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The World's First Lab Grown Meat Factory Just Opened Up
Growing Burgers Israeli biotech company Future Meat has opened what it claims to be the "world's first industrial cultured meat facility," a watershed moment in the development of futuristic meat alternative products. They say the facility is capable of producing 1,100 pounds of lab grown — rather than plant-based — meat products a day, or roughly the equivalent of 3,000 medium-sized hamburgers.
10h
Elon Musk's New House Is a $50,000 Shack
Musk Mahal SpaceX CEO Elon Musk has chosen to move into a $50,000 prefabricated house that's only about 400 square feet, on-site at the company's South Texas testing facilities, Teslarati reports . The news comes after Musk announced last week he had "decided to sell my last remaining house" in a tweet . "Just needs to go to a large family who will live there," he added. "It's a special place." I
12h
Study: A Comet Hitting Earth May Have Helped Spark Civilization
Trigger Point 13,000 years ago, fragments of a comet that exploded in space screamed through the atmosphere and crashed into the Earth around what ' s now the Middle East, North America, and Greenland. And according to a new study, there's a growing body of evidence suggesting that the impact helped trigger human civilization. For now, most of the work involved in the paper , published in the jou
13h
Startup Successfully Tests Space Hotel Building Robot
Robot Space Assembly Orbital Assembly Corporation, a company that claims to be the "first large-space space construction company" on its website , has unveiled an early prototype robot capable of churning out parts for a ring-shaped luxury hotel that it says will one day orbit the Earth. "Today we achieved our milestone in validating the Demonstrator Structural Truss Assembly Robot (DSTAR) fabric
10h
We've Never Heard Britney Spears Like This
When typed out in full , the chilling speech that Britney Spears gave to a Los Angeles judge yesterday afternoon comes to more than 4,500 words. Those words are now circulating online as quotations about how Spears lived in "denial" about the legal and medical arrangement that has given other people control over her life for 13 years. She says this "abusive" conservatorship forced her to take deb
13h
'Chirps' in space: new album captures the sound of black holes colliding
Scientists have turned electromagnetic and gravitational waves – which, unlike sound waves, can travel in a vacuum – into musical tracks If two black holes collide in the vacuum of space, do they make a sound? Sound waves can't travel in the almost perfect vacuum of space – no one can hear you scream, as the tagline from Alien goes. But electromagnetic and gravitational waves can, and a new album
13h
Britney Spears Says She's Being Forced to Take Psychiatric Medication, Stay on Birth Control
American pop icon Britney Spears spoke out in explosive testimony on Wednesday about the troubling situation surrounding her conservatorship, a contractual agreement that she says has resulted in trauma and abuse. "I've been in denial; I've been in shock; I am traumatized," Spears said during the hearing, as quoted by The New York Times . "I just want my life back." "I truly believe this conserva
13h
Manchin and Sinema Now Face the Weight of History
The battle over access to the ballot is entering a precarious new stage. Democrats and civil-rights groups are pursuing a two-track strategy to preserve their embattled hopes of passing federal legislation establishing a nationwide floor of voting rights. What happens next will likely determine whether Congress can act at all. Advocates are betting that a combination of what might be called insid
14h
Fossilised bones found in Israel could belong to mystery extinct humans
Remains with combination of Neanderthal and early human features date back 100,000 years Fossilised bones recovered from an ancient sinkhole in Israel may belong to a previously unknown group of extinct humans that lived in the Levant more than 100,000 years ago. Researchers unearthed the bones alongside stone tools and the remains of horses, fallow deer and wild ox during excavations at the Nesh
12h
Head of NASA Slams Congress's Hypocrisy
Budget Battle Finally, after an exhausting amount of controversy and protest surrounding NASA's decision to contract SpaceX to use its Starship spacecraft for the Artemis Moon missions, it seems like those projects can finally move forward. The main problem now is that NASA Administrator Bill Nelson is still butting heads with members of Congress, Ars Technica reports , saying its high expectatio
14h
The future of humanity: can we avert disaster?
Just by living our day-to-day lives, we are walking into a disaster. Can humanity wake up to avert disaster? Perhaps COVID was the wake-up call we all needed. Does humanity have a chance for a better future, or are we just unable to stop ourselves from driving off a cliff? This was the question that came to me as I participated in a conference entitled The Future of Humanity hosted by Marcelo's I
14h
A Startup Is Working on Gene Hacked Trees to Gobble Up Tons of Climate-Destroying Carbon Dioxide
Planting Supertrees The climate change emergency continues to worsen and threaten the survival of countless species — humans included. As a result, the list of possible solutions is growing increasingly creative, including ideas like harvesting carbon dioxide from the air or even dimming the Sun . But a startup called Living Carbon is taking a different approach, asking the bold question "what if
9h
We're Planning Moon Missions But We've Only Mapped 20 Percent of the Ocean Floor
Slow and Steady An international team of scientists funded by billionaire investor Victor Vescovo recently announced that it's mapped about 20 percent of the ocean floor — and the fact that that's a major improvement over how little had previously been explored reveals just how much of our planet remains shrouded in mystery . According to the team's update , the Seabed 2030 project added an area
11h
Scientists can predict and design single atom catalysts for important chemical reactions
Researchers at Tufts University, University College London (UCL), Cambridge University and University of California at Santa Barbara have demonstrated that a catalyst can indeed be an agent of change. In a study published today in Science, they used quantum chemical simulations run on supercomputers to predict a new catalyst architecture as well as its interactions with certain chemicals, and demo
12h
Cosmic 'hand' hitting a wall
Motions of a remarkable cosmic structure have been measured for the first time, using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. The blast wave and debris from an exploded star are seen moving away from the explosion site and colliding with a wall of surrounding gas.
13h
Biden Doesn't Have an Answer to America's Crime Spike
Joe Biden knows he needs to appear to be doing something about crime. Murder rates around the country rose precipitously in 2020, and in many cities the increases have continued into 2021. But the president has few levers to affect crime quickly, and faces political hazards in every direction. Biden has championed police reform, and many progressive Democrats have pushed for sharp reductions in p
13h
The Dos and Don'ts of Hot Vax Summer
If your wanderlust is coming on extra strong this summer, you may be wondering what to do with it. Being vaccinated may feel like a superpower, but what exactly is safe—or not? The CDC suggests, for example, that this may be the summer for road-tripping by RV. "If traveling in a RV, you may have to stop less often for food or bathroom breaks, but you could still be in close contact with others wh
12h
What it will take to achieve affordable carbon removal
A pair of companies have begun designing what could become Europe's largest direct-air-capture plant, capable of capturing as much as a million metric tons of carbon dioxide per year and burying it deep beneath the floor of the North Sea. The sequestered climate pollution will be sold as carbon credits, reflecting the rising demand for carbon removal as a drove of nations and corporations lay out
13h
Herbivore gut fungi found to produce unique building blocks of antibiotics
For the past several years, chemical engineer Michelle O'Malley has focused her research on the anaerobic fungi found in the guts of herbivores, which make it possible for those animals to fuel themselves with sugars and starches extracted from fibrous plants. O'Malley's work, reflected in multiple research awards and journal articles, has centered on how these powerful fungi might be used to extr
10h
Children's beat gestures predict the subsequent development of their oral skills
New research shows that the early production of beat gestures with the hands (i.e., gestures normally associated with emphasis that do not represent the semantic content of speech) by infants between 14 and 58 months of age in natural interactions with their carers predicts that in their later development, nearing the age of five, these children obtain better results insofar as their oral narrativ
11h
How the pandemic got us addicted to longing – and why it's bad for us
I learned first-hand about longing through decades of celibacy – but why do we do it, and how can we stop? I was a 35-year-old virgin when I realized I was addicted to longing. I got off on the high of anticipating sex I knew I wasn't going to have, and then masochistically wallowed when letdown inevitably followed. My crushes were the popular guys in high school, the elusive seat-mate on an airp
2h
Researcher introduces new CRISPR 3.0 system for highly efficient gene activation in plants
In a study in Nature Plants, Yiping Qi, associate professor of Plant Science at the University of Maryland (UMD), introduces a new and improved CRISPR 3.0 system in plants, focusing on gene activation instead of traditional gene editing. This third generation CRISPR system focuses on multiplexed gene activation, meaning that it can boost the function of multiple genes simultaneously. According to
13h
Russia and China team up to build a moon base
International Lunar Research Station is intended to be ready for crewed visits by 2036 Russia and China have presented a plan to build the joint International Lunar Research Station (ILRS). The proposed lunar base is intended to be ready for crewed visits by 2036 and is unrelated to the American-led Artemis programme, which has pledged to land "the first woman and person of color" on the moon by
1h
Artificial intelligence breakthrough gives longer advance warning of ozone issues
Ozone levels in the earth's troposphere (the lowest level of our atmosphere) can now be forecasted with accuracy up to two weeks in advance, a remarkable improvement over current systems that can accurately predict ozone levels only three days ahead. The new artificial intelligence system developed in the University of Houston's Air Quality Forecasting and Modeling Lab could lead to improved ways
10h
Light-harvesting nanoparticle catalysts show promise in quest for renewable carbon-based fuels
Researchers report that small quantities of useful molecules such as hydrocarbons are produced when carbon dioxide and water react in the presence of light and a silver nanoparticle catalyst. Their validation study—made possible through the use of a high-resolution analytical technique—could pave the way for CO2-reduction technologies that allow industrial-scale production of renewable carbon-base
10h
A new type of Homo unknown to science
The bones of an early human, unknown to science, who lived in the Levant at least until 130,000 years ago, were discovered in excavations at the Nesher Ramla site, near the city of Ramla. Recognizing similarity to other archaic Homo specimens from 400,000 years ago, found in Israel and Eurasia, the researchers reached the conclusion that the Nesher Ramla fossils represent a unique Middle Pleistoce
11h
Study shows potential dangers of sweeteners
New research has discovered that common artificial sweeteners can cause previously healthy gut bacteria to become diseased and invade the gut wall, potentially leading to serious health issues. The study, published in the International Journal of Molecular Sciences, is the first to show the pathogenic effects of some of the most widely used artificial sweeteners – saccharin, sucralose, and asparta
7h
Scientists may need to rethink which genes control aging, study suggests
Researchers fed fruit flies antibiotics and monitored the lifetime activity of hundreds of genes that scientists have traditionally thought control aging. To their surprise, the antibiotics not only extended the lives of the flies but also dramatically changed the activity of many of these genes. Their results suggested that only about 30% of the genes traditionally associated with aging set an an
10h
Preparing for the Tokyo Olympics and Paralympics
With less than a month left until the start of the Tokyo Olympics, organizers and athletes are making final preparations. Originally set to be held last year, the 2020 Summer Olympics and Paralympics were postponed until this year due to the coronavirus pandemic. Organizers in Tokyo have stated that the games will definitely be taking place, despite ongoing protests and public-health concerns. Wh
12h
COVID-linked multi-system inflammatory syndrome in children diagnosed more in Black and Latino child
Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (MIS-C) significantly affected more Black and Latino children than white children, with Black children at the highest risk, according to a new observational study of 124 pediatric patients treated at Children's National Hospital in Washington, D.C. Researchers also found cardiac complications, including systolic myocardial dysfunction and valvular regu
2h
Efter fire år fik Køge endelig sit geriatriske afsnit
Specialeansvarlig overlæge Ellen Holm kunne ikke slippe ideen om, at Sjællands Universitetshospital, Køge burde have en geriatrisk afdeling. Sådan havde den nye ledende overlæge på Medicinsk Afdeling det heldigvis også. Med opbakning fra hospitalsledelsen og sammen med tre yngre geriatere er Ellen Holm nu i fuld gang med at bygge op fra bunden.
2h
Geriatrien breder sig
Med udsigt til flere og flere ældre bliver der særligt brug for det geriatriske speciale i fremtiden, men samtidig betyder den brede uddannelse, at andre specialer 'stjæler' geriaterne.
2h
Det dårlige liv efter kræft
Senfølgeklinikker efter kræft skyder op rundt omkring i landet, men de ligger spredt, har meget forskellige tilgange, og nogle hviler på et usikkert finansielt fundament. Patientforeninger efterlyser ensartethed, men regionerne foretrækker lokale løsninger.
2h
Patienter får livet tilbage efter senfølger
Farvel til job. Farvel til sport og andre fritidsaktiviteter. Farvel til et normalt socialt liv. Patienter med sen­følger efter tarmkræft døjer med gener, som gør det ­vanskeligt eller ligefrem umuligt at leve et godt liv.
2h
Der er brug for en ny politisk samtale om sundhed
Dansk sundhedspolitik er præget af for mange mavefornemmelser og fokus på de samme sygdomme igen og igen. Der er behov for nye samtalesteder, hvor vi som fagpersoner og sammen med patienter og pårørende kan debattere fremtidens sundhedsvæsen.
2h
Fascineret af fortidens kulturelle skattekiste
KULTURKANYLEN Fertilitetslæge Peter Humaidan var i en ung alder tæt på at forlade lægefaget til fordel for antikvitets- og auktionsverdenen. Han beholdt dog den hvide kittel på, men passionen for kunsthåndværk lever stadig. For et par måneder siden bidrog Peter Humaidan selv til det kulturelle landskab med udgivelsen af sin nye bog 'Supersæd – En effektiv guide til mænd, der vil booste deres sæd'
3h
New album, Celestial Incantations, captures the 'sounds' of space – video
It's true that sound waves can't travel in space. However electromagnetic and gravitational waves can. Now, a new album, Celestial Incantations, has turned these signals such as the oscillations of a comet, radiation from a galactic pulsar and the merger of two black holes into musical tracks. The album is a collaboration between Kim Cunio, an associate professor and convenor of musicology at the
3h
Intan Recording System
Has anybody worked with s/Amps for any research? If you've used it for ECoG that would be cool, EEG would be cooler but I doubt anybody else does that. ​ We are using one (details are less important, just know that we need to use it and can't use alternatives) and I'm having a hard time finding external sensors that are compatible with the Intan itself. I very much want to have a photosensor on t
3h
Adolescent marijuana, alcohol use held steady during COVID-19 pandemic
Adolescent marijuana use and binge drinking did not significantly change during the COVID-19 pandemic, despite record decreases in the substances' perceived availability, according to a survey of 12th graders in the United States. The study's findings challenge the idea that reducing adolescent use of drugs can be achieved solely by limiting their supply.
6h
The lysosomal Rag-Ragulator complex licenses RIPK1- and caspase-8-mediated pyroptosis by Yersinia
Host cells initiate cell death programs to limit pathogen infection. Inhibition of transforming growth factor–β–activated kinase 1 (TAK1) by pathogenic Yersinia in macrophages triggers receptor-interacting serine-threonine protein kinase 1 (RIPK1)–dependent caspase-8 cleavage of gasdermin D (GSDMD) and inflammatory cell death (pyroptosis). A genome-wide CRISPR screen to uncover mediators of caspa
7h
mRNA vaccination boosts cross-variant neutralizing antibodies elicited by SARS-CoV-2 infection
Emerging severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) variants have raised concerns about resistance to neutralizing antibodies elicited by previous infection or vaccination. We examined whether sera from recovered and naïve donors, collected before and after immunizations with existing messenger RNA (mRNA) vaccines, could neutralize the Wuhan-Hu-1 and B.1.351 variants. Prevaccin
7h
Prior SARS-CoV-2 infection rescues B and T cell responses to variants after first vaccine dose
Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) vaccine rollout has coincided with the spread of variants of concern. We investigated whether single-dose vaccination, with or without prior infection, confers cross-protective immunity to variants. We analyzed T and B cell responses after first-dose vaccination with the Pfizer/BioNTech messenger RNA vaccine BNT162b2 in health care work
7h
A Middle Pleistocene Homo from Nesher Ramla, Israel
It has long been believed that Neanderthals originated and flourished on the European continent. However, recent morphological and genetic studies have suggested that they may have received a genetic contribution from a yet unknown non-European group. Here we report on the recent discovery of archaic Homo fossils from the site of Nesher Ramla, Israel, which we dated to 140,000 to 120,000 years ag
7h
Middle Pleistocene Homo behavior and culture at 140,000 to 120,000 years ago and interactions with Homo sapiens
Fossils of a Middle Pleistocene (MP) Homo within a well-defined archaeological context at the open-air site of Nesher Ramla, Israel, shed light on MP Homo culture and behavior. Radiometric ages, along with cultural and stratigraphic considerations, suggest that the fossils are 140,000 to 120,000 years old, chronologically overlapping with H. sapiens in western Asia. Lithic analysis reveals that M
7h
MBD5 and MBD6 couple DNA methylation to gene silencing through the J-domain protein SILENZIO
DNA methylation is associated with transcriptional repression of eukaryotic genes and transposons, but the downstream mechanism of gene silencing is largely unknown. Here, we describe two Arabidopsis thaliana methyl-CpG–binding domain proteins, MBD5 and MBD6, that are recruited to chromatin by recognition of CG methylation, and redundantly repress a subset of genes and transposons without affecti
7h
Face masks effectively limit the probability of SARS-CoV-2 transmission
Airborne transmission by droplets and aerosols is important for the spread of viruses. Face masks are a well-established preventive measure, but their effectiveness for mitigating severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) transmission is still under debate. We show that variations in mask efficacy can be explained by different regimes of virus abundance and are related to popul
7h
First-principles design of a single-atom-alloy propane dehydrogenation catalyst
The complexity of heterogeneous catalysts means that a priori design of new catalytic materials is difficult, but the well-defined nature of single-atom–alloy catalysts has made it feasible to perform unambiguous theoretical modeling and precise surface science experiments. Herein we report the theory-led discovery of a rhodium-copper (RhCu) single-atom–alloy catalyst for propane dehydrogenation
7h
Discovery of a Cooper-pair density wave state in a transition-metal dichalcogenide
Pair density wave (PDW) states are defined by a spatially modulating superconductive order parameter. To search for such states in transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), we used high-speed atomic-resolution scanned Josephson-tunneling microscopy. We detected a PDW state whose electron-pair density and energy gap modulate spatially at the wave vectors of the preexisting charge density wave (CDW)
7h
A tautomeric ligand enables directed C-H hydroxylation with molecular oxygen
Hydroxylation of aryl carbon–hydrogen bonds with transition metal catalysts has proven challenging when oxygen is used as the oxidant. Here, we report a palladium complex bearing a bidentate pyridine/pyridone ligand that efficiently catalyzes this reaction at ring positions adjacent to carboxylic acids. Infrared, x-ray, and computational analysis support a possible role of ligand tautomerization
7h
Stacking-engineered ferroelectricity in bilayer boron nitride
Two-dimensional (2D) ferroelectrics with robust polarization down to atomic thicknesses provide building blocks for functional heterostructures. Experimental realization remains challenging because of the requirement of a layered polar crystal. Here, we demonstrate a rational design approach to engineering 2D ferroelectrics from a nonferroelectric parent compound by using van der Waals assembly.
7h
Interfacial ferroelectricity by van der Waals sliding
Despite their partial ionic nature, many-layered diatomic crystals avoid internal electric polarization by forming a centrosymmetric lattice at their optimal van der Waals stacking. Here, we report a stable ferroelectric order emerging at the interface between two naturally grown flakes of hexagonal boron nitride, which are stacked together in a metastable non-centrosymmetric parallel orientation
7h
Pressure-driven fusion of amorphous particles into integrated monoliths
Biological organisms can use amorphous precursors to produce inorganic skeletons with continuous structures through complete particle fusion. Synthesizing monoliths is much more difficult because sintering techniques can destroy continuity and limit mechanical strength. We manufactured inorganic monoliths of amorphous calcium carbonate by the fusion of particles while regulating structurally boun
7h
Ubiquitination is essential for recovery of cellular activities after heat shock
Eukaryotic cells respond to stress through adaptive programs that include reversible shutdown of key cellular processes, the formation of stress granules, and a global increase in ubiquitination. The primary function of this ubiquitination is thought to be for tagging damaged or misfolded proteins for degradation. Here, working in mammalian cultured cells, we found that different stresses elicite
7h
MeCP2 is a microsatellite binding protein that protects CA repeats from nucleosome invasion
The Rett syndrome protein MeCP2 was described as a methyl-CpG-binding protein, but its exact function remains unknown. Here we show that mouse MeCP2 is a microsatellite binding protein that specifically recognizes hydroxymethylated CA repeats. Depletion of MeCP2 alters chromatin organization of CA repeats and lamina-associated domains and results in nucleosome accumulation on CA repeats and genom
7h
Ubiquitination of G3BP1 mediates stress granule disassembly in a context-specific manner
Stress granules are dynamic, reversible condensates composed of RNA and protein that assemble in eukaryotic cells in response to a variety of stressors and are normally disassembled after stress is removed. The composition and assembly of stress granules is well understood, but little is known about the mechanisms that govern disassembly. Impaired disassembly has been implicated in some diseases
7h
Transformative climate adaptation in the United States: Trends and prospects
As climate change intensifies, civil society is increasingly calling for transformative adaptation that redresses drivers of climate vulnerability. We review trends in how US federal government, private industry, and civil society are planning for climate adaptation. We find growing divergence in their approaches and impacts. This incoherence increases maladaptive investment in climate-blind infr
7h
The Atlantic Daily: Why Are Ketchup Bottles So Hard to Use?
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox. The world works in strange ways, and interesting design choices can often be found in the everyday objects we overlook. Here are two to think about just in time for summer. Ketchup bottles. If you
7h
When did the first COVID-19 case arise?
Using methods from conservation science, a new analysis suggests that the first case of COVID-19 arose between early October and mid-November, 2019 in China, with the most likely date of origin being November 17.
8h
Genetic study of liver cancer reveals new drug target
Drugs targeting the gene MAGEA3 may help block the growth of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the most common type of primary liver cancer and one of the leading causes of cancer deaths in the country. That's one conclusion of a new study analyzing the genetics of HCC tumors.
8h
Kiwi disease study finds closely related bacterial strains display different behaviors
Over the last decade, severe outbreaks of bacterial canker have caused huge economic losses for kiwi growers. Bacterial canker is caused by the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae (Psa) and more recent outbreaks have been particularly devastating due to the emergence of a new, extremely aggressive biovar called Psa3. Due to its recent introduction, the molecular basis of Psa3's
9h
Cosmic hand hitting a wall
Motions of a remarkable cosmic structure have been measured for the first time, using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. The blast wave and debris from an exploded star are seen moving away from the explosion site and colliding with a wall of surrounding gas.
9h
An enzyme prevents the formation of multiple heads and axes in freshwater polyp Hydra
In the animal kingdom, specific growth factors control body axis development. They are produced by a small group of cells at one end of the embryo to be distributed in a graded fashion toward the opposite pole. Through this, discrete spatial patterns arise that determine the correct formation of the head-foot axis. Researchers have discovered an enzyme in the freshwater polyp Hydra that shapes thi
9h
Virus that causes COVID-19 can find alternate route to infect cells
The virus that causes COVID-19 normally gets inside cells by attaching to a protein called ACE2. Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that a single mutation confers the ability to enter cells through another route, which may threaten the effectiveness of COVID-19 vaccines and therapeutics designed to block the standard route of entry.
9h
Researchers find health benefits of Connecticut-grown sugar kelp
Researchers have reported significant findings supporting the nutritional benefits of Connecticut-grown sugar kelp. They found brown sugar kelp (Saccharina latissima) inhibits hepatic inflammation and fibrosis in a mouse model of diet-induced non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, a fatty liver disease.
10h
Predicting tooth loss
New research suggests that machine learning tools can help identify those at greatest risk for tooth loss and refer them for further dental assessment in an effort to ensure early interventions to avert or delay the condition.
10h
Marmoset study identifies brain region linking actions to their outcomes
The 'anterior cingulate cortex' is key brain region involved in linking behaviors to their outcomes. When this region was temporarily silenced, monkeys did not change behavior even when it stopped having the expected outcome. The finding is a step towards targeted treatment of human disorders involving compulsive behavior, such as OCD and eating disorders, thought to involve impaired function in t
10h
Drought affects aspen survival decades later, new study finds
Drought—even in a single year—can leave aspen more vulnerable to insect infestation and other stressors decades later, a new study by NAU researchers found. Aspen trees that were not resilient to drought stayed smaller than others, growing more slowly and succumbing to an outbreak of insects known as aspen leaf miners that have plagued interior Alaska for more than two decades.
10h
Mosquito love songs send mixed message about immunity
As mosquito-borne diseases pose risks for half the world's population, scientists have been releasing sterile or genetically modified male mosquitos in attempts to suppress populations or alter their traits to control human disease.
10h
Artificial intelligence speeds forecasts to control fusion experiments
Machine learning, a technique used in the artificial intelligence (AI) software behind self-driving cars and digital assistants, now enables scientists to address key challenges to harvesting on Earth the fusion energy that powers the sun and stars. The technique recently empowered physicist Dan Boyer of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) to develop fa
10h
Recycling next-generation solar panels fosters green planet
Designing a recycling strategy for a new, forthcoming generation of photovoltaic solar cells – made from metal halide perovskites, a family of crystalline materials with structures like the natural mineral calcium titanate – will add a stronger dose of environmental friendliness to a green industry, according to new research published in Nature Sustainability.
10h
International study of rare childhood cancer finds genetic clues, potential for tailored therapy
In children with rhabdomyosarcoma, or RMS, a rare cancer that affects the muscles and other soft tissues, the presence of mutations in several genes, including TP53, MYOD1, and CDKN2A, appear to be associated with a more aggressive form of the disease and a poorer chance of survival. This finding is from the largest-ever international study on RMS, led by scientists at the National Cancer Institut
10h
Loss of FCHSD1 leads to amelioration of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [Immunology and Inflammation]
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD/emphysema) is a life-threatening disorder and there are few effective therapies. Cigarette smoke-induced oxidative stress, airway inflammation, and apoptosis of lung cells have been reported to be involved in the pathogenesis of COPD/emphysema and lead to alveolar septal destruction. Here we show that the expression level…
10h
The F-box protein gene exo-1 is a target for reverse engineering enzyme hypersecretion in filamentous fungi [Applied Biological Sciences]
Carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZymes) are vital for the lignocellulose-based biorefinery. The development of hypersecreting fungal protein production hosts is therefore a major aim for both academia and industry. However, despite advances in our understanding of their regulation, the number of promising candidate genes for targeted strain engineering remains limited. Here,…
10h
Cellular nucleic acid-binding protein is essential for type I interferon-mediated immunity to RNA virus infection [Immunology and Inflammation]
Type I interferons (IFNs) are innate immune cytokines required to establish cellular host defense. Precise control of IFN gene expression is crucial to maintaining immune homeostasis. Here, we demonstrated that cellular nucleic acid–binding protein (CNBP) was required for the production of type I IFNs in response to RNA virus infection….
10h
Interaction between the type 4 pili machinery and a diguanylate cyclase fine-tune c-di-GMP levels during early biofilm formation [Microbiology]
To initiate biofilm formation, it is critical for bacteria to sense a surface and respond precisely to activate downstream components of the biofilm program. Type 4 pili (T4P) and increasing levels of c-di-GMP have been shown to be important for surface sensing and biofilm formation, respectively; however, mechanisms important in…
10h
Streptococcus pneumoniae sticks to dying lung cells, worsening secondary infection following flu
Researchers have found a further reason for the severity of dual infection by influenza and Streptococcus pneumonia — a new virulence mechanism for a surface protein on the pneumonia-causing bacteria S. pneumoniae. This insight comes 30 years after discovery of that surface protein, called pneumococcal surface protein A. This mechanism had been missed in the past because it facilitates bacterial
10h
Muscling up with nanoparticle-based anti-inflammatory therapy
Researchers at Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have developed a new approach in which specifically designed anti-inflammatory nanoparticles (NPs) that could be applied locally and selectively to chronically inflamed muscles severely affected or at more immediate risk of deterioration, and maybe dif
10h
Research shows Alaska infrastructure at risk of earlier failure
Roads, bridges, pipelines and other types of infrastructure in Alaska and elsewhere in the Arctic will deteriorate faster than expected due to a failure by planners to account for the structures' impact on adjacent permafrost, according to research by a University of Alaska Fairbanks Geophysical Institute permafrost expert and others.
11h
UCLA study reveals how immune cells can be trained to fight infections
The body's immune cells fight off microbes and other invaders, and can also be reprogrammed or "trained" to respond even more aggressively to such threats, report UCLA scientists who have discovered the fundamental rule underlying this process in a particular class of cells. Their findings, published in the journal Science, could help pave the way for targeted strategies to enhance the immune syst
11h
New technique for studying cancer mutations – approaches for future therapies
An extended application of the CRISPR-Cas technology has been made possible by Dr Manual Kaulich's team at Goethe University: the new 3Cs multiplex technique allows the effect of genetic changes in any two genes to be studied simultaneously in cell cultures. This can provide important clues for the development of therapies to treat cancer or diseases of the nervous and immune systems.
11h
How to stay cool in a heat wave
It's not just you—it really has been absurdly hot in some areas of the US lately. On June 15, it got to 115 degrees in Tucson, Arizona, the fourth hottest day in the city's recorded history, according to the National Weather Service. The days leading up to and immediately following that had similar highs, with eight consecutive days topping out at or above 110 degrees. This year isn't as anomalou
11h
Rude behavior at work is not an epidemic, new study shows
Rude behavior at work has come to be expected, like donuts in the breakroom. Two decades of research on employee relationships shows that 98 percent of employees experience rude behavior at work, but now a new study suggests a large majority of workplace relationships are not characterized by rudeness. Isolated incidents of rude behavior at work, although somewhat common, do not point to widesprea
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City of Hope researchers ID how most common breast cancer becomes resistant to treatment
City of Hope has identified how cancer cells in patients with early-stage breast cancer change and become resistant to hormone or combination therapies. Andrea Bild, Ph.D., used single-cell RNA sequencing to identify resistant traits cancer cells acquire; these cancer cells can persist despite therapy. The team also identified when these resistant traits are acquired and found them as early as two
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Preventing the break-in of the toxoplasmosis parasite
Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite which, to survive, must absolutely penetrate its host's cells. Understanding how the parasite manages to enter host cells offers opportunities to develop more prevention. A team has now identified the key role of RON13, which is essential for the invasion process. The three-dimensional structure and the site of action of this enzyme are atypi
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Cyclone study improves climate projections
Migrating storms and local weather systems known as cyclones and anticyclones were thought to contribute to behaviors and properties of our global weather system. However, the means to probe cyclones and anticyclones were limited. Researchers demonstrated a new three-dimensional analytical methodology that can quantify the way individual cyclones and anticyclones impact broader weather systems. Th
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Researchers find the adhesions that build the brain's networks
A new study from Duke and UNC scientists has discovered a crucial protein involved in the communication and coordination between astrocytes as they build synapses in the brain. Lacking this molecule, called hepaCAM, astrocytes aren't as sticky as they should be, and tend to stick to themselves rather than forming connections with their fellow astrocytes.
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Can spirituality benefit breast cancer survivor health?
New research looks at the connection between breast cancer and spirituality Throughout her 20-year career as a nurse practitioner, Jennifer Hulett noticed survivors of breast cancer would often express gratitude for being alive and mention God or a divine acknowledgement that had improved their health and well-being. Now an assistant professor at the University of Missouri Sinclair School of Nurs
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Higher doses of neutralizing antibody could protect humans against HIV
Although the Antibody Mediated Prevention (AMP) study that launched in 2016 failed to show significant efficacy in a pair of clinical trials, Denis Burton argues in a Perspective that the AMP study's results represent a landmark in AIDS research; they show — for the first time — that a broadly neutralizing antibody (bnAb) can protect humans against exposure to some strains of HIV.
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Battle of the Pleiades against plant immunity
Mythological nymphs reincarnate as a group of corn smut proteins to launch a battle on maize immunity. One of these proteins appears to stand out among its sister Pleiades, much like its namesake character in Greek mythology. The research carried out at GMI—Gregor Mendel Institute of Molecular Plant Biology of the Austrian Academy of Sciences—is published in the journal PLOS Pathogens.
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Plumose anemone has a taste for ants—and spiders, too
A new study provides an in-depth look into the rich diversity of prey the giant plumrose anemone catches with its crown of tentacles. The critter is an animal, but it looks a bit like an underwater cauliflower. Its body consists of a stalk-like column that attaches to rocks and other surfaces on one end, and to its tentacles on the other. They use these feelers to collect and shove food into thei
13h
Research team discovers Arctic dinosaur nursery
Images of dinosaurs as cold-blooded creatures needing tropical temperatures could be a relic of the past. Scientists have found that nearly all types of Arctic dinosaurs, from small bird-like animals to giant tyrannosaurs, reproduced in the region and likely remained there year-round.
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New findings unveil a missing piece of human prehistory
A joint research team led by Prof. Fu Qiaomei from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences sequenced the ancient genomes of 31 individuals from southern East Asia, thus unveiling a missing piece of human prehistory.
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Tree pollen carries SARS-CoV-2 particles farther, facilitates virus spread, study finds
A study on the role of microscopic particles in virus transmission suggests pollen is nothing to sneeze at. In a new study, researchers investigate how pollen facilitates the spread of an RNA virus like the COVID-19 virus. The study draws on cutting-edge computational approaches for analyzing fluid dynamics to mimic the pollen movement from a willow tree, a prototypical pollen emitter. Airborne po
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Elephant seal diving mystery solved: 24-hour feeding could be a climate change sentinel
Female elephant seals weigh 350 kg on average, and dive continuously to the ocean's mesopelagic zone, about 200 to 1,000 meters deep, to consume their only prey: Small fish that weigh less than 10 grams. Now, an international team of researchers, armed with eight years' worth of data, may have answered a decades-long question: How do seals maintain their large size on such small prey?
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Antarctic Circumpolar Current flows more rapidly in warm phases
Our planet's strongest ocean current, which circulates around Antarctica, plays a major role in determining the transport of heat, salt and nutrients in the ocean. An international research team led by the Alfred Wegener Institute has now evaluated sediment samples from the Drake Passage.
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A hidden driver of food insecurity and environmental crisis
The cultivated planet is withstanding record-breaking pressure to ensure food security. To meet the rising demand of food, energy, and fiber, a 70%-100% increase in crop commodities will be needed globally by 2050. However, rapid urbanization and industrialization have caused dramatic loss of high-quality cropland and hence threatened food security. To stabilize cropland area, cropland expansion t
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Embryologists unlock secrets of a worm with regeneration abilities
This worm that lives in the White Sea is able to restore lost body segments. However, it turned out that suppression of FGF protein activity disturbs this ability. Similar proteins are found in humans. This discovery may lead to developing methods of fast wound healing. The research findings are published in the journal Genes as part of the project supported by the Russian Science Foundation.
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Employment realities don't match people's dreams
When it comes to career aspirations for teenagers, a University of Houston psychology researcher believes it's best to shoot for the moon, so you can at least land in the stars. The truth is the moon may sometimes be unreachable.
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Novel risk score for predicting blood cancer relapse
Several patients suffering from leukemia, who have undergone stem cell transplantation, are at a risk of relapse, owing to varied reasons. Before the inevitable, what if it is possible to predict this situation, and take appropriate medical measures? A group of researchers in China appear to have solved this challenge by developing a novel risk score for leukemia relapse prediction, according to a
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How neurons get past 'no'
A new Salk study shows that inhibitory neurons do more than just inhibit neuron activity like an off-switch; paradoxically, they actually increase the amount of information transmitted through the nervous system.
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UMD introduces new CRISPR 3.0 system for highly efficient gene activation in plants
Yiping Qi at the University of Maryland (UMD) introduced a new and improved CRISPR 3.0 system in plants, focusing on gene activation. This third generation system focuses on multiplexed gene activation that can boost the function of multiple genes simultaneously. This system boasts four to six times the activation capacity of current state-of-the-art CRISPR technology, demonstrating high accuracy
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Case report: Remdesivir induced dangerously low heart rate in COVID-19 patient
After beginning treatment with remdesivir for COVID-19, a patient experienced significant bradycardia, or low heart rate. Her physicians used a dopamine infusion to stabilize her through the five-day course of remdesivir treatment, and her cardiac condition resolved itself at the end of the treatment. The case is discussed in Heart Rhythm Case Reports, an official journal of the Heart Rhythm Socie
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Russian forests are crucial to global climate mitigation
Russia is the world's largest forest country. Being home to more than a fifth of forests globally, the country's forests and forestry have enormous potential to contribute to making a global impact in terms of climate mitigation. A new study by IIASA researchers, Russian experts, and other international colleagues have produced new estimates of biomass contained in Russian forests, confirming a su
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Developing a nanofilm-based 'cell cage' technology
A research team, led by Prof. Nathaniel S. Hwang and Prof. Byung-gee Kim, from Seoul National University (SNU) and Prof. Dong Yun Lee, from Hanyang University, has used enzymatic crosslinking to create nanofilms on cell surfaces. SNU has announced that it has developed a "cell caging" technology for application in cell-based therapies. The 'cell caging' technique can prevent immune rejection durin
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Mixed cultures for a greater yield
Monocultures dominate arable land today, with vast areas given over to single elite varieties that promise a high yield. But planting arable land with just one type of crop has its disadvantages: these areas are easy game for fungal and insect pests, posing a threat to crops. To keep pests at bay, farmers are having to use resistant varieties and various pesticides.
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Water meters help scientists quantify river runoff
The Third Pole centered on the Tibetan Plateau is home to the headwaters of multiple rivers in Asia. Despite the importance of these rivers, scientists have not known exactly how much water flows out of the mountains of the Third Pole as river runoff.
14h
A simple method to enhance responsivity of terahertz radiation detectors
Scientists of Tomsk Polytechnic University jointly with colleagues from Spanish universities have offered a simple method how to enhance the responsivity of terahertz radiation detectors by 3.5 times using a small Teflon cube. The 1 mm cube must be put on the surface of the detector without changing the inner design of the detector.
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Research looks to outer space to learn about human health on Earth
As an oncologist, Adam Dicker has seen how cancer treatments can pummel the body to knock out tumors, sometimes leading to deteriorating bones, more infections, and haywire sleep cycles. But others have observed similar ailments in a group of healthy people: astronauts who spend time in space.
14h
VR games can ease kids' fear of scary hospital procedures
Playing games using virtual reality headsets can help children cope with having to go through a painful medical procedure at the hospital, according to a new study. Medical procedures such as a venipuncture—the penetrating of a vein for a procedure such as drawing blood or inserting an intravenous tube—may make a young patient anxious or uneasy. Many hospitals have a dedicated child life services
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Improve photosynthesis performance via photosystem II-based biomimetic assembly
In the past decade, scientists have paid more attention to studying light harvest for producing novel bionic materials or integrating naturally biological components into synthetic systems. Tehir inspiration is the imitation of natural photosynthesis in green plants, algae, and cyanobacteria to convert light energy into chemical energy. Photosystem II (PSII) is a light-intervened protein complex r
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How plants strengthen their light-harvesting membranes against environmental stress
An international study led by Helmholtz Zentrum München has revealed the structure of a membrane-remodeling protein that builds and maintains photosynthetic membranes. These fundamental insights lay the groundwork for bioengineering efforts to strengthen plants against environmental stress, helping to sustaining human food supply and fight against climate change.
14h
Embryologists reveal a secret of a worm with regeneration super abilities
This worm that lives in the White Sea is able to restore lost body segments. However, it turned out that suppression of FGF protein activity disturbs this ability. Similar proteins are found in humans. This discovery may lead to developing methods of fast wound healing. The research findings are published in the journal Genes as part of the project supported by the Russian Science Foundation.
14h
Are zebra mussels eating or helping toxic algae?
While invasive zebra mussels consume small plant-like organisms called phytoplankton, Michigan State University researchers discovered during a long-term study that zebra mussels can actually increase Microcystis, a type of phytoplankton known as 'blue-green algae' or cyanobacteria, that forms harmful floating blooms.
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Spreading of infections = need for collaboration between biology and physics
Researchers at the Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, together with epidemiologist Lone Simonsen from Roskilde University form part of the panel advising the Danish government on how to tackle the different infection-spreading situations we have all seen unfold over the past year. Researchers have modelled the spread of infections under a variety of scenarios, and the Coronavirus has
14h
The fifth quartet: Excited neon discovery could reveal star qualities
Researchers show that an excited state previously predicted to exist in neon-20 is real by using particle scattering experiments. By merging into five groups of four, the protons and neutrons in neon-20 can exist in a special condensed state. This work may help scientists understand low-density nucleon many-body systems and neutron stars.
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Membrane proteins of bacteria and humans show surprising similarities
The cells of simple organisms, such as bacteria, as well as human cells are surrounded by a membrane, which fulfills various tasks including protecting the cell from stress. Researchers have now discovered that a membrane protein found in bacteria has a similar structure and function as a group of proteins that are responsible for remodeling and rebuilding the cell membrane in humans. No connectio
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Points to consider for studies of work participation in people with inflammatory arthritis
Inflammatory arthritis is the name for a group of diseases that cause joint pain and swelling. This happens because the body's immune system attacks its own tissues and causes inflammation. Types of inflammatory arthritis include rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, and axial spondyloarthritis. Inflammatory arthritis often affects people of working age, and can impact their employment. Work
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