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Nyheder2021juni30

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ASTRONOMER HAR SET ET SORT HUL OPSLUGE EN NEUTRON-STJERNE: Astronomers were finally able to detect a merger between a black hole and a neutron star. This phenomenon was predicted before, but just recently observed by detecting gravitational waves that were made in the merger. The unique thing about this is that instead of merging between 2 objects it could be more precise to say that tHe black hole "swallowed" the neutron star. 

https://www.space.com/first-black-hole-neutron-star-mergers-detected
 
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'There may not be a conflict after all' in expanding universe debate
DISKUSSION OM HVOR HURTIGT UNIVERSET UDVIDER SIG: Our universe is expanding, but our two main ways to measure how fast this expansion is happening have resulted in different answers. For the past decade, astrophysicists have been gradually dividing into two camps: one that believes that the difference is significant, and another that thinks it could be due to errors in measurement.
16h

 

A white dwarf living on the edge
ASTRONOMISK KOLLISION MELLEM TO HVIDE DVÆRGE: Astronomers have discovered the smallest and most massive white dwarf ever seen. The smoldering cinder, which formed when two less massive white dwarfs merged, is heavy, "packing a mass greater than that of our Sun into a body about the size of our Moon," says Ilaria Caiazzo, the Sherman Fairchild Postdoctoral Scholar Research Associate in Theoretical Astrophysics at Caltech and lead author of the
3h
'I felt betrayed': how Covid research could help patients living with chronic fatigue syndrome
KRONISK TRÆTHEDSSYNDROM LIGNER EN AF BIVIRKNINGERNE VED COVID: People with ME/CFS face debilitating symptoms but often feel dismissed by doctors. The focus on long Covid could help change that In the fall of 2016, Ashanti Daniel, a nurse in Beverly Hills, California, went to an infectious disease physician looking for answers about a weird illness she couldn't shake. After falling sick with a virus four months earlier, she still felt too tired to stand up in
15h
Covid: Sage scientist fears England could repeat 'mistakes of last summer'
DER ER RISIKO FOR EN SOMMERBØLGE AF COVID I ENGLAND: Prof Stephen Reicher says restrictions may have to be reimposed if reopening leads to surge in infections Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage A scientific adviser to the government's Covid-19 response has expressed fears England could be in danger of repeating "the mistakes of last summer". Prof Stephen Reicher, from the University of St Andrews and a member of the Scien
11h
How to photograph the moon on your phone or camera with the best settings
HVORDAN MAN TAGER GODE BILLEDER AF MÅNEN: Guardian Australia picture editor Carly Earl explains the dos and don'ts of taking pictures of the moon When a full moon rises, many people will pull out their mobile phones to try and get an Instagram-worthy photograph, but unfortunately it's really challenging to take a great picture of the moon. Two reasons: it is very far away and unless you have a telephoto lens (which makes the moon appear
19h
Virgin Orbit Just Launched a Rocket Strapped to the Wing of a 747
RICHARD BRANSON SATELLIT SENDT AFSTED: Virgin Orbit Satellite delivery company Virgin Orbit — not to be confused with the space tourism company Virgin Galactic, though both were started by Richard Branson — just flew a Boeing 747 to a lofty height before launching a space rocket strapped to the bottom of one of its wings. The modified 747, dubbed Cosmic Girl, took off from the Mojave Air and Space Port in California early Wednesday mo
5h
By Now, Burnout Is a Given
UDBRÆNDTHED ER ALMINDELIGT FÆNOMEN: Congratulations if you aren't burned out. Perhaps you learned to play the guitar, wrote a screenplay, or took up French during the pandemic. But if you're like me and most of my patients, you're running on fumes. Burnout is usually reserved to describe work-related phenomena : exhaustion, feelings of negativism, and reduced professional efficacy. In 2019, the World Health Organization officially
10h
A heatwave in Seattle? Extreme weather is no longer 'unprecedented' | Arwa Mahdawi
FREMTIDEN MED KLIMAFORANDRINGERNE: This is serious enough for the 1% to start building bunkers ready for environmental collapse A few years ago, the author and academic Douglas Rushkoff got invited to a swanky private resort to talk to a bunch of obscenely rich hedge fund guys about the future of technology. He thought they were going to ask him how technology was going to improve the world, but they were far more interested in di
14h
The Extremes a Walrus Will Go to for Love
PARRINGSLYDENE FRA EN HVALROS: When Sivuqaq the walrus wanted a mate, he let it be known, loud and clear. Each year, as winter turned to spring, the marine-animal center at Six Flags Discovery Kingdom in Vallejo, California, would reverberate with his come-hither calls—a nonstop orchestral mélange of whistles and warbles, barks and bellows, even clacks and clangs. The serenades emerged not just from Sivuqaq's mustachioed mouth
21h
Startup Wants to Build Tiny Nuclear Reactors That Run Off Nuclear Waste
:NOGLE FORESLÅR AT LAVE MINI-ATOMKRAFTVÆRKER: Off-Site Microreactors A Silicon Valley-based startup called Oklo wants to build tiny nuclear reactors that can run off spent fuel from much bigger, conventional nuclear reactors, CNBC reports . Experts are excited by the concept of microreactors because nuclear facilities have historically relied on economies of scale — a paradigm this tech could reverse. "Microreactors promise to turn this para
2h
Brighter Than a Billion Billion Suns: Gamma-Ray Bursts Continue to Surprise
:GAMMA-STRÅLER STADIG IKKE FORSTÅET HELT:  In July 1967, at the height of the Cold War, American satellites that had been launched to look for Soviet nuclear weapons tests found something wholly unexpected. The Vela 3 and 4 satellites observed brief flashes of high-energy photons, or gamma rays, that appeared to be coming from space. Later, in a 1973 paper that compiled more than a dozen such mysterious events, astronomers would dub them.
7h
Mysterious dodecahedrons of the Roman Empire
:ARKÆOLOGER HAR FUNDET 12-KANTEDE HULE GENSTANDE FRA ROMERTIDEN, SOM MAN IKKE KENDER BRUGEN AF:  In 1739, a strange, twelve-sided hollow object from Roman times was discovered in England. Since then, more than a hundred dodecahedrons have been unearthed, but their purpose remains unknown. The only thing we know for sure is where they were found, which points to a Gallo-Roman connection. Some outliers notwithstanding, almost all Roman dodecahedrons were found in Britain, Gaul, and Roman Germa
7h
The Internet Is Rotting
:INTERNETTETS FREMTID:  Sixty years ago the futurist Arthur C. Clarke observed that any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic. The internet—how we both communicate with one another and together preserve the intellectual products of human civilization—fits Clarke's observation well. In Steve Jobs's words, " it just works ," as readily as clicking, tapping, or speaking. And every bit as much ali
9h
Fukushima Now Home to Radioactive Boar-Pig Hybrids
(GENTAGELSE AF ARTIKEL OVENFOR): DER SES KRYDSNINGER MELLEM VILDSVIN OG TAMSVIN I JAPAN I OMRÅDER ER DER FORLADT PÅ GRUND AF ATOMKRAFT-ULYKKE: It's been just over a decade since a massive 9.0 magnitude earthquake triggered a tsunami that caused the meltdown of a nuclear reactor in Japan's Fukushima region. The ensuing evacuation has allowed local plant and animal species to thrive, reclaiming nature in the absence of humans. Included among the thriving fauna: domesticated pigs that have bred with wild boars to create new hybrids, as Inv
2h
Comet Sails Past Earth, Leaving Trail of Alcohol in Its Wake
:EN KOMET DANNEDE EN HALE AF ALKOHOL:  Watch the Road! The comet 46P/Wirtanen should have called a designated driver when it sailed past Earth in December 2018. That's because scientists who took a closer look at the comet's flyby found that it left a shocking amount of alcohol in its wake, according to research published in The Planetary Science Journal . Typically, other compounds will outweigh alcohol in a comet's trail, and the sc
3h
Awe Appears To Be Awfully Beneficial
:ÆREFRYGT ER EN GAVNLIG FØLELSE:  20 years ago, scientists began to study a mysterious emotion known as awe. Now they believe awe offers a range of benefits when practiced regularly, calming our nervous systems and relieving stress.
23h
Car With Pop-Out Wings Aces Test Flight
:TESTFLYVNING AF BIL (AirCar) SOM KAN FLYVE:  Roll Out! A flying car prototype just completed a 35-minute test flight, traveling the roughly 50 miles between the airports in Nitra and Bratislava, Slovakia. The AirCar, as it's called, takes its name literally. The vehicle is an unusual transforming hybrid that can drive around like a car before popping out its tail, unfolding its wings, and cruising down a runway to take flight, The BBC repor
31min
The Code That Build the Web Is a Now a $5 Million NFT The author of the code that built the WWW will donate the proceeds to charity. But the auction raises questions about the transformative impact of non-fungible tokens.
2h
Elon Musk Offers to Bring a "Few Spare Engines" to Rocket Competitor
:FIRMAER SOM VIL SENDE RAKETTER UD I RUMMET:  Potluck In a light-hearted exchange on Twitter this week, SpaceX CEO Elon Musk offered to give its competitor United Launch Alliance (ULA) a leg up. When invited to see the development of ULA's Vulcan Centaur rocket for himself by CEO Tory Bruno, Musk offered to "bring a few spare engines… I mean, just in case." "Thank you for the kind offer," Bruno replied . "But, I hear your bird flys [sic] wit
4h
Immune System Mutiny: Mast Cells and the Mystery of Long Covid
:MAST-CELLE AKTIVERINGSSYNDROM (MÅSKE SAMMENHÆNG MED BIVIRKNINGER FRA COVID):  When I showed up in my doctor's office, I was a young woman on an absurdly limited diet, experiencing a myriad of fluctuating symptoms. Decades later, I received a diagnosis: mast cell activation syndrome. Could my condition be linked to others, such as long Covid?
11h
Ten journals denied 2020 Impact Factors because of excessive self-citation or "citation stacking"
:NOGLE TIDSSKRIFTARTIKLER HAR USÆDVANLIGT MANGE CITATIONER TIL EGNE ARTIKLER:  Clarivate, the company behind the Impact Factor, a closely watched — and controversial — metric, is calling out more than 20 journals for unusual citation patterns. The 21 journals — 10 of which were suppressed, meaning they will not receive an Impact Factor in 2020, and 11 of which received an expression of concern — … Continue reading
11h
GPs in England 'failing to recognise thousands of long Covid cases'
:PROBLEMER MED AT FINDE LANGTIDS-BIVIRKNINGER HOS COVID-PATIENTER:  Research finds number of recorded cases is nearly 100 times smaller than adults estimated to have had condition Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage GPs in England may be failing to recognise thousands of cases of long Covid, according to research that raises questions about how the condition is diagnosed, recorded and managed in the NHS. Researchers at Oxford University
2h
Did Elon Musk Quietly Fire the President of Neuralink?
:AMBITIONEN OM AT LAVE EN COMPUTER SOM MENNESKETS HJERNE KAN STYRE VIA ET HJERNE-IMPLANTAT:  Elon Musk's brain-computer interface venture, Neuralink, remains highly secretive. The overarching idea, of course, is to develop an enormously ambitious commercial brain implant that will let users control computers with their minds. In Musk's telling, this " Fitbit in your skull " will do everything from streaming music directly into your brain to healing spinal paralysis and mental illness — a
6h
Building the dams that doomed a valley
:VIRKNINGER AF KÆMPEDÆMNINGER I USA:  As an MIT senior, Jerome "Jerre" Spurr had paid little attention to the articles in the Boston Globe about the new reservoir planned for Western Massachusetts. But in 1927, just a month before his graduation, he found himself in a face-to-face interview with Frank Winsor, the chief engineer of the massive construction project. Winsor had personally visited MIT to recruit top engineering graduates
17h
How green mining could pave the way to net zero and a sustainable future
:METALLER KAN UDTRÆKKES FRA VARME SALTKILDER UNDER SOVENDE VULKANER; GULD, SØLV, ZINK, KOBBER MV. VILLE KUNNE UDTRÆKKES FRA DE VARME SALTKILDER I 2 KM DYBDE:  Scientists at the University of Oxford demonstrate how it is possible to directly extract valuable metals from hot salty fluids ('brines') trapped in porous rocks at depths of around 2km below dormant volcanoes. They propose this radical green-mining approach to provide essential metals for a net zero future—copper, gold, zinc, silver and lithium—in a sustainable way.
6h
Breakthrough for tracking RNA with fluorescence
***RNA (mRNA) KAN FØLGES VED AT BRUGE FLUORESCENS SOM SPORINGSMIDDEL (MÆRKNINGSMIDDEL):  Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have succeeded in developing a method to label mRNA molecules, and thereby follow, in real time, their path through cells, using a microscope—without affecting their properties or subsequent activity. The breakthrough could be of great importance in facilitating the development of new RNA-based medicines.
10h
A future ocean too warm for corals might have half as many fish species
Predicting the potential effects of coral loss on fish communities globally is a fundamental task, especially considering that reef fishes provide protein to millions of people. A new study led by the University of Helsinki predicts how fish diversity will respond to declines in coral diversity and shows that future coral loss might cause a more than 40% reduction in reef fish diversity globally.
6h
A fast-expanding Type Ia supernova exploded in NGC 474, study finds
Using ground-based facilities, astronomers from China and elsewhere have conducted extensive optical photometric and spectroscopic observations of the supernova SN 2017fgc, which exploded in the galaxy NGC 474. Results of the study, published June 23 on arXiv.org, indicate that this explosion is a fast-expanding Type Ia supernova.
8h
Search for heavy bosons sets new limits
Since discovering the Higgs boson in 2012, the ATLAS Collaboration at CERN has been working to understand its properties. One question in particular stands out: why does the Higgs boson have the mass that it does? Experiments have measured its mass to be around 125 GeV—yet the Standard Model implies it has much larger mass and requires a very large correction to the mathematics in order to align t
6h
Ancient carved snake found in Finland
A pair of researchers from the University of Turku and the University of Helsinki, respectively, both in Finland, has found a well-preserved ancient carved snake at Järvensuo 1, a dig site in south-west Finland. In their paper published on the Cambridge University Press site Cambridge Core, Satu Koivisto and Antti Lahelma describe where the artifact was found, its condition, its age and its possib
6h
Science journal editor says he quit over China boycott article
David Curtis says publisher of Annals of Human Genetics blocked call for protest at treatment of Uyghurs The editor of a long-established academic journal has said he resigned after his publisher vetoed a call to boycott Chinese science in protest at Beijing's treatment of Uyghurs and other Muslim minorities in Xinjiang. Prof David Curtis, from University College London's Genetics Institute, says
8h
Our pilot events illuminated the means of managing Covid risks | Letter
Prof Iain Buchan, the principal investigator for the Events Research Programme at Liverpool, explains how the trial events generated a large amount of valuable data about Covid transmission As lead researcher for the Liverpool pilots in the Events Research Programme (ERP), I would like to set out some important facts in response to your article regarding the phase one report ( Covid event pilots
4h
Study finds new ways of detecting dark matter in black holes
A new paper narrowed down what type of black holes may be the best candidates for containing dark matter. So far, dark matter has not been directly observed. The research team also developed new techniques to spot Hawking radiation that potentially comes from black holes. Predicted to account for over 80 percent of all matter in the universe, so far, no one has directly seen dark matter. This is
1h
Richard Branson Roasts Jeff Bezos Going to Space: "Jeff Who?"
Jeff Who? Following Virgin Orbit's successful launch of seven satellites via a rocket dropped from the wing of a Boeing 747 jet liner this morning, CEO Richard Branson threw a jab at the competition. During a televised interview with CNBC 's Kelly Evans, the Virgin Group CEO made light of reports that Blue Origin and Amazon founder Jeff Bezos might beat him to space. "Are you trying to beat Jeff
53min
35 Innovators Under 35
The is our yearly opportunity to take a look at not just where technology is now, but where it's going and who's taking it there. More than 500 people are nominated every year, and from this group the editors pick the most promising 100 to move on to the semifinalist round. Their work is then evaluated by our panel of judges who have expertise in such areas as artificial intelligence, biotechnol
9h
Finally, a Film That Understands Social Media
When A'ziah King, a.k.a. Zola, a.k.a. @_zolarmoon , hit Send on the first of her 148 tweets about a trip to Florida gone wrong, Twitter was a different place. In 2015, users could publish only 140 characters at a time. A debate about the color of a dress could dominate the platform for a week. And a winding thread like King's—about meeting a stripper named Jessica and accompanying her for a weeke
6h
The world's thinnest technology—only two atoms thick
Researchers from Tel Aviv University have engineered the world's tiniest technology, with a thickness of only two atoms. According to the researchers, the new technology proposes a way for storing electric information in the thinnest unit known to science, in one of the most stable and inert materials in nature. The allowed quantum-mechanical electron tunneling through the atomically thin film may
5h
Coin toss influences outcome of penalty shootouts
In the knockout phase of the European Championship, some matches will probably be decided in a penalty shoot-out. There has been much discussion about whether the sequence in which the teams take their penalties has an influence on the outcome of the match. A new study has now tried answering this question. As Matthias Sutter from the Max Planck Institute for the Study of Collective Goods in Bonn
6h
A legacy of landmark buildings in Malaysia and Singapore
Lim Chong Keat, MArch '57, has created a towering legacy in Southeast Asia, in more ways than one. He's responsible for modernist landmarks such as the Komtar Tower in Penang (once Malaysia's tallest skyscraper) and the Singapore Conference Hall—which for half a century has hosted cultural and political events, serving as home to the Singapore Symphony Orchestra and later to the Singapore Chinese
18h
Mixing and matching different vaccines seems to work
The news: In a preprint published on Monday, researchers reported that people who got a shot of Oxford-AstraZeneca followed four weeks later by Pfizer-BioNTech had strong immune responses, higher than those who got two doses of Oxford-AstraZeneca, and roughly comparable to those who received two doses of Pfizer-BioNTech. That's reassuring news for the countries that have already been mixing and m
11h
The woman who brought us the world
Had Virginia Tower Norwood listened to her high school guidance counselor, she would have become a librarian. Her aptitude test showed a remarkable facility with numbers, and in 1943, he could think of no better way for a young woman to put such skills to use. Luckily, Norwood didn't suffer from the same lack of imagination. The salutatorian of her Philadelphia high school class, she had long bee
16h
The Atlantic Daily: Heat Threatens to Define the Next Century
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox. This summer's heat is no joke. We're not talking about an ice-cream-cone-melting, sweat-through-your-clothes kind of hot. This is a deadly, smothering, street-buckling hot. Extreme heat is a known
7h
Robinhood Paying $70 Million Fine For Being Absolutely Terrible
Systemic Failures Investing platform Robinhood has agreed to pay a fine of nearly $70 million to the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA), a US group tasked with regulating brokerage firms and exchange markets. Why? Basically because Robinhood is really, really terrible at its job. The "financial penalty" was ordered by FINRA due to Robinhood's "systemic supervisory failures and signif
3min
Are multiple sclerosis drugs used early on in the disease also effective later?
New research may help neurologists identify which drugs are best for people with the advanced form of MS called secondary progressive MS. The new study, published in the June 30, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology, found that the more potent disease-modifying drugs are more effective in reducing flare-ups in secondary progressive MS than the
24min
Machine learning helps in predicting when immunotherapy will be effective
Cancer cells can put the body's immune cells into sleep mode. Immunotherapy can reverse this, but it doesn't work for all patients and all cancer types. Researchers have now developed machine learning models that can predict if someone is likely to respond positively to immunotherapy. In clinical settings, this could pave the way for personalized immunotherapy approaches for patients, as well as g
27min
Common errors in internet energy analysis
When it comes to understanding and predicting trends in energy use, the internet is a tough nut to crack. So say energy researchers in two recent articles that discuss the pitfalls that plague estimates of the internet's energy and carbon impacts.
27min
A future ocean that is too warm for corals might have half as many fish species
Predicting the potential effects of coral loss on fish communities globally is a fundamental task, especially considering that reef fishes provide protein to millions of people. A new study predicts how fish diversity will respond to declines in coral diversity and shows that future coral loss might cause a more than 40% reduction in reef fish diversity globally.
27min
Conservatives' sensitivity to pandemic threat suppressed by distrust of science, media
Researchers studying the intersection of politics and psychology have long documented a link between threat sensitivity and social conservatism: People who are more socially conservative tend to react more strongly to threats. Conversely, those who are more socially liberal tend to be less sensitive to threats, viewing the world as a generally safe place and embracing change to explore new possibi
49min
Solving a murder case with physics
In 2009, famed music producer Phil Spector was found guilty of the murder of actress Lana Clarkson, who was found dead from a single gunshot to her mouth at close range in Spector's California mansion.
49min
Embryo freezing for IVF appears linked to blood pressure problems in pregnancy
A large cohort study drawn from the national IVF registry of France, which included almost 70,000 pregnancies delivered after 22 weeks gestation between 2013 and 2018, has found a higher risk of pre-eclampsia and hypertension in pregnancies derived from frozen-thawed embryos. This risk was found significantly greater in those treatments in which the uterus was prepared for implantation with hormon
1h
Jessica Morris obituary
Campaigner for better treatments for people with brain cancer The communications consultant Jessica Morris did much to give a voice to people who lacked one. In the years up to her death at the age of 57 from brain cancer, she made her illness the basis of a campaign to find treatments for others. In January 2016 she was hiking in a valley north of New York when she found herself trying to speak:
1h
AI and marshmallows: Training human-AI collaboration
In an effort to understand how to train AI, researchers discovered a total of nine negotiations strategies that study participants utilized throughout an exercise. The stand out lesson: cooperative strategies of negotiation were more effective than selfish strategies. This information can be used in the future to inform the creation of an automated system which takes various strategies of negotiat
1h
Slowing down grape ripening can improve fruit quality for winemaking
Wine grapes are particularly finicky when it comes to their environment. For instance, heatwaves and droughts lead to earlier berry ripening and lackluster wine. And these types of episodes are expected to intensify as Earth's climate changes. Now, researchers have tweaked growing conditions for Cabernet Sauvignon grapes to slow down their ripening, which increased the levels of compounds associat
1h
Scientists intensify electrolysis, utilize carbon dioxide more efficiently with magnets
A promising approach captures atmospheric carbon dioxide and then through CO2 electrolysis converts it into value-added chemicals and intermediates, like ethanol. Reducing the energy consumption of this high-power process has been underexplored. Researchers report a new opportunity to use magnetism to reduce the energy required for CO2 electrolysis by up to 60% in a flow electrolyzer.
1h
Discovery of the role of a key gene in the development of ALS
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS, attacks nerve cells known as motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord, gradually leading to paralysis. The loss of function of an important gene, C9orf72, may affect communication between motor neurons and muscles in people with this disease.
1h
New York City Absolutely Botched Its Futuristic Voting System
Great Work New York City deployed a new ranked-choice voting system for its Democratic mayoral primary election that allowed voters to select multiple candidates based on the order that they preferred each over the others. The idea was to grant greater freedom to voters who perhaps wanted to prioritize a candidate who was unlikely to win but better matched their values — without handing the elect
1h
Human variation in gingival inflammation [Immunology and Inflammation]
Oral commensal bacteria actively participate with gingival tissue to maintain healthy neutrophil surveillance and normal tissue and bone turnover processes. Disruption of this homeostatic host–bacteria relationship occurs during experimental gingivitis studies where it has been clearly established that increases in the bacterial burden increase gingival inflammation. Here, we show that…
1h
Dissociations between glucose metabolism and blood oxygenation in the human default mode network revealed by simultaneous PET-fMRI [Neuroscience]
The finding of reduced functional MRI (fMRI) activity in the default mode network (DMN) during externally focused cognitive control has been highly influential to our understanding of human brain function. However, these negative fMRI responses, measured as relative decreases in the blood-oxygenation-level–dependent (BOLD) response between rest and task, have also…
1h
Scalable live-attenuated SARS-CoV-2 vaccine candidate demonstrates preclinical safety and efficacy [Microbiology]
Successfully combating the COVID-19 pandemic depends on mass vaccination with suitable vaccines to achieve herd immunity. Here, we describe COVI-VAC, the only live attenuated severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) vaccine currently in clinical development. COVI-VAC was developed by recoding a segment of the viral spike protein with synonymous…
1h
Digging into the molecules of fossilized dinosaur eggshells
Dinosaurs roamed the Earth more than 65 million years ago, and paleontologists and amateur fossil hunters are still unearthing traces of them today. The minerals in fossilized eggs and shell fragments provide snapshots into these creatures' early lives, as well as their fossilization processes. Now, researchers have analyzed the molecular makeup of fossilized dinosaur eggshells from Mexico, findin
2h
COVID-19 bereavement care lacking for ethnic minorities
Grieving friends and relatives from ethnic minority backgrounds are suffering from a lack of appropriate help to cope with the loss of a loved one, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic. Researchers say people representing those communities need to be involved when services are developed and delivered to ensure that groups get the support they need.
2h
Feedback activity in the visual cortex is necessary for the perception of objects
When we look at a visual stimulus, it drives a cascade of neural activity from low-level to higher level visual brain areas. The higher areas also provide feedback to the lower areas, where figures elicit more activity than the background. Researchers from the Netherlands Institute of Neuroscience (NIN) now showed that feedback causes the extra neuronal activity in low-level areas and that the ext
2h
NIST-led study finds variations in quantitative MRI scanners' measurements
Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is widely used in medicine to detect, diagnose and treat diseases such as cancer, while relying on experts' interpretation of images. Quantitative MRI, which obtains numerical measurements during the scans, can now potentially offer greater accuracy, repeatability and speed — but rigorous quality control is needed for it to reach its full potential, according to a
2h
There's a Hole in the Summer Bay! | Deadliest Catch
Stream Full Episodes of Deadliest Catch: discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/deadliest-catch Discovery ► https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DeadliestCatch https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/DeadliestCatch https://twitter.com/D
2h
If You're Serious About Gut Health, Choose Science, Not Snake Oil
In the last twenty years, the science behind gut health has been linked to a variety of aspects of our systemic health—including immune health, mood, mental health, endocrine health, and skin health. Many people have turned to probiotics to support their gut health (and beyond), but all too often, the probiotics available on the market offer little to no scientific substantiation. Instead, they s
2h
Stuff from ancient poop shows Maya population fell due to climate
A new study shows that the size of the Maya population in the lowland city of Itzan (in present-day Guatemala) varied over time in response to climate change. The findings show that both droughts and very wet periods led to important population declines. These results are based on using a relatively new technique involving looking at stanols (organic molecules found in human and animal fecal matt
2h
Malaria parasite infection compromises colonization resistance to an enteric pathogen by reducing gastric acidity
Malaria parasite infection weakens colonization resistance against Salmonella enterica serovar ( S. ) Typhimurium. S. Typhimurium is a member of the Enterobacterales, a taxon that increases in abundance when the colonic microbiota is disrupted or when the colonic mucosa is inflamed. However, here, we show that infection of mice with Plasmodium yoelii enhances S. Typhimurium colonization by weaken
2h
The essential role of recurrent processing for figure-ground perception in mice
The segregation of figures from the background is an important step in visual perception. In primary visual cortex, figures evoke stronger activity than backgrounds during a delayed phase of the neuronal responses, but it is unknown how this figure-ground modulation (FGM) arises and whether it is necessary for perception. Here, we show, using optogenetic silencing in mice, that the delayed V1 res
2h
Lacrimal gland budding requires PI3K-dependent suppression of EGF signaling
The patterning of epithelial buds is determined by the underlying signaling network. Here, we study the cross-talk between phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and Ras signaling during lacrimal gland budding morphogenesis. Our results show that PI3K is activated by both the p85-mediated insulin-like growth factor (IGF) and Ras-mediated fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling. On the other hand, PI3K
2h
High plasticity in marmoset monkey vocal development from infancy to adulthood
The vocal behavior of human infants undergoes marked changes across their first year while becoming increasingly speech-like. Conversely, vocal development in nonhuman primates has been assumed to be largely predetermined and completed within the first postnatal months. Contradicting this assumption, we found a dichotomy between the development of call features and vocal sequences in marmoset mon
2h
Single-step label-free nanowell immunoassay accurately quantifies serum stress hormones within minutes
A non-faradaic label-free cortisol sensing platform is presented using a nanowell array design, in which the two probe electrodes are integrated within the nanowell structure. Rapid and low volume (≤5 μl) sensing was realized through functionalizing nanoscale volume wells with antibodies and monitoring the real-time binding events. A 28-well plate biochip was built on a glass substrate by sequent
2h
Satellite-based survey of extreme methane emissions in the Permian basin
Industrial emissions play a major role in the global methane budget. The Permian basin is thought to be responsible for almost half of the methane emissions from all U.S. oil- and gas-producing regions, but little is known about individual contributors, a prerequisite for mitigation. We use a new class of satellite measurements acquired during several days in 2019 and 2020 to perform the first re
2h
Maternal diabetes induces senescence and neural tube defects sensitive to the senomorphic rapamycin
Neural tube defects (NTDs) are the second most common structural birth defect. Senescence, a state of permanent cell cycle arrest, occurs only after neural tube closure. Maternal diabetes–induced NTDs are severe diabetic complications that lead to infant mortality or lifelong morbidity and may be linked to premature senescence. Here, we report that premature senescence occurs in the mouse neuroep
2h
Fast nanoparticle rotational and translational diffusion in synovial fluid and hyaluronic acid solutions
Nanoparticles are under investigation as diagnostic and therapeutic agents for joint diseases, such as osteoarthritis. However, there is incomplete understanding of nanoparticle diffusion in synovial fluid, the fluid inside the joint, which consists of a mixture of the polyelectrolyte hyaluronic acid, proteins, and other components. Here, we show that rotational and translational diffusion of pol
2h
Assembly principles and stoichiometry of a complete human kinetochore module
Centromeres are epigenetically determined chromosomal loci that seed kinetochore assembly to promote chromosome segregation during cell division. CENP-A, a centromere-specific histone H3 variant, establishes the foundations for centromere epigenetic memory and kinetochore assembly. It recruits the constitutive centromere-associated network (CCAN), which in turn assembles the microtubule-binding i
2h
In vitro engineering of a bone metastases model allows for study of the effects of antiandrogen therapies in advanced prostate cancer
While androgen-targeted therapies are routinely used in advanced prostate cancer (PCa), their effect is poorly understood in treating bone metastatic lesions and ultimately results in the development of metastatic castrate resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Here, we used an all-human microtissue-engineered model of mineralized metastatic tissue combining human osteoprogenitor cells, 3D printing a
2h
Force-mediated cellular anisotropy and plasticity dictate the elongation dynamics of embryos
We developed a unified dynamic model to explain how cellular anisotropy and plasticity, induced by alignment and severing/rebundling of actin filaments, dictate the elongation dynamics of Caenorhabditis elegans embryos. It was found that the gradual alignment of F-actins must be synchronized with the development of intracellular forces for the embryo to elongate, which is then further sustained b
2h
Observation of second sound in a rapidly varying temperature field in Ge
Second sound is known as the thermal transport regime where heat is carried by temperature waves. Its experimental observation was previously restricted to a small number of materials, usually in rather narrow temperature windows. We show that it is possible to overcome these limitations by driving the system with a rapidly varying temperature field. High-frequency second sound is demonstrated in
2h
Ultrastrong nanotwinned pure nickel with extremely fine twin thickness
The strength of nanocrystalline and nanotwinned metals stops increasing or even starts decreasing when their grain size or twin thickness is below a critical size—a phenomenon known as Hall-Petch breakdown—which hinders the attainment of ultrahigh strength. Here, we report continuous strengthening in nanotwinned pure Ni with twin thicknesses ranging from 81.0 to 2.9 nm. An unprecedented strength
2h
Helical springs as a color indicator for determining chirality and enantiomeric excess
Chirality plays a key role in the physiological system, because molecular functionalities may drastically alter due to a change in chirality. We report herein a unique color indicator with a static helicity memory, which exhibits visible color changes in response to the chirality of chiral amines. A difference of less than 2% in the enantiomeric excess (ee) values causes a change in the absorptio
2h
Charge order lock-in by electron-phonon coupling in La1.675Eu0.2Sr0.125CuO4
Charge order is universal to all hole-doped cuprates. Yet, the driving interactions remain an unsolved problem. Electron-electron interaction is widely believed to be essential, whereas the role of electron-phonon interaction is unclear. We report an ultrahigh-resolution resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) study of the in-plane bond-stretching phonon mode in stripe-ordered cuprate La 1.675
2h
Long-term reliable physical health monitoring by sweat pore-inspired perforated electronic skins
Electronic skins (e-skins)—electronic sensors mechanically compliant to human skin—have long been developed as an ideal electronic platform for noninvasive human health monitoring. For reliable physical health monitoring, the interface between the e-skin and human skin must be conformal and intact consistently. However, conventional e-skins cannot perfectly permeate sweat in normal day-to-day act
2h
Soft-bodied adaptive multimodal locomotion strategies in fluid-filled confined spaces
Soft-bodied locomotion in fluid-filled confined spaces is critical for future wireless medical robots operating inside vessels, tubes, channels, and cavities of the human body, which are filled with stagnant or flowing biological fluids. However, the active soft-bodied locomotion is challenging to achieve when the robot size is comparable with the cross-sectional dimension of these confined space
2h
Gene-rich UV sex chromosomes harbor conserved regulators of sexual development
Nonrecombining sex chromosomes, like the mammalian Y, often lose genes and accumulate transposable elements, a process termed degeneration. The correlation between suppressed recombination and degeneration is clear in animal XY systems, but the absence of recombination is confounded with other asymmetries between the X and Y. In contrast, UV sex chromosomes, like those found in bryophytes, experi
2h
Identification of SARS-CoV-2-induced pathways reveals drug repurposing strategies
The global outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) necessitates the rapid development of new therapies against coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection. Here, we present the identification of 200 approved drugs, appropriate for repurposing against COVID-19. We constructed a SARS-CoV-2–induced protein network, based on disease signatures defined by COVID-19 mu
2h
Order and disorder–An integrative structure of the full-length human growth hormone receptor
Because of its small size (70 kilodalton) and large content of structural disorder (>50%), the human growth hormone receptor (hGHR) falls between the cracks of conventional high-resolution structural biology methods. Here, we study the structure of the full-length hGHR in nanodiscs with small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) as the foundation. We develop an approach that combines SAXS, x-ray diffrac
2h
Retromer stabilizes transient membrane insertion of L2 capsid protein during retrograde entry of human papillomavirus
Retromer, a cellular protein trafficking complex, sorts human papillomaviruses (HPVs) into the retrograde pathway for transport of HPV to the nucleus during virus entry. Here, we conducted a protein modulation screen to isolate four artificial transmembrane proteins called traptamers that inhibit different steps of HPV entry. By analyzing cells expressing pairs of traptamers, we ordered the traff
2h
Behavioral study on common marmosets provides new insights into the evolution of language
Language distinguishes us humans; we learn it through experience and social interactions. Especially in the first year of life, human vocalizations change dramatically, becoming more and more language-like. In our closest relatives, non-human primates, language development was previously thought to be largely predetermined and completed within the first few weeks after birth. In a behavioral study
2h
Thermal waves observed in semiconductor materials
A study published in Science Advances reports on the unexpected observation of thermal waves in germanium, a semiconductor material, for the first time. This phenomenon may allow a significant improvement in the performance of our electronic devices in a near future. The study is led by researchers from the Institute of Materials Science of Barcelona (ICMAB, CSIC) in collaboration with researchers
2h
Where are the foreigners of the first international age?
The Bronze Age in the eastern Mediterranean has long been considered by researchers to have been the 'first international age,' especially the period from 1600-1200 BC, when powerful empires from Anatolia, Mesopotamia, and Egypt set up large networks of subordinate client kingdoms in the Near East. These empires fought, traded, and corresponded with one another, and ancient texts from the period r
2h
Hot nights mess up rice's internal clock
New research clarifies how hot nights are curbing crop yields for rice. "Essentially, we found that warmer nights throw the rice plant's internal clock out of whack," says Colleen Doherty, an associate professor of biochemistry at North Carolina State University and corresponding author of a paper on the work in the journal PNAS . "Most people think plants aren't dynamic, but they are. Plants are
2h
Technology only two atoms thick could enable storage of information in thinnest unit
The new technology, enabling the storage of information in the thinnest unit known to science, is expected to improve future electronic devices in terms of density, speed, and efficiency. The allowed quantum-mechanical electron tunneling through the atomically thin film may boost the information reading process much beyond current technologies. The technology involves laterally sliding one-atom-th
3h
Tång blir tåligare tillsammans med musslor
Marin samodling med musslor kan göra att tång växer bättre och blir mer tålig för klimatförändringar, visar studier från Göteborgs universitet. Övervägande delen av matproduktionen i världen sker med monokultur, alltså att bara en art odlas, som till exempel vete på land, eller uppfödning av lax i havsvatten. Dessa system är produktiva men kan ha stor påverkan på miljön. I stället för att bara od
3h
Do 'Made in USA' claims make a difference in marketing results?
Pick up any product in just about any store and you're likely to find information that indicates the country of origin of the product. The U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC) requires this for any imported product, but not for products made in the United States. When you see the words "Made in U.S." on a product, it's purely for marketing purposes. So, does it work?
3h
New articles for Geosphere posted online in June
GSA's dynamic online journal, Geosphere, posts articles online regularly. Locations and topics studied this month include the central Appalachian Mountains; fossil pollen in Colombia; the precision and accuracy of model analyses; the Bone Spring Formation, Permian Basin, west Texas; and the geochronology of modern river sediment in south-central Alaska.
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SLAS Discovery's July special edition 'Drug discovery targeting COVID-19' now available
The July edition of SLAS Discovery is a Special Edition featuring the cover article, "Development of a High-Throughput Screening Assay to Identify Inhibitors of the SARS-CoV-2 Guanine-N7-Methyltransferase Using RapidFire Mass Spectrometry" by Lesley-Anne Pearson, Charlotte J. Green, Ph.D., De Lin, Ph.D., Alain-Pierre Petit, Ph.D., David W. Gray, Ph.D., Victoria H. Cowling, Ph.D., and Euan A. F. Fo
3h
Fecal records show Maya population affected by climate change
A McGill-led study has shown that the size of the Maya population in the lowland city of Itzan (in present-day Guatemala) varied over time in response to climate change. The findings, published recently in Quaternary Science Reviews, show that both droughts and very wet periods led to important population declines.
3h
Click reaction for living systems: Bioorthogonal hydroamination of activated linear alkynes
Increasing our understanding of cellular processes requires information about the types of biomolecules involved, their locations, and their interactions. This requires the molecules to be labeled without affecting physiological processes (bioorthogonality). This works when the markers are very quickly and selectively coupled using small molecules and 'click chemistry'. In the journal Angewandte C
3h
Floods may be nearly as important as droughts for future carbon accounting
Plants play an essential role in curbing climate change, absorbing about one-third of the carbon dioxide emitted from human activities and storing it in soil so it doesn't become a heat-trapping gas. Extreme weather affects this ecosystem service, but when it comes to understanding carbon uptake, floods are studied far less than droughts—and they may be just as important, according to new research
3h
Eel products in the EU and the UK need better regulation
Growing in popularity, unagi kabayaki—grilled freshwater eel in soy sauce—can be found on the menu of many Japanese restaurants, and is stocked by Asian shops and in specialist supermarkets. But new research tracing the DNA of eel filets used for this dish has found that fraudulent food labeling is rife, with a third of the products violating EU regulations on the provision of food information. Wi
3h
A detailed simulation of air flow after sneezing
By the beginning of April 2021, the number of people infected during the COVID-19 pandemic had risen to more than 130 million people of whom more than 2.8 million died. The SARS-CoV-2 virus responsible for COVID-19 is transmitted particularly by droplets or aerosols emitted when an infected person speaks, sneezes or coughs. This is how the viruses and other pathogens spread through the environment
3h
When and why do politicians use emotive rhetoric in parliamentary speeches?
Politicians use emotional resources in their speeches in parliament depending on the type of debate and use emotive rhetoric strategically and selectively, mainly to attract voters. This is one of the main conclusions of a study published in the journal American Political Science Review (APSR) involving Toni Rodon, a professor with the UPF Department of Political and Social Sciences and member of
3h
Phase transitions lead to new advanced materials
Believe it or not, steel has something in common with bacterial appendages: they can both undergo a special type of physical transformation that remains puzzling. Now, researchers from Japan and China have used direct microscopic observations to provide more clarity to how this transformation occurs.
3h
Antibiotic makes these pesky flies produce only males
Making certain fruit flies, Drosophila suzukii , produce only male offspring could protect soft-skinned fruit crops, research indicates. D. suzukii , also called "spotted-wing drosophila" are modified with a female-lethal gene that uses a common antibiotic as an off switch. Withholding the antibiotic tetracycline in the diet of larvae essentially eliminates birth of female D. suzukii flies as the
3h
How the "Bomber Mafia" planned to win World War II with just a few dozen bombs
Malcom Gladwell's new book The Bomber Mafia traces the stories of major personalities during WWII as bombing tactics developed. Of particular interest to him were the men who dreamed of precision bombing as a way to make war quick, efficient, and far less deadly. He concludes that the Bomber Mafia was ahead of its time. Humanity has always had the odd idea that one tactical change or new technolo
3h
Thinking in 3D improves mathematical skills
Spatial reasoning ability in small children reflects how well they will perform in mathematics later. Researchers from the University of Basel recently came to this conclusion, making the case for better cultivation of spatial reasoning.
3h
Extreme events: Ecosystems offer cost-effective protection
Decision-makers around the world are increasingly interested in using ecosystem solutions such as mangroves, coral reefs, sand dunes and forests on steep slopes to help buffer the impacts from hazard events and protect populations. But what evidence exists to show the efficacy of nature-based solutions over man-made protective measures to reduce the impacts of the increasing numbers of hazard even
3h
Rattlesnakes may like climate change
When it comes to climate change, not all organisms will lose out. A new study finds that rattlesnakes are likely to benefit from a warming climate. A combination of factors makes a warming climate beneficial to rattlesnakes that are found in almost every part of the continental United States but are especially common in the Southwest.
3h
New beetle species found pristinely preserved in fossilized dropping of dinosaur ancestor
Fossilized feces are common finds at paleontological dig sites and might actually contain hidden treasures. By scanning fossilized dung assigned to a close dinosaur relative from the Triassic period, scientists discovered a 230-million-year-old beetle species, representing a new family of beetles, previously unknown to science. The beetles were preserved in a 3D state with their legs and antennae
3h
During epic migrations, great snipes fly at surprising heights by day and lower by night
A stocky marsh bird with a 20-inch wingspan, great snipes are also speedy marathoners that can migrate from Sweden to Central Africa in just three days, without stopping to eat, drink, or sleep. Now, researchers find that snipes also rise nearly 2,500 meters in elevation at dawn and descend again at dusk each day, perhaps to avoid overheating from daytime solar radiation by climbing higher.
3h
Investigational malaria vaccine gives strong, lasting protection
Two U.S. Phase 1 clinical trials of a novel candidate malaria vaccine have found that the regimen conferred unprecedentedly high levels of durable protection when volunteers were later exposed to disease-causing malaria parasites. The vaccine combines live parasites with either of two widely used antimalarial drugs — an approach termed chemoprophylaxis vaccination. A Phase 2 clinical trial of the
3h
What you should know about inflation right now
On June 16, the Federal Reserve announced it may raise interest rates twice in 2023 in response to higher-than-expected increases in inflation. In his announcement, Fed Chairman Jerome Powell said the higher inflation recorded this year should be temporary, but the risks that it would be "higher and more persistent than we expect" could not be ignored. John Horn, professor of practice in economic
3h
Engineered single-domain antibodies tackle COVID variants
Nature, Published online: 30 June 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01721-5 Camels and llamas make antibodies that bind to targets using small, 'nanobody' protein domains. Mice have now been engineered to make nanobodies that might be more effective than conventional antibodies in treating COVID-19.
3h
Wildfire changes songbird plumage and testosterone
Following habitat-destroying wildfires, researchers found many male red-backed fairywrens failed to molt into their ornamental plumage, making them less attractive to potential mates. They also had lowered circulating testosterone, which has been associated with their showy feathers. The birds' fat stores and stress hormone corticosterone remained at normal levels. While the findings are specific
4h
University of Cincinnati screening program contributes to increase in HIV diagnoses
Newly published research shows that a screening program in the University of Cincinnati Medical Center Emergency Department helped detect an outbreak of HIV among persons who inject drugs in Hamilton County, Ohio, from 2014-18. The study was published in PLOS ONE in May 2021. The researchers would like to see this study have an impact on public health policy as well as the frequency of HIV screeni
4h
Repairing 'broken' hearts — new promising surgical technique for heart attacks
Patients suffering from severe heart attacks are susceptible to ruptures in the wall of their hearts. Such conditions coupled with drastic fluctuations in blood pressure could be fatal. A group of Chinese medical researchers has now been successful in devising a new surgical technique, called SurCOP, to repair such ruptures, according to a study published in Chinese Medical Journal.
4h
MD Anderson research highlights for June 30, 2021
The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center's Research Highlights provides a glimpse into recently published studies in basic, translational and clinical cancer research from MD Anderson experts. Current advances include expanded use of a targeted therapy for a new group of patients with leukemia, molecular studies yielding novel cancer therapeutic targets, insights into radiation therapy re
4h
COVID-19 in Europe and travel: Researchers show the important role of newly introduced lineages in COVID-19 resurgence after last summer
On the eve of summer holidays, a study conducted by researchers of the KU Leuven and ULB and published in the journal Nature, assesses how newly introduced viral lineages contributed to COVID-19 resurgence after last summer in Europe. The researchers show that in the majority of European countries under investigation, more than half of the lineages circulating at the end of summer 2020 resulted fr
4h
Have a pandemic plan? Most people did not
Since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic last year, medical experts have stressed the importance of having a plan in the event of a positive test result. A new study by University of Houston psychologists reveals 96% of healthy, educated adults did not have a comprehensive plan in mind.
4h
What being a physician taught one astronaut about living in space
Not all astronauts start off as test pilots. I spoke with David Saint-Jacques, a Canadian astronaut with a medical degree who's spent 203 days aboard the ISS, and learned some of the career twists and turns one can take on the way into orbit. Most people would think being an engineer and astrophysicist is enough. You also earned a medical degree—and then topped that by becoming an astronaut. What
4h
Buttoned up biomolecules
Increasing our understanding of cellular processes requires information about the types of biomolecules involved, their locations, and their interactions. This requires the molecules to be labeled without affecting physiological processes (bioorthogonality). This works when the markers are very quickly and selectively coupled using small molecules and 'click chemistry.' In the journal Angewandte C
4h
Detailed simulation of air flow after sneezing to study the transmission of diseases
Using high-performance computation systems, a Universitat Rovira i Virgili research team (Tarragona-Spain) has simulated the flow of air produced by coughing and sneezing in unprecedented detail. The results give greater insight into the characteristics of the flow produced by breathing and the capacity of infectious aerosols to disperse in the environment and remain suspended, which spreads COVID
4h
Ivermectin treatment in humans for reducing malaria transmission
Malaria still kills millions. Researchers are excited by a new intervention: giving people a drug which kills mosquitoes that bite them. Incredibly, this is a reality, as the drug ivermectin, widely used for the control of parasite infections such as lymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis, appears to do this. With some mosquitoes now resistant to the insecticides used in treated bed nets, this is
4h
Horrific Heatwave Kills Dozens
Dire Situation As the horrific, record-shattering heatwave continues in western Canada and the northwest United States, a disturbing death toll is starting to climb. Officials in the Vancouver area told the BBC that the intense heat has contributed to about 130 sudden deaths between Friday and Wednesday. A dozen more occurred in Portland, Oregon and Seattle since the heatwave began — illustrating
5h
Effects of masks on exercise
What The Study Did: This crossover trial found that perceived breathing resistance at peak exercise is uniquely and significantly elevated when exercise stress testing (EST) is performed while wearing a mask. Performing EST with a mask yielded lower peak exercise oxygen uptake and heart rates as compared with no mask.
5h
Sanaria vaccine results show unprecedented progress in battle against variant malaria
In an article published today in Nature, Sanaria's PfSPZ-CVac (CQ) vaccine is reported as being safe and protecting 100% of six subjects against a variant malaria parasite three months after their last dose in the company's Phase 1 safety and efficacy trial. This is the first time complete protection against a variant malaria parasite has ever been achieved that long after vaccine administration.
5h
The scientist whose hybrid rice helped feed billions
Nature, Published online: 30 June 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01807-0 A historian reflects on the life of Chinese crop scientist Yuan Longping, and the possible influence of geothermal energy production on earthquake aftershocks.
5h
Demonstration of a trapped-ion atomic clock in space
Nature, Published online: 30 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03571-7 Operating in space, NASA's Deep Space Atomic Clock, a trapped-ion clock, is shown to have long-term stability and drift that are an order of magnitude better than current space clocks.
5h
Measuring algorithmically infused societies
Nature, Published online: 30 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03666-1 This Perspective discusses the challenges for social science practices imposed by the ubiquity of algorithms and large-scale measurement and what should—and should not—be measured in societies pervaded by algorithms.
5h
G-protein activation by a metabotropic glutamate receptor
Nature, Published online: 30 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03680-3 Cryo-electron microscopy structures show that metabotropic glutamate receptor 2 forms a dimer to which only one G protein is coupled, revealing the basis for asymmetric signal transduction.
5h
Cellular fluidics
Nature, Published online: 30 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03603-2 provides a platform of unit-cell-based, three-dimensional structures for the deterministic control of multiphase flow, transport and reaction processes.
5h
Precise date for the Laacher See eruption synchronizes the Younger Dryas
Nature, Published online: 30 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03608-x A revised date for the Laacher See eruption using measurements of subfossil trees shifts the chronology of European varved lakes relative to the Greenland ice core record, synchronizing the onset of the Younger Dryas across the North Atlantic–European sector.
5h
Ridgecrest aftershocks at Coso suppressed by thermal destressing
Nature, Published online: 30 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03601-4 Thirty years of geothermal heat production at Coso in California depleted shear stresses within the geothermal reservoir, which changed its faulting style and inhibited aftershocks from the 2019 Ridgecrest earthquake.
5h
Asymmetric activation of the calcium-sensing receptor homodimer
Nature, Published online: 30 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03691-0 Cryo-EM structures of human calcium-sensing receptor reveal intrinsic asymmetry in the receptor homodimer upon activation that is stabilized by calcimimetic drugs adopting distinct poses in the two protomers, priming one protomer for G-protein coupling.
5h
Two chemoattenuated PfSPZ malaria vaccines induce sterile hepatic immunity
Nature, Published online: 30 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03684-z Two malaria vaccines comprising Plasmodium falciparum sporozoites and treatment with either pyrimethamine or chloroquine induced durable protective responses against both the African vaccine strain and a heterologous South American strain of P. falciparum.
5h
Malaria vaccine gets a parasite boost in the liver
Nature, Published online: 30 June 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01720-6 Effective malaria vaccines are urgently needed. Now, clinical evidence indicates that a vaccination approach that uses live parasites growing in the liver can generate high levels of immune protection from infection.
5h
Programmable capillary action controls fluid flows
Nature, Published online: 30 June 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01708-2 A technological platform has been developed in which millimetre-scale cubes are assembled into 3D structures that control capillary action — enabling programmable fluid flows and modelling of a range of fluidic processes.
5h
Spaghetti, windowsill, and LEGO: On-the-fly composites modeling
Sure, they're mixed metaphors—but just as modeling is a close estimate of real-world processes, so too are verbal explanations of such nuanced arithmetic. Trisha Sain, assistant professor of mechanical engineering, explores multiscale physics by thinking about the LEGO bricks in her living room, the windows of skyscrapers and cooking a feast.
5h
Try it: Illusion shows how your brain 'connects the dots'
A new class of illusion, developed by a visual artist and a psychology researcher, underscores the highly constructive nature of visual perception. The illusion, which the creators label "Scintillating Starburst," evokes illusory rays that seem to shimmer or scintillate—like a starburst. Composed of several concentric star polygons, the images prompt viewers to see bright fleeting rays emanating
5h
Introducing the world's thinnest technology — only two atoms thick
The new technology, enabling the storage of information in the thinnest unit known to science, is expected to improve future electronic devices in terms of density, speed, and efficiency.The allowed quantum-mechanical electron tunneling through the atomically thin film may boost the information reading process much beyond current technologies.The technology involves laterally sliding one-atom-thic
5h
Study associates organic food intake in childhood with better cognitive development
A study analyzing the association between a wide variety of prenatal and childhood exposures and neuropsychological development in school-age children has found that organic food intake is associated with better scores on tests of fluid intelligence (ability to solve novel reasoning problems) and working memory (ability of the brain to retain new information while it is needed in the short term).
5h
Extreme events: Ecosystems offer cost effective protection
Ecosystems can buffer impacts from hazard events and provide other benefits such as clean water, biodiversity and human well-being. Twenty-eight researchers from 11 nations, including Jaroslav Mysiak of the CMCC Foundation, spent several years analyzing over 500 peer-reviewed articles on mangroves, coral reefs, sand dunes, slope forests and more. A new study on ecosystem-based approaches to disast
5h
Tracking a photon without leaving a trace
Nature, Published online: 30 June 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01755-9 Conventional detectors often obliterate photons, but the particles can escape a vacuum-based device unscathed.
5h
Protein Aggregation Diseases
If you have occasion to study neurodegeneration, you will be struck by how many terrible high-profile diseases in this area seem to share a common theme. Alzheimer's , ALS , progressive supranuclear palsy , Parkinson's , Lewy body dementia , some types of frontotemporal dementia , Huntington's , prion diseases such as BSE and more all feature abnormal protein aggregates that appear in neural tiss
6h
Fungi embrace human economic ideas in trade with hosts
It seems fungi quietly practice one of the basic functions of a free market, researchers report. New research suggests certain networks of fungi embrace an important economic theory as they engage in trading nutrients for carbon with their host plants. This finding could aid the understanding of carbon storage in soils, an important tool in mitigating climate change. The paper will appear in an u
6h
Hoard of Roman coins turns out to be offering for safe crossing
Several years ago, two amateur archaeologists from Brabant discovered over a hundred Roman coins near to Berlicum in the north of the province. After years of research, it now appears that the location, close to a ford in the river, was a site for offerings. Another interesting fact is that the coins offered were chosen very precisely. "This was an important eureka moment in my academic career."
6h
How occupational skills influence migration
What characteristics distinguish people who migrate to a different country for a better income from others in their homeland? The fact that formal education alone is not enough to answer this question has been demonstrated for the first time in the specialist literature by a German-Mexican research team whose members include Prof. Dr Simon Wiederhold (Chair of Economics/Macroeconomics at the Catho
6h
Over 100 fire scientists urge the US West: Skip the fireworks this record-dry Fourth of July
The heat wave hitting the northwestern U.S. and Canada has been shattering records, with temperatures 30 degrees Fahrenheit or more above normal. With drought already gripping the West, the intense heat has helped suck even more moisture from millions of acres of forests and grasslands, bringing dead vegetation in many regions to record-dry levels and elevating the fire danger to its highest categ
6h
Reprogrammable satellite shipped to launch site
Developed under an ESA Partnership Project, Quantum will be able to respond to changing demands on Earth during its 15-year lifetime, providing data, communications and entertainment exactly where and when it is wanted.
6h
Survey measures whites', Blacks' views on American identity, guns, political violence
A recent national survey from University of Illinois Chicago researchers found strong consensus both across and within white and Black populations in the U.S., and transcending political party lines, when freedom of speech, voting rights, respect for institutions, and peaceful resolution of political conflict were considered as key dimensions of what it means to be American.
6h
Makers and shakers
Nature, Published online: 30 June 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01791-5 Three researchers making a material difference.
6h
A guide to the Nature Index
Nature, Published online: 30 June 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01794-2 A description of the terminology and methodology used in this supplement, and a guide to the functionality that is available free online at natureindex.com.
6h
See the Beautiful Color of Rare Birds from Every Angle and in 3-D
How close have you ever gotten to a wild bird? Can you remember the details of its plumage or the curvature of its beak? Did it sit in one place long enough for you to really study all of its colors and other characteristics? Probably not—at least if it was alive. The avid birders among us sometimes search their whole life for a glimpse of a particularly rare species. But if you are just a casual
7h
The absence of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders in the conversation about criminal justice reform
In a forthcoming article in the Michigan Journal of Race & Law, Raymond Magsaysay explores the multifaceted problem of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPIs) being largely left out of recent conversations about overhauling the criminal justice system to address racial injustice. The selection of Magsaysay's article for publication is a distinguished honor as law students rarely have the opp
7h
Pentagon UFO report: Government transparency and desire for better data might bring science to the UFO world
On June 25, 2021, the Pentagon released a much-anticipated report on UFOs to Congress. The military has rebranded unidentified flying objects as unidentified aerial phenomena –UAPs—in part to avoid the stigma that has been attached to claims of aliens visiting the Earth since the Roswell incident in 1947. The report presents no convincing evidence that alien spacecraft have been spotted, but some
7h
'Vaccinating' against fake news
It's easy to catch but often difficult to detect. Some cases are mild, while some are dangerous. Some of us are more capable of fighting it off.
7h
Report published on new business models that cut back on single-use plastic
Research conducted at the SCI by Mariel Vilella, Director of Global Strategy at Zero Waste Europe, in collaboration with the Global Alliance for Incinerator Alternatives and Break Free From Plastic, looks at examples of successful business models that are successfully contributing to the reduction of single-use plastic consumption, exploring their impact and the key conditions for their replicatio
7h
Reducing need for blood transfusion during heart surgery is focus of new practice guideline
Four leading medical specialty societies released a new clinical practice guideline that includes recommendations for reducing blood loss during heart surgery and improving patient outcomes. The document is a multidisciplinary collaboration among The Society of Thoracic Surgeons, the Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists, the American Society of ExtraCorporeal Technology, and the Society for
7h
A few missing fish: US West Coast recreational and discarded catches
Despite being the leading country when it comes to transparency, public accessibility and free availability of fisheries data, the United States of America's lack of international reporting of recreational catches and fish discarded at sea may hinder proper ecosystem-based management efforts, new research has found.
7h
NASA: Binary Star Systems Could Be Hiding Earth-Like Worlds
This illustration depicts a planet partially hidden in the glare of its host star and a nearby companion star. After examining a number of binary stars, astronomers have concluded that Earth-sized planets in many two-star systems might be going unnoticed by transit searches, which look for changes in the light from a star when a planet passes in front of it. The light from the second star makes i
7h
Check your pockets
Nature, Published online: 30 June 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01808-z A sleight problem.
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Metod spårar RNA i celler utan att störa
Forskare på Chalmers har tagit fram en metod för att märka mRNA-molekyler och följa dess väg i cellerna, med blotta ögat i ett mikroskop och i realtid – utan att påverka mRNAts naturliga funktion. Genombrottet gör det lättare att utveckla nya RNA-baserade mediciner. Medicinska terapier baserade på RNA kan ge möjligheter att förebygga, behandla och potentiellt bota sjukdomar. Utmaningen är att lev
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Slowing down grape ripening can improve berry quality for winemaking
Wine grapes are particularly finicky when it comes to their environment. For instance, heatwaves and droughts lead to earlier berry ripening and lackluster wine. And these types of episodes are expected to intensify as Earth's climate changes. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry have tweaked growing conditions for Cabernet Sauvignon grapes to slow down the
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267 million people worldwide at risk from sea-level rise
Worldwide, 267 million people live on land less than two meters above sea level, which is most at risk from sea level rise, according to a study in Nature Communications. The paper suggests that by 2100 the number could increase to 410 million people, with the majority of this land found in the tropics.
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Hjälp forskarna kartlägga algblomningar i havet
Nu vill forskare på Göteborgs universitet ha hjälp från allmänheten att rapportera algblomningar längs Sveriges kust. Målet är att utveckla en digital tjänst som kan förutse var och när giftiga algblomningar kommer att ske. Varje sommar kommer rapporter om algblomningar i havet som förpestar livet för badgäster, båtfolk och fiskare. På senare år har rapporterna kommit allt tätare. – Klimatförändr
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The change chronicles
October 1967 From "How I Stopped Worrying and Learned to Live with Irrationality": Whatever form it takes, resistance to any change is essentially an act of self-protection. When an individual perceives that the consequences of a change conflict with his needs and desires, he will become anxious and fear for his future. … Whether or not the circumstances justify such response is irrelevant. What
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This photographer-scientists collaboration shows the speed of climate change
Climate change is warping geological time, compressing the time scales of natural processes. In photographs taken around the world, Ian van Coller has documented these shifts, reflected in rocks, sediment, and the shrinking of glaciers. Van Coller collaborates with scientists who annotate his images, pointing out key geological features. He also uses historical photos to show changes, juxtaposing
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Why it's so hard to make tech more diverse
In 2017, MIT Technology Review honored Tracy Chou as one of our 35 Innovators Under 35. At the time, Chou was working to expose Silicon Valley's diversity issues. As an engineer at Pinterest, she'd published a widely circulated blog post calling for tech companies to share data on how many women worked on their engineering teams. She collected their responses in a public database that revealed ho
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The power of us
Though we've called it the "Change" issue, this edition of the magazine is really about two things: reflection and empowerment. For far too many of us, the pandemic has been a study in feeling powerless, and we've had little time to reflect as we focus on keeping ourselves and our loved ones safe, employed, and as mentally sound as possible. We've been forced to cope almost constantly with the tw
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China's path to modernization has, for centuries, gone through my hometown
One day in late March, People's Daily , the Chinese Communist Party's official newspaper, shared a pair of photos on Chinese social media. The first, in black and white, was of the signing of the Boxer Protocol, a 1901 treaty between the Qing empire, which ruled China at the time, and 11 foreign nations. Troops from eight of these countries, including the US, had occupied Beijing following sieges
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Cheaper solar PV is key to addressing climate change
In late 2007, less than 10 years into the company's existence, Google came out swinging on the clean energy front. To a fanfare of plaudits up and down Silicon Valley and well beyond, it declared "RE : make renewable energy cheaper than coal. The company invested tens of millions of dollars into R&D efforts from concentrated solar power to hydrothermal drilling. Four years later, those efforts ha
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What does breaking up Big Tech really mean?
For Apple, Amazon, Facebook, and Alphabet, covid-19 was an economic blessing . Even as the pandemic sent the global economy into a deep recession and cratered most companies' profits, these companies—often referred to as the "Big Four" of technology —not only survived but thrived. Collectively, they now have annual revenue of well over a trillion dollars, and the value of their stocks has soared:
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Tech's new labor movement is harnessing lessons learned a century ago
The workers at the Amazon fulfillment center in Bessemer, Alabama, wanted a union . The center opened in March of last year, just as stay-at-home orders for covid-19 went into effect. While much of the world economy tanked, some sectors thrived, including tech—Amazon founder Jeff Bezos would add some $75 billion to his own net worth in 2020. Back at Bessemer, though, workers were being pressed to
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The great chip crisis threatens the promise of Moore's Law
A year into the covid-19 pandemic, Apple commemorated the growing array of devices featuring its custom M1 chip with great fanfare, including a "Mission Implausible" ad on TV featuring a young man running across the rooftops of its "spaceship" campus in Cupertino and infiltrating the facility to "steal" the breakthrough microprocessor from a MacBook and place it inside an iPad Pro. Apple's custom
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Turn Your Standard Toilet Paper Into A More Soothing Experience With Pristine
Flushable wipes might feel good, but they're terrible for the environment. Despite the name, they can overwhelm sewer systems and bind together into enormous clogs that can block the sewers for entire cities. Pristine toilet paper spray gives you all of the advantages of a flushable wipe, while keeping the lower cost, and disposability, of toilet paper. If you're a Shark Tank fan, you already kno
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New NASA radiation rules could open up space missions to more women
Because Earth's magnetic fields are able to protect us from much of the radiation that barrels through space, humans on this planet aren't exposed to much of it—only about 3 to 4 millisieverts (mSv) every year. An astronaut staying on the International Space Station for 180 days, on the other hand, would get hit by 50 to 180 mSv. How that affects you depends on many different factors, including g
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Exceptional heat hits Pacific Northwest
Extraordinary heat events occur around the planet during most summers, but the current heatwave in the Pacific Northwest is truly exceptional. In June 2021, all-time temperature records fell in multiple cities in the U.S. and Canada during a heatwave that the National Weather Service called "historic and dangerous."
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Higher cost of finance exacerbates a climate investment trap in developing economies
Nature Communications, Published online: 30 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24305-3 Access to low cost finance is vital for developing economies' transition to green energy. Here the authors show how modelled decarbonization pathways for developing economies are disproportionately impacted by different weighted average cost of capital (WACC) assumptions.
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Xyloglucan processing machinery in Xanthomonas pathogens and its role in the transcriptional activation of virulence factors
Nature Communications, Published online: 30 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24277-4 Xyloglucans are polysaccharides found in plant cell walls. Here, the authors describe the xyloglucan depolymerization machinery of phytopathogenic Xanthomonas bacteria, and show that sugars released by this system induce the expression of key virulence factors driving pathogenesis.
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The rate and molecular spectrum of mutation are selectively maintained in yeast
Nature Communications, Published online: 30 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24364-6 How natural selection shapes the rate and molecular spectrum of mutations is debated. Yeast mutation accumulation experiments identify a gene promoting mutagenesis and show stabilizing selection maintaining the mutation rate above the drift barrier. Selection also preserves the mutation spectrum.
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Revealing thermally-activated nucleation pathways of diffusionless solid-to-solid transition
Nature Communications, Published online: 30 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24256-9 Normally the diffusionless solid-to-solid transition between phases are driven by athermal processes, due to strain being overwhelmingly dominant. Here, the authors present a unique series of in-situ particle level observations of the solid-to-solid transition in colloidal particles suspended in a solvent, revea
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CVnCoV and CV2CoV protect human ACE2 transgenic mice from ancestral B BavPat1 and emerging B.1.351 SARS-CoV-2
Nature Communications, Published online: 30 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24339-7 Emerging SARS-CoV-2 variants with mutations in the spike protein raise concerns regarding vaccine efficacy. Here, the authors show that two spike encoding mRNA vaccines in preclinical and clinical development protect human ACE2 mice from the B.1.351 variant of concern and ancestral B BavPat1.
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SARS-CoV-2-specific T cell memory is sustained in COVID-19 convalescent patients for 10 months with successful development of stem cell-like memory T cells
Nature Communications, Published online: 30 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24377-1 T cells are instrumental to protective immune responses against SARS-CoV-2, the pathogen responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic. Here the authors show that, in convalescent COVID-19 patients, memory T cell responses are detectable up to 317 days post-symptom onset, in which the presence of stem cell-like memory T
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Characterising lithium-ion electrolytes via operando Raman microspectroscopy
Nature Communications, Published online: 30 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24297-0 The full characterisation of lithium-ion electrolytes is of paramount importance for the continued development and innovation of lithium ion and lithium metal batteries. Here, the authors present a new experimental setup to obtain all key electrolyte parameters using operando Raman microspectroscopy
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Surfactant-guided spatial assembly of nano-architectures for molecular profiling of extracellular vesicles
Nature Communications, Published online: 30 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23759-9 Current methods for controlled assembly of nanomaterials into desired architectures often lack the precision and versatility to develop complex architectures. Here the authors report STAR, surfactant tunable spatial architecture, to guide nanomaterial integration in metal-organic frameworks.
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Ten years of Scientific Reports
Scientific Reports, Published online: 30 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-021-92477-5 Scientific Reports launched in June 2011 with an inclusive ethos, and a mission to publish high-quality research without selecting papers based on perceived impact or significance. We reflect on our first 10 years, and thank our authors, reviewers and Editorial Board Members for their contributions to the success o
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Digitalt utanförskap ännu svårare för äldre under pandemin
Att tro att alla äldre människor är teknikfientliga är ålderism och stämmer inte med sanningen. Risken för att hamna i digitalt utanförskap handlar inte främst om ålder – utan snarare om ekonomi, kunskap och socialt nätverk. Det visar en studie där forskare har följt 3000 personer i ålderspannen 30–39, 50–59 och 70–79 år under pandemin. Fokus har legat på deras attityder till och användning av di
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How likely do you guys think a collapse/apocalypse is in the next hundred years?
So first of all whenever this is asked it's mainly negative such as this thread with at least 2 people active in collapse subs. Anyways I have been reading some subs such as r /collapse and I'm wondering how likely do you think something such as a nuclear war or climate change ending civilization. I'm not gonna survive one since im a teenager and if I get a chance to grow up it's also unlikely th
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COVID-19 and balancing the risks: The vaccine or the virus
Given recent reports of myocarditis after vaccination with mRNA-based COVID-19 vaccines in young people, we think it's a good time to reexamine the risk/benefit ratio of these vaccines in this population. The post COVID-19 and balancing the risks: The vaccine or the virus first appeared on Science-Based Medicine .
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Portrait of an island on fire
On January 9, 2020, Landsat 8 scanned this image of Australia's wildfire-ravaged Kangaroo Island. With Landsat 9 scheduled to launch in 2021, NASA's Goddard Media Studios produced the following video about the Landsat program's history. It includes a cameo appearance by Virginia Tower Norwood '47 , the alumna behind the original Landsat multispectral scanner. NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. A
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How do babies perceive the world?
It's Ursula's third time in the functional MRI machine. Heather Kosakowski, a PhD student in cognitive neuroscience, is hoping to get just two precious minutes of data from her session. Even though Ursula has been booked to have her brain scanned for two hours, it's far from a sure thing. Her first two sessions, also booked for two hours each, yielded only eight minutes of usable material combine
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MIT in a box
Admissions applications in this pandemic year jumped 66% after MIT temporarily lifted the requirement to submit test scores. But for the 1,340 students who got good news from MIT on Pi Day, coming to Cambridge for the usual Campus Preview Weekend (CPW) was off the table. Instead, the Admissions Office invited them to CP*, a monthlong series of virtual events, and sent them a box of MIT love. It i
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Taking our earthshot
Last May, when we issued our Climate Action Plan for the Decade , we were mobilizing MIT to take on the climate problem as never before. The complexity and uncertainty of climate change make tackling it much more than a "moonshot." Getting humans to the moon was difficult. But it was a well-​defined problem with a solution based on established science, with no opposing forces other than a few law
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Sickness isn't sexy
Which is more powerful: the urge for sex or the instinct to stay away from someone who's sick? A new study suggests that at least in mice, it's the latter. Researchers in the lab of Gloria Choi, an associate professor of brain and cognitive sciences at MIT and a member of the Picower Institute for Learning and Memory, found that when male mice encountered a female mouse showing signs of illness,
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Two new Institute Professors
Arup K. Chakraborty and Paula Hammond '84, PhD '93, have been named Institute Professors, the highest honor for MIT faculty members. Chakraborty, the founding director of MIT's Institute for Medical Engineering and Science (IMES), is a pioneer in applying computational techniques to immunology. His work has led to discoveries about the functioning of T cells and contributed to the development of
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AI vs. skin cancer
Early detection is key to surviving melanoma, a type of malignant tumor responsible for more than 70% of skin-cancer-related deaths worldwide, but "suspicious pigmented skin lesions" (SPLs) are so common it's impractical for doctors to check them all out. Now MIT researchers have developed a tool that can analyze skin photos taken with a smartphone to determine which SPLs should be evaluated by a
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Easy desalination
When water used in many industrial systems evaporates, salts and other dissolved minerals can be left behind on component surfaces, where they eventually degrade equipment, block pipes, and reduce the efficiency of important heat exchange processes. Now MIT researchers have discovered a phenomenon that could help solve this problem while potentially turning the contaminants into useful products—a
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Martian oxygen
In April, thanks to an MIT-designed instrument, NASA's Mars rover Perseverance achieved a remarkable milestone: it generated the first breathable oxygen on another planet. The Martian atmosphere is about 95% carbon dioxide, but MOXIE (Mars Oxygen In-situ Resource Utilization Experiment), a small box-shaped device on board, converted it to oxygen through a technique called solid oxide electrolysis
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Where we walk
City planners have standard methods of estimating the car traffic that a project is likely to generate, but they have no equivalent for foot traffic. Now Andres Sevtsuk, director of MIT's City Form Lab, has published a model that could help. The model estimates pedestrian trips along networks between common origins and destinations like homes, offices, amenities, and transit stops. To calibrate i
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Closing the gap for Black business owners
Early in her career, Burunda Prince '83 recognized that even with a title, a nice office, and credentials including a bachelor's in chemical engineering from MIT and an MBA from Harvard Business School, she would still be excluded from important discussions at her workplace. Once, after a meeting about one of Prince's projects, her male colleagues continued their dialogue as they walked into the
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GrubHub founder starts a handy alternative to the gig economy
It started not with a stroke of creative genius, but with a rain barrel that Mike Evans '99, MEng '00, wanted to install in his garden. Fourteen calls later, he still hadn't been able to hire anyone. He started researching the home maintenance sector and discovered that many US trade schools have closed in recent decades, creating a shortage of handypeople. That's how Fixer was born. "What it com
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Global-minded alumna makes US forests a priority
When Tchelet Segev '18, MEng '18, graduated from MIT with degrees in civil and environmental engineering, she had her sights set on becoming the first female UN secretary-general. She has since added other dream jobs to her wish list. "I applied to be an astronaut with NASA—I would drop everything to be an astronaut," she says, laughing. That Segev's interests span the globe (and beyond) is unsur
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Francesco '70, SM '72, and Marybeth Pompei
Frank Pompei is founder and CEO of Exergen, a maker of scanners, thermometers, and sensors. He credits his MIT education with equipping him to build a successful company, mindful of the possibilities created by his financial aid package. "My parents could never have sent me to MIT on their wages as factory workers," he says. Thriving at MIT and beyond . "I remember the academics as challenging bu
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The rs-FC fMRI Law of Attraction (i.e., Resting-State Functional Connectivity of Speed Dating Choice)
Feeling starved for affection after 15 months of pandemic-mandated social distancing? Ready to look for a suitable romantic partner by attending an in-person speed dating event? Just recline inside this noisy tube for 10 minutes, think about anything you like, and our algorithm will Predict [the] Compatibility of a Female-Male Relationship ! This new study by Kajimura and colleagues garnered a lo
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Bronze Age: how the market began
Knowing the weight of a commodity provides a way to value goods in the marketplace. But did a self-regulating market even exist in the Bronze Age? And what can weight systems tell us? Researchers investigated the dissemination of weight systems throughout Western Eurasia. Their simulation indicates that the interaction of merchants, even without intervention from institutions, is likely to explain
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This Science-Backed NAD+ Supplement Helps You Improve Your Health From the Inside Out
Worried about aging ? That's totally understandable. Nobody wants to get old. However, that doesn't mean you should try to fight it. A lot of people waste their money on health, wellness, and beauty products that claim to "stop" or "defy" or even "reverse" the "signs" of aging. But in reality all of those things are impossible. And even if they weren't impossible, aging isn't just about what you
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ACTG announces publication of REPRIEVE sub-study in JAMA Network Open, providing insights into cardiovascular disease risk among people living with HIV
The AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG), the largest global HIV research network, today announced that findings from a sub-study of REPRIEVE (A5332/A5332s, an international clinical trial studying heart disease prevention in people living with HIV) have been published in the Journal of the American Medical Association Network Open. The study found that approximately half of study participants, who w
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In with the old, out with the mew
Keep your checklists handy because the 62nd Supplement to the American Ornithological Society's Check-list of North American Birds, publishing today in Ornithology, includes numerous updates to the classification of the continent's bird species. A few highlights from this year's supplement include species splits for Mew Gull, Barred Owl, and Sedge Wren, among quite a few others; a transfer back to
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