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Nyheder2021juni17

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Using semiconductors and silicon coated glass as outer shell scientists have achieved flexibile, denss, high performance and low power micro computers for the first time. They overcame few production and technology issues and these techniques will further micro technologies advancements. flexible electronics can be used as addition to existing technologies or implemented on or in humans. 
https://techxplore.com/news/2021-06-technique-flexible-electronics.html
Study finds potentially druggable process of SARS-CoV-2 replication
Of all the proteins of the SARS-CoV-2 virus (the pathogen that causes COVID-19), the spike protein is the one that gets the most attention. This attention is well-deserved—the spike protein is essential for latching on to cells and infecting a host, and the three FDA-authorized vaccines against COVID-19 focus on the spike protein. While the initial invasion of a virus into a host is certainly an i
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LATEST

Pupil size surprisingly linked to differences in intelligence
Researchers find a correlation between pupil size and differences in cognitive ability. The larger the pupil, the higher the intelligence. The explanation for why this happens lies within the brain, but more research is needed. What can you tell by looking into someone's eyes? You can spot a glint of humor, signs of tiredness, or maybe that they don't like something or someone. But outside of ass
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Largest structures in the universe show clear light-shifted signal of rotation
By mapping the motion of galaxies in huge filaments that connect the cosmic web, astronomers at the Leibniz Institute for Astrophysics Potsdam (AIP), in collaboration with scientists in China and Estonia, have found that these long tendrils of galaxies spin on the scale of hundreds of millions of light years. A rotation on such enormous scales has never been seen before. The results published in N
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Study points to a seed black hole produced by a dark matter halo collapse
Supermassive black holes, or SMBHs, are black holes with masses that are several million to billion times the mass of our sun. The Milky Way hosts an SMBH with mass a few million times the solar mass. Surprisingly, astrophysical observations show that SMBHs already existed when the universe was very young. For example, a billion solar mass black holes are found when the universe was just 6% of its
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Mystery of Betelgeuse's dip in brightness solved
When Betelgeuse, a bright orange star in the constellation of Orion, became visibly darker in late 2019 and early 2020, the astronomy community was puzzled. A team of astronomers have now published new images of the star's surface, taken using the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope (ESO's VLT), that clearly show how its brightness changed. The new research reveals that the star w
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Study: Half of US cosmetics contain toxic chemicals
More than half the cosmetics sold in the United States and Canada likely contain high levels of a toxic industrial compound linked to serious health conditions, including cancer and reduced birth weight, according to a new study.
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Negev Desert archaeological site illuminates an important chapter in modern humans' origin
The Boker Tachtit archaeological excavation site in Israel's central Negev desert holds clues to one of the most significant events in human history: the spread of modern humans, Homo sapiens, from Africa into Eurasia, and the subsequent demise of Neanderthal populations in the region. Researchers from the Weizmann Institute of Science and the Max Planck Society, led by Prof. Elisabetta Boaretto,
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Self-healing concrete could multiply lifespans of structures
Researchers at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) are using an enzyme found in red blood cells to create self-healing concrete that is four times more durable than traditional concrete, extending the life of concrete-based structures and eliminating the need for expensive repairs or replacements. The work, published in the peer-reviewed journal Applied Materials Today, uses an enzyme that autom
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The electron merry-go-round: Researchers find new mechanism for classical behavior of many-particle quantum systems
Photoemission is a property of metals and other materials that emit electrons when struck by light. Electron emission after light absorption was already explained by Albert Einstein. But since this effect is a highly complex process, scientists have still not been able to fully elucidate its details. Prof. Dr. Bernd von Issendorff and his team at the University of Freiburg's Institute of Physics h
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Rare superconductor may be vital for quantum computing
Research led by the University of Kent and the STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory has resulted in the discovery of a new rare topological superconductor, LaPt3P. This discovery may be of huge importance to the future operations of quantum computers.
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Study investigates the behavior of magnetar SGR J1745–2900
Using NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR), Russian astronomers have investigated the behavior of a magnetar known as SGR J1745–2900 after its outburst in April 2013. Results of the study, published June 9 on arXiv.org, could be essential to better understand the nature of this magnetar.
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Advocating reimbursement parity for nurse practitioners
The current Medicare reimbursement policy for nurse practitioners (NPs) allows NPs to directly bill Medicare for services that they perform, but they are reimbursed at only 85% of the physician rate. A growing number of states are granting full practice authority to nurse practitioners. Even more states have loosened practice restrictions due to COVID-19. Both of these reasons illustrate why payme
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Disrupted osteocyte connectivity and pericellular fluid flow in bone with aging and defective TGF-{beta} signaling [Cell Biology]
Skeletal fragility in the elderly does not simply result from a loss of bone mass. However, the mechanisms underlying the concurrent decline in bone mass, quality, and mechanosensitivity with age remain unclear. The important role of osteocytes in these processes and the age-related degeneration of the intricate lacunocanalicular network (LCN)…
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Potency boost of a Mycobacterium tuberculosis dihydrofolate reductase inhibitor by multienzyme F420H2-dependent reduction [Microbiology]
Triaza-coumarin (TA-C) is a Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) inhibitor with an IC50 (half maximal inhibitory concentration) of ∼1 µM against the enzyme. Despite this moderate target inhibition, TA-C shows exquisite antimycobacterial activity (MIC50, concentration inhibiting growth by 50% = 10 to 20 nM). Here, we investigated the mechanism…
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Proteasomal conformation controls unfolding ability [Biochemistry]
The 26S proteasome is the macromolecular machine responsible for the bulk of protein degradation in eukaryotic cells. As it degrades a ubiquitinated protein, the proteasome transitions from a substrate-accepting conformation (s1) to a set of substrate-processing conformations (s3 like), each stabilized by different intramolecular contacts. Tools to study these conformational…
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Helicobacter pylori's historical ȷourney through Siberia and the Americas [Evolution]
The gastric bacterium Helicobacter pylori shares a coevolutionary history with humans that predates the out-of-Africa diaspora, and the geographical specificities of H. pylori populations reflect multiple well-known human migrations. We extensively sampled H. pylori from 16 ethnically diverse human populations across Siberia to help resolve whether ancient northern Eurasian populations…
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Lipophilic statin use linked to increased risk of dementia
In patients with mild cognitive impairment, taking lipophilic statins more than doubles their risk of developing dementia compared to those who do not take statins. According to research presented at the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging 2021 Annual Meeting, positron emission tomography (PET) scans of lipophilic statin users revealed a highly significant decline in metabolism in th
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The absolute chronology of Boker Tachtit (Israel) and implications for the Middle to Upper Paleolithic transition in the Levant [Anthropology]
The Initial Upper Paleolithic (IUP) is a crucial lithic assemblage type in the archaeology of southwest Asia because it marks a dramatic shift in hominin populations accompanied by technological changes in material culture. This phase is conventionally divided into two chronocultural phases based on the Boker Tachtit site, central Negev,…
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Unlabeled PFAS chemicals detected in makeup
Makeup wearers may be absorbing and ingesting potentially toxic per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), according to a new study. The researchers found high fluorine levels–indicating probable presence of PFAS–in about half of makeup tested. Some products underwent further analysis and were all confirmed to contain at least four PFAS of concern. Most products had no PFAS listed on the label.
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Third of UK hospital Covid patients had 'do not resuscitate' order in first wave
Study found increase in people with DNACPR decisions compared with before pandemic Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Almost a third of patients admitted to hospital with suspected Covid-19 during the first wave of the pandemic had a "do not resuscitate" decision recorded before or on their day of admission, research suggests. This is higher than the rates reported in p
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Scientists convert used plastic bottles into vanilla flavouring
Production of chemical could help make recycling more attractive and tackle global plastic pollution Plastic bottles have been converted into vanilla flavouring using genetically engineered bacteria, the first time a valuable chemical has been brewed from waste plastic. Upcycling plastic bottles into more lucrative materials could make the recycling process far more attractive and effective. Curr
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Astronomer: Aliens Will Most Likely Resemble AI if We Ever Make Contact
If we ever make contact with an extraterrestrial civilization, we're unlikely to find a group of little green Martians running around. That's at least according to Seth Shostak, senior astronomer and director at the Center for SETI (Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) Research. In a recent opinion piece for The Guardian , Shostak argues that we are far more likely to encounter beings that r
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The Covid Delta variant: how effective are the vaccines?
Analysis: what protection do they offer against infection, hospital admission and death? Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage As lockdown easing in England is delayed from 21 June to a possible date of 19 July amid concerns of a substantial wave of hospitalisations due to the Delta variant of coronavirus, we take a look at the latest data on the protection offered by vacc
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The Delta variant is spreading. What does it mean for the US?
Covid-19 cases have fallen far below the winter peak, but the Delta variant has roughly doubled every two weeks in the US Scientists in the United States are anxiously watching the Delta variant of Covid-19, as it spreads through an unevenly vaccinated American public and an economy that is rapidly reopening. The Delta variant, first identified as B.1.617.2 in India, is believed to be more transm
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Supergiant Star Betelgeuse Dimmed Mysteriously, and Now We Know Why
The Great Dimming In late 2019, astronomers noticed something strange: Betelgeuse, a red supergiant in the Orion constellation some 550 light years away from Earth (and the tenth brightest star in the night sky), abruptly dipped in brightness. The strange event, now dubbed the "Great Dimming," had scientists scratching their heads — and leading some to believe it's about to blow up in a supernova
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Company Starts Shipping Its $50,000 Mind-Reading Helmet
California-based startup Kernel is about to start shipping a $50,000 helmet that can analyze neurons being fired in someone's brain to dozens of customers across the US, Bloomberg reports . In other words, a helmet that can, at least to a small degree, read your mind. The technology behind it may have been around for many years, but so far, devices like it have often been as big as rooms and cost
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New drug cuts deaths among patients with no Covid antibodies
Oxford University trial reports cocktail of manmade antibodies reduces fatalities by a fifth Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage A new drug has been found to cut Covid deaths by a fifth among the sickest patients in hospital and may change official practice so that every patient with coronavirus will have an antibody test before they are admitted. The Recovery trial base
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It's Official: Tesla Model S Plaid Fastest Production Car Ever Made
A Winner As seen on a recent episode of "Jay Leno's Garage," the former late night host hit the drag strip at Pomona Raceway in California with Tesla's latest Model S refresh dubbed "Plaid." Leno covered the quarter mile in just 9.247 seconds, speeding up to 152.09 mph, numbers confirmed by representatives from the National Hot Rod Association, who were present during the sprint, as CleanTechnica
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The Materials Scientist Who Studies the Innards of Exoplanets
Out in the vast universe, unknown billions of strange worlds drift around other stars. Many of them are quite unlike anything in our solar system. While astronomers hope to use immense upcoming observatories to get a better look at their outsides, Federica Coppari has been using the world's largest laser to investigate their insides. Coppari compresses familiar substances… Source
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A Google AI Designed a Computer Chip as Well as a Human Engineer—But Much Faster
AI has finally come full circle. A new suite of algorithms by Google Brain can now design computer chips —those specifically tailored for running AI software —that vastly outperform those designed by human experts. And the system works in just a few hours, dramatically slashing the weeks- or months-long process that normally gums up digital innovation. At the heart of these robotic chip designers
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America's 'Great Chief Justice' Was an Unrepentant Slaveholder
John Marshall is America's most important jurist. Biographers are universally laudatory of the "Great Chief Justice." A recent documentary about him (in which I am interviewed) is subtitled The Man Who Made the Supreme Court . This icon of jurisprudence is central to America's constitutional development. For nearly three and a half decades, longer than any other chief justice, he led the Court an
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Vaccines and oxygen run out as third wave of Covid hits Uganda
Vaccine thefts reported and hospitals unable to admit patients as cases leap 2,800% in a month Uganda has all but run out of Covid-19 vaccines and oxygen as the country grapples with another wave of the pandemic. Both private and public medical facilities in the capital, Kampala and in towns across the country – including regional hubs in Entebbe, Jinja, Soroti, Gulu and Masaka – have reported ru
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China Just Launched the First Astronauts to Its Space Station
Big Night China just launched the first astronauts to its nascent space station, who blasted off aboard a Long March 2F rocket. Images show the spacecraft already soaring high above the Earth. "We have invested so much energy," the rocket's designer, Rong Yi, told NBC News . "But I am thrilled to see it fulfill its duty within 10 minutes." Orbit Party The launch is significant because it's the fi
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Slouching Towards Gilead
In June 2019, Kylie Jenner shared with the world some pictures of a birthday party she'd thrown for a friend. The event had a theme: The Handmaid's Tale . It featured guests garbed in blood-red gowns; servers dressed as "Marthas," or women enslaved for household labor; and drinks with such names as "Under His Eye tequila" and "Praise Be vodka." The whole thing was cringey and absurd. It was also,
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The Generational Clash at Pride Is Actually a Sign of Progress
This month, the memes related to LGBTQ Pride celebrations have had a striking theme: disgust. Some people have been sharing images of queer icons and homophobes alike wearing expressions of disapproval—RuPaul frowning on the phone , Little Edie ranting in Grey Gardens , Aunt Lydia scowling in The Handmaid's Tale . The captions say something along the lines of "Gen Z calling the cops after seeing
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Prince Harry is doing a special trauma therapy called EMDR. It worked for me | Christina Wyman
Harry has said that living with the death of his mother, Diana, Princess of Wales makes him feel 'helpless' and 'hunted'. I've been there In an interview last month with Oprah for their jointly produced docuseries about mental health, The Me You Can't See , Prince Harry made a deeply personal disclosure . Harry said he sought a special therapy program, EMDR, to process the death of his mother, Di
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The Rise and Fall of an American Tech Giant
Above, clockwise from bottom-right : Kodak founder George Eastman takes a picture, circa 1925. High Falls in Rochester, New York, Kodak's hometown. Postcard of the Kodak Pavilion at the New York World's Fair, 1964. FIGHT, a group seeking to change Kodak's hiring practices, protests at a shareholders' meeting, 1967. This article was published online on June 16, 2021. W hen I was in fifth grade , m
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Who Is Trump Reaching?
"T he Republican Party is just a name," Steve Bannon told me last week. I had called him to ask about the influence he believes his old boss still carries inside the GOP. "The bulk of it is a populist, nationalist party led by Donald Trump." As for the rest of it? "The Republican Party, pre-2016, are the modern Whigs," he added, referring to the national party that collapsed in the mid-19th centu
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A third of care home staff in some London areas have not had Covid jab
Figures come as Matt Hancock confirms the government plans to make it mandatory for staff to get jab Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage A third of staff in older adult care homes in some areas of London have not received a single vaccine nearly six months after they were made a top priority, in a development that has left more than a 1,000 care workers still unprotected
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Plantwatch: staghorn ferns – the plants that form colonies like bees
Species on Lord Howe Island shows remarkable collaboration, with some plants deflecting water to colony and others soaking it up Staghorn ferns are spectacular plants with fronds that look like antlers, and make very attractive houseplants. One particular species, Platycerium bifurcatum , grows on Lord Howe Island in Australia and lives in colonies of hundreds of individuals. A recent study found
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Elon Musk: "Decided to Sell My Last Remaining House"
No House Just weeks after news emerged Tesla CEO Elon Musk paid zero dollars in federal income tax over several years, the billionaire has decided to cash in and sell the last of his homes, according to a recent tweet. "Decided to sell my last remaining house," Musk tweeted on Monday. "Just needs to go to a large family who will live there. It's a special place." Earlier this month, Musk revealed
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More countries restrict travel from UK over Delta variant fears
Ireland to double to 10 days its quarantine period for UK travellers who are not fully vaccinated Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Ireland is to double to 10 days its quarantine period for travellers from Britain who are not fully vaccinated, joining a growing list of countries imposing stricter travel rules on British arrivals due to concerns over the rapid spread of
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Crayfish behave more boldly after exposure to antidepressants – study
Traces of drugs found in water can make crustaceans more outgoing – but also vulnerable to predators Antidepressant drugs in water can alter the behaviour of crayfish, making them bolder and more outgoing, and therefore more vulnerable to predators, researchers have found. Low levels of antidepressants – excreted by humans or disposed of incorrectly – are found in many water bodies. Researchers f
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Elon Musk Shares New Pic of Giant Starship Rocket Booster
Booster Butt SpaceX has made big progress towards building the first flightworthy prototype of its Starship booster called Super Heavy . An image shared by SpaceX CEO Elon Musk early Tuesday morning shows just how tall the booster prototype already is, towering above the intrepid billionaire inside High Bay, a 265 feet tall vertical assembly structure at the company's South Texas testing faciliti
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Is ignorant bliss better than knowledgable gloom?
The long-running series in which readers answer other readers' questions on subjects ranging from trivial flights of fancy to profound scientific and philosophical concepts Happier people live longer, more pleasant lives. Informed people are weighed down with the woes of the world. So, is ignorant bliss better than knowledgable gloom? Mary Shider, Macclesfield Post your answers (and new questions
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Extremism Has Spread Into the Mainstream
In the two decades since September 11, the U.S. has fought terrorism and extremism by concentrating on law-enforcement and intelligence readiness, with experts focused on disrupting fringe groups before they carry out violence. This Band-Aid approach is ill-suited to combatting modern far-right extremism, which has spread well beyond fringe groups and into the mainstream. The extremism we're now
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Top Gun Is an Infomercial for America
Illustration by Paul Spella; images by Mary Evans / Ronald Grant / Everett Collection This article was published online on June 15, 2021. I n 1983 , the Swedish aerospace and auto company Saab ran an ad with an old premise—sports cars are sexy—and a new twist: Saab's cars, the ad suggests, are as sexy as its fighter jets. The spot makes its case by splicing slo-mo shots of a car and a plane emerg
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Ageing process is unstoppable, finds unprecedented study
Research suggests humans cannot slow the rate at which they get older because of biological constraints Immortality and everlasting youth are the stuff of myths, according to new research which may finally end the eternal debate about whether we can live for ever. Backed by governments, business, academics and investors in an industry worth $110bn (£82.5bn) – and estimated to be worth $610bn by 2
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NASA's Hubble Telescope Just Glitched Into Safe Mode, Whoops
Software Glitch NASA's Hubble Space Telescope experienced an issue with its payload computer, forcing scientific operations to grind to a halt into safe mode over the weekend, according to NASA . Scientists at the agency are planning to switch to a backup memory module some time today, and allow the computer to run for a day to make sure the issue gets resolved. If all goes according to plan, Hub
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The Einstein-Bohr legacy: can we ever figure out what quantum theory means?
The weirdness of quantum theory flies in the face of what we experience in our everyday lives. Quantum weirdness quickly created a split in the physics community, each side championed by a giant: Albert Einstein and Niels Bohr. As two recent books espousing opposing views show, the debate still rages on nearly a century afterward. Each "resolution" comes with a high price tag. Albert Einstein and
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After Decades, Mystery Surrounding Giant Space Explosions Is Solved
Case Closed After decades of confusion, conflicting results, and general chaos, scientists have finally figured out what drives the powerful gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) blasted outward by dying stars. GRBs are extremely short but extremely intense explosions given off when a massive star dies and forms a black hole in its place. But the underlying force driving these focused beams remained a mystery
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Cryptocurrency Miners Bought 700,000 GPUs in Q1 2021
Feature image by Jernej Furman Ever since Ampere's launch in September 2020, there've been questions about how much of the shortage was driven by semiconductors and how much was driven by cryptocurrency demand. Reports over the last 10 months have pointed to various additional causes, including low yields at Samsung, GDDR6 shortages, and ABF (Ajinomoto Build-up Film) shortages. New work from Jon
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Japan could allow up to 10,000 spectators at Tokyo Olympic events
Health experts approve plans to increase cap from 5,000, with final decision expected later this month Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Up to 10,000 people could be allowed to watch Olympic events in Tokyo this summer, after Japanese health experts approved plans to raise the number of spectators at sports venues. The proposed measure would come into force after a Cov
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The People of the Soil Have Won
Updated at 6:05 a.m. ET on June 16, 2021. I grew up in a hidden city. Not a forgotten city, or a faraway city—a hidden city. My hometown, Nizhny Novgorod, lies east of Moscow along the Volga River. It was a center of international trade before the Russian Revolution but was bombed by the Nazis during World War II; to preserve crucial industries housed there, the Soviet authorities effectively clo
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The Atlantic Daily: What We Know About the Delta Coronavirus Variant
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . A new variant of the coronavirus is raising alarms globally. What does it mean for Americans? The bad news: Delta, a scary new variant of the coronavirus, is spreading both stateside and abroad.
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Gove 'pretty confident' end of Covid lockdown in England will not be delayed again
Minister says government trying not to impose 'imprisonment' of restrictions longer than necessary Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Ministers are "pretty confident" that the final lifting of Covid restrictions in England, delayed until 19 July, will not be pushed back again, Michael Gove has said. The Cabinet Office minister sought to reassure people the government wa
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Covid outbreaks in Chinese ports could cause global goods shortages
Combination of rise in demand for products as some countries reopen and lockdowns in some port cities mean prices could climb An outbreak of Covid-19 in southern China has combined with the rapid reopening of the world economy and a shortage of shipping containers to cause a surge in transport costs that could fuel inflation and cause shortages of goods across the globe. China reported 21 new cor
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Why America Doesn't Really Make Solar Panels Anymore
Every week, our lead climate reporter brings you the big ideas, expert analysis, and vital guidance that will help you flourish on a changing planet. Sign up to get T he Weekly Planet , our guide to living through climate change, in your inbox . You wouldn't know it today, but the silicon photovoltaic solar cell—the standard, black-and-copper solar panel you can find on suburban rooftops and sola
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Report: SpaceX Ignored FAA Warnings Before Massive Starship Explosion
Despite last-minute warnings from the Federal Aviation Administration, SpaceX went ahead and launched its first high-altitude Starship prototype in December, a launch that ended in a gigantic explosion , The Verge reports . The prototype, dubbed SN8, violated the company's launch license, as issued by the FAA, according to documents obtained by The Verge . Explosion or not, SpaceX seems to have g
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The 'grand tour' Atlantic Ocean water takes around the world
Scientists at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego and colleagues have created an estimate of the journey water makes around the world ocean basins. They used information from more than 1 billion points of data collected over 25 years.
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China set to administer 1bn Covid vaccine doses by end of this week
Cash incentives and gifts offered to fulfil target of vaccinating 40% of population by end of month Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage China is on track to administer 1bn vaccine doses by the end of this week, after bolstering production and distribution networks in an ambitious drive to vaccinate 40% of the population by this month. Chinese authorities have been encour
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Malicious content exploits pathways between platforms to thrive online, subvert moderation
Malicious COVID-19 online content—including racist content, disinformation and misinformation—thrives and spreads online by bypassing the moderation efforts of individual social media platforms, according to new research published in the journal Scientific Reports. By mapping online hate clusters across six major social media platforms, researchers at the George Washington University show how mali
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China prepares to send astronauts to new space station
Crew reportedly getting ready to blast off this week to the Tiangong on China's longest crewed space mission to date The first crew for China's new space station has reportedly begun final preparations to blast off this week. The mission is China's first crewed spaceflight in nearly five years, and a matter of prestige for the government as it prepares to mark the 100th anniversary of the ruling
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First Astronauts Arrive at China's New Space Station
Arrival After landing a rover on the far side of the Moon and another on the surface of Mars in a matter of just two years, China has completed its next major milestone in space exploration: sending astronauts to the core module of its new space station. Three astronauts successfully entered the country's Tiangong space station on Thursday afternoon Beijing time, just hours after launching from t
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Democracy Is Surprisingly Easy to Undermine
Here's a quiz: Which world leader made the following statements? " We are witnessing the greatest election fraud in the history of the country, in my opinion in the history of any democracy ." " This may be the most important speech I've ever made. I want to provide an update on our ongoing efforts to expose … tremendous voter fraud and irregularities." "The election will be flipped, dear friends
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How do we learn to live with Covid in the UK?
Analysis: Lockdown extension brings questions on when and how UK can draw a line under social distancing The Commons vote to delay step four of England's roadmap out of lockdown has focused attention on when and how the country can draw a line under social distancing and, in the words of the prime minister, "learn to live with the virus". While the surge in cases in Blackburn – one of the origina
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Chinese astronauts reach new space station for three-month mission
Shenzhou-12 carrying three astronauts docks with Tiangong space station after seven-hour flight Astronauts on board China's first crewed spacecraft in nearly five years have reached the new Tiangong space station after blasting off from the Gobi desert. A Long March-2F rocket launched the three astronauts in the Shenzhou-12 spacecraft, which docked with Tianhe, the main section of the Tiangong st
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How the U.S. Made Progress on Climate Change Without Ever Passing a Bill
Here, at least, is the standard story: The past decade has been abysmal for climate-change policy in the United States. In 2009, a handsome new president took office pledging to pass a comprehensive climate bill in Congress. He did not. The Environmental Protection Agency sought to meaningfully reduce carbon pollution from power plants. It did not. The United States joined the Paris Agreement. Th
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Terrifying Robot "Swarm" Gets Smarter the More We Make It Work
Clever Girl A robotics company called Geek+ says it's developed a swarm of autonomous worker robots numbering in the thousands that can learn and improve the more it works, growing smarter over time. Again: The more we work them , the smarter they get . This is probably the beginning of the end. For their part, Geek+ says they've deployed 15,000 of their autonomous robots in about 30 countries, b
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Researchers uncover unique properties of a promising new superconductor
An international team of physicists led by the University of Minnesota has discovered that a unique superconducting metal is more resilient when used as a very thin layer. The research is the first step toward a larger goal of understanding unconventional superconducting states in materials, which could possibly be used in quantum computing in the future.
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The best places to find extraterrestrial life in our solar system, ranked
If you want to believe, now is the time: the hope that we might one day stumble upon alien life is greater than it ever was. No, it's not going to be little green men speeding through space in flying disks—more likely microbes or primitive bacteria. But a discovery like that would nevertheless be a sign that we are not alone in the universe—that life elsewhere is a possibility. Where are we going
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Robot Skin Now Gets Bruised When Punched, Horrifyingly
A team of engineers developed a new kind of artificial skin for robots or prosthetic limbs that actually bruises up when it gets hit, providing both a valuable medical tool and a way to check your progress when you're fighting off a killer robot. Give it a good enough bump, press, or shock and the artificial skin will activate a colorful hydrogel that forms a big purple spot as if it were really
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US Regulators Are Terrified of Stablecoins
Stablecoins US regulators have rung the alarm bells over the recent rise in stablecoins, cryptocurrency tokens that have a fixed price and are backed by fiat currency reserves, Bloomberg reports . The total market capitalization of all stablecoins combined broke $100 billion, showing more and more investors throwing their weight behind the tokens, according to Bloomberg . And that has lawmakers c
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Se när den döende stjärnan kastar ut ett stort mörkt moln
För ett och ett halvt år sedan tappade den röda jättestjärnan Betelgeuse plötsligt ljusstyrka. Förändringen gick att se med blotta ögat på natthimlen. Långtidsobservationer av stjärnan visar nu att stjärnan blev förmörkad – av gas och stoft som den själv kastade ut. Spela klippet och se hur Betelgeuse tappade sin stjärnglans.
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How Animals Color Themselves With Nanoscale Structures
Peacocks, panther chameleons, scarlet macaws, clown fish, toucans, blue-ringed octopuses and so many more: The animal kingdom has countless denizens with extraordinarily colorful beauty. But in many cases, scientists know much more about how the animals use their colors than how they make them. New work continues to reveal those secrets, which often depend on the fantastically precise… Source
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US Military Admits That It Lost 34 Rocket Launchers
Unaccounted for Weapons According to a shocking new report by the Associated Press , north of 1,900 firearms were lost by or stolen from the US military between 2010 and 2019. Several of these weapons resurfaced being used in violent crimes. For instance, an Army trainee hijacked a school bus full of children in May while pointing his assault weapon at the driver. Fortunately, he chose to let eve
23h
We are all conspiracy theorists
Conspiracy theories exist on a spectrum, from plausible and mainstream to fringe and unpopular. It's very rare to find someone who only believes in one conspiracy theory. They generally believe in every conspiracy theory that's less extreme than their favorite one. To some extent, we are all conspiracy theorists. The following is an excerpt from the book Escaping the Rabbit Hole by Mick West. It
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Uyghurs outside China are traumatized. Now they're starting to talk about it
Mustafa Aksu had a bad track record with therapists. Growing up in China, he was bullied by his Han Chinese classmates for being Uyghur. This made him constantly anxious, and his stomach often hurt, so much that sometimes he threw up. A concerned teacher referred him to counseling, but Aksu was skeptical it could help. "I was always waiting for the time when I could go out and live somewhere that
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Here's How Quickly Aliens Could Conquer the Galaxy
Risk: Galaxy Edition Colonizing the Milky Way is an unfathomable task for us mere Earthlings, but for an extraterrestrial civilization capable of hopping from one star system to the next, it's shockingly doable. Based on reasonable technological constraints, the researchers suggest it would take an ambitious alien race about one billion years to conquer and colonize the entire inner portion of th
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Ultra-thin film could one day turn regular glasses into night vision goggles, researchers say
Developed by Australian and European researchers, the film works by converting infrared light into light visible to the human eye A transparent metallic film allowing a viewer to see in the dark could one day turn regular spectacles into night vision googles. The ultra-thin film, made of a semiconductor called gallium arsenide, could also be used to develop compact and flexible infrared sensors,
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Coronal mass ejections and cosmic ray observations at Syowa Station
Solar activities, such as CME(Coronal Mass Ejection), cause geomagnetic storms that disturb the Earth's magnetosphere. Geomagnetic storms can affect GPS positioning, radio communication, and power transmission system. Solar explosions also emit radiation, which can cause satellite failures, radiation exposure to aircraft crew, and space activity. Therefore, it is important to understand space weat
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New Data: COVID Reached the US Earlier Than We Thought
After well over a year of living through this pandemic, it's hard to remember what things were like back in January 2020. But if you try to think back, you might recall that was a particularly stressful time in the United States. The government had just identified the country's first COVID-19 infection on the 21st and, with how little we understood about the coronavirus at the time, very few peop
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Autonomous killer robots may have already killed on the battlefield
Autonomous weapons have been used in war for decades, but artificial intelligence is ushering in a new category of autonomous weapons. These weapons are not only capable of moving autonomously but also identifying and attacking targets on their own without oversight from a human. There's currently no clear international restrictions on the use of new autonomous weapons, but some nations are calli
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Tailored messaging increases understanding of climate change in Republicans
A team of researchers at Yale University's Yale Program on Climate Change Communication has found that the use of tailored advertising can increase awareness among Republicans of the dangers posed by climate change. In their paper published in the journal Nature Climate Change, the group describes field experiments they conducted with tailored advertising in competitive districts in the U.S. and w
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The Delta variant doubles the risk of hospitalization—but the vaccines still work
The risk of being hospitalized with the Delta covid-19 variant is roughly double that associated with the original Alpha strain, according to a study published in The Lancet . The study: The researchers analyzed data from 5.4 million people in Scotland, where the Delta variant is now dominant, from April 1 to June 6. After adjusting for age and comorbidities, the Delta variant approximately doubl
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Watch the World's First Flying Race Car Take Flight for the First Time
First Flight The world's first flying race car has taken to the skies for the very first time, setting the stage for an entirely new kind of racing league. In February, Alauda Racing, an Australian eVTOL (electric vertical takeoff or landing) startup, revealed the Airspeeder Mk3 , a sleek drone-like flying car built from the ground up for speed. Now, the Mk3 has taken off for the first time, over
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Previous Covid infection may not offer long-term protection, study finds
Research found marked differences in immune response of medical staff six months after contracting virus Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Previous infection with coronavirus does not necessarily protect against Covid in the longer term, especially when caused by new variants of concern, a study on healthcare workers suggests. Researchers at Oxford University found mar
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I Was Taught From a Young Age to Protect My Dynastic Wealth
When ProPublica published its report last week on the tax profiles of 25 of the richest Americans, jaws dropped across the United States. How was it possible that plutocrats such as Elon Musk, Jeff Bezos, and Warren Buffett could pay nothing in income taxes to the federal government? What sneaky sleights of pen, what subterfuge, what acts of turpitude could have led to this result? The shock stem
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MPs vote 461 to 60 in favour of extending social restrictions in England to 19 July – as it happened
Latest updates: 60 MPs vote against government plans while former special adviser Dominic Cummings publishes messages purporting to show PM's criticism of health secretary Matt Hancock Tory MPs speak out against delaying lifting of final restrictions Cummings texts show Johnson calling Matt Hancock 'totally hopeless' PM plans to leave No 10 two years after next election, Cummings claims Analysis
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Vaccine nationalism is killing us. We need an internationalist approach
We must develop a common plan to produce and distribute vaccines for all. That's the only way to end this pandemic We have the power to end this pandemic. We have the technology, materials and productive capacity to vaccinate the world against Covid-19 this year. We can save millions of lives, protect billions of livelihoods and reclaim trillions of dollars worth of economic activity along the wa
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'Gamechanging' £10m environmental DNA project to map life in world's rivers
eBioAtlas programme aims to identify fish, birds, amphibians and land animals in freshwater systems from the Ganges to the Mekong Concealed by the turbid, swirling waters of the Amazon, the Mekong and the Congo, the biodiversity of the world's great rivers has largely remained a mystery to scientists. But now a multimillion-pound project aims to describe and identify the web of life in major fres
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IBM Ships Its First Quantum Computer Outside the United States
The scientists at Germany's Fraunhofer Institute have announced they've taken delivery of the kind of package most of us dream of getting — provided you've got a steady supply of liquid nitrogen on hand, a degree in theoretical physics (as opposed to a theoretical degree in physics), and a working knowledge of whatever it is you need to know to program quantum computers in the first place. Specif
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The Beauty of Earth From Orbit
Expedition 65 began in April of this year aboard the International Space Station, currently home to seven crew members. The ISS orbits the Earth at about 17,150 miles per hour, making a trip around the world about every 90 minutes. Today, the astronauts Shane Kimbrough and Thomas Pesquet spent hours outside the ISS, working on newly arrived solar arrays. In the past few months, crew members of Ex
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The Atlantic Daily: Trump's DOJ Looks Even Worse Now
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox. When it rains, it pours, and lately it's been pouring Department of Justice news. In the last month or so alone, we've learned that, under Trump, the department reportedly pursued or subpoenaed th
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These Mice Were Born From Sperm That Spent Almost 6 Years in Space
As inconceivable as it still sounds, the wheels have been set in motion for humans to one day reach and colonize Mars. There's already a detailed design for the first Martian city , SpaceX is building its first offshore spaceport to one day launch Starships to Mars (among other missions), and NASA recently flew a helicopter on Mars. But there are a few big pieces of the puzzle still missing, incl
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Her Lesson Plan Was Junk
W hen you pass the kindergarten at Sde Eliyahu, a kibbutz near the Jordan River in northern Israel, you might not recognize it. Instead, you'll see a yard for castaway objects: rusty tractor parts, old computers, and orphaned bike wheels. It takes a few moments to realize that some person, or many people, has devoted thought to arranging the parts into strange structures and machines. What seems
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A Hint About How Life Made It Onto Land
Mangrove rivulus fish hate enforced water aerobics. Despite her best efforts, Giulia Rossi, a biologist who recently received her doctorate from the University of Guelph, cannot coax the fish to swim against a current in a laboratory tank. "They refuse to exercise in water," she told me. "They just let themselves hit the back mesh." When plucked out of water, however, the stubborn swimmers quickl
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Help Name NASA's Moon-Bound Manikin
Crash Test Dummy NASA is gearing up for its Artemis I mission, but the space agency overlooked one crucial detail — and it's asking the public for help. The upcoming mission, expected to launch in early November, is essentially a test run for the following crewed launches that will send actual humans to the Moon. So, to prepare, NASA is sending a yet-unnamed manikin around the Moon in an Orion sp
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Oh No, Oil Companies Are Paying Social Media Influencers Now
SponCon In retrospect, we have known that it was only a matter of time before giant oil companies like Shell started to sponsor influencers' posts on social media — because here we are. Surely, you may be telling yourself, surely no one is buying into an eco-friendly cross-country trip sponsored by big oil. But that's exactly what's happening, Earther reports . Just look at this disturbingly iron
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Observations detect a brown dwarf orbiting the star TOI–1278
An international team of astronomers reports the discovery of a companion to the M dwarf star known as TOI–1278. The newly found object turns out to be a brown dwarf nearly 20 times as massive as Jupiter. The finding is detailed in a paper published June 8 on the arXiv pre-print server.
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How stem cells synchronize to repair the spinal cord in axolotls
The spinal cord is an important component of our central nervous system: it connects the brain with the rest of the body and plays a crucial part in coordinating our sensations with our actions. Falls, violence, disease—various forms of trauma can cause irreversible damage to the spinal cord, leading to paralysis, sometimes even death.
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The Cost of Trump After Trump
When Joe Biden meets with Vladimir Putin tomorrow, huge numbers of news outlets will cover the story. One, however, stands to be part of the story. Russia's effort to expel Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty (which is funded by, though editorially independent of, the United States government) from the country has received widespread attention. As the two presidents prepare to converge on Lake Geneva
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Whether Covid came from a leak or not, it's time to talk about lab safety | Gregory D Koblentz and Filippa Lentzos
We studied biosecurity at the world's most sophisticated laboratories, and found their policies often left much to be desired Dr Gregory D Koblentz is an associate professor at George Mason University, and Dr Filippa Lentzos is senior lecturer in science and international security at King's College London The debate on the origins of the Covid-19 pandemic has recently focused on the potential for
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The give and take of mega-flares from stars
The long relationships between stars and the planets around them—including the Sun and the Earth—may be even more complex than previously thought. This is one conclusion of a new study involving thousands of stars using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory.
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Kill the 5-Day Workweek
T he 89 people who work at Buffer, a company that makes social-media management tools, are used to having an unconventional employer. Everyone's salary, including the CEO's, is public. All employees work remotely; their only office closed down six years ago. And as a perk, Buffer pays for any books employees want to buy for themselves. So perhaps it is unsurprising that last year, when the pandem
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Sage adviser and bagpiper premieres Covid-inspired musical work
Piece featuring bagpipe solo by one of government's scientific advisers aims to capture collaborative nature of experts' work Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage A musical composition inspired by research into the Covid pandemic and featuring a bagpipe solo by one of the government's scientific advisers is to have its world premiere on Thursday. Prof Calum Semple, one of
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Research papers that omit 'mice' from titles receive misleading media coverage
There is increasing scrutiny around how science is communicated to the public, but what is the relationship between how scientists report their findings and how media reports it to the public? A study published in PLOS Biology by Marcia Triunfol at Humane Society International, in Washington, DC and Fabio Gouveia at Oswaldo Cruz Foundation in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil suggests that when authors of sc
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Eradicating polio is finally within reach. Why is the UK taking its foot off the pedal? | Anne Wafula Strike
Instead of cutting the aid budget – including 95% from the plan to stamp out the disease – Britain should take a global lead Despite the Covid pandemic, there have been just two recorded cases of wild polio in 2021 – in Afghanistan and Pakistan, the two remaining hiding places for the disease. But eradication is not guaranteed. Polio is virulent and spreads quickly. Even one case poses a threat t
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Victorian Science's Great Unsolved Murder Mystery
I n the summer of 1893 , an unusual volume appeared on the shelves of London booksellers. The Great Barrier Reef of Australia: Its Products and Potentialities , published by W. H. Allen and Company, was remarkable both for its price—the leather-bound volume would have cost a skilled tradesperson nearly two weeks' pay—and for its fantastically close observation of the world's largest reef system.
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Fox News Gets a British Accent
In the months leading up to the launch of Great Britain's newest television channel, GB News, its backers insisted that it wouldn't be a British version of Fox News. They were right in one way: Fox is a slick product with fancy studios and whizzy graphics. By contrast, when GB News went on the air Sunday night, it looked as though it had been filmed in an abandoned strip club—all dark walls and n
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Novel calibration procedure for super-resolution brain imaging
Light—and all waves—can bend around the corners of obstacles found along its path. Because of this phenomenon, called diffraction, it is impossible to focus light onto a spot that is smaller than half its wavelength. In other words, the highest resolution one can theoretically achieve using an optical microscope is approximately 250nm, a barrier called the diffraction limit. Unfortunately, this re
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We investigated whether digital contact tracing actually worked in the US
In the spring of 2020, the first versions of covid-19 exposure notification systems were released to the public. These systems promised to slow the disease's spread by providing automated warnings to people who came into contact with the virus. Now, over a year later, residents in over 50 countries —including half of US states—can opt into these systems. But the big question remains: how well did
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Rocky Mountain subalpine forests now burning more than any time in recent millennia [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
The 2020 fire season punctuated a decades-long trend of increased fire activity across the western United States, nearly doubling the total area burned in the central Rocky Mountains since 1984. Understanding the causes and implications of such extreme fire seasons, particularly in subalpine forests that have historically burned infrequently, requires…
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The suction speed of an elephant's trunk is 330 miles per hour
The way an elephant manipulates its trunk to eat and drink could lead to better robots, researchers say. Elephants dilate their nostrils to create more space in their trunks, allowing them to store up to 5.5 liters (1.45 gallons) of water, according to their new study. They can also suck up three liters (0.79 gallons) per second—a speed 30 times faster than a human sneeze (150 meters per second/3
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Watch This Terrifying Segway on Steroids Backflip Using Its Tail
Do a Backflip Tencent Robotics X Lab, a subsidiary of Chinese tech conglomerate Tencent, has unveiled a terrifying new "novel wheel-legged robot" called Ollie that can drive around on two wheels-wielding, leg-like appendages, as IEEE Spectrum reports . Thanks to plenty of muscle power and a creepy tail, Ollie can jump a good foot in the air — and even do a backflip while jumping over a gap, as ev
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Watch Astronauts Venture Outside the Space Station to Install Solar Panels
Sneaking Out Two NASA astronauts took a roughly six-hour spacewalk outside the International Space Station, Space.com reports , so that they could install some new solar panels on the station. The actual spacewalk happened early Wednesday morning, but you can still watch and follow along. NASA put the entire livestreamed video on YouTube so you can still click back through it to see the astronaut
21h
It's Not Too Late to Avert a Historic Shame
In the past few weeks, the outlook for Afghans who helped the United States in Afghanistan has gone from worrying to critical. As U.S. and NATO troops leave the country with breathtaking speed, the Taliban are attacking districts that had long been in the Afghan government's hands, setting up checkpoints on major roads, and threatening provincial capitals. Many of the 18,000 Afghans who, along wi
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International Vaccine Program Still Struggling After Rich Countries Hoard Shots
COVAX, the international effort that asks wealthier nations to subsidize COVID-19 vaccine distribution in their poorer neighbors, isn't doing so hot. The problem, perhaps unsurprisingly, is that those wealthy nations bought up and hoarded as many coronavirus vaccines as they could, leaving those with fewer resources to try and pick among the scraps. That's why, as Scientific American reports , mo
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Why does life flash before your eyes in a life-threatening scenario?
At the age of 16, when Tony Kofi was an apprentice builder living in Nottingham, he fell from the third story of a building. Time seemed to slow down massively, and he saw a complex series of images flash before his eyes. As he described it , "In my mind's eye I saw many, many things: children that I hadn't even had yet, friends that I had never seen but are now my friends. The thing that really
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Testing the effects of Facebook usage in an ethnically polarized setting [Political Sciences]
Despite the belief that social media is altering intergroup dynamics—bringing people closer or further alienating them from one another—the impact of social media on interethnic attitudes has yet to be rigorously evaluated, especially within areas with tenuous interethnic relations. We report results from a randomized controlled trial in Bosnia and…
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New Tech Could Take Doctors Out of Hospitals Completely
Now that new medical sensors and gadgets can reliably monitor a patient's health — in real time and theoretically from anywhere in the world — healthcare providers are left navigating a new kind of medicine where machines might handle so many parts of the job that they don't even need to show up in person. Primary care physician Neil Singh of Brighton and Sussex Medical School grapples with this
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Widely covered paper on ranitidine-cancer link retracted
A paper linking the use of a wildly popular drug for heartburn to cancer has been retracted after the authors concluded that their widely touted finding appears to have resulted from a hiccup in the way they conducted their testing. The 2016 article, in Carcinogenesis, has played a minor role in an ongoing class action … Continue reading
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Bias isn't the only problem with credit scores—and no, AI can't help
We already knew that biased data and biased algorithms skew automated decision-making in a way that disadvantages low-income and minority groups. For example, software used by banks to predict whether or not someone will pay back credit-card debt typically favors wealthier white applicants. Many researchers and a slew of start-ups are trying to fix the problem by making these algorithms more fair
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The Trees Are Talking
Illustration by Danny This article was published online on June 17, 2021. A bove all else in the plant kingdom, trees make good trellises for our self-regarding thoughts. Robert Frost knew this when he wrote "Two roads diverged in a yellow wood." A woodland is the right spot to yield to reflection. Though the life of a tree has little in common with the life of a person, we are accustomed to appr
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Rare triple galaxy merger with at least two supermassive black holes
One of the best things about that universe is that there is so much to it. If you look hard enough, you can most likely find any combination of astronomical events happening. Not long ago, we reported on research that found seven separate instances of three galaxies colliding with one another. Now, a team led by Jonathan Williams of the University of Maryland has found another triple galaxy mergin
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The Lithium Mine Versus the Wildflower
The deposit could power 400,000 clean-energy car batteries. There's just one roadblock: a rare, fragile species of buckwheat, which for a mine might mean extinction.
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Dads Just Want to Help
" How to Build a Life " is a weekly column by Arthur Brooks, tackling questions of meaning and happiness. M y late father was a generous and kind man, but often morose. He was troubled about matters large and small, be they the fate of the world or the water in the basement. I remember two times when he seemed genuinely happy. The first was when, unable to meet our family's needs with his modest
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AI model examines virus spread from animals to humans
A new model that applies artificial intelligence to carbohydrates improves the understanding of the infection process and could help predict which viruses are likely to spread from animals to humans. This is reported in a recent study led by researchers at the University of Gothenburg.
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How romantic love is like addiction
Many writers have commented on the addictive qualities of love. Science agrees. The reward system of the brain reacts similarly to both love and drugs Someday, it might be possible to treat "love addiction." Since people started writing, they've written about love. The oldest love poem known dates back to the 21st century BCE. For most of that time, writers also apparently have been of two (or mo
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Epigenetic inheritance of DNA methylation changes in fish living in hydrogen sulfide-rich springs [Environmental Sciences]
Environmental factors can promote phenotypic variation through alterations in the epigenome and facilitate adaptation of an organism to the environment. Although hydrogen sulfide is toxic to most organisms, the fish Poecilia mexicana has adapted to survive in environments with high levels that exceed toxicity thresholds by orders of magnitude. Epigenetic…
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Study shows Head Start teachers' depressive symptoms related to children's math skills
Teachers play a key role in supporting children's development in early childhood education classrooms such as Head Start. Research shows significant associations between teachers' depressive symptoms and their students' social and emotional development. However, little research has focused on the associations between teachers' depressive symptoms and academic outcomes of preschoolers from low-inco
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Scientists Turned Snails Into Tiny Cyborgs
SnailBot 9000 Scientists from the University of Michigan took an unusual approach to wildlife conservation: turning the threatened animals into cyborgs so they could keep track of them and study how they survive. Back in the 1970s, scientists introduced an invasive snail called the rosy wolf snail to the Society Islands in French Polynesia. What followed was a bloodbath, according to a press rele
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The Novavax Vaccine Data, and Spike Proteins in General
1. Novavax Clinical Data Word came yesterday that Novavax had very good safety and efficacy in the trial of their recombinant protein vaccine. This is good news. By this point, the vaccine is much less needed here in the US, but it could be a very important part of getting many other countries vaccinated, due to its less demanding storage requirements and (relatively) straightforward production p
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Mathematicians Prove 2D Version of Quantum Gravity Really Works
Alexander Polyakov, a theoretical physicist now at Princeton University, caught a glimpse of the future of quantum theory in 1981. A range of mysteries, from the wiggling of strings to the binding of quarks into protons, demanded a new mathematical tool whose silhouette he could just make out. "There are methods and formulae in science which serve as master keys to many apparently different… So
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Activists Are Keeping Fading Indigenous Languages Alive — on Twitch
Maintaining Traditions There are about 7,000 languages spoken on Earth, but half are expected to go extinct by the end of the century, as their last native speakers die off or cultures blur together — so activists are going online to keep traditions alive. A new wave of streamers are broadcasting these at-risk, indigenous languages live over the video-games-and-other-stuff streaming platform Twit
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Drivers Never Learn the One Lesson of Cicada Season
The story sounds ridiculous, but it's true: A man in Ohio recently drove his car into a utility pole after a cicada flew through his open window and smacked into his face. He was fine! The car, not so much . The Brood X cicadas have certainly made their presence known over the past several weeks: their ceaseless screeching from the treetops, their slow, meandering manner of flying around, sometim
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A molecular switch for organisms adapting to fasts
Getting energy and nutrients from the environment—eating—is such an important function that it has been regulated through sophisticated mechanisms over hundreds of millions of years. Some of these mechanisms are only now beginning to be unraveled. A group at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) has found one of their key components—a switch that controls the ability of organisms to a
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Machine learning can reduce worry about nanoparticles in food
While crop yield has achieved a substantial boost from nanotechnology in recent years, alarms over the health risks posed by nanoparticles within fresh produce and grains have also increased. In particular, nanoparticles entering the soil through irrigation, fertilizers and other sources have raised concerns about whether plants absorb these minute particles enough to cause toxicity.
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Carbonate-hosted microbial communities are prolific and pervasive methane oxidizers at geologically diverse marine methane seep sites [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
At marine methane seeps, vast quantities of methane move through the shallow subseafloor, where it is largely consumed by microbial communities. This process plays an important role in global methane dynamics, but we have yet to identify all of the methane sinks in the deep sea. Here, we conducted a…
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Is healthy sugar possible — and would you eat it?
Consumers are fed a lot of nonsense about sugar and fad diets. Our bodies must consume sugar; the question is how much and in what form. Companies are trying to develop healthier sugars to combat our "sugar addiction." Can we hack sugar to be healthy? www.youtube.com Humans consume too much sugar. This is a refrain you've likely read for years, if not decades. As with any generality, that topline
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Homeroom: Summer Learning Is About More Than Reading and Math
Editor's Note: Every week, Abby Freireich and Brian Platzer have taken questions from parents about their kids' education. This is the last article in the "Homeroom" series. Dear Abby and Brian, This year has been really hard emotionally, but now that a much-needed summer break is here, I'm starting to worry about academics. How do we prevent a summer slide? Thanks for everything, Zoe Brooklyn, N
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Scientists discover unreported plant body part
A previously unreported anatomical structure named the 'cantil' has been described in the popular plant model, Arabidopsis thaliana. Scientists from The Pennsylvania State University, U.S., reveal that the cantil forms between the stem and flower-bearing stalk when flowering is delayed. Published in the journal Development, this study highlights that there are still discoveries to be made, even in
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Over half of the world's rivers cease to flow for at least one day a year on average
A new study led by researchers from McGill University and INRAE found that between 51-60% of the 64 million kilometres of rivers and streams on Earth that they investigated stop flowing periodically, or run dry for part of the year. It is the first-ever empirically grounded effort to quantify the global distribution of non-perennial rivers and streams. The research, which was published today in Na
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Centuries-old shipwrecks found off Singapore
Two centuries-old shipwrecks packed with ceramics and other artifacts have been found off Singapore in a rare discovery that will shed light on the city-state's maritime heritage, archaeologists said Wednesday.
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Young birds do household chores
Young birds support their parents in raising youngsters, defending the territory and keeping predators at bay. This social behavior, exhibited by birds such as the mousebird, appear to contradict the prevailing theory of evolution: young birds even surrender their food to younger siblings. This is the result of a study conducted by Wageningen University & Research scientists in Swaziland.
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Pioneering chemistry approach could lead to more robust soft electronics
A new approach to studying conjugated polymers has made it possible for an Army-funded research team to measure, for the first time, the individual molecules' mechanical and kinetic properties during polymerization reaction. The insights gained could lead to more flexible and robust soft electronic materials, such as health monitors and soft robotics.
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World's most powerful magnet ready to ship
After a decade of design and fabrication, General Atomics is ready to ship the first module of the Central Solenoid, the world's most powerful magnet. It will become a central component of ITER, a machine that replicates the fusion power of the sun. ITER is being built in southern France by 35 partner countries.
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Total solar eclipses shine a light on the solar wind with help from NASA's ACE mission
From traversing sand dunes in the Sahara Desert to keeping watch for polar bears in the Arctic, a group of solar scientists known as the "Solar Wind Sherpas" led by Shadia Habbal, have traveled to the ends of the Earth to scientifically observe total solar eclipses—the fleeting moments when the Moon completely blocks the Sun, temporarily turning day into night. With the images, they've uncovered a
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How Patent Extensions Keep Some Drug Costs High
For the top 12 grossing drugs in the U.S., each had an average of 71 patents granted, which almost doubled the time these drugs are protected from generic competition. Many of the granted patents are for minor tweaks. Reform bills are coming, but some critics worry that they won't necessarily curb abuse.
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The demonstration of hydrodynamic cloaking and shielding at the microscale
Researchers at Technion—Israel Institute of Technology, Technische Universität Darmstadt, and IBM Research Europe have recently proposed a new strategy to simultaneously achieve microscale hydrodynamic cloaking and shielding. While the idea of cloaking or shielding objects has been around for some time now, in contrast with other previously developed methods the technique they proposed allows phys
47min
When tyrannosaurs dominated, medium-sized predators disappeared
A new study in the Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences shows that medium-sized predators all but disappeared late in dinosaur history wherever Tyrannosaurus rex and its close relatives rose to dominance. In those areas — lands that eventually became central Asia and Western North America — juvenile tyrannosaurs stepped in to fill the missing ecological niche previously held by other carnivores.
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Stem cell scientists make big progress in building mini-kidneys
Researchers have created what could be a key building block for assembling a synthetic kidney. They describe how they generate rudimentary kidney structures, known as organoids, that resemble the collecting duct system that helps maintain the body's fluid and pH balance by concentrating and transporting urine. The organoids provide a way to study kidney disease that could lead to new treatments an
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Child-free adults are just as happy as parents
A quarter of adults don't want children and they're still happy, research on child-free people finds. As more people acknowledge they simply don't want to have kids, Jennifer Watling Neal and Zachary Neal, both associate professors in Michigan State University's psychology department, are among the first to dive deeper into how these "child-free" individuals differ from others. "Most studies have
19h
Leading scientists warn of global impacts as Antarctic nears tipping points
As governments convene for the annual Antarctic Treaty Consultative Meeting (ATCM) June 14-24, 2021, an Expert Working Group of leading Antarctic scientists warns that climate change is pushing this remote polar region, which connects all our ocean basins and keeps our planet habitable, towards numerous tipping points with global ramifications for humanity and biodiversity.
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A biological blueprint for tough color
The unique mechanical and optical properties found in the exoskeleton of a humble Asian beetle has the potential to offer a fascinating new insight into how to develop new, effective bio-inspired technologies.
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Link found between gut microbes and stroke
New findings show that the gut microbiome impacts stroke severity and functional impairment following stroke. The results lay the groundwork for potential new interventions to help treat or prevent stroke.
21h
Soaking up the sun: Artificial photosynthesis promises clean, sustainable source of energy
Humans can do lots of things that plants can't do. But plants have one major advantage over humans: They can make energy directly from the sun. That process of turning sunlight directly into usable energy – called photosynthesis – may soon be a feat humans are able to mimic to harness the sun's energy for clean, storable, efficient fuel. If so, it could open a whole new frontier of clean energy.
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Algorithm reveals the mysterious foraging habits of narwhals
An algorithm can predict when narwhals hunt—a task once nearly impossible to gain insight into. Mathematicians and computer scientists at the University of Copenhagen, together with marine biologists in Greenland, have made progress in gathering knowledge about this enigmatic Arctic whale at a time when climate change is pressuring the species.
20h
Best binoculars for kids 2021
We've rounded up the best Amazon Prime Day deals on binoculars for kids. No matter your child's skill level, your own budget or their level of enthusiasm for nature, there is a perfect pair of binoculars waiting to inspire them.
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World's Strongest Magnet Could Help Make Fusion Energy a Reality
Mammoth Magnet Engineers are shipping the world's most powerful magnet to the construction site of the world's largest experimental fusion reactor called ITER in France. The massive 1,000 ton solenoid, a type of electromagnet that can generate controlled magnetic fields, will eventually stand just short of 60 feet tall and over 13 feet wide. It can generate a magnetic field of 13 tesla (or about
19h
Primate ecology and evolution shaped by two most consumed plant families
By analyzing the relative proportion of different plant parts consumed by primates, researchers suggest that primates may be intricately and subtly shaped by two key families of plants: Moraceae and Fabaceae. The study, led by researchers from the University of Amsterdam and Indiana University, highlights the importance of detailed dietary studies to better understand primate ecology and evolution
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Every workplace can be a place of continual learning
While businesses in every sector have been working toward a digital transformation for the past several years, covid-19 accelerated this shift across industries. New technologies are advancing at a pace that requires employers to continuously retrain their workforce to stay current. Organizations must become places of learning if they are to prepare workers for jobs of the future. Joe Schaefer is
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Common cold combats COVID-19
In a new study, the researchers found that the common respiratory virus jump-starts the activity of interferon-stimulated genes, early-response molecules in the immune system which can halt replication of the SARS-CoV-2 virus within airway tissues infected with the cold.
1d
Is It Time to Give Up on Consciousness as 'the Ghost in the Machine'?
As individuals, we feel that we know what consciousness is because we experience it daily. It's that intimate sense of personal awareness we carry around with us, and the accompanying feeling of ownership and control over our thoughts, emotions, and memories. But science has not yet reached a consensus on the nature of consciousness, which has important implications for our belief in free will an
16min
Cell death discovery could lead to new treatment for COPD
Inhibiting necroptosis, a form of cell death, could yield a new treatment approach for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), an inflammatory lung condition also known as emphysema, new research shows. The study, by a team of Australian and Belgian researchers, revealed elevated levels of necroptosis in patients with COPD. By inhibiting necroptosis activity in the lung tissue of COPD patien
16min
Lobsters, jellyfish, and the foolish quest for immortality
Since the beginning of time, humans have fantasized over and quested for "eternal life." Lobsters and a kind of jellyfish offer us clues about what immortality might look like in the natural world. Evolution does not lend itself easily to longevity, and philosophy might suggest that life is more precious without immortality. One of the oldest pieces of epic literature we have is known as the Epic
17min
AI system-on-chip runs on solar power
Engineers have developed an integrated circuit that can carry out complicated artificial-intelligence operations like face, voice and gesture recognition and cardiac monitoring. Powered by either a tiny battery or a solar panel, it processes data at the edge and can be configured for use in just about any type of application.
35min
UBCO researchers identify best strategy to reduce human-bear conflict
Conservationists have long warned of the dangers associated with bears becoming habituated to life in urban areas. Yet, it appears the message hasn't gotten through to everyone.News reports continue to cover seemingly similar situations — a foraging bear enters a neighbourhood, easily finds high-value food and refuses to leave. The story often ends with conservation officers being forced to eutha
37min
This deep-sea creature is long-armed, bristling with teeth, and the sole survivor of 180 million years of evolution
Let me introduce you to Ophiojura, a bizarre deep-sea animal found in 2011 by scientists from the French Natural History Museum, while trawling the summit of a secluded seamount called Banc Durand, 500 meters below the waves and 200 kilometers east of New Caledonia in the southwest Pacific Ocean.
47min
40% of EU agricultural imports will be 'highly vulnerable' to drought by 2050
A trio of researchers has found that approximately 40% of agricultural products imported into the European Union will be "highly vulnerable" to drought by 2050. In their paper published in the journal Nature Communications, Ertug Ercin, Ted Veldkamp and Johannes Hunink, from R2Water Research and Consultancy, the Amsterdam University of Applied Science and FutureWater, respectively, suggest the dro
47min
Should ships in India switch to shore power?
Countries throughout Europe and North America require ships, when in port, to be attached to the shore-based power grid to prevent them from running their own engines and generating harmful emissions right on the city's doorstep. How effective could measures like these be for a developing nation like India, with a history of poor air quality and the public health problems associated with it?
47min
Numerical study first to reveal origin of 'motion of the ocean' in the straits of Florida
Using a numerical model that simulates ocean currents, researchers are shedding light on the important "motion of the ocean" in the Straits of Florida. They have conducted a first-of-its-kind study identifying the mechanisms behind the formation of sub-mesoscale eddies, which have important environmental implications and play a significant role in the health of the Florida Keys coral reef ecosyste
52min
Study of young chaotic star system reveals planet formation secrets
A team of scientists using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) to study the young star Elias 2-27 have confirmed that gravitational instabilities play a key role in planet formation, and have for the first time directly measured the mass of protoplanetary disks using gas velocity data, potentially unlocking one of the mysteries of planet formation.
52min
Alpine plant spins its own flavonoid wool
Like the movie version of Spider-Man who shoots spider webs from holes in his wrists, a little alpine plant has been found to eject cobweb-like threads from tiny holes in specialised cells on its leaves. It's these tiny holes that have taken plant scientists by surprise because puncturing the surface of a plant cell would normally cause it to explode like a water balloon.
52min
Close-up look at brain uptake of omega-3
New details on the structure and function of a transport protein could help researchers develop drugs for neurological diseases that are better able to cross the blood-brain barrier. The findings were published in the journal Nature by researchers at Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons, Duke-NUS Medical School, Weill Cornell Medicine and colleagues.
58min
Mutant genes can promote genetic transfer across taxonomic kingdoms
Bacteria do not sexually reproduce, but that does not stop them from exchanging genetic information as it evolves and adapts. During conjugal transfer, a bacterium can connect to another bacterium to pass along DNA and proteins. Escherichia coli bacteria, commonly called E. coli, can transfer at least one of these gene-containing plasmids to organisms across taxonomic kingdoms, including to fungi
58min
Amsterdam is a model for what tourism should look like after COVID
When COVID hit the Netherlands in 2020, Amsterdam emptied of visitors overnight. Long-term residents, inured to the permanent noise and litter and tourists peeing in the streets, welcomed the newfound tranquility. The pandemic, they told the Washington Post, was "a blessing in disguise."
59min
Detoxifiers from the landfill
The production of chemicals is a cumbersome business. Often, only a small part of what is actually wanted is produced in the factory. The large remainder is unusable—or even worse. Examples? The defoliant "Agent Orange" used by the US army in the Vietnam War was produced in great hurry. It contained dioxin as an impurity. As a result, not only did trees in the combat zone lose their foliage, but U
59min
Defining the Hund physics landscape of two-orbital systems
Electrons are ubiquitous among atoms, subatomic tokens of energy that can independently change how a system behaves—but they also can change each other. An international research collaboration found that collectively measuring electrons revealed unique and unanticipated findings. The researchers published their results on May 17 in Physical Review Letters.
59min
Sulfur enhances carbon storage in the Black Sea
A study led by Oldenburg researchers finds new explanation for the accumulation of organic compounds in oxygen-depleted marine areas. The effect could negatively feedback on the climate on geological time scales.
1h
Facebook Announces a New Oculus VR Feature: In-Game Ads
Facebook has announced it will officially begin trialing in-game ads in Oculus VR headsets. The company claims that this is part of an effort to "give developers a new way to showcase their VR applications." The first game to be modified in this fashion will be Blaston, but other titles are said to be rolling out in the next few weeks. According to Facebook , its goals are "to bring more people i
1h
Underwater robot offers new insight into mid-ocean 'twilight zone'
An innovative underwater robot known as Mesobot is providing researchers with deeper insight into the vast mid-ocean region known as the 'twilight zone.' Capable of tracking and recording high-resolution images of slow-moving and fragile zooplankton, gelatinous animals, and particles, Mesobot greatly expands scientists' ability to observe creatures in their mesopelagic habitat with minimal disturb
2h
Scientists unravel the function of a sight-saving growth factor
Researchers have determined how certain short protein fragments, called peptides, can protect neuronal cells found in the light-sensing retina layer at the back of the eye. The peptides might someday be used to treat degenerative retinal diseases, such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD).
2h
Betelgeuse Mystery Solved
In 2019 and 2020 the red supergiant star Betelgeuse was dimming, and by a significant amount. Betelgeuse is the right shoulder of the constellation Orion and so is one of the easier stars to find. As a red supergiant it is also in the later stages of it's life. Such start might dim like this when they are getting close to going supernova, and so that possibility was excitedly proposed. Not only w
2h
Studie spårar pandemins spridning i Sverige
Gratisappen COVID Symptom Study hjälper studien med samma namn att i pandemitider bidra med kunskap om virusets komplexitet och framfart. – Det har blivit mer än vad jag hoppades på än när vi lanserade studien. Deltagare runt om i Sverige har engagerat sig och lagt en minut om dagen på att svara på frågor kring sin hälsa.
2h
Ending furlough will hit older workers hard: How to soften the blow
UK employers affected by the pandemic have been able to put their employees on furlough thanks to the coronavirus job retention scheme, with the government covering 80% of their monthly wages up to £2,500. The furlough scheme is set to wind down in July (with higher employer contributions required), despite the recently announced delay to the lifting of all lockdown restrictions. It has also been
2h
Africa's drylands are getting more support. How to make the most of this
The United Nations (UN) recently launched the Decade on Ecosystem Restoration to prevent, halt and reverse the degradation of ecosystems worldwide. It is a response to evidence that our current abuse of nature has accelerated global warming and degraded natural resources to a degree that threatens the wellbeing of people.
2h
Research highlights techniques for studying materials under extreme conditions
The properties of materials under extreme conditions are of key interest to a number of fields, including planetary geophysics, materials science and inertial confinement fusion (ICF). In geophysics, the equation of state of planetary materials such as hydrogen and iron under ultrahigh pressure and density will provide a better understanding of their formation and interior structure.
2h
Learn How To Build Your Own Video Games With This Development Bundle And Start Making Games
As video games increasingly bleed into the real world , learning how to develop your own is becoming easier. New tools, like the Unity development environment, and new methods of getting games in front of players have opened it up to artists, educators, and even more. This Build A Bundle deal will bring you into the gaming revolution, on your terms. Developed by Zenva Academy, which has a 4.4/5 i
2h
The Beautiful Summer Day When My Family Almost Died
The worst things can happen on the most beautiful days. My family's worst day was a perfect one in the summer of 2019. We picked my daughter up from camp and talked about where to go for lunch: the diner or the burger place. I don't remember which we chose. What I do remember: being woken up, again and again, by doctors who insist on asking me the same questions—my name, where I am, what month it
3h
BlackRock Is Not Ruining the U.S. Housing Market
The BlackRock saga sounds grotesque. At a time of maximal desperation in the U.S. housing market, giant investment banks, such as BlackRock, are buying up some of the few houses left on the market, boxing families out of the American dream. They're turning these homes into rental units that they will, in some cases, leave to decay . Such faceless institutional investors are reportedly more likely
3h
There Once Was a Republican Fight for D.C. Statehood
Updated at 9:20 a.m. ET on June 17, 2021. When residents of Washington, D.C., got the chance to vote in the 1956 presidential primaries, their first opportunities to vote since Reconstruction, it was at the behest of a Republican president, Dwight Eisenhower, who phrased his support in conservative terms: "In the District of Columbia the time is long overdue for granting national suffrage to its
3h
Pandemic adolescent mental health study reveals turnaround finding
Young people with poor mental health took a turn for the better during the pandemic but those with good mental health saw a considerable decline, new research reveals.The first nationally representative evidence regarding the diverse impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on adolescent mental health in the UK was led by researchers at Lancaster University working with the University of British Columbia i
3h
Bicyclo[2.2.0]hexene derivatives as a proaromatic platform for group transfer and chemical sensing
Nature Communications, Published online: 17 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24054-3 Cyclohexadienes have been widely explored as proaromatic surrogates for group transfer reactions but limited storage stability and difficult accessibility of these compounds limits the application range. Here, the authors present a class of proaromatic bicyclo[2.2.0]hexene derivatives and demonstrate their appli
4h
C(sp3)−C(sp3) bond formation via nickel-catalyzed deoxygenative homo-coupling of aldehydes/ketones mediated by hydrazine
Nature Communications, Published online: 17 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23971-7 The direct deoxygenative coupling of aldehydes or ketones to construct C(sp3)−C(sp3) bond remains a scientific challenge. Here the authors use a nickel−catalyzed reductive homo-coupling of moisture- and air-stable hydrazones generated in-situ from naturally abundant aldehydes and ketones to construct challenging
4h
BNT162b2 vaccine uptake and effectiveness in UK healthcare workers – a single centre cohort study
Nature Communications, Published online: 17 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23927-x Several vaccines for COVID-19 have received emergency approval. Here, the authors describe BNT162B2 vaccine uptake and effectiveness among UK healthcare workers in a single centre cohort study during a time of high community COVID-19 prevalence.
4h
A single cell characterisation of human embryogenesis identifies pluripotency transitions and putative anterior hypoblast centre
Nature Communications, Published online: 17 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23758-w Single cell analysis of early human embryos identifies key changes in pluripotency, the requirement of FGF signalling for embryo survival, and defines a putative anterior-like region of hypoblast cells, providing insights into how early human development is regulated.
4h
Evolution of an assembly factor-based subunit contributed to a novel NDH-PSI supercomplex formation in chloroplasts
Nature Communications, Published online: 17 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24065-0 The chloroplast NDH complex interacts with Photosystem I to form the NDH-PSI supercomplex. Here the authors show that Arabidopsis NDF5 shares a common ancestor with the NDH subunit PnsB2 and acts as an NDH assembly factor initiating the assembly of PnsB2 and the evolutionarily distinct PnsB3.
4h
Nonlinearity-induced nanoparticle circumgyration at sub-diffraction scale
Nature Communications, Published online: 17 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24100-0 It has been challenging to rotate nanoparticles orbitally via optical trapping beyond the diffraction limit. Here, the authors take advantage of the nonlinear optical effect and demonstrate fast and controlled orbital rotation at subwavelength scale with a femtosecond pulsed Gaussian beam.
4h
Combining machine learning and nanopore construction creates an artificial intelligence nanopore for coronavirus detection
Nature Communications, Published online: 17 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24001-2 Rapid, accurate and specific point-of-care diagnostics can help manage and contain fast-spreading infections. Here, the authors present a nanopore-based system that uses artificial intelligence to discriminate between four coronaviruses in saliva, with little need for sample pre-processing.
4h
Identifying the key steps determining the selectivity of toluene methylation with methanol over HZSM-5
Nature Communications, Published online: 17 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24098-5 The selectivity of zeolite catalyzed toluene methylation is still under debate. Here the authors report a comprehensive theoretical investigation based on ab-initio molecular dynamics to identify the key-steps of methylation of toluene with methanol over a zeolite to produce p-xylene.
4h
Nedkylning vid hjärtstopp gör inte att fler överlever
Sedan 2005 har riktlinjerna för vård av medvetslösa hjärtstoppspatienter varit att kyla ned kroppstemperaturen till 33 grader. En ny studie med 1900 patienter visar att behandlingen inte gör att fler patienter överlever. – Resultaten kommer att påverka riktlinjerna för intensivvård i hela världen, säger Niklas Nielsen, forskare vid Lunds universitet och intensivvårdsöverläkare vid Helsingborgs la
4h
Nya bostäder utformas för unga och friska
När det byggs nytt är det ofta med unga, friska och välutbildade i åtanke. Inte äldre människor och personer med funktionsnedsättningar. Forskaren Lilian Müller har i sin licentiatuppsats Vem bygger vi för? – om tillgänglighet och universell utformning i stadens rum studerat ny- och ombyggnadsprojekt samt planhandlingar och strategidokument från två kommuner i Sverige. Det hon har undersökt är hu
4h
Hired blade: Anchoring complex in plant cells recruits its own katana sword
Researchers from Nara Institute of Science and Technology have found that an anchoring complex in plant cells recruits its own version of the katana sword for cutting microtubules. The Msd1-Wdr8 complex is used to stabilize sites within plant cells where new microtubules are created, before it recruits katanin — an enzyme named after the katana sword — to cut and release new microtubules. This r
4h
Flotte danske bidrag på EHA 2021
Årets store kongres for European Hematology Association er nået sin ende, og danske forskere har bidraget til kongressen med både fase 3-studier og registerstudier i verdensklasse.
5h
Podcast: Life, Liberty, and Drugs
Listen and subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Podcasts The Columbia professor Carl Hart spent his career studying the effects of drugs, and uses heroin himself. In his book Drug Use for Grown-Ups , he argues that not only can drug use be safer, but that it's our right. This week on The Experiment : how villainizing drug use interferes with our right to life, liberty, and the
5h
Focus on emotions is key to improving heart health in people living with obesity
People living with obesity who attended a non-judgemental and personalised lifestyle modification programme improved their cardiovascular and mental health during just 10 weeks, according to a study presented today at EuroHeartCare – ACNAP Congress 2021, an online scientific congress of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). Participants lost weight and achieved benefits in anxiety and depressi
7h
Skabb eller pälsbyte för räven?
Svar av Gustaf Samelius och Tomas Willebrand, forskare vid Det skandinaviska rävprojektet Rävar kan som du skriver se luggslitna ut på vårkanten när de fäller vinterpälsen, och det kan därför vara svårt att säga om det var en räv med skabb eller en som fällde sin päls som ni såg. Generellt sett börjar skabben oftast på öron, hälar och vid svansroten, och ses lättast vid svansroten och främre delen
8h
H.R. 2654 forces Medicare to treat chiropractors and MDs as equals
Chiropractors are deceptively trying to sell H.R. 2654 as expanded Medicare coverage for musculoskeletal conditions. The bill actually mandates that Medicare treat chiropractors and medical doctors as equals, covering anything a chiropractors are authorized to do under their expansive state scope of practice laws. The post first appeared on Science-Based Medicine .
9h
China launches three astronauts towards new space station – video
China has launched three astronauts into orbit ahead of their arrival to the country's partially-constructed space station. The trio will spend three months in low Earth orbit in what is China's first crewed mission in nearly five years and will dock with the main section of the Tianhe space station that was launched in late-April. The astronauts' stay will coincide with marking the 100th anniver
9h
Stress during pandemic linked to poor sleep
A study found that stress, anxiety and depression during the first few weeks of the pandemic were associated with less and lower quality sleep. In a survey of more than 900 twins, about half of the respondents reported no change in sleep patterns, but 32.9% reported decreased sleep. Another 29.8% reported sleeping more. The researchers found that any change in sleep was connected to self-reported
9h
New study finds fast-food companies spending more on ads, targeting Black and Hispanic youth
The fast-food industry spent $5 billion on advertising in 2019, and the advertisements disproportionately targeted Black and Hispanic youth, according to new research published today by the Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity at the University of Connecticut. The new report, Fast Food FACTS 2021, finds that the industry's annual ad spending in 2019 increased by over $400 million since 2012, an
9h
Inside the world of wildlife trafficking (part two)
In the second part of our look at wildlife crime, Phoebe Weston and Patrick Greenfield from the Guardian's age of extinction project look at another victim: orchids. Why are they valued so highly? And how are they being protected?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod
10h
My 3 Greatest Revelations – Issue 102: Hidden Truths
1 The "Dataome" Is Huge The dataome is shorthand to describe all of the externalized information we generate in symbolic representations: drawings, music, books, computing, data storage. It's all of the information we utilize and propagate, along with ourselves, through time and space. It's not encoded in our genes but it's clearly heritable. I can read a copy of a text from 1,000 years ago and i
12h
Is the Universe Open-Ended? – Issue 102: Hidden Truths
One of my favorite albeit heavily paraphrased quotes from Albert Einstein is his assertion that the most incomprehensible thing about the universe is that it is comprehensible. (What he actually said, in his 1936 work "Physics and Reality," is more longwinded, and includes a digression into Immanuel Kant and the meaning of "comprehensibility", but he does write "… the eternal mystery of the wor
12h
The History of Locker-Room Talk – Issue 102: Hidden Truths
When I first posted on social media about my new book, Father Figure: How to Be a Feminist Dad , some of my friends were confused. One commented, "I don't understand; do you hate men?" Another said, "I feel bad for your sons." It turns out that many people—even some in my progressive, liberal bubble—resist the idea of men becoming feminist dads because they think feminism is inherently "emasculat
12h
New super-resolution microscopy method approaches the atomic scale
Scientists have developed a computational technique that greatly increases the resolution of atomic force microscopy, a specialized type of microscope that 'feels' the atoms at a surface. The method reveals atomic-level details on proteins and other biological structures under normal physiological conditions, opening a new window on cell biology, virology and other microscopic processes.
14h
Genetically engineered nanoparticle delivers dexamethasone directly to inflamed lungs
Nanoengineers have developed immune cell-mimicking nanoparticles that target inflammation in the lungs and deliver drugs directly where they're needed. As a proof of concept, the researchers filled the nanoparticles with the drug dexamethasone and administered them to mice with inflamed lung tissue. Inflammation was completely treated in mice given the nanoparticles, at a drug concentration where
14h
Inducing and tuning spin interactions in layered material
Magnetic-spin interactions that allow spin-manipulation by electrical control allow potential applications in energy-efficient spintronic devices. Researchers now describe the induction of such interactions in a layered material tantalum-sulfide by addition of iron atoms, and tuning by insertion of protons.
14h
Several persistent chemicals found in fetal organs
Researchers found industrial chemicals in the organs of fetuses conceived decades after many countries had banned the substances. The researchers urge decision makers to consider the combined impact of the mix of chemicals that accumulate in people and nature.
14h
Yeast mating — more than meets the eye
Researchers have discovered a surprising asymmetry in the mating behavior of unicellular yeast that emerges solely from molecular differences in pheromone signaling. Their results might shed new light on the evolutionary origins of sexual dimorphism in higher eukaryotes.
14h
Machine learning can now reduce worry about nanoparticles in food
While crop yield has achieved a substantial boost from nanotechnology in recent years, the alarms over the health risks posed by nanoparticles within fresh produce and grains have also increased. In particular, nanoparticles entering the soil through irrigation, fertilizers and other sources have raised concerns about whether plants absorb these minute particles enough to cause toxicity.
15h
Exploring the shallow underground world with a burrowing soft robot
We've seen robots take to the air, dive beneath the waves and perform all sorts of maneuvers on land. Now, researchers are exploring a new frontier: the ground beneath our feet. Taking their cues from plants and animals that have evolved to navigate subterranean spaces, they've developed a fast, controllable soft robot that can burrow through sand.
16h
Most rivers run dry — now and then
A new study found that between 51-60% of the 64 million kilometres of rivers and streams on Earth that they investigated stop flowing periodically, or run dry for part of the year. It is the first-ever empirically grounded effort to quantify the global distribution of non-perennial rivers and streams. The research, which was published today in Nature, calls for a paradigm shift in river science an
16h
Particles with 'eyes' allow a closer look at rotational dynamics
An international team has developed spherical colloidal particles for the visualization of rotational dynamics. The two-color fluorescent particles have an off-center core that allows tracking of dense suspensions using microscopy. The researchers observed coupling between the rotation of charged particles, correlation between local crystallinity and rotational diffusivity, and 'slip-stick' fricti
16h
Underwater robot offers new insight into mid-ocean "twilight zone"
An innovative underwater robot known as Mesobot is providing researchers with deeper insight into the vast mid-ocean region known as the "twilight zone." Capable of tracking and recording high-resolution images of slow-moving and fragile zooplankton, gelatinous animals, and particles, Mesobot greatly expands scientists' ability to observe creatures in their mesopelagic habitat with minimal disturb
17h
New study finds fresh evidence for our inevitable death
Philosophers, artists and scientists – and probably all the rest of us – have long obsessed over the key to human immortality. We all, no matter our income, culture or religion are bound to die. Even if we escape mortal diseases or accidents, we all face a deadly biological deterioration. While the debate of human longevity has divided the scientific community for centuries, a new study finds fres
17h
Scientists prepare for next coronavirus pandemic, maybe in 2028?
Scientists are already preparing for a possible next coronavirus pandemic to strike, keeping with the seven-year pattern since 2004. In future-looking research, scientists have identified a novel target for a drug to treat SARS-CoV-2 that also could impact a new emerging coronavirus. "God forbid we need this, but we will be ready," said the lead Northwestern scientist.
17h
How a supermassive black hole originates
How do supermassive black holes in the early universe originate? A team led by a theoretical physicist has come up with an explanation: a massive seed black hole that the collapse of a dark matter halo could produce.
18h
Correlated errors in quantum computers emphasize need for design changes
Quantum computers could outperform classical computers at many tasks, but only if the errors that are an inevitable part of computational tasks are isolated rather than widespread events. Now, researchers have found evidence that errors are correlated across an entire superconducting quantum computing chip — highlighting a problem that must be acknowledged and addressed in the quest for fault-tol
18h
How sex trafficking trauma affects the way its survivors parent
A study of young immigrant mothers who are survivors of sex trafficking found that the trauma affected how they parented: It made them overprotective parents in a world perceived to be unsafe, it fueled emotional withdrawal when struggling with stress and mental health symptoms, and was a barrier to building confidence as mothers. Yet, they coped with such challenges through finding meaning in the
18h
Subterranean investigations
We've seen robots take to the air, dive beneath the waves and perform all sorts of maneuvers on land. Now, researchers at UC Santa Barbara and Georgia Institute of Technology are exploring a new frontier: the ground beneath our feet. Taking their cues from plants and animals that have evolved to navigate subterranean spaces, they've developed a fast, controllable soft robot that can burrow through
18h
Over-the-counter fungicide can disrupt hormones
The active ingredient in medicines commonly used to treat yeast infections has the potential to disrupt steroid hormone levels, according to a study from the National Food Institute, Technical University of Denmark. This can have consequences for sexual development in unborn babies if women use these medicines during pregnancy.
19h
Foam film stratification studies probe intermicellar interactions [Engineering]
Ultrathin foam films containing supramolecular structures like micelles in bulk and adsorbed surfactant at the liquid–air interface undergo drainage via stratification. At a fixed surfactant concentration, the stepwise decrease in the average film thickness of a stratifying micellar film yields a characteristic step size that also describes the quantized thickness…
19h
Spatiotemporally resolved subcellular phosphoproteomics [Chemistry]
Proteome-wide profiling of protein phosphorylation has been widely used to reveal the underlying mechanism of diverse cellular signaling events. Yet, characterizing subcellular phosphoproteome with high spatial–temporal resolution has remained challenging. Herein, we developed a subcellular-specific uncaging-assisted biotinylation and mapping of phosphoproteome (SubMAPP) strategy to monitor the ph
19h
Physical theory of biological noise buffering by multicomponent phase separation [Physics]
Maintaining homeostasis is a fundamental characteristic of living systems. In cells, this is contributed to by the assembly of biochemically distinct organelles, many of which are not membrane bound but form by the physical process of liquid–liquid phase separation (LLPS). By analogy with LLPS in binary solutions, cellular LLPS was…
19h
Assembly factors chaperone ribosomal RNA folding by isolating helical junctions that are prone to misfolding [Biochemistry]
While RNAs are known to misfold, the underlying molecular causes have been mainly studied in fragments of biologically relevant larger RNAs. As these small RNAs are dominated by secondary structures, misfolding of these secondary structures remains the most-explored cause for global RNA misfolding. Conversely, how RNA chaperones function in a…
19h
Key computational findings reveal proton transfer as driving the functional cycle in the phosphate transporter PiPT [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Phosphate is an indispensable metabolite in a wide variety of cells and is involved in nucleotide and lipid synthesis, signaling, and chemical energy storage. Proton-coupled phosphate transporters within the major facilitator family are crucial for phosphate uptake in plants and fungi. Similar proton-coupled phosphate transporters have been found in different…
19h
Proteomic analysis identifies the E3 ubiquitin ligase Pdzrn3 as a regulatory target of Wnt5a-Ror signaling [Developmental Biology]
Wnt5a-Ror signaling is a conserved pathway that regulates morphogenetic processes during vertebrate development [R. T. Moon et al., Development 119, 97–111 (1993); I. Oishi et al., Genes Cells 8, 645–654 (2003)], but its downstream signaling events remain poorly understood. Through a large-scale proteomic screen in mouse embryonic fibroblasts, we identified…
19h
Ocean microplastic levels change with the seasons
A new method can spot ocean microplastics globally and track them over time. The new work provides a day-by-day timeline of where microplastics enter the water, how they move, and where they tend to collect. An estimated 8 million tons of plastic trash enters the ocean each year, and most of it is battered by sun and waves into microplastics—tiny flecks that can ride currents hundreds or thousand
19h
Toward the use of neural networks for influenza prediction at multiple spatial resolutions
Mitigating the effects of disease outbreaks with timely and effective interventions requires accurate real-time surveillance and forecasting of disease activity, but traditional health care–based surveillance systems are limited by inherent reporting delays. Machine learning methods have the potential to fill this temporal "data gap," but work to date in this area has focused on relatively simple
19h
Spatiotemporally confined red light-controlled gene delivery at single-cell resolution using adeno-associated viral vectors
Methodologies for the controlled delivery of genetic information into target cells are of utmost importance for genetic engineering in both fundamental and applied research. However, available methods for efficient gene transfer into user-selected or even single cells suffer from low throughput, the need for complicated equipment, high invasiveness, or side effects by off-target viral uptake. Her
19h
Cluster-based network modeling–From snapshots to complex dynamical systems
We propose a universal method for data-driven modeling of complex nonlinear dynamics from time-resolved snapshot data without prior knowledge. Complex nonlinear dynamics govern many fields of science and engineering. Data-driven dynamic modeling often assumes a low-dimensional subspace or manifold for the state. We liberate ourselves from this assumption by proposing cluster-based network modelin
19h
Diving beetle-like miniaturized plungers with reversible, rapid biofluid capturing for machine learning-based care of skin disease
Recent advances in bioinspired nano/microstructures have received attention as promising approaches with which to implement smart skin-interfacial devices for personalized health care. In situ skin diagnosis requires adaptable skin adherence and rapid capture of clinical biofluids. Here, we report a simple, all-in-one device consisting of microplungers and hydrogels that can rapidly capture biofl
19h
Sulfurization of dissolved organic matter in the anoxic water column of the Black Sea
Today's oceans store as much dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the water column as there is CO 2 in the atmosphere, and as such dissolved organic matter (DOM) is an important component of the global carbon cycle. It was shown that in anoxic marine sediments, reduced sulfur species (e.g., H 2 S) abiotically react with organic matter, contributing to carbon preservation. It is not known whether suc
19h
Genetically engineered cell membrane-coated nanoparticles for targeted delivery of dexamethasone to inflamed lungs
As numerous diseases are associated with increased local inflammation, directing drugs to the inflamed sites can be a powerful therapeutic strategy. One of the common characteristics of inflamed endothelial cells is the up-regulation of vascular cell adhesion molecule–1 (VCAM-1). Here, the specific affinity between very late antigen–4 (VLA-4) and VCAM-1 is exploited to produce a biomimetic nanopa
19h
Targeting highly pathogenic coronavirus-induced apoptosis reduces viral pathogenesis and disease severity
Infection by highly pathogenic coronaviruses results in substantial apoptosis. However, the physiological relevance of apoptosis in the pathogenesis of coronavirus infections is unknown. Here, with a combination of in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo models, we demonstrated that protein kinase R–like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) signaling mediated the proapoptotic signals in Middle East respira
19h
Cryo-EM structure of the photosynthetic RC-LH1-PufX supercomplex at 2.8-A resolution
The reaction center (RC)–light-harvesting complex 1 (LH1) supercomplex plays a pivotal role in bacterial photosynthesis. Many RC-LH1 complexes integrate an additional protein PufX that is key for bacterial growth and photosynthetic competence. Here, we present a cryo–electron microscopy structure of the RC-LH1-PufX supercomplex from Rhodobacter veldkampii at 2.8-Å resolution. The RC-LH1-PufX mono
19h
Mechanisms underlying divergent responses of genetically distinct macrophages to IL-4
Mechanisms by which noncoding genetic variation influences gene expression remain only partially understood but are considered to be major determinants of phenotypic diversity and disease risk. Here, we evaluated effects of >50 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms and short insertions/deletions provided by five inbred strains of mice on the responses of macrophages to interleukin-4 (IL-4), a c
19h
Time-resolved dissolution elucidates the mechanism of zeolite MFI crystallization
Zeolite crystal growth mechanisms are not fully elucidated owing to their complexity wherein the formation of a particular zeolite can occur by more than one crystallization pathway. Here, we have conducted time-resolved dissolution experiments of MFI-type zeolite crystals in ammonium fluoride medium where detailed structural analysis allowed us to extrapolate and elucidate the possible mechanism
19h
m6A demethylase ALKBH5 controls CD4+ T cell pathogenicity and promotes autoimmunity
N 6 -methyladenosine (m 6 A) modification is dynamically regulated by "writer" and "eraser" enzymes. m 6 A "writers" have been shown to ensure the homeostasis of CD4 + T cells, but the "erasers" functioning in T cells is poorly understood. Here, we reported that m 6 A eraser AlkB homolog 5 (ALKBH5), but not FTO, maintains the ability of naïve CD4 + T cells to induce adoptive transfer colitis. In
19h
Monopolar and dipolar relaxation in spin ice Ho2Ti2O7
Ferromagnetically interacting Ising spins on the pyrochlore lattice of corner-sharing tetrahedra form a highly degenerate manifold of low-energy states. A spin flip relative to this "spin-ice" manifold can fractionalize into two oppositely charged magnetic monopoles with effective Coulomb interactions. To understand this process, we have probed the low-temperature magnetic response of spin ice to
19h
Alterations in hormonal signals spatially coordinate distinct responses to DNA double-strand breaks in Arabidopsis roots
Plants have a high ability to cope with changing environments and grow continuously throughout life. However, the mechanisms by which plants strike a balance between stress response and organ growth remain elusive. Here, we found that DNA double-strand breaks enhance the accumulation of cytokinin hormones through the DNA damage signaling pathway in the Arabidopsis root tip. Our data showed that a
19h
Nano-to-micro spatiotemporal imaging of magnetic skyrmions life cycle
Magnetic skyrmions are self-organized topological spin textures that behave like particles. Because of their fast creation and typically long lifetime, experimental verification of skyrmion's creation/annihilation processes has been challenging. Here, we successfully track skyrmion dynamics in defect-introduced Co 9 Zn 9 Mn 2 by using pump-probe Lorentz transmission electron microscope. Following
19h
Nonvolatile programmable silicon photonics using an ultralow-loss Sb2Se3 phase change material
The next generation of silicon-based photonic processors and neural and quantum networks need to be adaptable, reconfigurable, and programmable. Phase change technology offers proven nonvolatile electronic programmability; however, the materials used to date have shown prohibitively high optical losses, which are incompatible with integrated photonic platforms. Here, we demonstrate the capability
19h
Spatially structured inhibition defined by polarized parvalbumin interneuron axons promotes head direction tuning
In cortical microcircuits, it is generally assumed that fast-spiking parvalbumin interneurons mediate dense and nonselective inhibition. Some reports indicate sparse and structured inhibitory connectivity, but the computational relevance and the underlying spatial organization remain unresolved. In the rat superficial presubiculum, we find that inhibition by fast-spiking interneurons is organized
19h
Following spatial A{beta} aggregation dynamics in evolving Alzheimers disease pathology by imaging stable isotope labeling kinetics
β-Amyloid (Aβ) plaque formation is the major pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and constitutes a potentially critical, early inducer driving AD pathogenesis as it precedes other pathological events and cognitive symptoms by decades. It is therefore critical to understand how Aβ pathology is initiated and where and when distinct Aβ species aggregate. Here, we used metabolic isotope
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Hormonal control of motivational circuitry orchestrates the transition to sexuality in Drosophila
Newborns and hatchlings can perform incredibly sophisticated behaviors, but many animals abstain from sexual activity at the beginning of life. Hormonal changes have long been known to drive both physical and behavioral changes during adolescence, leading to the largely untested assumption that sexuality emerges from organizational changes to neuronal circuitry. We show that the transition to sex
19h
Longitudinal high-resolution imaging through a flexible intravital imaging window
Intravital microscopy (IVM) is a powerful technique that enables imaging of internal tissues at (sub)cellular resolutions in living animals. Here, we present a silicone-based imaging window consisting of a fully flexible, sutureless design that is ideally suited for long-term, longitudinal IVM of growing tissues and tumors. Crucially, we show that this window, without any customization, is suitab
19h
Structural basis of the activation of the CC chemokine receptor 5 by a chemokine agonist
The human CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is a G protein–coupled receptor (GPCR) that plays a major role in inflammation and is involved in cancer, HIV, and COVID-19. Despite its importance as a drug target, the molecular activation mechanism of CCR5, i.e., how chemokine agonists transduce the activation signal through the receptor, is yet unknown. Here, we report the cryo-EM structure of wild-typ
19h
Abrupt Heinrich Stadial 1 cooling missing in Greenland oxygen isotopes
Abrupt climate changes during the last deglaciation have been well preserved in proxy records across the globe. However, one long-standing puzzle is the apparent absence of the onset of the Heinrich Stadial 1 (HS1) cold event around 18 ka in Greenland ice core oxygen isotope 18 O records, inconsistent with other proxies. Here, combining proxy records with an isotope-enabled transient deglacial si
19h
Concordia researchers break down the COVID-19 diagnostic arsenal
For a new paper published in the journal Clinical Microbiology Reviews, a team of researchers led by Concordia engineers sifted through hundreds of papers on COVID-19 detection tools and technologies. They wanted to categorize and understand what exists, what is lacking and what can be improved. The result is a thorough assessment of the field citing almost 600 separate papers that cover an extens
19h
How do immune cells get activated?
Chemokine receptors, located at the surface of many immune cells, play an important role in their function. However, despite the importance of this family of receptors, their activation mechanism remains poorly understood. A research consortium (UNIGE/UNIBAS/PSI) has succeeded in decoding the activation mechanism of the CCR5 receptor, a member of this family implicated in several diseases such as
19h
When small epigenomic signals matter: Regulatory elements that are directly involved in human neuronal brain functions
Although each organism has a unique genome, a single gene sequence, each individual has many epigenomes. An epigenome consists of chemical compounds and proteins that can bind to DNA and regulate gene action, either by activating or deactivating them or producing organ- or tissue-specific proteins. As it is a highly dynamic material, it can provide a large amount of information to shed light on th
20h
Scientists identify properties that allow proteins to strengthen under pressure
A new rubber band stretches, but then snaps back into its original shape and size. Stretched again, it does the same. But what if the rubber band was made of a material that remembered how it had been stretched? Just as our bones strengthen in response to impact, medical implants or prosthetics composed of such a material could adjust to environmental pressures such as those encountered in strenuo
20h
What factors put Philippine birds at risk of extinction?
The lush forests and more than 7,000 islands of the Philippines hold a rich diversity of life, with 258 bird species who live nowhere but the Philippine archipelago. A new study from University of Utah researchers suggests that due to deforestation and habitat degradation, more bird species may be endangered that previously thought—including species that may not have been discovered yet. The study
20h
Stoneflies: Youth influences adulthood
In the majority of insects, metamorphosis fosters completely different-looking larval and adult stages. For example, adult butterflies are completely different from their larval counterparts, termed caterpillars. This "decoupling" of life stages is thought to allow for adaptation to different environments. Researchers of the University of Bonn now falsified this text book knowledge of evolutionary
20h
Yeast mating—more than meets the eye
Researchers from the Max-Planck Institute for Terrestrial Microbiology have discovered a surprising asymmetry in the mating behavior of unicellular yeast that emerges solely from molecular differences in pheromone signaling. Their results, published in the current issue of "Science Advances", might shed new light on the evolutionary origins of sexual dimorphism in higher eukaryotes.
20h
Effects of smartphone bans in the workplace
For many of us, our smartphone has become our ever-present companion and is usually far more than just a phone. Thanks to the constant availability of online content as well as our reachability through messenger services and social networks via our smartphone, this everyday object's potential to distract us is high—at work too. This is why many employers view the use of smartphones during work tim
20h
Can biodegradable polymers live up to the hype?
As consumers and corporations alike become more environmentally conscious, the chemical industry is working to find solutions to the plastic waste crisis. One idea is to use biodegradable polymers known as polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) as replacements for traditional plastic packaging and other materials. A feature article in Chemical & Engineering News, the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemi
20h
How should governments subsidize clean-energy heating?
Transitioning to low-carbon energy production is a big climate challenge to overcome. Many countries are already looking to adopt clean heating solutions more widely, with the International Energy Agency projecting that by 2045 nearly half of global heating will be done with heat pumps. To ensure speedy uptake, governments are likely to offer subsidies to ensure these energy-efficient options actu
20h
How a bath sponge becomes a bio-based industrial filter
Researchers at TU Bergakademie Freiberg developed an innovative material from a cultured marine sponge. When the fibers of the sponge react with a copper-containing ammonia solution, such as that found in the electronics industry, the mineral atacamite is formed. This mineral, which occurs only very rarely in nature, attaches itself so strongly to the sponge fibers that a robust material is create
20h
Molecular breeding can make better bitter olives
Olives, well-known for their characteristic bitter taste, are in high demand owing to the popularity of the oil they produce. The health benefits of olive oil are well known, ranging from antiviral, anti-cancer, to even anti-hypertensive effects. These benefits are attributed to "oleuropein," the most abundant olive secoiridoid found in olives.
20h
Keeping strawberries fresh using bioactive packaging
Québec produces more strawberries than any other Canadian province. Strawberries are delicate and difficult to keep fresh. In response to this challenge, Monique Lacroix, a professor at at the Institut national de la recherche scientifique (INRS), and her team have developed a packaging film that can keep strawberries fresh for up to 12 days. The team's findings on how this film protects against m
20h
Lies to hide doping in professional sport
How do top athletes talk about doping when they themselves are using performance-enhancing drugs? Or do they just avoid the issue? A new study by the University of Göttingen reveals that any decision to use drugs almost inevitably means the decision to engage in deceptive communication. Those using drugs regularly describe anti-doping policies as being more intense than ever or overly restrictive,
20h
ST-segment depression in leads I and aVL: Artifactual or pathophysiological findings?
In a new publication from Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications; DOI https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2021.0013, Sharen Lee, Gary Tse, Xin Wang, Adrian Baranchuk and Tong Liu from Laboratory of Cardiovascular Physiology, Hong Kong, China, Second Hospital of Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, China and Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada consider ST-segment depression in leads I and
20h
Iran is draining its aquifers dry
Nature, Published online: 16 June 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01604-9 Wells are proliferating, but data from across the country show that groundwater extraction is falling.
20h
Coronary angiography video interpolation methods to reduce x-ray exposure frequency
In a new publication from Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications; DOI https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2021.0011, Xiao-lei Yin, Dong-xue Liang, Lu Wang, Jing Qiu, Zhi-yun Yang, Jian-zeng Dong and Zhao-yuan Ma from Tsinghua University, Beijing, China; Capital Medical University, Beijing, China and The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, China analyse coronary angiography
20h
Stem cells may hold a key to developing new vaccines against COVID-19
The SARS-CoV-2 virus that causes COVID-19 may have the ability to reactivate dormant tuberculosis (TB). In a novel study scientists report in The American Journal of Pathology that infection with a specific coronavirus strain reactivated dormant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) in mice. This knowledge may help to develop new vaccines for COVID-19 and avoid a potential global tuberculosis epidemic.
20h
What does Netanyahu's ouster mean for Israel?
Benjamin Netanyahu has been ousted as Israel's Prime Minister after a no-confidence vote by the Knesset. Netanyahu's historic and regularly controversial 12-year political reign make him the longest serving Premier in Israel's history. With Naftali Bennett ascending to Prime Minister, Israel may be on the cusp of change. Yehudah Mirsky , professor of professor of Near Eastern and Judaic Studies a
20h
Ten years of ancient genome analysis has taught scientists 'what it means to be human'
A ball of 4,000-year-old hair frozen in time tangled around a whalebone comb led to the first ever reconstruction of an ancient human genome a decade ago. The hair, which was preserved in arctic permafrost in Greenland, was collected in the 1980s. It wasn't until 2010 that evolutionary biologists were able to use pioneering shotgun DNA sequencing to reconstruct the genetic history of the hair. It
21h
Why a gargantuan star blinked
Nature, Published online: 16 June 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01607-6 Astronomers watch as a star is nearly totally blotted out, perhaps by a disk of material surrounding another star.
21h
Crayfish get bolder when antidepressants pollute water
Exposure to antidepressants in the water can make crayfish more outgoing, but that's not such a good thing for the freshwater crustaceans, a new study finds. "Low levels of antidepressants are found in many water bodies," says A.J. Reisinger, lead author of the study and an assistant professor in the University of Florida/Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences soil and water sciences departm
21h
When small epigenomic signals matter
Although each organism has a unique genome, a single gene sequence, each individual has many epigenomes. An epigenome consists of chemical compounds and proteins that can bind to DNA and regulate gene action, either by activating or deactivating them or producing organ- or tissue-specific proteins. As it is a highly dynamic material, it can provide a large amount of information to shed light on th
21h
Chose Your Controls Wisely
I've been meaning to write about this paper (open access) on some problems with chemical probes, and now's a good time. There was a well-known article a few years ago about "The Promise and Peril of Chemical Probes", and this is a deliberate follow-up, starting with its title. Even if you don't give much of a hoot about chemical probes, the point it makes is worth keeping in mind. All chemical pr
21h
MD Anderson research highlights for June 16, 2021
The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center's Research Highlights provides a glimpse into recently published studies in basic, translational and clinical cancer research from MD Anderson experts. Current advances include a new combination therapy for acute myeloid leukemia (AML), a greater understanding of persistent conditions after AML remission, the discovery of a universal biomarker for
21h
Sweeping analysis concludes there's no cheating old age
Today the average person can expect to live nearly twice as long as people in the 1850s. But a new study comparing data from nine human populations and 30 populations of non-human primates says that we are probably not cheating the reaper. The researchers say the increase in human life expectancy is more likely the statistical outcome of improved survival for children and young adults, not slowing
21h
SNMMI Image of the Year: PET imaging measures cognitive impairment in COVID-19 patients
The effects of COVID-19 on the brain can be accurately measured with positron emission tomography (PET), according to research presented at the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) 2021 Annual Meeting. The detailed depiction of areas of cognitive impairment, neurological symptoms and comparison of impairment over a six-month time frame has been selected as SNMMI's 2021 Image o
21h
Many Milky Way stars may host planets like Earth
Researchers have developed a new method for better understanding the relationship between a star's chemical composition and planet formation. The researchers found that the majority of stars in their dataset are similar in composition to the sun, somewhat at odds with earlier work and implying that many stars in the Milky Way could host their own Earth-like planets. The most common technique for
21h
Arbetsförmedlare spelar stor roll för chansen till jobb
Det är stora skillnader i hur snabbt arbetsförmedlare får de arbetssökande i jobb. Att få en skicklig arbetsförmedlare ökar den arbetssökandes chanser på arbetsmarknaden påtagligt, visar en rapport från IFAU. Forskarna vid IFAU, Institutet för arbetsmarknads- och utbildningspolitisk utvärdering har studerat 6 800 arbetsförmedlare och 1 600 000 arbetssökande 2003–2010. Sannolikheten för att lämna
21h
Several persistent chemicals were found in fetal organs
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden found industrial chemicals in the organs of fetuses conceived decades after many countries had banned the substances. In a study published in the journal Chemosphere, the researchers urge decision makers to consider the combined impact of the mix of chemicals that accumulate in people and nature.
21h
Holistic decision-making in a digitized health-care environment
Smart data integration can help to increase the quality of data-based decision-making, especially in scenarios where clinical decision-makers face multiple barriers and challenges along the patient pathway. And this is critically important in today's digitized health-care environment where the quality of decision-making depends on the quality and availability of the underlying data. In medicine,
22h
Research study suggests BAT's Modern Oral products have similar toxicant profile to NRT
New research published today indicates that BAT's modern oral (MO) products in the form of tobacco-free nicotine pouches have a toxicant profile that is comparable to nicotine replacement therapies (NRTs) and much lower than traditional oral snus, a category of products that, when used as the sole nicotine product is already established as a reduced risk product compared with cigarettes.
22h
Oväntat svårt att förutspå framtida havsnivåer
Prognoserna för framtidens havsnivåer beror på hur vi matematiskt beskriver friktionen under isen. – Om vi väljer fel ekvation kan det i prognosen i värsta fall motsvara en uppvärmning på flera grader, säger Henning Åkesson, forskare vid Bolincentret för klimatforskning vid Stockholms universitet. Den friktion som uppstår mellan botten av en glaciär och landskapet under isen, har en avgörande rol
22h
Climate change: The long view
What will the Earth be like for our children and grandchildren, as temperatures continue to rise? We can be fairly certain of some things: Some regions will become inhospitable, as heat drives their inhabitants away or causes massive declines and changes in their ecosystems. Many other physical, chemical and biological processes will also be affected by rising temperatures that threaten critical e
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