DC and Fabio Gouveia at Oswaldo Cruz Foundation in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil suggests that when authors of sc
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Prince Harry is doing a special trauma therapy called EMDR. It worked for me | Christina Wyman
Harry has said that living with the death of his mother, Diana, Princess of Wales makes him feel 'helpless' and 'hunted'. I've been there In an interview last month with Oprah for their jointly produced docuseries about mental health, The Me You Can't See , Prince Harry made a deeply personal disclosure . Harry said he sought a special therapy program, EMDR, to process the death of his mother, Di
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Novel calibration procedure for super-resolution brain imaging
Light—and all waves—can bend around the corners of obstacles found along its path. Because of this phenomenon, called diffraction, it is impossible to focus light onto a spot that is smaller than half its wavelength. In other words, the highest resolution one can theoretically achieve using an optical microscope is approximately 250nm, a barrier called the diffraction limit. Unfortunately, this re
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The Rise and Fall of an American Tech Giant
Above, clockwise from bottom-right : Kodak founder George Eastman takes a picture, circa 1925. High Falls in Rochester, New York, Kodak's hometown. Postcard of the Kodak Pavilion at the New York World's Fair, 1964. FIGHT, a group seeking to change Kodak's hiring practices, protests at a shareholders' meeting, 1967. This article was published online on June 16, 2021. W hen I was in fifth grade , m
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Watch This Terrifying Segway on Steroids Backflip Using Its Tail
Do a Backflip Tencent Robotics X Lab, a subsidiary of Chinese tech conglomerate Tencent, has unveiled a terrifying new "novel wheel-legged robot" called Ollie that can drive around on two wheels-wielding, leg-like appendages, as IEEE Spectrum reports . Thanks to plenty of muscle power and a creepy tail, Ollie can jump a good foot in the air — and even do a backflip while jumping over a gap, as ev
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Why does life flash before your eyes in a life-threatening scenario?
At the age of 16, when Tony Kofi was an apprentice builder living in Nottingham, he fell from the third story of a building. Time seemed to slow down massively, and he saw a complex series of images flash before his eyes. As he described it , "In my mind's eye I saw many, many things: children that I hadn't even had yet, friends that I had never seen but are now my friends. The thing that really
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The absolute chronology of Boker Tachtit (Israel) and implications for the Middle to Upper Paleolithic transition in the Levant [Anthropology]
The Initial Upper Paleolithic (IUP) is a crucial lithic assemblage type in the archaeology of southwest Asia because it marks a dramatic shift in hominin populations accompanied by technological changes in material culture. This phase is conventionally divided into two chronocultural phases based on the Boker Tachtit site, central Negev,…
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Widely covered paper on ranitidine-cancer link retracted
A paper linking the use of a wildly popular drug for heartburn to cancer has been retracted after the authors concluded that their widely touted finding appears to have resulted from a hiccup in the way they conducted their testing. The 2016 article, in Carcinogenesis, has played a minor role in an ongoing class action … Continue reading
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Rocky Mountain subalpine forests now burning more than any time in recent millennia [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
The 2020 fire season punctuated a decades-long trend of increased fire activity across the western United States, nearly doubling the total area burned in the central Rocky Mountains since 1984. Understanding the causes and implications of such extreme fire seasons, particularly in subalpine forests that have historically burned infrequently, requires…
21h
We investigated whether digital contact tracing actually worked in the US
In the spring of 2020, the first versions of covid-19 exposure notification systems were released to the public. These systems promised to slow the disease's spread by providing automated warnings to people who came into contact with the virus. Now, over a year later, residents in over 50 countries —including half of US states—can opt into these systems. But the big question remains: how well did
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New Tech Could Take Doctors Out of Hospitals Completely
Now that new medical sensors and gadgets can reliably monitor a patient's health — in real time and theoretically from anywhere in the world — healthcare providers are left navigating a new kind of medicine where machines might handle so many parts of the job that they don't even need to show up in person. Primary care physician Neil Singh of Brighton and Sussex Medical School grapples with this
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AI model examines virus spread from animals to humans
A new model that applies artificial intelligence to carbohydrates improves the understanding of the infection process and could help predict which viruses are likely to spread from animals to humans. This is reported in a recent study led by researchers at the University of Gothenburg.
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How romantic love is like addiction
Many writers have commented on the addictive qualities of love. Science agrees. The reward system of the brain reacts similarly to both love and drugs Someday, it might be possible to treat "love addiction." Since people started writing, they've written about love. The oldest love poem known dates back to the 21st century BCE. For most of that time, writers also apparently have been of two (or mo
21h
Plantwatch: staghorn ferns – the plants that form colonies like bees
Species on Lord Howe Island shows remarkable collaboration, with some plants deflecting water to colony and others soaking it up Staghorn ferns are spectacular plants with fronds that look like antlers, and make very attractive houseplants. One particular species, Platycerium bifurcatum , grows on Lord Howe Island in Australia and lives in colonies of hundreds of individuals. A recent study found
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Epigenetic inheritance of DNA methylation changes in fish living in hydrogen sulfide-rich springs [Environmental Sciences]
Environmental factors can promote phenotypic variation through alterations in the epigenome and facilitate adaptation of an organism to the environment. Although hydrogen sulfide is toxic to most organisms, the fish Poecilia mexicana has adapted to survive in environments with high levels that exceed toxicity thresholds by orders of magnitude. Epigenetic…
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Testing the effects of Facebook usage in an ethnically polarized setting [Political Sciences]
Despite the belief that social media is altering intergroup dynamics—bringing people closer or further alienating them from one another—the impact of social media on interethnic attitudes has yet to be rigorously evaluated, especially within areas with tenuous interethnic relations. We report results from a randomized controlled trial in Bosnia and…
18h
Is healthy sugar possible — and would you eat it?
Consumers are fed a lot of nonsense about sugar and fad diets. Our bodies must consume sugar; the question is how much and in what form. Companies are trying to develop healthier sugars to combat our "sugar addiction." Can we hack sugar to be healthy? www.youtube.com Humans consume too much sugar. This is a refrain you've likely read for years, if not decades. As with any generality, that topline
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Scientists discover unreported plant body part
A previously unreported anatomical structure named the 'cantil' has been described in the popular plant model, Arabidopsis thaliana. Scientists from The Pennsylvania State University, U.S., reveal that the cantil forms between the stem and flower-bearing stalk when flowering is delayed. Published in the journal Development, this study highlights that there are still discoveries to be made, even in
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Carbonate-hosted microbial communities are prolific and pervasive methane oxidizers at geologically diverse marine methane seep sites [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
At marine methane seeps, vast quantities of methane move through the shallow subseafloor, where it is largely consumed by microbial communities. This process plays an important role in global methane dynamics, but we have yet to identify all of the methane sinks in the deep sea. Here, we conducted a…
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Homeroom: Summer Learning Is About More Than Reading and Math
Editor's Note: Every week, Abby Freireich and Brian Platzer have taken questions from parents about their kids' education. This is the last article in the "Homeroom" series. Dear Abby and Brian, This year has been really hard emotionally, but now that a much-needed summer break is here, I'm starting to worry about academics. How do we prevent a summer slide? Thanks for everything, Zoe Brooklyn, N
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Study shows Head Start teachers' depressive symptoms related to children's math skills
Teachers play a key role in supporting children's development in early childhood education classrooms such as Head Start. Research shows significant associations between teachers' depressive symptoms and their students' social and emotional development. However, little research has focused on the associations between teachers' depressive symptoms and academic outcomes of preschoolers from low-inco
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Scientists Turned Snails Into Tiny Cyborgs
SnailBot 9000 Scientists from the University of Michigan took an unusual approach to wildlife conservation: turning the threatened animals into cyborgs so they could keep track of them and study how they survive. Back in the 1970s, scientists introduced an invasive snail called the rosy wolf snail to the Society Islands in French Polynesia. What followed was a bloodbath, according to a press rele
18h
World's most powerful magnet ready to ship
After a decade of design and fabrication, General Atomics is ready to ship the first module of the Central Solenoid, the world's most powerful magnet. It will become a central component of ITER, a machine that replicates the fusion power of the sun. ITER is being built in southern France by 35 partner countries.
21h
Young birds do household chores
Young birds support their parents in raising youngsters, defending the territory and keeping predators at bay. This social behavior, exhibited by birds such as the mousebird, appear to contradict the prevailing theory of evolution: young birds even surrender their food to younger siblings. This is the result of a study conducted by Wageningen University & Research scientists in Swaziland.
23h
The Generational Clash at Pride Is Actually a Sign of Progress
This month, the memes related to LGBTQ Pride celebrations have had a striking theme: disgust. Some people have been sharing images of queer icons and homophobes alike wearing expressions of disapproval—RuPaul frowning on the phone , Little Edie ranting in Grey Gardens , Aunt Lydia scowling in The Handmaid's Tale . The captions say something along the lines of "Gen Z calling the cops after seeing
1h
Leading scientists warn of global impacts as Antarctic nears tipping points
As governments convene for the annual Antarctic Treaty Consultative Meeting (ATCM) June 14-24, 2021, an Expert Working Group of leading Antarctic scientists warns that climate change is pushing this remote polar region, which connects all our ocean basins and keeps our planet habitable, towards numerous tipping points with global ramifications for humanity and biodiversity.
23h
Stem cell scientists make big progress in building mini-kidneys
Researchers have created what could be a key building block for assembling a synthetic kidney. They describe how they generate rudimentary kidney structures, known as organoids, that resemble the collecting duct system that helps maintain the body's fluid and pH balance by concentrating and transporting urine. The organoids provide a way to study kidney disease that could lead to new treatments an
19h
Immune cells from the skull protect the brain
New research in mice reveals the skull as unexpected source of brain immunity. The immune system is the brain's best frenemy. It protects the brain from infection and helps injured tissues heal, but it also causes autoimmune diseases and creates inflammation that drives neurodegeneration. Two new studies in mice suggest that the double-edged nature of the relationship between the immune system an
5min
Cryptocurrency Miners Bought 700,000 GPUs in Q1 2021
Feature image by Jernej Furman Ever since Ampere's launch in September 2020, there've been questions about how much of the shortage was driven by semiconductors and how much was driven by cryptocurrency demand. Reports over the last 10 months have pointed to various additional causes, including low yields at Samsung, GDDR6 shortages, and ABF (Ajinomoto Build-up Film) shortages. New work from Jon
15min
Chatbots for dementia patients and caregivers need more work
Chatbots hold promise for dementia patient or caregiver support, but are still in their infancy, finds a new paper. None of the interactive digital apps tested performed well on all testing criteria, and all the apps contained linguistic biases and usability challenges. The authors conclude that until developers produce evidence-based chatbots that have undergone end user evaluation it will be har
16min
These Mice Were Born From Sperm That Spent Almost 6 Years in Space
As inconceivable as it still sounds, the wheels have been set in motion for humans to one day reach and colonize Mars. There's already a detailed design for the first Martian city , SpaceX is building its first offshore spaceport to one day launch Starships to Mars (among other missions), and NASA recently flew a helicopter on Mars. But there's a few big pieces of the puzzle still missing, includ
17min
Elever i förorten positiva till sin skola
Elever i förorten är positiva till utbildning – och håller på sin skola. De beskriver en stark gemenskap och tillhörighet till skolan, samtidigt som de är kritiska till hur skolan oftast framställs i media. Under ett helt läsår följde doktoranden Jonas Lindbäck eleverna i åttan och nian på en högstadieskola i en socioekonomiskt utsatt stadsdel i Göteborg. Han var med på deras lektioner, pratade m
40min
We are all conspiracy theorists
Conspiracy theories exist on a spectrum, from plausible and mainstream to fringe and unpopular. It's very rare to find someone who only believes in one conspiracy theory. They generally believe in every conspiracy theory that's less extreme than their favorite one. To some extent, we are all conspiracy theorists. The following is an excerpt from the book Escaping the Rabbit Hole by Mick West. It
48min
Quantum-nonlocality at all speeds
The phenomenon of quantum nonlocality defies our everyday intuition. It shows the strong correlations between several quantum particles some of which change their state instantaneously when the others are measured, regardless of the distance between them. While this phenomenon has been confirmed for slow moving particles, it has been debated whether nonlocality is preserved when particles move ver
58min
Early encounter of microbes and fetal immune system during second trimester of gestation
The human fetal immune system begins to develop early during gestation, however, factors responsible for fetal immune-priming remain elusive. Dr Florent Ginhoux from A*STAR's Singapore Immunology Network, Professor Jerry Chan from KK Women's and Children's Hospital, Professor Salvatore Albani from SingHealth Duke-NUS Translational Immunology Institute, and Cambridge University explored potential e
1h
Finding the 'sweet spots' for managed aquifer recharge
Much of California's $50 billion agricultural industry depends on groundwater. We typically see only what this water makes possible above the soil: almond and pistachio groves, citrus orchards, rows of lettuce and grapevines and cattle herds in a valley that supplies a quarter of the nation's food even when surface water is scarce.
1h
Bruisable artificial skin could help prosthetics, robots sense injuries
When someone bumps their elbow against a wall, they not only feel pain but also might experience bruising. Robots and prosthetic limbs don't have these warning signs, which could lead to further injury. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces have developed an artificial skin that senses force through ionic signals and also changes color from yellow to a bruise-like purple
1h
Honeybees show withdrawal symptoms when weaned off alcohol
A team of researchers from Jagiellonian University and the Polish Academy of Sciences has found that honeybees fed a diet of alcohol-spiked food exhibit withdrawal symptoms when the alcohol is removed. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, the group describes experiments they conducted with honeybees and why they believe their findings are relevant to treatment of alcoholism in
1h
Mitochondrial ribosome assembly in 3D
In a study published in Nature Communications, researchers at Karolinska Institutet provide insight into the sequence of events leading to formation of functional mitoribosomes and sheds light on the mechanism of action of nine mitoribosome assembly factors involved in this process. The results may help yield novel opportunities for diagnosis and therapeutic intervention for mitochondrial diseases
1h
The amazing world of flame balls, doughnuts and horseshoes
Flame balls are gentle and fragile spherical flames that up till recently could only exist in conditions of near-zero gravity. Researchers at TU/e have managed to observe flameballs at normal earth-bound conditions, and thus, discovered new insights in the working of lean fuel mixtures. Lean hydrogen mixtures are believed to be the fuel of the future as they emit no CO2 and only low concentrations
1h
Study of mangrove rivulus fish hints at mechanism for brain evolution of land animals
A pair of researchers at the University of Guelph has found that forcing mangrove rivulus fish to flip into the air regularly pushes them to develop more brain matter. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, Giulia Rossi and Patricia Wright describe experiments they conducted with the amphibious fish, what they learned about them and why they believe their findings shed lig
1h
This Powerful Prebiotic Body Spray Stops Odor-Causing Bacteria Before They Start
The first step to feeling confident is feeling secure. But it's hard to be secure if you're worried about body odor . That's why most people have incorporated an antiperspirant or deodorant into their daily routine. However, with all the conflicting information linking the aluminum used in these products to cancer , many people are being forced to choose between smelling good and feeling safe. Bu
1h
COVID widens digital divide, but cuts e-waste
Consumption of electronic and electrical equipment at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic fell in low- and middle-income countries by almost a third, according to a UN report, despite a growing need to be connected with the world in lockdown.
1h
Queen of the Junkyard
W hen you pass the kindergarten at Sde Eliyahu, a kibbutz near the Jordan River in northern Israel, you might not recognize it. Instead, you'll see a yard for castaway objects: rusty tractor parts, old computers, and orphaned bike wheels. It takes a few moments to realize that some person, or many people, has devoted thought to arranging the parts into strange structures and machines. What seems
1h
Victorian Science's Great Unsolved Murder Mystery
I n the summer of 1893 , an unusual volume appeared on the shelves of London booksellers. The Great Barrier Reef of Australia: Its Products and Potentialities , published by W. H. Allen and Company, was remarkable both for its price—the leather-bound volume would have cost a skilled tradesperson nearly two weeks' pay—and for its fantastically close observation of the world's largest reef system.
1h
Urbanization drives antibiotic resistance on microplastics in Chinese river
Microplastic pollution of waterways has become a huge concern, with the tiny pieces of plastic entering food webs and potentially having harmful effects on animals and people. In addition, microplastics can act as breeding grounds for antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Now, researchers reporting in Environmental Science & Technology have analyzed antibiotic-resistance genes (ARGs) on five types of mic
1h
Ozone pollution has increased in Antarctica
Ozone is a pollutant at ground level, but very high in the atmosphere's 'ozone layer,' it absorbs damaging ultraviolet radiation. Past studies have examined ozone levels in the Southern Hemisphere, but little is known about levels of the molecule in Antarctica over long periods. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology have analyzed more than 25 years of Antarctic data
1h
Counting mammals, birds and dung beetles could be vital for saving the Amazon
The Amazon rainforest holds around 50% of all remaining rainforests on the planet, while hosting more than 400 species of mammal, 1700 species of bird and an unknown number of insect species numbering in the millions. It is also vital for maintaining life on Earth. Amazonian forests mitigate climate change by soaking up around 560 million tons of carbon per year and support agriculture by stimulat
2h
Primate ecology and evolution shaped by two most consumed plant families
By analyzing the relative proportion of different plant parts consumed by primates, researchers suggest that primates may be intricately and subtly shaped by two key families of plants: Moraceae and Fabaceae. The study, led by researchers from the University of Amsterdam and Indiana University, highlights the importance of detailed dietary studies to better understand primate ecology and evolution
2h
Poison frog tadpoles can survive (almost) anywhere
A group of researchers from the University of Jyväskylä and Stanford University were part of an expedition to French Guiana to study tropical frogs in the Amazon. Amphibian species of this region use ephemeral pools of water as their nurseries and display unique preferences for specific physical and chemical characteristics. Despite species-specific preferences, researchers were surprised to find
2h
Space scientists solve a decades-long gamma-ray burst puzzle
An international team of scientists, led by astrophysicists from the University of Bath in the UK, has measured the magnetic field in a far-off Gamma-Ray Burst, confirming for the first time a decades-long theoretical prediction—that the magnetic field in these blast waves becomes scrambled after the ejected material crashes into, and shocks, the surrounding medium.
2h
Total solar eclipses shine a light on the solar wind with help from NASA's ACE mission
From traversing sand dunes in the Sahara Desert to keeping watch for polar bears in the Arctic, a group of solar scientists known as the "Solar Wind Sherpas" led by Shadia Habbal, have traveled to the ends of the Earth to scientifically observe total solar eclipses—the fleeting moments when the Moon completely blocks the Sun, temporarily turning day into night. With the images, they've uncovered a
2h
Machine learning can reduce worry about nanoparticles in food
While crop yield has achieved a substantial boost from nanotechnology in recent years, alarms over the health risks posed by nanoparticles within fresh produce and grains have also increased. In particular, nanoparticles entering the soil through irrigation, fertilizers and other sources have raised concerns about whether plants absorb these minute particles enough to cause toxicity.
2h
Japan could allow up to 10,000 spectators at Tokyo Olympic events
Health experts approve plans to increase cap from 5,000, with final decision expected later this month Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Up to 10,000 people could be allowed to watch Olympic events in Tokyo this summer, after Japanese health experts approved plans to raise the number of spectators at sports venues. The proposed measure would come into force after a Cov
2h
Keeping strawberries fresh using bioactive packaging
Québec produces more strawberries than any other Canadian province. Strawberries are delicate and difficult to keep fresh. In response to this challenge, Monique Lacroix, a professor at INRS (l'Institut national de la recherche scientifique), and her team have developed a packaging film that can keep strawberries fresh for up to 12 days. The team's findings on how this film protects against mould
3h
Master The World's Most Popular Coding Language With This Super Training Package
Python is the language that drives much of what we do online and at work, whether we're managing data or just dealing with people doing it for the 'gram . It's the system behind popular social media sites, industrial data management, and a lot more. The Complete 2021 Python Expert Super Bundle is designed to help you master this powerful, flexible coding language, whether you're a complete beginn
3h
Rare triple galaxy merger with at least two supermassive black holes
One of the best things about that universe is that there is so much to it. If you look hard enough, you can most likely find any combination of astronomical events happening. Not long ago, we reported on research that found seven separate instances of three galaxies colliding with one another. Now, a team led by Jonathan Williams of the University of Maryland has found another triple galaxy mergin
3h
Gravmonument visar på maktkamp i Sverige
En ny tid stod för dörren. Under 1100- och 1200-talen ersattes de enkla gamla träkyrkorna och mäktiga familjers gårdskyrkor av sockenkyrkor i sten av kontinentalt snitt. Kyrkan flyttade med påvedömets stöd fram sina positioner, och lierade sig med kungamakten. En modern kung skulle inte längre få sin legitimitet av mäktiga familjer utan från Gud. Men alla ville inte vara med om den nya ordningen.
3h
How Patent Extensions Keep Some Drug Costs High
For the top 12 grossing drugs in the U.S., each had an average of 71 patents granted, which almost doubled the time these drugs are protected from generic competition. Many of the granted patents are for minor tweaks. Reform bills are coming, but some critics worry that they won't necessarily curb abuse.
4h
How Wellcome is tackling racism
Nature, Published online: 16 June 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01582-y A specialist in diversity and inclusion lays out the science funder's plan for promoting equity.
4h
We cannot cheat ageing and death
Philosophers, artists and scientists – and probably all the rest of us – have long obsessed over the key to human immortality. We all, no matter our income, culture or religion are bound to die. Even if we escape mortal diseases or accidents, we all face a deadly biological deterioration. While the debate of human longevity has divided the scientific community for centuries, a new study finds fres
4h
The Next Escalator Ride
"T he Republican Party is just a name," Steve Bannon told me last week. I had called him to ask about the influence he believes his old boss still carries inside the GOP. "The bulk of it is a populist, nationalist party led by Donald Trump." As for the rest of it? "The Republican Party, pre-2016, are the modern Whigs," he added, referring to the national party that collapsed in the mid-19th centu
4h
Homing in on genomic instability as a therapeutic target in cancer
Nature Communications, Published online: 16 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23965-5 While genomic instability is a hallmark of cancer, its genetic vulnerabilities remain poorly understood. Identifying strategies that exploit genomic instability to selectively target cancer cells is a central challenge in cancer biology with major implications for anti-cancer drug development.
5h
Remote whispering metamaterial for non-radiative transceiving of ultra-weak sound
Nature Communications, Published online: 16 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23991-3 Typically, sending sound from transmitter to receiver requires pre-amplification and disturbs the surrounding sound environment. Here, the authors present a metamaterial designed to enable transmission of weak sound that can be recovered even in the presence of strong noise
5h
Identification of a dual orange/far-red and blue light photoreceptor from an oceanic green picoplankton
Nature Communications, Published online: 16 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23741-5 Blue light penetrates deeper than red light in ocean, thus blue light sensing is critical for adaptation to marine environments. Here, the authors report the genome of Pyconococcus provasolii and identify a chimeric dual orange/far-red and blue light receptor composed of a phytochrome and a cryptochrome by analy
5h
PGC-1α mediates a metabolic host defense response in human airway epithelium during rhinovirus infections
Nature Communications, Published online: 16 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23925-z Epithelial host defense to rhinovirus infections is enhanced by targeting the mitochondrial metabolic regulator, PGC-1a. Using metabolomics and proteomics, Michi et al show that human airway epithelial cells mount a barrier-protective early glycolysis-shift in response to rhinovirus, and that by targeting PGC-1a
5h
Effect of COVID-19 response policies on walking behavior in US cities
Nature Communications, Published online: 16 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23937-9 Mobility restrictions implemented to reduce the spread of COVID-19 have significantly impacted walking behavior. In this study, the authors integrated mobility data from mobile devices and area-level data to study the walking patterns of 1.62 million anonymous users in 10 US metropolitan areas.
5h
Modeling the effectiveness of olfactory testing to limit SARS-CoV-2 transmission
Nature Communications, Published online: 16 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23315-5 A central problem in the COVID-19 pandemic is that there is not enough testing to prevent infectious spread of SARS-CoV-2, causing surges and lockdowns with human and economic toll. Here, the authors evaluate an alternative strategy based on the monitoring of olfactory dysfunction with a mathematical model.
5h
Limited survival and impaired hepatic fasting metabolism in mice with constitutive Rag GTPase signaling
Nature Communications, Published online: 16 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23857-8 The mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) integrates nutrient and hormonal signals to control metabolism. Here the authors investigate the effects of constitutive nutrient signaling through genetic activation of RagA in adult mice and show that constitutive nutrient signaling regulates the response
5h
Spatial regulation of thermomorphogenesis by HY5 and PIF4 in Arabidopsis
Nature Communications, Published online: 16 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24018-7 Plants undergo morphological changes collectively termed thermomorphogenesis when exposed to elevated temperature. Here the authors show that the SPA1 kinase regulates distinct thermomorphogenic responses according to tissue type by interactions with PIF4 and HY5 in shoots and roots, respectively.
5h
After enrollment dips, public schools hope for fall rebound
Ashley Pearce's daughter was set to start kindergarten last year in Maryland's Montgomery County school system. But when it became clear that the year would begin online, Pearce found a nearby Catholic school offering in-person instruction and made the switch.
6h
Western US braced for record heat wave
Much of the western United States is braced for record heat waves this week, with approximately 50 million Americans placed on alert Tuesday for "excessive" temperatures, which could approach 120 degrees Fahrenheit (50 degrees Celsius) in some areas.
6h
Ett nytt koncept för behandling av blåscancer
Forskare vid Lunds universitet har tagit ytterligare ett kliv framåt i utvecklingen av ett nytt koncept för cancerbehandling. En syntetisk peptid, som målinriktat söker upp och startar celldöd hos cancerceller, har tillsammans med en fettsyra visat god effekt mot blåscancer i en klinisk studie.
6h
The suction speed of an elephant's trunk is 330 miles per hour
The way an elephant manipulates its trunk to eat and drink could lead to better robots, researchers say. Elephants dilate their nostrils to create more space in their trunks, allowing them to store up to 5.5 liters (1.45 gallons) of water, according to their new study. They can also suck up three liters (0.79 gallons) per second—a speed 30 times faster than a human sneeze (150 meters per second/3
7h
American-Style Grievance Politics Comes to British TV
In the months leading up to the launch of Great Britain's newest television channel, GB News, its backers insisted that it wouldn't be a British version of Fox News. They were right in one way: Fox is a slick product with fancy studios and whizzy graphics. By contrast, when GB News went on the air Sunday night, it looked as though it had been filmed in an abandoned strip club—all dark walls and n
7h
Enormous flock of declining shorebird discovered in South Carolina
It's not every day that someone discovers a new-to-science bird migration spectacle. It's even more unexpected that such an encounter—in this case, tens of thousands of shorebirds gathering during their annual journey north—would be just a stone's throw from a metropolitan area. But two years ago, that's exactly what happened in coastal South Carolina.
8h
Glyphosate pesticides persist for years in wild plants and cause flower infertility
An herbicide widely used in agriculture, forestry and other applications can cause deleterious effects on the reproductive health of a common perennial plant found in forests in British Columbia, Canada. Researchers reported in the journal Frontiers in Plant Science that glyphosate-based herbicides (GBH) deformed various reproductive parts on prickly rose (Rosa acicularis) a year after the chemica
8h
Country diary: in the fight to survive, red campion is a surprise battleground
Brancepeth, County Durham: These small flowers are prone to an extraordinary parasite A wild tangle of brambles covers this section of embankment beside a former railway line. A wren scolds from the undergrowth. Drone flies hover in the sun flecks filtered through overhanging branches of wild cherry. Butterflies chase through dappled shade. But what has stopped us in our tracks today are drifts o
9h
Semiconductor technology mitigates fire risk in electric vehicle batteries
Despite rapid development of EVs, the safety of the Li-ion batteries remains a concern as they are as a fire and explosion risk. Among the various approaches to tackle this issue, Korean researchers have used semiconductor technology to improve the safety of Li-ion batteries. A research team has succeeded in inhibiting the growth of dendrites, crystals with multiple branches that cause EV battery
10h
Brug for bedre uddannelse i ultralyd
I dag kan praktiserende læger på korte kurser tilegne sig basale scanningskompetencer, men de kan muligvis blive endnu bedre til at bruge ultralyd, hvis kurserne får mere fokus på øvelse og træning af kompetencer over tid, viser ny dansk forskning.
10h
Novel radiotracer shows promise to predict abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture
A new positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracer can detect abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) and potentially predict when they will rupture, according to research presented at the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging 2021 Annual Meeting. Targeting a novel biomarker associated with AAA, the radiotracer is effective both in diagnosis and in providing information to assist in the de
15h
The long view: Studying kelp forests and coral reefs to understand and predict the effects of climate change
What will the Earth be like for our children and grandchildren, as temperatures continue to rise? We can be fairly certain of some things: Some regions will become inhospitable, as heat drives their inhabitants away or causes massive declines and changes in their ecosystems. Many other physical, chemical and biological processes will also be affected by rising temperatures that threaten critical e
17h
Best binoculars for kids 2021
We've rounded up the best Amazon Prime Day deals on binoculars for kids. No matter your child's skill level, your own budget or their level of enthusiasm for nature, there is a perfect pair of binoculars waiting to inspire them.
18h
Obesity and hypertension: Researchers discover novel mechanisms
Researchers have succeeded for the first time in demonstrating the role of hypothalamic astrocytes in obesity-related hypertension. In addition, they showed that the hormone leptin is involved in the increase of blood vessels in the hypothalamus of obese mice, contributing of hypertension.
18h
Small streams in agricultural ecosystems are heavily polluted with pesticides
Pesticides safeguard agricultural yields by controlling insects, fungi, and weeds. However, they also enter streams and damage the aquatic communities. In a nationwide monitoring program, scientists have shown that the governmental thresholds for pesticides are generally too high and that these levels are still exceeded in over 80% of water bodies. The loss of biodiversity can only be halted if th
18h
A bark in the dark reveals a hidden hyrax
Nature, Published online: 14 June 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01606-7 Its neighbours scream, but a new species of tree hyrax — a cousin of the elephant — unleashes a rattling bark.
18h
Data and safety review board reports how it monitored the COVID-19 vaccine trials
Evaluation of three COVID-19 vaccine candidates in 2020-21 during a worldwide pandemic was unprecedented in terms of urgency and scope. Responsibility for the safety, integrity and scientific validity of U.S. trials fell to 12 experts of the federally appointed COVID-19 Vaccine Data and Safety Monitoring Board, who in turn report to an oversight group. This team has now taken the unusual step of p
18h
Soaking up the sun: Artificial photosynthesis promises clean, sustainable source of energy
Humans can do lots of things that plants can't do. But plants have one major advantage over humans: They can make energy directly from the sun. That process of turning sunlight directly into usable energy – called photosynthesis – may soon be a feat humans are able to mimic to harness the sun's energy for clean, storable, efficient fuel. If so, it could open a whole new frontier of clean energy.
18h
Analysis: Chile's transition to democracy slow, incomplete, fueled by social movements
A new article analyzes Chile's transition in 1990 from dictatorship to democracy, the nature of democracy between 1990 and 2019, and the appearance of several social movements geared to expanding this democracy. The article, by researchers at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU), appears in The Latin Americanist, a publication of the Southeastern Council of Latin American Studies.
18h
Evolution of bacterial steroid biosynthesis and its impact on eukaryogenesis [Evolution]
Steroids are components of the eukaryotic cellular membrane and have indispensable roles in the process of eukaryotic endocytosis by regulating membrane fluidity and permeability. In particular, steroids may have been a structural prerequisite for the acquisition of mitochondria via endocytosis during eukaryogenesis. While eukaryotes are inferred to have evolved from…
18h
A heat shock-responsive lncRNA Heat acts as a HSF1-directed transcriptional brake via m6A modification [Genetics]
Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are key regulators of gene expression in diverse cellular contexts and biological processes. Given the surprising range of shapes and sizes, how distinct lncRNAs achieve functional specificity remains incompletely understood. Here, we identified a heat shock–inducible lncRNA, Heat, in mouse cells that acts as a transcriptional…
18h
An RNA-centric global view of Clostridioides difficile reveals broad activity of Hfq in a clinically important gram-positive bacterium [Microbiology]
The gram-positive human pathogen Clostridioides difficile has emerged as the leading cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. However, little is known about the bacterium's transcriptome architecture and mechanisms of posttranscriptional control. Here, we have applied transcription start site and termination mapping to generate a single-nucleotide–resolution RNA map of C. difficile 5′ and…
18h
Vibrational relaxation dynamics in layered perovskite quantum wells [Applied Physical Sciences]
Organic–inorganic layered perovskites, or Ruddlesden–Popper perovskites, are two-dimensional quantum wells with layers of lead-halide octahedra stacked between organic ligand barriers. The combination of their dielectric confinement and ionic sublattice results in excitonic excitations with substantial binding energies that are strongly coupled to the surrounding soft, polar lattice. However, the
18h
Estimating genetic nurture with summary statistics of multigenerational genome-wide association studies [Social Sciences]
Marginal effect estimates in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are mixtures of direct and indirect genetic effects. Existing methods to dissect these effects require family-based, individual-level genetic, and phenotypic data with large samples, which is difficult to obtain in practice. Here, we propose a statistical framework to estimate direct and indirect…
18h
Reduced microbial stability in the active layer is associated with carbon loss under alpine permafrost degradation [Microbiology]
Permafrost degradation may induce soil carbon (C) loss, critical for global C cycling, and be mediated by microbes. Despite larger C stored within the active layer of permafrost regions, which are more affected by warming, and the critical roles of Qinghai-Tibet Plateau in C cycling, most previous studies focused on…
18h
PSMA-targeted radiotracer pinpoints metastatic prostate cancer across anatomic regions
A phase III clinical trial has validated the effectiveness of the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-targeted radiotracer 18F-DCFPyL in detecting and localizing recurrent prostate cancer. Approved by the FDA last month, the radiotracer identified metastatic lesions with high positive predictive values regardless of anatomic region, adding to the evidence that PSMA-targeted radiotracers are
18h
Scientists explain the crucial role of motor proteins in cell division
Proper chromosome segregation into two future daughter cells requires the mitotic spindle to elongate in anaphase. However, although some candidate proteins are implicated in this process, the molecular mechanism that drives spindle elongation in human cells has been unknown until now. Researchers at the Croatian Ruđer Bošković Institute (RBI) have discovered the exact molecular mechanism of bridg
18h
New web tool fights antibacterial resistance
In 1943, two scientists named Max Delbrück and Salvador Luria conducted an experiment to show that bacteria can mutate randomly, independent of external stimulus, such as an antibiotic that threatens a bacterial cells' survival. Today the Luria-Delbrück experiment is widely used in laboratories for a different purpose—scientists use this classic experiment to determine microbial mutation rates. Wh
19h
Common cold combats COVID-19, study finds
In a new study, the researchers found that the common respiratory virus jump-starts the activity of interferon-stimulated genes, early-response molecules in the immune system which can halt replication of the SARS-CoV-2 virus within airway tissues infected with the cold.
19h
Rarest bee genus in North America is not so rare after all
Canadian researchers have discovered that a bee thought to be rarest in North America, as the only representative of its genus, is no more than an unusual specimen of a widespread species. They have reclassified the mystery bee, collected in Nevada in the 1870s, as an aberrant specimen of the California digger-cuckoo bee, a cleptoparasitic bee, with females that lay eggs in the nests of digger bee
19h
From symmetry to asymmetry: The two sides of life
Researchers used innovative imaging techniques to demonstrate symmetric collective alignment of nuclei in the muscle cells of the anterior midgut of the Drosophila embryo. This 'collective nuclear behavior' further influences bilateral asymmetry in the development of internal organs. A clear understanding of the factors that influence the shape and location of viscera will help inform future resea
19h
Karen Kwon
Contributor is a science journalist based in the Washington, D.C. area, currently working at Inside Science as a science writing intern. She is also a graduate student in the Science, Health & Environmental Reporting Program (SHERP) at New York University. Originally from Seoul, Korea, she was a 2020 AAAS Mass Media Fellow at Scientific American and has a Ph.D. in chemistry. Follow her on Twitte
19h
Hollywood sexism still tarnishes female journalists
Sexist portrayals of female journalists on TV and in movies can reinforce existing bias, research finds. When a fictional female journalist appears on screen, chances are she's about to sleep with one of her sources. It's a trope that infuriates actual women in news media—and it can have real-life consequences, says University of Florida researcher Frank Waddell. In shows like House of Cards and
19h
The long view
What will the Earth be like for our children and grandchildren, as temperatures continue to rise? We can be fairly certain of some things: Some regions will become inhospitable, as heat drives their inhabitants away or causes massive declines and changes in their ecosystems. Many other physical, chemical and biological processes will also be affected by rising temperatures that threaten critical e
19h
Vad alla SARS-CoV-2-viruspartiklar väger tillsammans
En artikel i den amerikanska vetenskapsakademins tidskrift (PNAS) med Ron Sender som första författare görs en beräkning av massan av alla viruspartiklar av SARS-CoV-2-typ som mänskligheten bär på under den nuvarande pandemin. Man har kommit fram till, att de tillsammans väger mellan 0,1 och 10 kg. Knappast tyngre än vad en enda person kan bära med sig i fickorna eller handväskan.
19h
Over half of cardiovascular disease deaths worldwide occur in Asia
The number of people dying from cardiovascular disease (CVD) in Asia is increasing rapidly, with over half of all CVD deaths globally in 2019 occurring in Asian countries, according to a state-of-the-art review paper published in the inaugural issue of JACC: Asia. The data demonstrates an urgent need to understand the burdens and epidemiological features of CVD in Asian countries to develop locali
19h
A push for a shift in the value system that defines "impact" and "success"
Discussions of a broken value system are ubiquitous in science, especially after the COVID-19 pandemic served to expose inequality globally. However, according to the authors of an article publishing 15th June 2021 in the open access journal PLOS Biology, science itself is not "broken," but it was built on deeply-entrenched, systemic sexist and racist values, which perpetuate biases through the co
19h
GPS-wearing hippos track anthrax outbreak
Hippos offered scientists a window into the progression of an anthrax outbreak that struck Ruaha National Park, Tanzania, in the dry season of 2017. Through surveys and GPS monitoring, researchers learned that reduced dry-season flows in the Great Ruaha River indirectly spread the disease by affecting hippo movement. The results, which appear in the journal Ecosphere , present a unique perspectiv
20h
What makes us sneeze?
What exactly triggers a sneeze? A team has identified, in mice, specific cells and proteins that control the sneeze reflex. Better understanding of what causes us to sneeze — specifically how neurons behave in response to allergens and viruses — may point to treatments capable of slowing the spread of infectious respiratory diseases.
20h
Fungal spores from 250-year-old collections given new lease of life
The biological and historical diversity in museum collections is staggering, with specimens collected across centuries by some of the most famous scientists in history. In a new study, researchers successfully revived museal fungal specimens that were more than 250 years old and used the live cultures for whole genome sequencing and physiological experiments.
20h
A push for a shift in the value system that defines 'impact' and 'success'
Discussions of a broken value system are ubiquitous in science, especially after the COVID-19 pandemic served to expose inequality globally. However, according to the authors of an article publishing 15th June 2021 in the open access journal PLOS Biology, science itself is not "broken," but it was built on deeply-entrenched, systemic sexist and racist values, which perpetuate biases through the co
20h
Every workplace can be a place of continual learning
While businesses in every sector have been working toward a digital transformation for the past several years, covid-19 accelerated this shift across industries. New technologies are advancing at a pace that requires employers to continuously retrain their workforce to stay current. Organizations must become places of learning if they are to prepare workers for jobs of the future. Joe Schaefer is
20h
Sequencing of wastewater can help monitor SARS-COV-2 variants
Viral genome sequencing of wastewater can provide an early warning system of emerging SARS-CoV-2 variants that is independent of investigations of identified clinical cases, according to a new study published in mSystems, an open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology. In the study, researchers describe the detection and quantification of variant B.1.1.7, first identified in south
20h
Preference for round numbers skews job stats in the news
Journalists' preference for round numbers can influence elections, new research indicates. The findings may clarify how the media's choices about what to cover influence the way people vote—and, consequently, election results. Gregory J. Martin, an assistant professor of political economy at Stanford Graduate School of Business, teamed up with Marcel Garzopen, an associate professor of economics
21h
Receptor location in heart plays a key role in their function
In the heart there are two different subtypes of beta-adrenergic receptors—beta1 and beta2—which are activated by the stress hormones adrenaline and noradrenaline. They both trigger the strongest stimulation of the heart rate and pumping capacity that we know of. The two subtypes are highly similar biochemically, but differ substantially in terms of their functional and therapeutic relevance.
21h
Snails toting world's tiniest computers solve extinction mystery
New research with snails wearing the world's smallest computer explains the survival of a particular species in the face of extinction of many others. More than 50 species of tree snail in the South Pacific Society Islands were wiped out following the introduction of an alien predatory snail in the 1970s, but the white-shelled Partula hyalina survived. Now scientists understand why: P. hyalina ca
21h
Scientists trying to make California forests more fire resilient
To the untrained eye, the scrubby slope off Wentworth Springs Road in the Eldorado National Forest looks like any other patch of Sierra Nevada ridgetop. Tufted in native shrubs and flecked by darkened pine stumps, it's part of a 30,000-acre swath of land that was deforested in 2014, when the King fire tore through 17 miles of canyon in less than six hours.
21h
New studies identify how tuberculosis destroy the lungs and how to protect them
A "3D Culture System" developed by University of Southampton has closely replicated how cells infected with TB change in the human lung. Analytical evidence of these changes identified 7 key gene changes that cause damage in the lungs, from hundreds of thousands. A second trial showed that a common antibiotic, doxycycline, could help reverse these changes and speed up recovery.
21h
Anthropogenic lead pervasive in Canadian Arctic seawater [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Anthropogenic Pb is widespread in the environment including remote places. However, its presence in Canadian Arctic seawater is thought to be negligible based on low dissolved Pb (dPb) concentrations and proxy data. Here, we measured dPb isotopes in Arctic seawater with very low dPb concentrations (average ∼5 pmol ⋅ kg−1)…
21h
Restriction of SARS-CoV-2 replication by targeting programmed -1 ribosomal frameshifting [Biochemistry]
Translation of open reading frame 1b (ORF1b) in severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) requires a programmed −1 ribosomal frameshift (−1 PRF) promoted by an RNA pseudoknot. The extent to which SARS-CoV-2 replication may be sensitive to changes in −1 PRF efficiency is currently unknown. Through an unbiased, reporter-based…
21h
AI-based spectroscopic monitoring of real-time interactions between SARS-CoV-2 and human ACE2 [Chemistry]
The novel coronavirus, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), invades a human cell via human angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (hACE2) as the entry, causing the severe coronavirus disease (COVID-19). The interactions between hACE2 and the spike glycoprotein (S protein) of SARS-CoV-2 hold the key to understanding the molecular mechanism to…
21h
Validating model-based Bayesian integration using prior-cost metamers [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
There are two competing views on how humans make decisions under uncertainty. Bayesian decision theory posits that humans optimize their behavior by establishing and integrating internal models of past sensory experiences (priors) and decision outcomes (cost functions). An alternative hypothesis posits that decisions are optimized through trial and error without…
21h
Functional compartmentalization and metabolic separation in a prokaryotic cell [Microbiology]
The prokaryotic cell is traditionally seen as a "bag of enzymes," yet its organization is much more complex than in this simplified view. By now, various microcompartments encapsulating metabolic enzymes or pathways are known for Bacteria. These microcompartments are usually small, encapsulating and concentrating only a few enzymes, thus protecting…
21h
Monocarboxylate transporter antagonism reveals metabolic vulnerabilities of viral-driven lymphomas [Microbiology]
Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) is a ubiquitous herpesvirus that typically causes asymptomatic infection but can promote B lymphoid tumors in the immune suppressed. In vitro, EBV infection of primary B cells stimulates glycolysis during immortalization into lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs). Lactate export during glycolysis is crucial for continued proliferation of many…
21h
Early role for a Na+,K+-ATPase (ATP1A3) in brain development [Genetics]
Osmotic equilibrium and membrane potential in animal cells depend on concentration gradients of sodium (Na+) and potassium (K+) ions across the plasma membrane, a function catalyzed by the Na+,K+-ATPase α-subunit. Here, we describe ATP1A3 variants encoding dysfunctional α3-subunits in children affected by polymicrogyria, a developmental malformation of the cerebral cortex…
21h
TAK1 inhibition elicits mitochondrial ROS to block intracellular bacterial colonization [Immunology and Inflammation]
Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 7 (MAP3K7), known as TAK1, is an intracellular signaling intermediate of inflammatory responses. However, a series of mouse Tak1 gene deletion analyses have revealed that ablation of TAK1 does not prevent but rather elicits inflammation, which is accompanied by elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS)….
21h
Fever supports CD8+ effector T cell responses by promoting mitochondrial translation [Immunology and Inflammation]
Fever can provide a survival advantage during infection. Metabolic processes are sensitive to environmental conditions, but the effect of fever on T cell metabolism is not well characterized. We show that in activated CD8+ T cells, exposure to febrile temperature (39 °C) augmented metabolic activity and T cell effector functions,…
21h
Anthropogenic depletion of Iran's aquifers [Sustainability Science]
Global groundwater assessments rank Iran among countries with the highest groundwater depletion rate using coarse spatial scales that hinder detection of regional imbalances between renewable groundwater supply and human withdrawals. Herein, we use in situ data from 12,230 piezometers, 14,856 observation wells, and groundwater extraction points to provide ground-based evidence…
21h
Long-read sequencing revealed cooccurrence, host range, and potential mobility of antibiotic resistome in cow feces [Environmental Sciences]
While it is well recognized that the environmental resistome is global, diverse, and augmented by human activities, it has been difficult to assess risk because of the inability to culture many environmental organisms, and it is difficult to evaluate risk from current sequence-based environmental methods. The four most important criteria…
21h
Evidence for even parity unconventional superconductivity in Sr2RuO4 [Physics]
Unambiguous identification of the superconducting order parameter symmetry in Sr2RuO4 has remained elusive for more than a quarter century. While a chiral p-wave ground state analogue to superfluid 3He-A was ruled out only very recently, other proposed triplet-pairing scenarios are still viable. Establishing the condensate magnetic susceptibility reveals a sharp…
21h
Electrochemical quantification of accelerated FADGDH rates in aqueous nanodroplets [Biochemistry]
Enzymes are molecules that catalyze reactions critical to life. These catalysts are often studied in bulk water, where the influence of water volume on reactivity is neglected. Here, we demonstrate rate enhancement of up to two orders of magnitude for enzymes trapped in submicrometer water nanodroplets suspended in 1,2-dichloroethane. When…
21h
A single-cell-resolution fate map of endoderm reveals demarcation of pancreatic progenitors by cell cycle [Developmental Biology]
A progenitor cell could generate a certain type or multiple types of descendant cells during embryonic development. To make all the descendant cell types and developmental trajectories of every single progenitor cell clear remains an ultimate goal in developmental biology. Characterizations of descendant cells produced by each uncommitted progenitor for…
21h
Unaccounted CO2 leaks downstream of a large tropical hydroelectric reservoir [Environmental Sciences]
Recent studies show that tropical hydroelectric reservoirs may be responsible for substantial greenhouse gas emissions to the atmosphere, yet emissions from the surface of released water downstream of the dam are poorly characterized if not neglected entirely from most assessments. We found that carbon dioxide (CO2) emission downstream of Kariba…
21h
Attention, awareness, and the right temporoparietal junction [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
The attention schema theory posits a specific relationship between subjective awareness and attention, in which awareness is the control model that the brain uses to aid in the endogenous control of attention. In previous experiments, we developed a behavioral paradigm in human subjects to manipulate awareness and attention. The paradigm…
21h
Groundwater dependence of riparian woodlands and the disrupting effect of anthropogenically altered streamflow [Sustainability Science]
Riparian ecosystems fundamentally depend on groundwater, especially in dryland regions, yet their water requirements and sources are rarely considered in water resource management decisions. Until recently, technological limitations and data gaps have hindered assessment of groundwater influences on riparian ecosystem health at the spatial and temporal scales relevant to policy…
21h
Computational modeling of ovarian cancer dynamics suggests optimal strategies for therapy and screening [Medical Sciences]
High-grade serous tubo-ovarian carcinoma (HGSC) is a major cause of cancer-related death. Treatment is not uniform, with some patients undergoing primary debulking surgery followed by chemotherapy (PDS) and others being treated directly with chemotherapy and only having surgery after three to four cycles (NACT). Which strategy is optimal remains controversial….
21h
Interleukin-6 is an activator of pituitary stem cells upon local damage, a competence quenched in the aging gland [Cell Biology]
Stem cells in the adult pituitary are quiescent yet show acute activation upon tissue injury. The molecular mechanisms underlying this reaction are completely unknown. We applied single-cell transcriptomics to start unraveling the acute pituitary stem cell activation process as occurring upon targeted endocrine cell–ablation damage. This stem cell reaction was…
21h
Localized chondro-ossification underlies joint dysfunction and motor deficits in the Fkbp10 mouse model of osteogenesis imperfecta [Medical Sciences]
Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a genetic disorder that features wide-ranging defects in both skeletal and nonskeletal tissues. Previously, we and others reported that loss-of-function mutations in FK506 Binding Protein 10 (FKBP10) lead to skeletal deformities in conjunction with joint contractures. However, the pathogenic mechanisms underlying joint dysfunction in OI are…
21h
Host's guardian protein counters degenerative symbiont evolution [Evolution]
Microbial symbioses significantly contribute to diverse organisms, where long-lasting associations tend to result in symbiont genome erosion, uncultivability, extinction, and replacement. How such inherently deteriorating symbiosis can be harnessed to stable partnership is of general evolutionary interest. Here, we report the discovery of a host protein essential for sustaining symbiosis….
21h
De novo determination of near-surface electrostatic potentials by NMR [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Electrostatic potentials computed from three-dimensional structures of biomolecules by solving the Poisson–Boltzmann equation are widely used in molecular biophysics, structural biology, and medicinal chemistry. Despite the approximate nature of the Poisson–Boltzmann theory, validation of the computed electrostatic potentials around biological macromolecules is rare and methodologically limited. H
21h
Information-theoretic measures of superconductivity in a two-dimensional doped Mott insulator [Physics]
A key open issue in condensed-matter physics is how quantum and classical correlations emerge in an unconventional superconductor from the underlying normal state. We study this problem in a doped Mott insulator with information-theory tools on the two-dimensional (2D) Hubbard model at finite temperature with cluster dynamical mean-field theory. We…
21h
The iron chaperone and nucleic acid-binding activities of poly(rC)-binding protein 1 are separable and independently essential [Cell Biology]
Poly(rC)-binding protein (PCBP1) is a multifunctional adaptor protein that can coordinate single-stranded nucleic acids and iron–glutathione complexes, altering the processing and transfer of these ligands through interactions with other proteins. Multiple phenotypes are ascribed to cells lacking PCBP1, but the relative contribution of RNA, DNA, or iron chaperone activity is…
21h
Sensing of intracellular Hcp levels controls T6SS expression in Vibrio cholerae [Microbiology]
The type 6 secretion system (T6SS) is a bacterial weapon broadly distributed in gram-negative bacteria and used to kill competitors and predators. Featuring a long and double-tubular structure, this molecular machine is energetically costly to produce and thus is likely subject to diverse regulation strategies that are largely ill defined….
21h
A mycorrhiza-associated receptor-like kinase with an ancient origin in the green lineage [Plant Biology]
Receptor-like kinases (RLKs) are key cell signaling components. The rice ARBUSCULAR RECEPTOR-LIKE KINASE 1 (OsARK1) regulates the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) association postarbuscule development and belongs to an undefined subfamily of RLKs. Our phylogenetic analysis revealed that ARK1 has an ancient paralogue in spermatophytes, ARK2. Single ark2 and ark1/ark2 double mutants…
21h
Increased expression of LAP2{beta} eliminates nuclear membrane ruptures in nuclear lamin-deficient neurons and fibroblasts [Medical Sciences]
Defects or deficiencies in nuclear lamins cause pathology in many cell types, and recent studies have implicated nuclear membrane (NM) ruptures as a cause of cell toxicity. We previously observed NM ruptures and progressive cell death in the developing brain of lamin B1–deficient mouse embryos. We also observed frequent NM…
21h
Soil metabolome response to whole-ecosystem warming at the Spruce and Peatland Responses under Changing Environments experiment [Environmental Sciences]
In this study, a suite of complementary environmental geochemical analyses, including NMR and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analyses of central metabolites, Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS) of secondary metabolites, and lipidomics, was used to investigate the influence of organic matter (OM) quality on the heterotrophic microbial mechanisms…
21h
Tailoring electrocatalytic activity of in situ crafted perovskite oxide nanocrystals via size and dopant control [Engineering]
Perovskite oxides (ABO3) have been widely recognized as a class of promising noble-metal–free electrocatalysts due to their unique compositional flexibility and structural stability. Surprisingly, investigation into their size-dependent electrocatalytic properties, in particular barium titanate (BaTiO3), has been comparatively few and limited in scope. Herein, we report the scrutiny of size-…
21h
Time-restricted feeding protects the blood pressure circadian rhythm in diabetic mice [Systems Biology]
The quantity and quality of food intake have been considered crucial for peoples' wellness. Only recently has it become appreciated that the timing of food intake is also critical. Nondipping blood pressure (BP) is prevalent in diabetic patients and is associated with increased cardiovascular events. However, the causes and mechanisms…
21h
The most ancient ice in the Alps will be preserved in Antarctica
The Ice Memory international mission on Monte Rosa has been accomplished. After working for five days at 4,500 meters in the accumulation zone of the Grenzgletscher, the glacier saddle of Colle Gnifetti, scientists extracted three shallow ice cores (15-22 meters) and two deep ice cores reaching down to bedrock at 82 meters depth.
21h
Researchers develop more reliable rapid tests for COVID-19
Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) have developed two rapid diagnostic tests for COVID-19 that are nearly as accurate as the gold-standard test currently used in laboratories. Unlike the gold standard test, which extracts RNA and uses it to amplify the DNA of the virus, these new tests can detect the presence of the virus in as little as five minutes using differe
22h
Hippos and anthrax
Hippopotamus aren't the first thing that come to mind when considering epidemiology and disease ecology. And yet these amphibious megafauna offered UC Santa Barbara ecologist Keenan Stears a window into the progression of an anthrax outbreak that struck Ruaha National Park, Tanzania, in the dry season of 2017.
22h
Team closes in on first drug to treat deadly liver cancer
Researchers have discovered a few classes of therapeutics that destroy fibrolamellar tumor cells growing in mice. Treatment options for the deadly liver cancer, called fibrolamellar carcinoma, are severely lacking. Drugs that work on other liver cancers are not effective, and although progress has been made in identifying the specific genes involved in driving the growth of fibrolamellar tumors,
22h
Inside the world of wildlife trafficking (part one)
We often think of the illegal trade in wildlife as involving charismatic megafauna such as elephants and big cats. But some of the biggest victims are more inconspicuous. Phoebe Weston and Patrick Greenfield from the Guardian's age of extinction project explore wildlife crime in a two part series. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod
22h
Primärvården tyngd av pappersarbete
Personal i primärvården lägger omkring 40 procent av sin arbetstid på administrativa uppgifter. Orsaken kan vara de många myndigheter som är kravställare gentemot vårdcentralerna. Hälso- och sjukvården i Sverige är en del av administrationssamhället. Det innebär att alltmer tid används till att utföra administrativt arbete, som att redovisa, rapportera, kommunicera, mäta, granska och föra statist
22h
Brain cell membranes' lipids may play big role in Alzheimer's progression
Links between lipid imbalance and disease have been established, in which lipid changes increase the formation of amyloid plaques, a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. This imbalance inspired researchers to explore the role of lipids comprising the cellular membranes of brain cells. In Biointerphases, the researchers report on the significant role lipids may play in regulating C99, a protein within
22h
USC Stem Cell scientists make big progress in building mini-kidneys
USC researchers have created what could be a key building block for assembling a synthetic kidney. In a new study, Zhongwei Li and his colleagues describe how they generate rudimentary kidney structures, known as organoids, that resemble the collecting duct system that helps maintain the body's fluid and pH balance by concentrating and transporting urine. The organoids provide a way to study kidne
22h
What you should know about the new Alzheimer's drug
In a highly anticipated announcement, the US Food and Drug Administration last week approved the first new drug for Alzheimer's disease in nearly two decades. That approval was not without controversy. Both before and after the FDA's decision, physicians and researchers expressed a wide variety of perspectives on the drug's potential, given a limited evidence base, and multiple stops and starts i
23h
How to be a professional troublemaker | Luvvie Ajayi Jones
Disrupting the status quo can be scary, but sometimes it's necessary to make the world a fairer place. Reclaiming what it means to be a troublemaker, author Luvvie Ajayi Jones shares three questions to ask yourself when tackling fear and standing up for what you believe in — and urges all of us to speak up in ways that honor ourselves and others. (This conversation, hosted by TED current affairs
23h
Cosmic rays: Coronal mass ejections and cosmic ray observations at Syowa Station in the Antarctic
Solar activities, such as CME(Coronal Mass Ejection), cause geomagnetic storm that is a temporary disturbance of the Earth's magnetosphere. Geomagnetic storms can affect GPS positioning, radio communication, and power transmission system. Solar explosions also emit radiation, which can affect satellite failures, radiation exposure to aircraft crew, and space activity. Therefore, it is important to
23h
New study looks at gender, teaching contracts and grade inflation
A new study, "Under pressure: How faculty gender and contract uncertainty impact students' grades," by Wake Forest University Associate Professor of Economics Amanda Griffith and her co-researcher Veronica Sovero from San Francisco State University looks at how grade inflation may be more likely in classes taught by female adjunct instructors and non-tenured professors.
23h
Recommendations for reproducibility in stem cell research
The ability to program induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and drive their differentiation into a variety of neural cells is essential for studying neurological disorders, including intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDDs). But issues regarding variability and reproducibility from lab to lab make translating discoveries difficult, in turn slowing the progress of IDD research. To addre
23h
Predicting the evolution of a pandemic
The inclusion of biological uncertainty and the latest case data can significantly improve the prediction accuracy of standard epidemiological models of virus transmission, new research led by KAUST and the Kuwait College of Science and Technology (KCST) has shown.
23h
Human-generated noise can contribute to deplete Seagrass Posidonia populations
When exposed to human-made noise, seagrass posidonia reveals permanent severe lesions in their sensory organs that sense gravity, which threatens their survival. This is the main conclusion of a recent study of the Laboratory of Applied Bioacoustics (LAB) of Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya BarcelonaTech (UPC) titled "Seagrass Posidonia is impaired by human-generated noise," which is published
23h
Liver cancer call for help
Rising numbers of liver cancer in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities has led experts at Flinders University to call for more programs, including mobile liver clinics and ultrasound in rural and remote Australia. The Australian study just published in international Lancet journal EClinicalMedicine reveals the survival difference was largely accounted for by factors other than Indigen
23h
Common cold combats COVID-19
In a new study, the researchers found that the common respiratory virus jump-starts the activity of interferon-stimulated genes, early-response molecules in the immune system which can halt replication of the SARS-CoV-2 virus within airway tissues infected with the cold.
23h
Is artificial intelligence the key to preventing relapse of severe mental illness?
New AI software developed by researchers at Flinders University shows promise for enabling timely support ahead of relapse in patients with severe mental illness. In the trial of 304 patients, the AI2 software found that 10% of them were at increased risk of not adhering to treatment plans by failing to take medication or disengaging with health services. This led to interventions which clinicians
23h
New 'recipe' could lead to better COVID-19 vaccines
A new study looking at the way human cells activate the immune system in response to SARS-CoV-2 infection could open the door to even more effective and powerful vaccines against the coronavirus and its rapidly emerging variants. Researchers say it's the first real look at exactly what types of "red flags" the human body uses to enlist the help of T cells—killers the immune system sends out to de
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The Last Holdouts
In 2020, five major storms slammed the Louisiana coast, the most ever in a single season. For many living here, this unprecedented barrage was a final warning. Now Biloxi-Chitimacha-Choctaw tribal members have decided to leave. Pointe-Aux-Chenes, and its neighbor, the Isle de Jean Charles, are about 90 minutes southwest of New Orleans. At some points, they are just a foot above sea level. What ha
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EHRs not meeting the challenges of primary care according to new study
A new study from US Department of Veterans Affairs, Regenstrief Institute and IUPUI researchers reports that electronic health records (EHRs) are not rising to the challenges faced by primary care physicians because EHRs have not been designed or tailored to their specific needs. The study authors recommend implementing a human factors approach to the design or redesign of EHR user interfaces.
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Träna luktsinnet hemma med ny uppfinning
Luktträning var tidigare mest något för vinentusiaster och doftforskare. Men det har coronapandemin ändrat på. Det enskilt tydligaste symptomet på covid-19 är luktförlust. Men långt före coronapandemin såg Simon Niedenthal, doftforskare vid Malmö universitet, ett behov av strukturerad luktträning utanför labb- och sjukhusmiljö. – På frågan vilket sinne du inte skulle vilja förlora skulle de flest
1d
Is it feasible to remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere?
Last week, the media reported that atmospheric carbon dioxide is at its highest levels in more than 4 million years. Carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is one of the primary drivers of global warming. The dip in greenhouse gases associated with reduced travel during the pandemic was a fleeting blip in the larger trend of anthropogenic climate change—climate change driven by human activities. One rea
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This Peer-to-Peer Real Estate Platform Is a Game Changer for Retail Investors
Real estate investing is one of those things that is tightly controlled by a small number of people and companies. And if you don't have the capital or the connections to participate, it can be difficult or impossible to break in. But with peer-to-peer real estate investment platforms like PeerStreet, that's starting to change, and you can be a beneficiary of it by signing up now . Peer-to-peer r
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Nätläkare blottar brister i svenska sjukvårdssystemet
Nätläkare används mest av unga och relativt friska personer i storstäderna. Hur går det ihop med att vården ska vara behovsstyrd och kostnadseffektiv? – Nätläkarna har nischat sig mot patienter med okomplicerade vårdbehov, säger forskaren Peter Bergwall. Svensk sjukvård ska vägledas av behovsprincipen: den med störst behov ska få vård först. Genom politiska reformer har även valfrihet införts som
1d
Analysis: China could boost yields and cut emissions by switching from maize to soy
A large team of researchers, mostly from China, with a few others from the U.S. and Canada, has found that if many of the farmers in China switched from growing maize to growing soy, the country as a whole could boost yields while also reducing greenhouse gas emissions. In their paper published in the journal Nature Food, the researchers describe their county-level analysis of farming practices in
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Chainsaw-carved trees make perfect homes for marsupial phascogale
As a result of logging and severe bushfires, Australian wildlife is facing a severe shortage of tree hollows—holes in the trunks and branches of large old trees. More than 300 species of birds and mammals, including possums, bats, cockatoos, owls and kookaburras, rely on tree hollows for shelter or breeding.
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Why the Earth needs a course correction now
The massive impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on lives and economies underscores that our collective survival and well-being hinges on our willingness to confront environmental threats that have global consequences. Key to protecting lives and making communities more resilient to such threats will be an emphasis on proactive, science-based decision-making at all levels of society. And among the most
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The story behind infinitely recyclable plastic
A multidisciplinary Berkeley Lab team has been working for several years to develop a game-changing plastic that, unlike traditional plastics, can be recycled indefinitely and is not made from petroleum. Their latest milestone was the release of an analysis showing the feasibility and potential outcomes of launching the unique material, called poly(diketoenamine) or PDK, into the market at an indu
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The Novavax Vaccine Data, and Spike Proteins in General
1. Novavax Clinical Data Word came yesterday that Novavax had very good safety and efficacy in the trial of their recombinant protein vaccine. This is good news. By this point, the vaccine is much less needed here in the US, but it could be a very important part of getting many other countries vaccinated, due to its less demanding storage requirements and (relatively) straightforward production p
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Mobilapp mäter trygghet i vardagen
Vad avgör om en ungdom ska råka ut för ett brott – eller själv begå ett? Och kan en mobiltelefon säga något om hur, var och när människor känner sig trygga? Det undersöks i en ny avhandling. I sin avhandling har kriminologen Alexander Engström analyserat gymnasieungdomar som begår brott och utsätts för brott och dessutom mätt tryggheten hos universitetsstudenter genom en mobilapp: – Sambandet mel
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Rogue Planets' Moons Could Harbor Life, Says New Study
CC0 public domain The search for life among the stars naturally focuses on stars . That's where most planets are, after all, but a new analysis from a team of German and Chilean researchers points to another interesting possibility. Perhaps rogue planets that are not tethered to any star could provide a home for life — not on the planet itself but on a moon orbiting that planet . Based on all ava
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How carbon-intensive industries can scale up carbon recycling
New technologies that capture and recycle carbon dioxide from industrial processes such as steel and cement making will be vital if the EU is to meet its goal of slashing greenhouse gas emissions by at least 55% by 2030 and down to zero by 2050. However, while solutions are emerging, more work is needed in order to roll them out at scale, experts say.
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Waking from Coma
There are many amusing movie tropes, mostly used as a shorthand for directors to communicate with the audience. Bags of groceries always have either a loaf of bread or a leafy vegetable sticking out the top, so that you know at a glance they are groceries. Live mics always give a burst of feedback when someone steps up to them. Holograms always glitch, so you know they are holograms. People falli
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Learn The Infrastructure Of The Internet With This Cisco Training Bundle
The modern world thrives on the internet, even if there are some bizarre unintended consequences from tying everything to an Ethernet cable or wireless signal. And as networks grow, the demand for people who know how to design, build, maintain, and protect them becomes even more important. The 2021 Cisco CCNA & CCNP Certification Training Bundle will get you the certifications you need to become
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How to cure all diseases
"I have a passion to solve a problem that is facing millions. I could have a job that makes more money, has normal hours, but this is where I should be right now." Dr Leen Kawas, CEO of Althira Pharma
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Unlabeled PFAS chemicals detected in makeup
Makeup wearers may be absorbing and ingesting potentially toxic per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), according to a new study. The researchers found high fluorine levels–indicating probable presence of PFAS–in about half of makeup tested. Some products underwent further analysis and were all confirmed to contain at least four PFAS of concern. Most products had no PFAS listed on the label.
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Book Review: Irreversible Damage: The Transgender Craze Seducing Our Daughters, by Abigail Shrier
According to Harriet Hall, Abigail Shrier's book describes a disturbing trend: an increasing number of adolescent girls who suddenly self-identify as transgender and demand puberty blockers and gender surgeries. We have no data on how many of them will suffer irreversible damage and regret their decision, and it appears that at least some of them have been unduly influenced by peer pressure, the
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Nanoscale bubble domains with polar topologies in bulk ferroelectrics
Nature Communications, Published online: 15 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23863-w Experimentally manipulating bubble domains remains elusive especially in the bulk form of ferroelectrics. Here, the authors achieve self-confined bubble domains with multiple polar topologies in bulk Bi0.5Na0.5TiO3 ferroelectrics, demonstrating reversible and donut-like domain morphology evolution.
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Neuronal variability reflects probabilistic inference tuned to natural image statistics
Nature Communications, Published online: 15 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23838-x The neural sampling theory suggests that neuronal variability encodes the uncertainty of probabilistic inferences. This paper shows that response variability in primary visual cortex reflects the statistical structure of visual inputs, as required for inferences correctly tuned to the statistics of the natural e
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Structural basis of mechano-chemical coupling by the mitotic kinesin KIF14
Nature Communications, Published online: 15 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23581-3 KIF14 is a mitotic kinesin whose malfunction is associated with cerebral and renal developmental defects and several cancers. Here the authors use cryoEM to determine 20 structures of KIF14 constructs bound to microtubules in the presence of different nucleotide analogues and provide the structural basis for a c
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Significant underestimation of radiative forcing by aerosol–cloud interactions derived from satellite-based methods
Nature Communications, Published online: 15 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23888-1 Satellite-based estimates of radiative forcing by aerosol–cloud interactions are consistently smaller than those from global models, hampering accurate projections of future climate change. Here, the authors show that the discrepancy can be substantially reduced by correcting sampling biases induced by inherent
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Genome sequencing unveils a regulatory landscape of platelet reactivity
Nature Communications, Published online: 15 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23470-9 Platelet aggregation is associated with myocardial infarction and stroke. Here, the authors have conducted a whole genome sequencing association study on platelet aggregation, discovering a locus in RGS18, where enhancer assays suggest an effect on activity of haematopoeitic lineage transcription factors.
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Lasp1 regulates adherens junction dynamics and fibroblast transformation in destructive arthritis
Nature Communications, Published online: 15 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23706-8 Fibroblast-like synoviocytes are important mediators of joint pathology in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here the authors show that Lasp1 is epigenetically regulated and highly expressed by these cells in RA and its deletion can limit joint pathology in a mouse model of inflammatory arthritis.
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IL-6 regulates autophagy and chemotherapy resistance by promoting BECN1 phosphorylation
Nature Communications, Published online: 15 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23923-1 IL-6 is an important cytokine in the tumour microenvironment, but its role in regulating autophagy in cancer cells is unclear. Here the authors show that IL-6 activates autophagy in colorectal cancer through the interaction between JAK2 and autophagy regulator, BECN1, which leads to chemotherapeutic resistance.
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Super-resolution label-free volumetric vibrational imaging
Nature Communications, Published online: 15 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23951-x Super-resolution microscopy is often limited by photobleaching or uneven distribution of fluorophores. The authors present a label-free superresolution method termed VISTA, combining sample-expansion and vibrational imaging, with resolution down to 78 nm in protein-rich biological structures in cells and tissues
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Future job title: Genetic Reconstructionist
I'm imagining a very positive future at this moment so thought I'd throw up a possible future situation. Let's assume we have overcome most of the ecological challenges and many risks we will have in the coming decades. We are allowing ecosystems to recover but are aware they won't ever be what they used to be. So we decide to play God. We support ecosystems that have niches that are low life den
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Insect Population Decline/Climate Anxiety is driving me insane
Hello. In the past 2 years, ever since I became aware of the issues plaguing our planet – both political and environmental – my anxiety has reached new heights and is now seriously interfering with my day-to-day life. I have become incapable of enjoying most things, and I have frequent anxiety attacks. No matter what I do these issues are always on the back of my mind and nothing can alleviate fe
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Boeing Study Casts Doubt on Air Purifiers Used in Schools
Boeing found minimal or no reduction of pathogens on surfaces when treated with air purifier ionization technology made by Global Plasma Solutions. The study has been cited in a proposed class-action lawsuit that contends GPS makes "deceptive, misleading, and false" claims about its products.
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NASA snow campaign wraps for 2021
As the last snow melts, NASA's SnowEx teams are packing up the snowshoes, skis, and scientific instruments they've used all winter to study snow in mountains and prairies. Now, they're turning their attention to a different kind of mountain—all of the data they collected.
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Job-related stress threatens the teacher supply: RAND survey
Nearly one in four teachers may leave their job by the end of the current (2020-'21) school year, compared with one in six who were likely to leave prior to the pandemic, according to a new RAND Corporation survey. Teachers who identified as Black or African American were particularly likely to consider leaving.
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My Lab Uses Ultrasound to Stimulate Unconscious Patients – Facts So Romantic
Ultrasound can be a neuromodulator—to increase or decrease the likelihood that neurons will fire. Exactly how this works remains unclear, but it likely results from the physical "shaking" of neurons. Illustration by Jackie Niam / Shutterstock A few years ago, at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, I escaped the noisy midday hustle and bustle, ducking into a room in the Intensive Care Unit. It was
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A new reporter mouse line to detect mitophagy changes during muscle tissue loss
The information presented in this study is primarily positioned to benefit scientists and experts in Cellular Physiology and Histochemistry where new tools to discover therapeutic targets for muscle atrophy are needed. The study outlines the development of a new fluorescent reporter mouse line to detect changes in mitophagy activity. These findings could revolutionize treatment strategies and poss
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Job-related stress threatens the teacher supply – RAND survey
Nearly one in four teachers may leave their job by the end of the current (2020-'21) school year, compared with one in six who were likely to leave prior to the pandemic, according to a new RAND Corporation survey. Teachers who identified as Black or African American were particularly likely to consider leaving. These results suggest potential immediate and long-term threats to the teacher supply.
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Young adults' alcohol use increases when casually dating
When young adults are more interested in socializing and casually dating, they tend to drink more alcohol, according to a new paper led by a Washington State University professor.On the other hand, scientists found that when young adults are in serious relationships, are not interested in dating or place less importance on friendship, their alcohol use was significantly lower.
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Head impacts and abnormal imaging findings in youth football players over consecutive seasons
Researchers examined the frequency and severity of head impacts experienced by youth football players and how exposure to head impacts changes from one year to the next in returning players. The researchers then compared the resulting data with findings on neuroimaging studies obtained over consecutive years in the same athletes. The comparison demonstrated a significant positive association betwe
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New PET tracer detects hallmark of Alzheimer's disease years before symptoms emerge
A novel PET radiotracer has been shown to effectively measure increases in brain tau–a distinguishing characteristic of Alzheimer's disease–before any symptoms of the disease are observed. With the potential to measure increases in tau over a long period of time, this tracer offers an important tool to assess the effectiveness of Alzheimer's disease treatments in clinical trials. This research w
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Novel radiopharmaceutical tracks 'master switch' protein responsible for cancer growth
A protein that is critical in cancer cell metabolism has been imaged for the first time with a newly developed radiopharmaceutical, 18F-DASA-23. Imaging with this novel agent has the potential to improve the assessment of treatment response for patients, specifically those with brain tumors. This study was presented at the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging 2021 Annual Meeting.
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