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Man Charged With Rape After Uploading His DNA to Ancestry Site
A Florida man named Jared Vaughn was recently charged with rape after he bought a consumer DNA kit, uploaded his genetic code to a genealogy tracing web site, and, unbeknownst to him, matched to a DNA sample taken from when he allegedly assaulted a college student back in 2007, Insider reports . "It has taken 14 years for resolution in this case, but it's something that was important to us and wa
22h
Cambridge hospital's mask upgrade appears to eliminate Covid risk to staff
Hospital infection study shows use of FFP3 respirators at Addenbrooke's 'may have cut ward-based infection to zero' Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage An NHS hospital that upgraded the type of face masks used by staff on Covid-19 wards recorded a dramatic fall of up to 100% in hospital-acquired coronavirus infections among those workers, research shows. Addenbrooke's ho
13h
The Head of NASA Says He Believes in Aliens
Not Alone Bill Nelson, the recently appointed head of NASA, believes that there's extraterrestrial life lurking somewhere in the cosmos. "Are we alone? Personally, I don't think we are," Nelson told CNN in a video interview on Sunday. The interview came after the Pentagon finally released the unclassified version of its long-awaited report on unexplained aerial phenomena (UAP). And despite the re
6h
New type of metasurface allows unprecedented laser control
The ability to precisely control the various properties of laser light is critical to much of the technology that we use today, from commercial virtual reality (VR) headsets to microscopic imaging for biomedical research. Many of today's laser systems rely on separate, rotating components to control the wavelength, shape and power of a laser beam, making these devices bulky and difficult to mainta
12h
Rise of the diatoms—a new timeline
Diatoms—tiny phytoplankton that are responsible for a fifth of all energy converted into matter by plants—may have become important much earlier in the development of Earth's ocean ecosystems and carbon cycle than previously thought, according to a new Yale study.
6h
The most curious babies become the most curious toddlers
A longitudinal study of infant curiosity found that months-old babies most captivated by magic tricks became the most curious toddlers, suggesting a pre-verbal baby's level of interest in surprising aspects of the world remains constant over time and could predict their future cognitive ability.
21h
Deadly Condo Collapse Linked to Climate Change
Looking for Answers After a Miami condo building collapsed in a deadly tragedy last week, experts are now probing the role that climate change played in the building's well-documented and largely-ignored deterioration. For now, their understanding is not yet as cut and dry as saying "rising sea levels caused the building to collapse," but there do seem to be a number of ways that Miami's precario
3h
Bitcoin Billionaire Reportedly Found Dead
Death of a Billionaire Bitcoin billionaire and crypto exchange founder Mircea Popescu has reportedly drowned off the coast of Costa Rica, according to a brief and rather ambiguous report by local TV station Teletica . According to the report, the country's Judicial Investigation Agency confirmed the death, but it remains unclear if a body has been recovered or not. Bitcoin Magazine also talked to
4h
5,000-year-old hunter-gatherer is earliest person to die with the plague
Remains of man found in Latvia had DNA fragments and proteins of bacterium that causes plague A hunter-gatherer who lived more than 5,000 years ago is the earliest known person to have died with the plague, researchers have revealed. Stone-age communities in western Europe experienced a huge population decline about 5,500 years ago, an event that is thought to have subsequently enabled a huge mig
5h
'I struggle every day with the loss of my former life': what it's like to live with chronic pain
Long Covid is highlighting conditions that have been around much longer than the pandemic. Ten readers share their experiences "The endless cycle of seeing doctors and never seeing any change or improvement" is how one 43-year-old woman from the US described what it's like to live with chronic overlapping pain conditions. Long Covid has helped highlight issues surrrounding chronic illness but man
15h
Scientists Warn That Social Media Could Be a Threat to Civilization
Great Filter What if human civilization could survive wars and plagues, but not social media? That's the question that seems to motivate an alarming new paper , published in the elite journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences and authored by a strikingly diverse team of researchers in biology, psychology, neural and climate science, and more. It's a bleak read — and, possibly, a cal
23h
Gravitational waves from star-eating black holes detected on Earth
Spacetime-altering shock waves came from massive neutron stars crashing into black holes millions of years ago There are moments when life as an astrophysicist is like hanging around at the bus stop. You wait ages for a cataclysmic cosmic event to send shock waves through the fabric of spacetime and then two come along at once. Years after scientists began their search for quivers in spacetime an
7h
Why women are more likely to suffer from long Covid | Susan Evans and Mark Hutchinson
Men are more likely to die from the coronavirus but for women, a stronger immune system comes at a price When Covid-19 burst into our world, the initial focus was on how to prevent death. Older men were more likely to die from the virus than young people or women, and it became clear that not all humans suffered or died at an equal rate. Covid-19 infection was fatal in some and asymptomatic in ot
14h
Surge in Covid-19 cases in Tokyo, less than a month out from Olympics
Fears of a possible fifth wave as Tokyo reported 317 infections on Monday and the ninth week-on-week rise A rise in daily cases of the coronavirus in Tokyo has triggered fears of a possible fifth wave of infections, less than a month before the city is due to host the Olympics . Tokyo reported 317 infections on Monday – an increase of 81 from the same day last week and the ninth week-on-week same
16h
The Hubble Space Telescope Is in Really Serious Trouble
Death Watch NASA's groundbreaking Hubble space telescope is in deep trouble. According to a Friday update from NASA, both the aging telescope's main payload computer — as well as the backup computer — are experiencing the same glitch. In other words, Hubble is on thin ice — and, since it's been four days since we last heard from NASA about Hubble's condition, it seems increasingly likely that the
4h
Now is not the time to abandon all Covid caution
Analysis: scientists say the Delta variant should make the government think twice about resting all its hopes on vaccines If the new health secretary is to be believed, we are about to embark on an "exciting new journey" come 19 July. Sajid Javid, like the prime minister, appears confident that restrictions will be lifted irreversibly on that date. The data, however, is beginning to tell a differ
23h
Nowhere Is Ready for This Heat
The Portland Streetcar is 20 years old, making it relatively sprightly for infrastructure in the United States. Yet it was built for a different geological epoch. On Sunday, while Portland suffered through what was then its hottest day ever, the system started to melt. As the temperature reached 112 degrees Fahrenheit, a power cable on a major bridge warped , twisted around some metal hardware, a
5h
If there is no God, can anything be objectively good?
The divine command theory is an ethical position that argues that we should do only what God or the gods say. It was popular in ancient Greece and is still important in modern monotheism. Plato's Euthyphro dilemma is a challenge to this view, asking if the "good" is only that way because God says so, or does God only command what is good? If we do not believe in God, then it's hard to find a sour
7h
Inside the risky bat-virus engineering that links America to Wuhan
In 2013, the American virologist Ralph Baric approached Zhengli Shi at a meeting. Baric was a top expert in coronaviruses, with hundreds of papers to his credit, and Shi, along with her team at the Wuhan Institute of Virology, had been discovering them by the fistful in bat caves. In one sample of bat guano, Shi had detected the genome of a new virus, called SHC014, that was one of the two closes
11h
The Left's War on Gifted Kids
The Democratic primary voters of deep-blue New York City delivered a message clearly, firmly, and loudly: "Defund the police" was stupid and is now over. The first tally of the mayoral primary showed the pro-funding and pro-reform ex–police officer Eric Adams atop a large lead. The next day, President Joe Biden urged Democratic cities and states to spend some of their billions in coronavirus-reli
3h
We won't fix the obesity epidemic by locking people's jaws shut | Arwa Mahdawi
This is an economic issue, and a 'torture device' that stops you opening your mouth properly isn't the solution Want to hear a weight-loss idea so ingenious it's guaranteed to make your jaw drop by exactly 2mm? Introducing the DentalSlim Diet Control : a terrifying contraption that uses magnets cemented to your teeth to stop you opening your mouth by more than a couple of millimetres. That makes
5h
One in 20 children missed school in England due to Covid as cases rise 66%
Nearly 400,000 pupils absent within a week as scientists raise concerns about plan to replace isolation with tests Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage At least one in 20 children were absent from state schools in England because of Covid within the last week, as official figures reveal a 66% increase in the number of pupils with confirmed coronavirus infections. The data
5h
Can Math Help You Escape a Hungry Bear?
Once upon a time in a country far, far away, there was a champion athlete who could literally swim circles around his competition. He wished to train for the circle swimming world championship, but on account of a pandemic, he had to do so in isolation. So his country's swimming federation constructed a perfectly circular lake in the middle of a forest where he could safely practice. Source
6h
Ireland to delay indoor dining and only allow access to fully vaccinated
No date agreed for planned reopening as health officials warn of risks of a Delta-driven new wave Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Ireland has delayed the reopening of indoor hospitality and plans to limit indoor dining to people who have been fully vaccinated against Covid-19. The government announced the changes on Tuesday after health officials warned of a possible
6h
Can the most exciting new solar material live up to its hype?
Testing perovskite solar cells in the lab used to require a decent pair of running shoes. The materials fell apart so quickly that scientists would bolt from where they made the cells to where they tested them, trying to measure their performance before the cells degraded in their hands—usually within a couple of minutes. Perovskites have long enchanted researchers with the promise of producing i
11h
Is Facebook a monopoly? Please define, says judge.
It was never going to be easy to challenge the market power of Facebook, the world's largest social network and 34th-largest company, by revenue —and on Monday, a US judge further complicated efforts by dismissing two legal complaints against it brought by attorneys general around the country. Judge James Boasberg of the DC Circuit Court sided with the company in its motion to dismiss two separat
17h
Bronze Statue of Elon Musk Looks Nothing Like Elon Musk
Bronze Elon Investment site Public.com decided to give Tesla CEO Elon Musk a gift for his 50th birthday: a life-sized bronze statue in Lower Manhattan. The only problem? It doesn't look anything like him. It appears to be based on the widely-circulated video in which he watched the first Falcon Heavy launch, but aside from the pose it doesn't capture much of Musk's likeness, leading to mockery on
5h
The Atlantic Daily: Who's Afraid of Critical Race Theory?
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox. The GOP has found a new cultural boogeyman, and it's "critical race theory." I style that term in quotes because, as my colleague Adam Harris points out , some of the texts under fire bear little
8h
Scientists Turn Galaxy Cluster Into Giant Magnifying Lens To Study Even Farther Galaxies
Gravitational Lensing A team of scientists used a clever physics trick to study a galaxy that's otherwise so far away that no observatories on or orbiting the Earth could get a good look at it. The galaxy CSWA128 lurks nearly 11 billion light-years away from Earth. Because that's such a great distance, the light appears as little more than a pale blur in even our most powerful telescopes. To blow
2h
Old oil fields may be less prone to induced earthquakes
Subsurface carbon sequestration—storing carbon inrocks deep underground—offers a partial solution for removing carbon fromthe atmosphere. Used alongside emissions reductions, geologic carbonsequestration could help mitigate anthropogenic climate change. But likeother underground operations, it comes with risks—including earthquakes.
12h
A comet impact may have paved the way for human civilization
A recent study overviewed the existing research on the Younger Dryas impact hypothesis. The study notes that there is a "synchronicity" of geochemical signals suggesting that fragments of a comet struck Earth approximately 13,000 years ago. Still, further research is needed to illuminate how the alleged impact might have shaped the future of human civilization. Scientists generally agree that a m
5h
Coastguard seizes half a tonne of cocaine floating off Algeria coast
Fishermen alerted authorities to 'suspicious' items floating in the sea The Algerian coastguard has seized almost half a tonne of cocaine after fishers alerted authorities to "suspicious" items floating off the north-west coast. The coastguard fished out 490kg (1,080 pounds) of cocaine split up into 442 packages from the water six nautical miles (11 kilometres) off Oran's Cap Carbon on Saturday e
20h
Polymers in meteorites provide clues to early solar system
Many meteorites, which are small pieces from asteroids, do not experience high temperatures at any point in their existence. Because of this, these meteorites provide a good record of complex chemistry present when or before our solar system was formed 4.57 billion years ago.
5h
Massive quiescent galaxy found in a distant protocluster
Using the Keck I telescope, Japanese astronomers have identified a massive quiescent galaxy in a distant galaxy protocluster known as SSA22. The galaxy, designated ADF22-QG1, turns out to be the most distant quiescent galaxy in a protocluster to date. The finding is reported in a paper published June 21 on the arXiv pre-print repository.
6h
A New Brain Implant Automatically Detects and Kills Pain in Real Time
Chronic pain is like a horror movie monster that sneaks up on you. It's unpredictable, lingers silently, and when it strikes it's often too late to tame. More diabolically, our best weapon against it—pain medication—can increase pain intensity over time. And as the opioid epidemic sadly shows, even pain medication is a double-edged sword. It's time for something new. This week, a group from the N
4h
The Iran Nuclear Deal Isn't the Problem. Iran Is.
Ebrahim Raisi's election as president of Iran came as no surprise. All those who might have been a threat to him were disqualified. He was the choice of the supreme leader, Ali Khamenei, and small wonder: Few people better embody the ideology of the Islamic Republic. He will not open Iran up to the outside world, and will certainly not look to accommodate the United States in any way. As for Iran
8h
Preserving Hong Kong, in Miniature
In a densely populated city like Hong Kong, where real estate is in high demand and building space is limited, older buildings are frequently torn down for new construction. Longtime residents and historians have worked to protect and preserve what they can of old Hong Kong, but often find themselves fighting an uphill battle. Model makers Tony Lai and Maggie Chan have been working to preserve th
2h
Worse outcomes observed after heart attacks during pandemic compared to previous year
Heart attacks during the COVID-19 pandemic were more likely to result in heart failure compared with heart attacks one year earlier, according to research presented today at Heart Failure 2021, an online scientific congress of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). 'Heart attack patients waited an average of 14 hours to get help during the pandemic, with some delaying for nearly two days. That
8h
Elon Musk Says He Goes on Twitter to Check on Starship's Progress
Despite being the CEO of SpaceX, Elon Musk revealed today that he likes to go on social media to check in on the progress his company is making on Starship. The development of the Mars-bound rocket is "followed quite rigorously on the internet," Musk said today during a video feed interview at the Mobile World Congress (MWC) in Barcelona. "In fact, often when I want to know what the latest thing
51min
Mapping the way to climate resilience
Many companies don't know yet how climate change will change their business, but more are taking the inquiry seriously, signaling a new reality—one that calls any companies don't yet know how for guarding against systemic risk while protecting customer relationships and corporate reputations. Recognizing that reducing carbon emissions is essential to combat climate change, AT&T has made a commitm
4h
The Fairy Tale America Likes to Tell Itself
Many Americans like to tell themselves a story about the choices the country makes in times of national crisis. We see our country's policies as a pendulum. We may overreact at first, temporarily sacrificing principles and rights to meet the emergency at hand. But eventually the crisis recedes, and in restoring our commitment to foundational principles and the rule of law, we push the pendulum ba
5h
COVID-19 vaccine generates immune structures critical for lasting immunity
The first two COVID-19 vaccines authorized for emergency use by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) employed mRNA technology, which had never before been used in FDA-approved vaccines. A new study has found evidence that the immune response to such vaccines is both strong and potentially long-lasting.
22h
SpaceX Scrubs Launch After Aircraft Enters "Keep Out Zone"
Don't Want No Scrubs After complaining that regulators are keeping his space company's ambitions back for years, Elon Musk had yet another setback to contend with. The plan was to send 88 satellites, including three Starlink internet satellites, into orbit as part of SpaceX's Transporter 2 rideshare mission. But then things went off the rails. "Unfortunately, launch is called off for today, as an
22min
The circadian clock gates Drosophila adult emergence by controlling the timecourse of metamorphosis [Developmental Biology]
The daily rhythm of adult emergence of holometabolous insects is one of the first circadian rhythms to be studied. In these insects, the circadian clock imposes a daily pattern of emergence by allowing or stimulating eclosion during certain windows of time and inhibiting emergence during others, a process that has…
3h
This Startup Is Paying People to Scan Their Eyeballs
Hello Worldcoin Prominent tech entrepreneur and OpenAI CEO Sam Altman is back with a new venture called Worldcoin that says it will distribute a new cryptocurrency to every single human on Earth. There are, of course, plenty of challenges associated with that, not the least of which is the fact that only 59.5 percent of the world's population uses has access to the internet. Even stranger, Bloomb
now
New Geology articles published online ahead of print in June
Article topics include the Great Unconformity of the Rocky Mountain region; new Ediacara-type fossils; the southern Cascade arc (California, USA); the European Alps and the Late Pleistocene glacial maximum; Permian-Triassic ammonoid mass extinction; permafrost thaw; the southern Rocky Mountains of Colorado (USA); "gargle dynamics"; invisible gold; and alluvial fan deposits in Valles Marineris, Mar
7min
Gene therapy breakthrough offers hope to children with rare and fatal brain disease
Scientists and doctors at UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health (UCL GOS ICH) and Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) have given hope of a gene therapy cure to children with a rare degenerative brain disorder called Dopamine Transporter Deficiency Syndrome (DTDS). The team have recreated and cured the disease using state-of-the-art laboratory and mouse models of the disease and will so
7min
This 5,000-year-old man had the earliest known strain of plague
The oldest strain of Yersinia pestis — the bacteria behind the plague that caused the Black Death, which may have killed as much as half of Europe's population in the 1300s — has been found in the remains of a 5,000-year-old hunter-gatherer. A genetic analysis reveals that this ancient strain was likely less contagious and not as deadly as its medieval version.
10min
Hot nights confuse circadian clocks in rice, hurting crop yields
Rising nighttime temperatures are curbing crop yields for rice, and new research moves us closer to understanding why. The study found that warmer nights alter the rice plant's biological schedule, with hundreds of genes being expressed earlier than usual, while hundreds of other genes are being expressed later than usual.
10min
Clay Dug Up by NASA Mars Rover Makes It Seem Like Red Planet Could've Supported Life
Wet Clay Back in 2016, NASA's Curiosity rover dug up some Martian clay that scientists are now saying is compelling evidence that the Red Planet could have once hosted life. The finding suggests that Mars experienced a long period of relatively stable, hospitable conditions, according to research published Monday in the journal Nature Astronomy . That's not even close to saying that Mars once hos
29min
Flawed data led to our belief in a a link between technology use and mental health problems
Even a casual follower of the news over the last few years is likely to have encountered stories about research showing that digital technologies like social media and smartphones are harming young people's mental health . Rates of depression and suicide among young people have risen steadily since the mid-2000s, around the time that the first smartphones and social media platforms were being rel
31min
Homo longi, the dragon man: Researchers identify our closest relative
In 1933 a mysterious fossil skull was discovered near Harbin City in the Heilongjiang province of north-eastern China. Despite being nearly perfectly preserved – with square eye sockets, thick brow ridges and large teeth – nobody could work out exactly what it was . The skull is much bigger than that of Homo sapiens and other human species – and its brain size is similar to that of our own specie
31min
Use of police force still breaking down across racial and ethnic lines, says study
UTSA criminology and criminal justice professors Michael R. Smith and Rob Tillyer working in collaboration with University of Cincinnati Professor Robin Engel examined racial and ethnic disparities in the use of force by the Fairfax County Police Department (FCPD). One of the nation's largest county police departments, the FCPD serves Fairfax County, Va., a major metropolitan county near Washingto
31min
Financial barriers to cervical cancer screening
Among low-income, uninsured, or publicly insured women ages 25-64 years who were not up to date on cervical cancer screening, 72% perceived financial barriers to screening. The most commonly reported barriers were screening appointment costs (71%) and follow-up/future treatment costs (44%).
42min
Scientists mine the rich seam of body wearable motion sensors
Body movement can be identified through clothing by passing a low voltage through a seam sewn from conductive yarn. Seam-based fitness trackers hold promise for tracking subtle movements (yoga, Pilates, rehabilitation, etc) — something today's fitness watches struggle with. Stretching conductive seams reduces voltage, and the increase in resistance broadly indicates the level of stretch. Changes
1h
The Cosmic Chomp Astronomers Have Been Waiting For
Are you in the mood to feel small? Like cosmically small? And not because of the usual dreamy, slightly cheesy stuff that space can offer—the idea that we exist on a tiny speck of rock clinging to our beautiful sun in the darkness. I'm talking about some truly wild action, so intense that it warps space-time, the invisible scaffolding that holds up everything we know, and reverberates for hundred
1h
UTSA study: Use of police force still breaking down across racial, ethnic lines
UTSA criminology and criminal justice professors Michael R. Smith and Rob Tillyer working in collaboration with University of Cincinnati Professor Robin Engel examined racial and ethnic disparities in the use of force by the Fairfax County Police Department (FCPD). One of the nation's largest county police departments, the FCPD serves Fairfax County, Va., a major metropolitan county near Washingto
1h
Reported cases of myocarditis in younger men following COVID-19 vaccination are rare
Researchers are taking a close look at rare cases of inflammation of the heart muscle, or myocarditis, in young men who developed symptoms shortly after receiving the second dose of the Moderna or Pfizer messenger RNA (mRNA) COVID-19 vaccines. Several recent studies suggest that health care professionals should watch for hypersensitivity myocarditis as a rare adverse reaction to being vaccinated f
1h
Identifying a topological fingerprint
Australian theoretical physics study just out has identified a 'smoking gun' in long search for the topological magnetic monopole referred to as the Berry curvature. This breakthrough in search for topological effects in non-equilibrium systems opens paths towards low-energy topological electronics viable for large-scale, room-temperature operation.
1h
Parasites manipulate praying mantis's polarized-light perception, causing it to jump into water
Researchers have revealed that praying mantis (mantids) infected with parasitic hairworms are attracted to horizontally polarized light that is strongly reflected off the surface of water, which causes them to enter the water. These results demonstrate that parasites can manipulate the host's specific light perception system to their advantage, causing the host to behave in an abnormal manner.
1h
Managing attention deficit disorder by training the brain
Scientists explored a technique called 'neurofeedback,' which enables ADHD patients to train their attention, based on instant feedback from the level of their brain activity. The team of neuroscientists found that not only did the training have a positive effect on patients' concentration abilities, but also that the attention improvement was closely linked to an enhanced response from the brain
1h
Paving the way to artificial photosynthesis: Effect of doping on the photocatalyst SrTiO3
For many years, researchers have been focused on developing technologies that can help us fight the imminent climate change crisis. They have one goal in common: Finding sustainable energy sources that can replace the environmentally toxic fossil fuels. Photocatalysts that drive an artificial process that replicates photosynthesis (in which solar energy is converted to useful materials) are promis
1h
A 50% rise in the level of CO2 could reduce rainfall in the Amazon more than deforestation
Simulations run by Brazilian scientists on a supercomputer at the National Space Research Institute (INPE) show that the direct impact of rising levels of carbon dioxide over the Amazon rainforest would be a reduction in rainfall equivalent to or even greater than the impact of complete substitution of the forest by pasture. The result calls attention to the need for regional and global action to
1h
Competing off-loading mechanisms of meropenem from an l,d-transpeptidase reduce antibiotic effectiveness [Biochemistry]
The carbapenem family of β-lactam antibiotics displays a remarkably broad spectrum of bactericidal activity, exemplified by meropenem's phase II clinical trial success in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis, a devastating disease for which β-lactam drugs historically have been notoriously ineffective. The discovery and validation of l,d-transpeptidases (Ldts) as critical drug targets…
1h
From hidden order to antiferromagnetism: Electronic structure changes in Fe-doped URu2Si2 [Physics]
In matter, any spontaneous symmetry breaking induces a phase transition characterized by an order parameter, such as the magnetization vector in ferromagnets, or a macroscopic many-electron wave function in superconductors. Phase transitions with unknown order parameter are rare but extremely appealing, as they may lead to novel physics. An emblematic…
1h
Mass-immigration determines the assembly of activated sludge microbial communities [Microbiology]
The assembly of bacterial communities in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) is affected by immigration via wastewater streams, but the impact and extent of bacterial immigrants are still unknown. Here, we quantify the effect of immigration at the species level in 11 Danish full-scale activated sludge (AS) plants. All plants have…
1h
Deep representation learning improves prediction of LacI-mediated transcriptional repression [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Recent progress in DNA synthesis and sequencing technology has enabled systematic studies of protein function at a massive scale. We explore a deep mutational scanning study that measured the transcriptional repression function of 43,669 variants of the Escherichia coli LacI protein. We analyze structural and evolutionary aspects that relate to…
1h
Autophagy deficiency modulates microglial lipid homeostasis and aggravates tau pathology and spreading [Neuroscience]
The autophagy–lysosomal pathway plays a critical role in intracellular clearance and metabolic homeostasis. While neuronal autophagy is known to participate in the degradation of neurofibrillary tangles composed of hyperphosphorylated and misfolded tau protein in Alzheimer's disease and other tauopathies, how microglial-specific autophagy regulates microglial intrinsic properties and neuronal tau
1h
Alternative splicing of GluN1 gates glycine site-dependent nonionotropic signaling by NMDAR receptors [Neuroscience]
N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors (NMDARs), a principal subtype of excitatory neurotransmitter receptor, are composed as tetrameric assemblies of two glycine-binding GluN1 subunits and two glutamate-binding GluN2 subunits. NMDARs can signal nonionotropically through binding of glycine alone to its cognate site on GluN1. A consequence of this signaling by glycine is that…
1h
Acute Trem2 reduction triggers increased microglial phagocytosis, slowing amyloid deposition in mice [Neuroscience]
Heterozygous genetic variants within the TREM2 gene show a strong association with increased Alzheimer's disease (AD) risk. Amyloid beta–depositing mouse models haploinsufficient or null for Trem2 have identified important relationships among TREM2, microglia, and AD pathology; however, results are challenging to interpret in the context of varying microglial phenotypes and…
1h
Multiscale mechanics and temporal evolution of vimentin intermediate filament networks [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
The cytoskeleton, an intricate network of protein filaments, motor proteins, and cross-linkers, largely determines the mechanical properties of cells. Among the three filamentous components, F-actin, microtubules, and intermediate filaments (IFs), the IF network is by far the most extensible and resilient to stress. We present a multiscale approach to disentangle…
1h
A chromodomain protein mediates heterochromatin-directed piRNA expression [Genetics]
PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) play significant roles in suppressing transposons, maintaining genome integrity, and defending against viral infections. How piRNA source loci are efficiently transcribed is poorly understood. Here, we show that in Caenorhabditis elegans, transcription of piRNA clusters depends on the chromatin microenvironment and a chromodomain-containing protein, UAD-2. piRNA clus
1h
Does exhaled aerosol increase with COVID-19 infection correlate with body mass index-years? [Biological Sciences]
Edwards et al. (1) report on how exhaled aerosols influence COVID-19 infections. Respiratory droplet generation and exhalation were studied in human and nonhuman primate (NHP) subjects. The number of exhaled aerosol particles (NEAPs) varied by three orders of magnitude whereby the respiratory droplet number increases with COVID-19 infection and, presumably,…
1h
Promoter-sequence determinants and structural basis of primer-dependent transcription initiation in Escherichia coli [Biochemistry]
Chemical modifications of RNA 5′-ends enable "epitranscriptomic" regulation, influencing multiple aspects of RNA fate. In transcription initiation, a large inventory of substrates compete with nucleoside triphosphates for use as initiating entities, providing an ab initio mechanism for altering the RNA 5′-end. In Escherichia coli cells, RNAs with a 5′-end hydroxyl…
1h
B cell residency but not T cell-independent IgA switching in the gut requires innate lymphoid cells [Immunology and Inflammation]
Immunoglobulin A (IgA)–producing plasma cells derived from conventional B cells in the gut play an important role in maintaining the homeostasis of gut flora. Both T cell–dependent and T cell–independent IgA class switching occurs in the lymphoid structures in the gut, whose formation depends on lymphoid tissue inducers (LTis), a…
1h
Activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis by exogenous and endogenous GDF15 [Physiology]
An acute increase in the circulating concentration of glucocorticoid hormones is essential for the survival of severe somatic stresses. Circulating concentrations of GDF15, a hormone that acts in the brain to reduce food intake, are frequently elevated in stressful states. We now report that GDF15 potently activates the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA)…
1h
Phytochrome A elevates plant circadian-clock components to suppress shade avoidance in deep-canopy shade [Plant Biology]
Shade-avoiding plants can detect the presence of neighboring vegetation and evoke escape responses before canopy cover limits photosynthesis. Rapid stem elongation facilitates light foraging and enables plants to overtop competitors. A major regulator of this response is the phytochrome B photoreceptor, which becomes inactivated in light environments with a low…
1h
Pan-African evolution of within- and between-country COVID-19 dynamics [Medical Sciences]
The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is heterogeneous throughout Africa and threatening millions of lives. Surveillance and short-term modeling forecasts are critical to provide timely information for decisions on control strategies. We created a strategy that helps predict the country-level case occurrences based on cases within or external to a…
1h
Paving the way to artificial photosynthesis — effect of doping on the photocatalyst SrTiO3
While the material strontium titanate (SrTiO3) has shown immense potential as a photocatalyst in solar energy conversion, it is unclear whether chemical defects can influence its properties. Now, researchers at Nagoya Institute of Technology, Japan, looked into how doping with niobium affects the charge properties of SrTiO3 crystals. Their findings can help us to increase the efficiency of SrTiO3
2h
Researchers investigate whether exposure to vaporized THC might mellow lobsters bound for the cooking pot
This lobster tale begins a few years ago when the proprietor of a northeastern seafood restaurant publicly asserted that exposing lobsters to a little cannabis prior to cooking produced notable changes in their behavior and a less dramatic scene in the kitchen for all concerned, which was the Maine thing.
2h
Research rebuttal paper uncovers misuse of Holocaust datasets
Aerospace engineering faculty member Melkior Ornik is also a mathematician, a history buff, and a strong believer in integrity when it comes to using hard science in public discussions. So, when a story popped up in his news feed about a pair of researchers who developed a statistical method to analyze datasets and used it to purportedly refute the number of Holocaust victims from a concentration
2h
24% of chemicals in plastic may be worth worrying about
Researchers have found an unexpectedly high number of potentially concerning chemicals intentionally used in everyday plastic products. A lack of transparency limits management of these chemicals. Plastic is practical, cheap, and incredibly popular. Every year, more than 350 million tonnes (around 386 million US tons) are produced worldwide. These plastics contain a huge variety of chemicals that
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Study provides first genome-wide evidence for functional importance of unusual DNA structures
Some regions of the human genome where the DNA can fold into unusual three-dimensional structures called G-quadruplexes (G4s) show signs that they are preserved by natural selection. When G4s are located in the regulatory sequences that control how genes are expressed, or in other functional but non-protein coding regions of the genome, they are maintained by selection, are more common, and their
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Hunting dark energy with gravity resonance spectroscopy
Dark Energy is widely believed to be the driving force behind the universe's accelerating expansion, and several theories have now been proposed to explain its elusive nature. However, these theories predict that its influence on quantum scales must be vanishingly small, and experiments so far have not been accurate enough to either verify or discredit them. In new research published in EPJ ST, a
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Fruit flies lose their virginity lightly – and then become choosy
Mate choice is important for females, who often invest much more energy in offspring than males. However, being too selective is a bad idea, as they might end up not mating at all. Biologists have wondered for a long time how females optimize their chances. Scientists at the University of Groningen have discovered that mating induces a behavioural change in female flies that makes them more choosy
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More efficient tests may one day replace endoscopy
A University of Houston biomedical researcher is widening the net, looking for symptoms of other proteins — not just blood – found elevated in colorectal cancer and inflammatory bowel disease. The new biomarkers may one day replace the invasive endoscopy to determine what's going on inside the intestines.
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Reported cases of myocarditis in younger men following COVID-19 vaccination are rare; vaccination remains important
Mayo Clinic researchers are taking a close look at rare cases of inflammation of the heart muscle, or myocarditis, in young men who developed symptoms shortly after receiving the second dose of the Moderna or Pfizer messenger RNA (mRNA) COVID-19 vaccines. Several recent studies suggest that health care professionals should watch for hypersensitivity myocarditis as a rare adverse reaction to being
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The Pandemic Really Did Change How We Tip
Essential workers who tugged the United States through the pandemic have not gotten much compensation for what they've had to endure, but hey, they did get some perks . Fifteen percent off mattresses for teachers! Allbirds at $35 off with the discount code HEALTHCAREHERO. A free Snickers bar (redeemable only at Walmart with an e-gift card)! Yes, some major retail chains issued hazard bonuses and
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Scientists: Citizen science needs more than 'rebranding'
Scientists need to focus on tangible efforts to boost equity, diversity, and inclusion in citizen science, argue a group of researchers. Published in the journal Science , the perspective is a response to a debate about rebranding "citizen science," a the movement to use crowdsourced data collection, analysis, or design in research. The researchers say that while the motivation for rebranding is
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Dinosaurs were in decline before the end
The death of the dinosaurs 66 million years ago was caused by the impact of a huge asteroid on the Earth. However, paleontologists have continued to debate whether they were already in decline or not before the impact. Scientists now show that they were already in decline for as much as ten million years before the final death blow.
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The earthworm in new light
Earthworms are special because they keep our soil healthy. From the outside they appear inconspicuous. But what earthworms look like from the inside, from their organs to the microbes and parasites that colonize them, has been difficult to grasp. Scientists have developed a method to visualize anatomical structures including products of an earthworm's metabolism.
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To spark curiosity, don't tell preschoolers too much or too little
Preschoolers are more likely to choose to gather more information about a topic if they know just enough about it to find it interesting, but not too much that it becomes boring, research finds. Preschool children are sensitive to the gap between how much they know and how much there is to learn, the finding indicates. Researchers say this "optimal" amount of existing knowledge creates the perfec
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Beckman neuroscientists uncover neuronal circuitry controlling auditory sensory perception
A new study led by Dan Llano and Baher Ibrahim at the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign discovered a new neuronal circuit that may help control which sensory information is relayed to the auditory cortex. Their paper, 'Corticothalamic gating of population auditory thalamocortical transmission in mouse,' was published in eLife in Ma
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A new class of functional elements in the human genome?
When regions of the human genome where the DNA can fold into unusual three-dimensional structures called G-quadruplexes (G4s) are located in regulatory sequences or other functional, but non-protein coding, regions of the genome, they are maintained by selection, are more common, and their unusual structures are more stable. Together, these lines of evidence suggest that G4 elements should be adde
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Biohackers could drive insulin price down 98 percent
Diabetes is the seventh-leading cause of death in America. About 463 million people (including 34 million Americans) are diabetic. The cost of insulin continues to surge, so the Open Insulin Project is fighting back by replicating medical-grade insulin that can be made at a lab in your neighborhood. The Biohackers Making Insulin 98% Cheaper www.youtube.com The sticker price for a vial of insulin
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COVID-19: Reduced sense of taste and smell lingers
Patients with mild COVID-19 infections experience a significantly increased longer lasting reduced sense of taste and smell. This is also the case for long-term shortness of breath, although relatively few people are affected. And women and the elderly are particularly affected, according to new research.
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How environmental factors could provide for a young brain
A stimulating environment keeps the 'hippocampus' — which is the brain's memory control center — young, so to speak. Causes of this are molecular mechanisms that affect gene regulation. These current findings from studies in mice provide clues as to why an active, varied life can help preserve mental fitness in old age.
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Sustainable mining of raw materials from thermal springs in Chile
Lithium, cesium, or even gold — in addition to energy geothermal waters can contain mineral treasures. Researchers want to leverage this potential and support sustainable mining in Chile. Together with their partners, they are developing strategies and methods for extracting mineral resources and even drinking water directly in geothermal power plants.
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This crystal impurity is sheer perfection
Scientists have developed a nanoparticle composite that grows into 3D crystals. The new 3D-grown material could speed up production and eliminate errors in the mass manufacturing of nanoscale photonics for smart buildings or actuators for robotics.
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Neural specification, targeting, and circuit formation during visual system assembly [Developmental Biology]
Like other sensory systems, the visual system is topographically organized: Its sensory neurons, the photoreceptors, and their targets maintain point-to-point correspondence in physical space, forming a retinotopic map. The iterative wiring of circuits in the visual system conveniently facilitates the study of its development. Over the past few decades, experiments…
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Comparing expert elicitation and model-based probabilistic technology cost forecasts for the energy transition [Economic Sciences]
We conduct a systematic comparison of technology cost forecasts produced by expert elicitation methods and model-based methods. Our focus is on energy technologies due to their importance for energy and climate policy. We assess the performance of several forecasting methods by generating probabilistic technology cost forecasts rooted at various years…
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Effects of double-dose algebra on college persistence and degree attainment [Social Sciences]
In 2003, Chicago Public Schools introduced double-dose algebra, requiring two periods of math—one period of algebra and one of algebra support—for incoming ninth graders with eighth-grade math scores below the national median. Using a regression discontinuity design, earlier studies showed promising results from the program: For median-skill students, double-dose algebra…
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Museum genomics reveals the rapid decline and extinction of Australian rodents since European settlement [Evolution]
Australia has the highest historically recorded rate of mammalian extinction in the world, with 34 terrestrial species declared extinct since European colonization in 1788. Among Australian mammals, rodents have been the most severely affected by these recent extinctions; however, given a sparse historical record, the scale and timing of their…
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Connecting structure and function from organisms to molecules in small-animal symbioses through chemo-histo-tomography [Applied Biological Sciences]
Our understanding of metabolic interactions between small symbiotic animals and bacteria or parasitic eukaryotes that reside within their bodies is extremely limited. This gap in knowledge originates from a methodological challenge, namely to connect histological changes in host tissues induced by beneficial and parasitic (micro)organisms to the underlying metabolites. We…
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Dysregulated copper transport in multiple sclerosis may cause demyelination via astrocytes [Immunology and Inflammation]
Demyelination is a key pathogenic feature of multiple sclerosis (MS). Here, we evaluated the astrocyte contribution to myelin loss and focused on the neurotrophin receptor TrkB, whose up-regulation on the astrocyte finely demarcated chronic demyelinated areas in MS and was paralleled by neurotrophin loss. Mice lacking astrocyte TrkB were resistant…
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Conventional NK cells and tissue-resident ILC1s join forces to control liver metastasis [Immunology and Inflammation]
The liver is a major metastatic target organ, and little is known about the role of immunity in controlling hepatic metastases. Here, we discovered that the concerted and nonredundant action of two innate lymphocyte subpopulations, conventional natural killer cells (cNKs) and tissue-resident type I innate lymphoid cells (trILC1s), is essential…
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Single-nuclear transcriptomics reveals diversity of proximal tubule cell states in a dynamic response to acute kidney injury [Medical Sciences]
Acute kidney injury (AKI), commonly caused by ischemia, sepsis, or nephrotoxic insult, is associated with increased mortality and a heightened risk of chronic kidney disease (CKD). AKI results in the dysfunction or death of proximal tubule cells (PTCs), triggering a poorly understood autologous cellular repair program. Defective repair associates with…
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How both partners' individual differences, stress, and behavior predict change in relationship satisfaction: Extending the VSA model [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
We pooled data from 10 longitudinal studies of 1,104 married couples to test the Vulnerability-Stress-Adaptation (VSA) model of change in relationship satisfaction. Studies contained both spouses' self-reports of neuroticism, attachment anxiety, and attachment avoidance; observational measures of engagement and opposition during problem-solving discussions at baseline; and repeated reports of both
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CRY2 missense mutations suppress P53 and enhance cell growth [Cell Biology]
Disruption of circadian rhythms increases the risk of several types of cancer. Mammalian cryptochromes (CRY1 and CRY2) are circadian transcriptional repressors that are related to DNA-repair enzymes. While CRYs lack DNA-repair activity, they modulate the transcriptional response to DNA damage, and CRY2 can promote SKP1 cullin 1–F-box (SCF)FBXL3-mediated ubiquitination of…
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Optimized river diversion scenarios promote sustainability of urbanized deltas [Sustainability Science]
Socioeconomic viability of fluvial-deltaic systems is limited by natural processes of these dynamic landforms. An especially impactful occurrence is avulsion, whereby channels unpredictably shift course. We construct a numerical model to simulate artificial diversions, which are engineered to prevent channel avulsion, and direct sediment-laden water to the coastline, thus mitigating…
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Cathelicidin and PMB neutralize endotoxins by multifactorial mechanisms including LPS interaction and targeting of host cell membranes [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) contribute to an effective protection against infections. The antibacterial function of AMPs depends on their interactions with microbial membranes and lipids, such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS; endotoxin). Hyperinflammation induced by endotoxin is a key factor in bacterial sepsis and many other human diseases. Here, we provide a comprehensive…
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Mechanisms of transport enhancement for self-propelled nanoswimmers in a porous matrix [Applied Physical Sciences]
Micro/nanoswimmers convert diverse energy sources into directional movement, demonstrating significant promise for biomedical and environmental applications, many of which involve complex, tortuous, or crowded environments. Here, we investigated the transport behavior of self-propelled catalytic Janus particles in a complex interconnected porous void space, where the rate-determining step involves
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Anthracene-induced formation of highly twisted metallacycle and its crystal structure and tunable assembly behaviors [Chemistry]
Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) continue to attract increasing interest with respect to their applications as luminescent materials. The ordered structure of the metal−organic complex facilitates the selective integration of PAHs that can be tuned to function cooperatively. Here, a unique highly twisted anthracene-based organoplatinum metallacycle was prepared via coordination-driven self-
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Elimination of fibrin {gamma}-chain cross-linking by FXIIIa increases pulmonary embolism arising from murine inferior vena cava thrombi [Medical Sciences]
The onset of venous thromboembolism, including pulmonary embolism, represents a significant health burden affecting more than 1 million people annually worldwide. Current treatment options are based on anticoagulation, which is suboptimal for preventing further embolic events. In order to develop better treatments for thromboembolism, we sought to understand the structural…
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Stable individual differences in infants' responses to violations of intuitive physics [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
Infants look longer at impossible or unlikely events than at possible events. While these responses to expectancy violations have been critical for understanding early cognition, interpreting them is challenging because infants' responses are highly variable. This variability has been treated as an unavoidable nuisance inherent to infant research. Here we…
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Correction for Kim et al., Caveolin-1 expression by means of p38{beta} mitogen-activated protein kinase mediates the antiproliferative effect of carbon monoxide [Corrections]
CELL BIOLOGY Correction for "Caveolin-1 expression by means of p38β mitogen-activated protein kinase mediates the antiproliferative effect of carbon monoxide," by Hong Pyo Kim, Xue Wang, Atsunori Nakao, Sung Il Kim, Noriko Murase, Mary E. Choi, Stefan W. Ryter, and Augustine M. K. Choi, which was first published July 28,…
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Correction for Seeman et al., The Great Recession worsened blood pressure and blood glucose levels in American adults [Corrections]
ECONOMIC SCIENCES, PHYSIOLOGY Correction for "The Great Recession worsened blood pressure and blood glucose levels in American adults," by Teresa Seeman, Duncan Thomas, Sharon Stein Merkin, Kari Moore, Karol Watson, and Arun Karlamangla, which was first published March 12, 2018; 10.1073/pnas.1710502115 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 115, 3296–3301). The authors…
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Correction for Mummolo, Militarization fails to enhance police safety or reduce crime but may harm police reputation [Corrections]
POLITICAL SCIENCES Correction for "Militarization fails to enhance police safety or reduce crime but may harm police reputation," by Jonathan Mummolo, which was first published August 20, 2018; 10.1073/pnas.1805161115 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 115, 9181–9186). The authors note that: "This correction addresses recently discovered code errors that affect one…
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Correction for Koh et al., KAISO, a critical regulator of p53-mediated transcription of CDKN1A and apoptotic genes [Corrections]
BIOCHEMISTRY Correction for "KAISO, a critical regulator of p53-mediated transcription of CDKN1A and apoptotic genes," by Dong-In Koh, Dohyun Han, Hoon Ryu, Won-Il Choi, Bu-Nam Jeon, Min-Kyeong Kim, Youngsoo Kim, Jin Young Kim, Lee Parry, Alan R. Clarke, Albert B. Reynolds, and Man-Wook Hur, which was first published October 6,…
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Correction for Edwards et al., Exhaled aerosol increases with COVID-19 infection, age, and obesity [Corrections]
MEDICAL SCIENCES, ENGINEERING Correction for "Exhaled aerosol increases with COVID-19 infection, age, and obesity," by David A. Edwards, Dennis Ausiello, Jonathan Salzman, Tom Devlin, Robert Langer, Brandon J. Beddingfield, Alyssa C. Fears, Lara A. Doyle-Meyers, Rachel K. Redmann, Stephanie Z. Killeen, Nicholas J. Maness, and Chad J. Roy, which published…
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Correction for Wood et al., Procedural justice training reduces police use of force and complaints against officers [Corrections]
SOCIAL SCIENCES Correction for "Procedural justice training reduces police use of force and complaints against officers," by George Wood, Tom R. Tyler, and Andrew V. Papachristos, which was first published April 20, 2020; 10.1073/pnas.1920671117 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 117, 9815–9821). The authors wish to note the following: "The analysis…
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Correction for Batiste and Johnston, Rapid synthesis of cyclic oligomeric depsipeptides with positional, stereochemical, and macrocycle size distribution control [Corrections]
CHEMISTRY Correction for "Rapid synthesis of cyclic oligomeric depsipeptides with positional, stereochemical, and macrocycle size distribution control," by Suzanne M. Batiste and Jeffrey N. Johnston, which was first published December 14, 2016; 10.1073/pnas.1616462114 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 113, 14893–14897). The authors wish to note the following: "The synthesis and…
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CU Anschutz called a 'case study' for commercializing medical breakthroughs
A new study highlights the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus as an example of how an academic medical center can turn groundbreaking research into commercial products that improve patient care and public health.The paper, published recently in the Journal of Clinical and Translational Science, focuses on the unique ecosystem at CU Anschutz responsible for these innovations. And it spe
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Study shows effectiveness of suppressing female fruit flies
Populations of Drosophila suzukii fruit flies—so-called "spotted-wing Drosophila" that devastate soft-skinned fruit in North America, Europe and parts of South America—could be greatly suppressed with the introduction of genetically modified D. suzukii flies that produce only males after mating, according to new research from North Carolina State University.
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'Unlocking' the potential of viruses to fight cancer
The LIH Department of Oncology (DONC) team elucidated the mechanism through which the H-1PV cancer-destroying virus can cause cell lysis and death. At the heart of this process lie laminins, and specifically laminin γ1, a family of proteins on the surface of a cancer cell to which this virus binds. The findings carry significant implications for the advancement of virus-based anticancer strategies
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The spread of weighing systems across Western Eurasia 4,000 years ago
Knowing the weight of a commodity provides an objective way to value goods in the marketplace. But did a self-regulating market even exist in the Bronze Age? And what can weight systems tell us about this? A team of researchers from the University of Göttingen researched this by investigating the dissemination of weight systems throughout Western Eurasia. Their new simulation indicates that the in
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New coronavirus mass test up to 100 times more sensitive than rapid antigen tests
A new coronavirus test developed at the University Hospital Bonn can analyze a large number of swabs simultaneously using sequencing technology and has a sensitivity comperable to the common qPCR test. The innovative method offers great potential, especially for systematic testing in daycare centers, schools or companies. Today, the results of the study on the new coronavirus test have been publis
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A new fuel cell electrolyte
As far back as the 1930s, inventors have commercialized fuel cells as a versatile source of power. Now, researchers from Japan have highlighted the impressive chemistry of an essential component of an upcoming fuel cell technology.
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A new method for the production of protonated hydrogen
A research group led by Prof. Matthias Kling of the Max Planck Institute for Quantum Optics (MPQ) and the Ludwig-Maximilian University in Munich (LMU), in cooperation with the American University in Sharjah, has discovered a new method for the production of protonated hydrogen (H+3). With the aid of high-intensity laser pulses, they were able to trigger a reaction between water molecules on the su
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Visualizing atomic-scale structures with the optical force
A team of scientists led by the Department of Applied Physics at Osaka University, the Department of Physics and Electronics at Osaka Prefecture University, and the Department of Materials Chemistry at Nagoya University used photoinduced force microscopy to map out the forces acting on quantum dots in three dimensions. By eliminating sources of noise, the team was able to achieve subnanometer prec
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To adsorb or to do not adsorb? That is the question
Prolonged exposure to antibiotics increases bacteria's ability to defeat these drugs. When antibiotic-resistant bacteria cause infection, one option is to use a specialized virus phage capable of infecting specific bacteria species. This is a powerful weapon against deadly diseases.
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The evolution of axial patterning
Body axes are molecular coordinate systems along which regulatory genes are activated. These genes then activate the development of anatomical structures in correct locations in the embryo. Thus, the body ensures that we do not develop arms on our heads or ears on our backs. In many organisms, the main body axis is regulated by the β-catenin signaling pathway. In a new article in Nature Communicat
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Seeing the earthworm in a new light
Earthworms experience constant chemical interactions with bacteria, fungi, plants and small invertebrates across soil ecosystems. Even within their tissues, earthworms harbor symbiotic microbes and small animal parasites that trigger internal metabolic responses such as innate immunity. To reveal the fundamental processes that enable animal-microbe symbioses to form and persist, we have to study t
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What mRNA is Good For, And What It Maybe Isn't
The huge success of the mRNA vaccination platform during the pandemic has set a lot of people to thinking about what comes next. Moderna and BioNTech, of course, have been thinking this way for quite some time. But Sanofi now says that they'll be investing large amounts into the technology, and this previously hadn't been a big priority for them. There are others as well. So let's step back a lit
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A new type of quasiparticle
Russian scientists have experimentally proved the existence of a new type of quasiparticle—previously unknown excitations of coupled pairs of photons in qubit chains. This discovery could be a step towards disorder-robust quantum metamaterials. The study was published in Physical Review B.
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The dynamics behind the exceptional summer 2020 Yangtze River rainfall projections
During summer 2020, the Yangtze River basin experienced persistent, record-breaking meiyu rainfall. Likewise, the region suffered from severe flooding and water damage as accumulated rainfall broke records dating back to 1954. Regions outside the meiyu rain belt received significant summer rainfall as well, including Beijing, located in northeastern China.
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Stopping the sulfur shuttle for better batteries
As our society and transportation systems become increasingly electrified, scientists worldwide are seeking more efficient and higher capacity storage systems. Researchers at KAUST have made an important contribution by modifying lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries to suppress a problem known as polysulfide shuttling.
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Targeted delivery of therapeutic RNAs directly to cancer cells
Tel Aviv University's groundbreaking technology may revolutionize the treatment of cancer and a wide range of diseases and medical conditions. In the framework of this study, the researchers were able to create a new method of transporting RNA-based drugs to a subpopulation of immune cells involved in the inflammation process, and target the disease-inflamed cell without causing damage to other ce
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Squeeze the shock out: What different phases of piezoelectric materials tell us
What if electricity could be squeezed out of something? It turns out some materials have this property. Piezoelectricity is the electric charge that accumulates in certain solids when mechanical stress is applied on them. Piezoelectric materials, like bismuth ferrite thin films, when grown on a single lanthanum aluminate substrate, give rise to highly strained epitaxial thin films that exhibit exc
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RUDN University chemists create substances for supramolecules' self-assembly
RUDN University chemists derived molecules that can assemble into complex structures using chlorine and bromine halogen atoms. They bind to each other as 'velcro' — chlorine 'sticks' to bromine, and vice versa. As a result supramolecules are assembled from individual molecules. The obtained substances will help to create supramolecules with catalytic, luminescent, conducting properties.
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Call to increase genetic diversity in immunogenomics
Historically, most large-scale immunogenomic studies – those exploring the association between genes and disease – were conducted with a bias toward individuals of European ancestry. Researchers are now calling to actively diversify the genetic resources immunogenomics researchers use in their work to advance genomic medicine more equitably.
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Clinic mandates surgical simulation training after research indicates improved performance
Researchers from the University of Manitoba and the Pan Am Clinic published a paper in the journal Arthroscopy, Sports Medicine, and Rehabilitation that looked at the effectiveness of a mixed reality simulator for the training of arthroscopy novices. Following this study, the residency program has made it a requirement in the curriculum that residents in the sports rotation complete the self-learn
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83% of the Spanish population trusts in vaccination against COVID, 25 points more than in January
This is one of the results of the third Social Perception Survey on scientific aspects of COVID-19 conducted by FECYT and presented at the MUNCYT headquarters in Alcobendas. The first survey was conducted between June 25 and July 15, 2020, and the second between Jan. 4-22, 2021. With the results obtained from both, the research on the Evolution of Social Perception of Scientific Aspects of COVID-1
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Computer training could reduce accidents for older drivers
A recent proof-of-concept study finds that a low-cost training program can reduce hazardous driving in older adults. Researchers hope the finding will lead to the training becoming more widely available. "On-road training and simulator training programs have been successful at reducing car accidents involving older drivers—with benefits lasting for years after the training," says Jing Yuan, first
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Scientists discover new type of quasiparticle
Russian scientists have experimentally proved the existence of a new type of quasiparticle — previously unknown excitations of coupled pairs of photons in qubit chains. This discovery could be a step towards disorder-robust quantum metamaterials. The study was published in Physical Review B.
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New components for antisense gene therapy show promise in treating spinal muscular atrophy
Skoltech researchers and their colleagues from Russia and the UK investigated the safety and efficacy of new chemistry in antisense oligonucleotides used to treat spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), a debilitating genetic disease.The new findings will help develop drugs with less toxicity and fewer injections needed thanks to prolonged action. Nusinersen, an approved drug for the treatment of SMA, is a
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Cancer neuroscientists identify a key culprit behind pediatric brain cancer's spread
Although rare, medulloblastoma is the most common and deadliest form of pediatric brain cancer. Metastasis to the lining of the brain or spinal cord is responsible for virtually all deaths. New USC research shines a light on how medulloblastoma spreads and may provide clues to new strategies for targeting deadly medulloblastoma metastases. An enzyme called GABA transaminase (ABAT) aids metastases
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Selection tool accurately predicts ovarian damage in girls with cancer
Cancer treatments can cause premature ovarian failure (POI) including in girls who want to become mothers eventually. Ovarian tissue cryopreservation (OTC) provides a future fertility option but is invasive, has risks and evidence indicates that most girls don't develop POI. So, doctors face the dilemma of how to offer OTC appropriately. An assessment tool has been found to help predict correctly
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Decline of dinosaurs underway long before asteroid fell
Ten million years before the well-known asteroid impact that marked the end of the Mesozoic Era, dinosaurs were already in decline. That is the conclusion of the Franco-Anglo-Canadian team led by CNRS researcher Fabien Condamine from the Institute of Evolutionary Science of Montpellier, which studied evolutionary trends during the Cretaceous for six major families of dinosaurs, including those of
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Steering wind turbines creates greater energy potential
For wind farms, it is important to control upstream turbines in an efficient manner so downstream turbines are not adversely affected by upstream wake effects. In the Journal of Renewable and Sustainable Energy, researchers show that by designing controllers based on viewing the wind farm system as a coupled network, it is possible to extract power more efficiently.
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Device harvests water from humidity 24 hours a day
Researchers have developed a condenser for countries where water is in short supply. Theirs is the first zero-energy solution for harvesting water from the atmosphere throughout the 24-hour daily cycle. It relies on a self-cooling surface and a special radiation shield. Fresh water is scarce in many parts of the world and getting it comes at great expense. Communities near the ocean can desalinat
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Butterfly effect can double travel of virus-laden droplets
Computer simulations have been used with great success in recent months to visualize the spread of the COVID-19 virus in a variety of situations. In Physics of Fluids, researchers explain how turbulence in the air can create surprising and counterintuitive behavior of exhaled droplets, potentially laden with virus.
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Astrophysicists detect first black hole-neutron star mergers
A long time ago, in two galaxies about 900 million light-years away, two black holes each gobbled up their neutron star companions, triggering gravitational waves that finally hit Earth in January 2020. Astrophysicists' observation of the two events — detected just 10 days apart — mark the first-ever detection of a black hole merging with a neutron star.
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Using artificial intelligence to overcome mental health stigma
Researchers from University of Tsukuba have developed an artificial intelligence system that identified signs of mental distress in workers using only sociodemographic, lifestyle, and sleep data. The predictions made by the system were comparable to those made by a team of psychiatrists. Such systems may be helpful for identifying signs of depression in individuals who may be hesitant to report su
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Paper claiming two deaths from COVID-19 vaccination for every three prevented cases earns expression of concern
A study published last week that quickly became another flashpoint for those arguing that COVID-19 vaccines are unsafe has earned an expression of concern. The original paper, published in the MDPI title Vaccines, claimed that: The number of cases experiencing adverse reactions has been reported to be 700 per 100,000 vaccinations. Currently, we see 16 … Continue reading
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Updated feline senior care guidelines for the veterinary community
The American Association of Feline Practitioners (AAFP) has released the updated 2021 AAFP Feline Senior Care Guidelines to be published in the July issue of the Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery. This update provides emerging advances in feline medicine with respect to the aging cat. The Task Force of experts provides a thorough current review in feline medicine that emphasizes the individua
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DNA barcodes decode the world of soil nematodes
The research team of Professor Toshihiko Eki of the Department of Applied Chemistry and Life Science (and Research Center for Agrotechnology and Biotechnology), Toyohashi University of Technology used a next-generation sequencer to develop a highly efficient method to analyze soil nematodes by using the 18S ribosomal RNA gene regions as DNA barcodes.
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A rapid malaria test kit that could aid diagnosis in developing countries
A team of scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) has developed a test kit for malaria that delivers results in 30 minutes. The kit could facilitate the diagnosis of malaria in the field, as the equipment needed is anticipated to be lightweight, easy-to-use, and able to detect the disease in its early stages.
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A world first! Visualizing atomic-scale structures with the optical force
A team of scientists from Osaka University, Osaka Prefecture University, and Nagoya University created three-dimensional maps of the force fields around quantum dots caused by laser light. Using atomic force microscopy with frequency modulation, they were able to achieve spatial resolution of less than one nanometer for the first time. This work may greatly advance the fields of nanotechnology and
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AAFP releases updated feline senior care guidelines to the veterinary community
The American Association of Feline Practitioners (AAFP) has released the updated 2021 AAFP Feline Senior Care Guidelines to be published in the July issue of the Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery. This update provides emerging advances in feline medicine with respect to the aging cat. The Task Force of experts provides a thorough current review in feline medicine that emphasizes the individua
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Cell-based immunotherapy shows promise against melanoma
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have shown in preclinical studies conducted in mice and human cells that a type of immunotherapy based on natural killer cells could be effective against solid tumors, starting with melanoma, a type of skin cancer that can be deadly if not caught early.
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Meaningful collaborations can end 'helicopter research'
Nature, Published online: 29 June 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01795-1 Instead of flying in, collecting samples and leaving, scientists should treat local people as partners, and think fair instead of charitable when it comes to authorship.
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How albumin activates sperm for fertilization
Albumin, an abundant protein in the body, plays a role in both fertilization and fighting infection, research finds. Albumin (Alb) activates a proton channel (hHv1), also widespread in the body, giving sperm the ability to penetrate and fertilize an egg, and allowing white blood cells to secrete large amounts of inflammatory mediators to fight infection. Researchers examined the physiological con
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Making seawater drinkable in minutes
According to the World Health Organization, about 785 million people around the world lack a clean source of drinking water. Despite the vast amount of water on Earth, most of it is seawater and freshwater accounts for only about 2.5% of the total. One of the ways to provide clean drinking water is to desalinate seawater. The Korea Institute of Civil Engineering and Building Technology (KICT) has
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Mineral previously known only in meteorites discovered at Dead Sea
Allabogdanite was first reported in the early 2000s from the Onello—a small iron meteorite recovered from the gold placer at the Bolshoi Dolguchan River in Eastern Yakutia. Chemically, the mineral belongs to phosphides—the compounds containing phosphorus in a negative oxidation state. It was named in honor of the crystallographer Alla Bogdanova. Since then, allabogdanite has been identified in sev
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Survey: Democratic attitudes can persist in countries with weak governance, even during pandemic
Research by Vanderbilt's Latin American Public Opinion Lab found that in Haiti, the COVID-19 pandemic rallied support for the incumbent administration, even though the public's commitment to it and to democracy itself was weak before the pandemic. The paper, published in PLOS ONE, was co-authored by Noam Lupu, associate professor of political science and associate director of LAPOP, and Elizabeth
6h
Weird 'beard-less' warbler holds clues to plumage genes
An incredibly rare hybrid warbler with mismatched color patterns has let researchers disentangle the genetic drivers of two traits that usually come as a package deal. A new study describing the peculiar bird and pinpointing the location in the genome that controls the black face mask and the black throat patch in blue-winged and golden-winged warblers. The work appears online in the journal Ecol
6h
Double-dose algebra pays off in college if students are paired with helpful peers
A trio of researchers, one from Saint Louis University, the other two from the University of Chicago, has found that offering double-dose algebra instruction to struggling 9th grade students can lead to later benefits in college—but only if the students are paired with helpful peers. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Takako Nomi, Stephen Raudenbush, and J
6h
Looking at tumors through a new lens
Neoadjuvant immune checkpoint blockade is a promising treatment for melanoma and other cancer types, and has recently been shown to provide a modest survival benefit for patients with recurrent glioblastoma. To improve the treatment efficacy, researchers are looking for vulnerabilities in surgically removed glioblastoma tissues, but this has been difficult due to the vast differences within the tu
7h
How proteins bind 'hidden' DNA
How can proteins bind DNA in the cell nucleus, where it is present in form of chromatin, tightly wrapped around histones and therefore mostly inaccessible? Recently, several studies began to uncover the various strategies used by DNA-binding proteins to solve this problem. In a Cell "Leading Edge review," Alicia Michael and Nico Thomä look at these findings and highlight general principles that ai
7h
New 2D alloy combines five metals, breaks down carbon dioxide
A two-dimensional alloy material—made from five metals as opposed to the traditional two—has been developed by a collaboration between researchers at the McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis and researchers at the College of Engineering at the University of Illinois at Chicago.
7h
Collaborative care effective for pain, depression and anxiety
Chronic pain, depression, anxiety, and other symptom-based conditions are growing in prevalence. Regenstrief Institute Research Scientist Kurt Kroenke, M.D., writes in the Journal of General Internal Medicine how collaborative care can and should play a major role targeting the treatment of symptoms and functional decline, both too frequently marginalized in medically oriented care delivery.
7h
UofL researchers lead call to increase genetic diversity in immunogenomics
Historically, most large-scale immunogenomic studies – those exploring the association between genes and disease – were conducted with a bias toward individuals of European ancestry. Corey T. Watson, Ph.D., assistant professor in the University of Louisville Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics, is leading a call to actively diversify the genetic resources he and fellow immunogenomics
8h
The final dance of mixed neutron star-black hole pairs
Another missing piece has just been added to our knowledge of cosmic phenomena. The LIGO, Virgo and KAGRA collaborations have announced the first detection of gravitational waves resulting from the 'mixed' merger between a black hole and a neutron star. The discovery, published on June 29, 2021 in Astrophysical Journal Letters, involves CNRS researchers working within the Virgo scientific collabor
8h
Endovascular therapy best for superior vena cava syndrome, review finds
In recent decades minimally invasive endovascular stenting, in which a tubular support is placed inside the collapsed or obstructed vessel, has become the preferred option of care for superior vena cava syndrome (SVCS). Whether it is the best option has been unclear, but now, a new analysis shows that endovascular therapy currently is the safest and most effective treatment for SVCS.
8h
Are Brazil's Amazon Policies 'Crimes Against Humanity'?
Indigenous chiefs and human rights organizations, citing what they call Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro's campaign to "plunder the wealth of the Amazon," have asked the International Criminal Court to open an investigation into possible crimes against humanity. Some call that a legal "hail mary."
9h
Legal Experts Settle on Definition for 'Ecocide'
The announcement was seen by environmentalists and international legal scholars as a key step in a growing global campaign to criminalize ecocide, which requires one of the court's 123 member nations to formally request consideration of a fifth crime within the court's purview. The process could take years.
9h
Breathe Freely With The Naväge Nose Cleaning Tool
The nose is one of the key connections between the outside world and your body, for better or worse . Yet most of the ways we have to clean the nose are wasteful or ineffective. Rated 4.5/5 stars on Amazon, this Naväge Clean-Nose Choice Package will not only help you literally keep your nose clean, but do it in a more sustainable way. It typically retails for $134, and is on sale now for 25% off
10h
Britney Spears story prompts apology from Nature and author
Britney Spears has, as Retraction Watch readers no doubt know, been in the news a great deal lately, as the battle over her father's "broad control over her life and finances" plays out in court. But a science fiction story about Spears that published in Nature in 2008 — the year Spears' father was appointed … Continue reading
10h
Forskare: Gör det lättare att göra rätt – för miljön
Miljövänliga åsikter räcker inte för att agera miljövänligt – vår omgivning måste vara utformad så att det är lätt att göra rätt. Och omvänt: det behöver bli krångligare att bete sig "fel". – Vår forskning visar att det inte alltid räcker att utbilda fram rätt miljöbeteende eller att göra det lätt att göra rätt, ibland måste det bli svårare att göra fel också, säger Noah Linder, miljöforskare vid
10h
NASA looks at Louisiana delta system, eyes global forecasts
Erosion, sinking land and sea rise from climate change have killed the Louisiana woods where a 41-year-old Native American chief played as a child. Not far away in the Mississippi River delta system, middle-school students can stand on islands that emerged the year they were born.
10h
A cross-dehydrogenative C(sp3)−H heteroarylation via photo-induced catalytic chlorine radical generation
Nature Communications, Published online: 29 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24280-9 Hydrogen atom abstraction from C(sp3)–H bonds of naturally abundant alkanes for alkyl radical generation represents a promising yet underexplored strategy in the alkylation reaction designs. Here the authors show a photo-induced and chemical oxidant-free cross-dehydrogenative coupling between alkanes and heteroa
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Iron-dependent apoptosis causes embryotoxicity in inflamed and obese pregnancy
Nature Communications, Published online: 29 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24333-z Iron is essential during pregnancy for embryo and placental development and maternal health. However, in this study using mouse models, the authors demonstrate that excess maternal iron causes adverse embryo outcomes in pregnancies with underlying systemic inflammation.
10h
Ferroelectric-tuned van der Waals heterojunction with band alignment evolution
Nature Communications, Published online: 29 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24296-1 Band alignment engineering is important to realize high performance and multifunctionality in a specific van der Waals heterojunction. Here, the authors observe band alignment transition of the heterojunction in a ferroelectric-tuned van der Waals heterojunction device with high performance.
10h
Avalanches and edge-of-chaos learning in neuromorphic nanowire networks
Nature Communications, Published online: 29 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24260-z Neuromorphic nanowire networks are found to exhibit neural-like dynamics, including phase transitions and avalanche criticality. Hochstetter and Kuncic et al. show that the dynamical state at the edge-of-chaos is optimal for learning and favours computationally complex information processing tasks.
10h
Spontaneous symmetry breaking of dissipative optical solitons in a two-component Kerr resonator
Nature Communications, Published online: 29 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24251-0 Dissipative solitons and their symmetry breaking is important for photonic applications. Here the authors show that dissipative solitons can undergo spontaneous symmetry breaking in a two-component nonlinear optical ring resonator, resulting in the coexistence of distinct vectorial solitons with asymmetric, mirr
10h
Structural basis of DNA synthesis opposite 8-oxoguanine by human PrimPol primase-polymerase
Nature Communications, Published online: 29 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24317-z The human DNA primase and DNA polymerase PrimPol replicates through the major oxidative DNA damage lesion 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (oxoG) via translesion synthesis in a mostly error-free manner thus suppressing oxoG-induced mutagenesis in mitochondria and the nucleus. Here, the authors present crystal structures
10h
Virtuella elever ger tryggare lärare
Lärarstudenter som tränar på att undervisa virtuella elever får större tilltro till sin undervisningsförmåga och känner sig mer förberedda när de kommer ut i arbetslivet. Lärarutbildningar har ofta svårt att erbjuda lärarstudenter tillräcklig träning för att praktiskt öva på sitt kommande yrke. Många nyblivna lärare känner sig oförberedda när de kommer ut i yrkeslivet och en del väljer att byta y
11h
Barn med trotssyndrom hjälpta av föräldraträning
Föräldrastödsprogram som Komet, samt KBT, gav god hjälp för barn med trotssyndrom. Tidiga insatser minskar också risken att barnet ska få psykiatriska problem senare i livet. Föräldraträning och barn-KBT är två behandlingar där det behövts mer kunskap om effekterna vid trotssyndrom. Enligt en ny doktorsavhandling från Karolinska Institutet ger båda god hjälp för barn med trotssyndrom. Trots hos b
11h
A step forward for IVF patients with predicted poor response to treatment
Fertility patients who have a poor response to ovarian stimulation represent a stubborn challenge in IVF. Clinical guidelines indicate that increasing the drug dose for stimulation or applying any of several adjunct therapies are of little benefit. A study assessing two cycles of ovarian stimulation and two egg collections in the same menstrual cycle may yet provide a real advance for predicted po
12h
Hotter, more frequent droughts threaten California's iconic blue oak woodlands
2016 drought in California triggered widespread tree cover loss and die-offs of a variety of species in the region. A new study in the open access journal Frontiers in Climate is the first to show that California's iconic blue oak (Quercus douglasii) woodlands have also decreased by more than 1,200 km2. By another metric, which reflects the altered or deteriorating condition of the tree cover, the
13h
Study highlights the importance of lived experience provided by prisoners
What is unique about the study is the combination of interviews with current and former people in prison, custodial professionals, and healthcare providers to identify and understand barriers in delivering high-quality healthcare and support to those in custody. In addition, researchers gathered data on the number, types and stages of cancers diagnosed in patients within prisons.
13h
A New Covid-19 Myth?
A correspondent suggested I should have known that the pandemic was over months ago. That's obviously a myth. But where did that idea come from? The post first appeared on Science-Based Medicine .
13h
Skruven som stänger ute grannens buller
Tycker du det låter mycket från grannen? Det är du inte ensam om. Störande ljud hör till de vanligaste klagomålen från boende. Nu har forskare tagit fram en skruv som kan halvera den upplevda ljudnivån. Det finns andra lösningar som bygger på samma teori med en fjädrande kontakt som tar bort en del av ljudvågorna. Finessen med den ljudabsorberande skruven, som Håkan Wernersson ursprungligen tog f
15h
How two California hospitals prevented the spread of a deadly fungal infection during the pandemic
In the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, infection preventionists at two Southern California hospitals took extreme measures to stop the spread of a deadly fungus that has emerged in the U.S. and around the world. The two will detail their proactive responses in oral presentations today at the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology's (APIC's), 48th Annual Conference.
16h
How effective is the new Alzheimer's drug aducanumab? – podcast
Before Covid, dementia was the biggest killer in the UK and Alzheimer's disease is the most common type. A controversial new drug for Alzheimer's, aducanumab, is the first in nearly 20 years to be approved in the US, which will trigger pressure to make it available worldwide. The Guardian's health editor, Sarah Bosley, talks Shivani Dave through the mixed evidence of its efficacy Continue reading
16h
How effective is the new Alzheimer's drug aducanumab?
Before Covid, dementia was the biggest killer in the UK and Alzheimer's disease is the most common type. A controversial new drug for Alzheimer's, aducanumab, is the first in nearly 20 years to be approved in the US, which will trigger pressure to make it available worldwide. The Guardian's health editor, Sarah Bosley, talks Shivani Dave through the mixed evidence of its efficacy. Help support our
16h
Transient pacemaker harmlessly dissolves in body
The thin, flexible, lightweight device could be used in patients who need temporary pacing after cardiac surgery or while waiting for a permanent pacemaker. All components of the pacemaker are biocompatible and naturally absorb into the body's biofluids over the course of five to seven weeks, without needing surgical extraction.
21h
Weird warbler reveals genetics of its mismatched colors
An incredibly rare hybrid warbler with mismatched color patterns has allowed researchers to disentangle the genetic drivers of two traits that usually come as a package deal — the black face mask and the black throat patch in blue-winged and golden-winged warblers.
22h
Are we missing other Earths?
Some exoplanet searches could be missing nearly half of the Earth-sized planets around other stars. New findings suggest that Earth-sized worlds could be lurking undiscovered in binary star systems, hidden in the glare of their parent stars. As roughly half of all stars are in binary systems, this means that astronomers could be missing many Earth-sized worlds.
22h
Unique exoplanet photobombs CHEOPS study of nearby star system
While studying two exoplanets in a bright nearby star system, the CHEOPS satellite has unexpectedly spotted the system's third known planet crossing the face of the star. This transit reveals exciting details about a rare planet 'with no known equivalent', as the scientific team points out.
22h
'Unexciting' an anxious brain: Novel drug reduces anxiety-like behavior in mice
Anxiety is considered a natural response to stress. However, a state of heightened anxiety, called anxiety disorder, prevents thousands of people from living their best lives. While several underlying mechanisms have been therapeutically targeted, much remains to be discovered about this disorder. In an effort to get closer to unraveling the mechanisms that govern this condition, researchers have
22h
Pop-up coffee table — no assembly required
Researchers have developed a deployable system that is light, compact, inexpensive, easy to manufacture, and, most importantly, easy to deploy. By harnessing the mechanical instabilities in curved beams, the system can transform objects into elaborate and customizable 3D configurations on a range of scales, from large-scale furniture to small medical devices.
22h
These CBD Sleep Gummies Are Designed To Help You Get the Rest You Need
If it feels like you're getting less sleep than ever, you probably are. Prior to 2020, 30-percent of Americans were not getting enough sleep. And since then, things have only gotten worse. As you probably suspected, the onset of the pandemic also coincided with a surge in sleep disorders, with two out of three Americans reporting trouble falling or staying asleep . And according to neuroscientist
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