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200-year-old poop shows rural elites in New England had parasitic infections
In the early 19th century in North America, parasitic infections were quite common in urban areas due in part to population growth and urbanization. Prior research has found that poor sanitation, unsanitary privy (outhouse) conditions, and increased contact with domestic animals, contributed to the prevalence of parasitic disease in urban areas. A new study examining fecal samples from a privy on
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LATEST

Millions Are Saying No to the Vaccines. What Are They Thinking?
S everal days ago , the mega-popular podcast host Joe Rogan advised his young listeners to skip the COVID-19 vaccine. "I think you should get vaccinated if you're vulnerable," Rogan said. "But if you're 21 years old, and you say to me, 'Should I get vaccinated?' I'll go, 'No.'" Rogan's comments drew widespread condemnation. But his view is surprisingly common. One in four Americans says they don'
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Covering India's Covid crisis: 'Hundreds of journalists have lost their lives'
Our South Asia correspondent reflects on a catastrophe that is now affecting the lives of almost everyone in the country You recently lost a close colleague, Kakoli Bhattacharya , to Covid-19. Can you tell us about her and the important work that she did? Kakoli was the Guardian's news assistant over here and had worked for us since 2009. She could find any number or contact I needed and smoothed
12h
Watch a UK Marine Jetpack onto Speeding Ship, Pull Out Gun
Jetpack Assist The British Royal Marines are testing out a futuristic new way to board a ship: flying there using a jetpack. A new video uploaded by UK-based jetpack maker Gravity Industries shows a Royal Marine using a jet engine-powered suit to land on a nearby ship after approaching it on a powerboat. In one iteration of the exercise, the soldier lands on the ship and then pulls out a handgun
2h
Deep space listening: 6000 hours of research to hear continuous gravitational waves
When searching for lost keys, there are a number of possible strategies. You might try moving from room to room, casting your eye over every flat surface, in the hope of spotting the missing keys. Of course, this assumes that they are somewhere in plain sight; if they're hidden under a newspaper or have fallen behind the sofa, you'll never spot them. So which is the best strategy?
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Mating with relatives? Not a big deal in nature
We usually assume that inbreeding is bad and should be avoided under all circumstances. But new research performed by researchers at Stockholm University, published in Nature Ecology and Evolution, shows that there is little support for this assumption.
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Image: Hubble views a dazzling cosmic necklace
The interaction of two doomed stars has created this spectacular ring adorned with bright clumps of gas—a diamond necklace of cosmic proportions. Fittingly known as the "Necklace Nebula," this planetary nebula is located 15,000 light-years away from Earth in the small, dim constellation of Sagitta (the Arrow).
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EPA Moves To Cut A Group Of Powerful Greenhouse Gases
The EPA plans to phase out hydrofluorocarbons, or HFCs, which are used in refrigerators and air conditioners. When HFCs are released into the atmosphere, they are extremely good at trapping heat. (Image credit: Keith Srakocic/AP)
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How many more images of Covid disaster does it take to jolt rich countries into action? | Nesrine Malik
The crisis in India forced the west to respond. But without an ambitious global plan, other nations may suffer similar fates As the number of Covid-19 cases rose dramatically in Europe and the US during the early part of last year, something strange seemed to be happening in the global south. South Africa's entire death toll was less than 100 at the same time that Britain was losing more than 1,0
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Air pollution spikes may impair older men's thinking, study finds
Even short, temporary increases in airborne particles can damage brain health, research suggests Temporary rises in air pollution may impair memory and thinking in older men, according to research that indicates even short-term spikes in airborne particles can be harmful to brain health. Scientists found that the men's cognitive performance fell following rises in air pollution during the month b
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Warren Buffet Associate Calls Bitcoin "Disgusting and Contrary to the Interests of Civilization"
Bitcoin Bear While Bitcoin has exploded in popularity and acceptance, even among Wall Street veterans, not everybody has warmed up to the idea of a decentralized digital currency. Most recently, Charlie Munger, vice chairman of the Warren Buffett-led investment firm Berkshire Hathaway, had no kind words to spare for Bitcoin. During a question and answer session at the company's annual shareholder
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We Should All Be More Afraid of Driving
I thought I saw something in the road. It was after 1 a.m. one night in April 2016, and I was heading home from a friend's house on the outskirts of Atlanta. From a distance, the dark spot looked like an oil stain. Then she turned her head and my headlights lit her face. A woman in dark clothing was standing in my lane on Interstate 75. I pounded the brake, but I was too late. Her body crashed in
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A Simple Approach to Ending Extreme Poverty
Guillem Casasús This article was published online on May 3, 2021. O n August 14, 1935 , President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed into law one of the most successful anti-poverty programs in the nation's history. The Social Security Act's old-age benefit was founded on a moral certainty: It was wrong that elderly Americans might suffer destitution when they were no longer able to work. The act promi
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Mysterious Biotech Startup Gave Anti-Aging Gene Therapy to Dementia Patients
Elizabeth Parrish, the CEO of a biotech startup called BioViva, announced last month that six dementia patients traveled to Mexico so that the company could inject them with an experimental anti-aging gene therapy beyond view of the FDA's watchful eye. Parrish — who told STAT News that she injected herself over 100 times with an experimental gene therapy of her own design — said that the dementia
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"The vaccinated are a danger to the unvaccinated because of shedding!": The latest COVID-19 antivaccine disinformation
Antivaxxers are masters of projection, which is why the latest antivaccine disinformation about COVID-19 vaccines is that they lead the recipient to "shed" spike protein, which can can cause menstrual irregularities or even miscarriages in women who come into contact with the vaccinated and even make people very sick. This trope is nothing more than a clever repackaging of the old antivaccine dis
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Vaccine shortages blight India's efforts to contain Covid crisis
Indian government accused of complacency, with shortage of jabs likely to continue 'for months' Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Severe Covid-19 vaccine shortages have hampered India's plan to administer jabs to all adults, with fewer then half of India's states able to begin vaccinating over-18s amid warnings the shortfall could last months. Over the weekend, more th
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Dark Matter May Be Hiding Inside Planets, Scientists Say
Danger: Quicksand A pair of scientists on the hunt for dark matter have an unusual new idea for where to look: trapped inside gas giant planets that sucked up the mysterious, invisible particles like cosmic quicksand. Researchers believe that a planet's gravitational pull can attract and capture dark matter particles, where they would eventually collide and destroy one another, releasing explosiv
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Starwatch: shooting stars from the tail of Halley's comet
The Eta Aquarids may not be the most spectacular meteors of the year but they are fun to see This week, keep an eye open for the Eta Aquarids meteor shower. Shooting stars from this annual display can usually be seen between 19 April and 28 May. This year they are expected to peak in the pre-dawn sky of 5 May, but the morning before and after are worth a try too. Continue reading…
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Former Senator Says Military Wouldn't Let Him See UFO Wreckage
Secret Stash In recent years, UFOs and other unexplained aerial phenomena have captured the attention of many public figures who either say aliens exist — or at least that it's reasonable to suspect they might . Harry Reid, a Senator from Nevada who served from 1987 to 2017, has even gone as far as suggesting that the military contractor Lockheed Martin has UFO fragments somewhere in its possessi
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Cell atlas of stony corals is boost for coral reef conservation efforts
Researchers at the University of Haifa, the Weizmann Institute and the Center for Genomic Regulation (CRG) have built the first atlas of all of the different types of cells in Stylophora pistillata, a reef-building stony coral native to the Indo-Pacific oceans. Published today in the journal Cell, the study is the first to detect the presence of specialized immune cells in corals.
3h
The patchy environment of a rare cosmic explosion revealed
Scientists from the National Centre for radio Astrophysics of the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (NCRA-TIFR) Pune used the upgraded Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (uGMRT) to determine that AT 2018 cow, the first of a newly discovered class of cosmic explosions, has an extremely patchy environment. Sources like AT 2018cow release an enormous amount of energy, nonetheless fade extremely rap
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A new way to make AR/VR glasses
"Image" is everything in the $20 billion market for AR/VR glasses. Consumers are looking for glasses that are compact and easy to wear, delivering high-quality imagery with socially acceptable optics that don't look like "bug eyes."
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A physics perspective on wound healing
In material physics understanding how systems interact across the interfaces separating them is of central interest. But can physical models clarify similar concepts in living systems, such as cells? Physicists at the University of Geneva (UNIGE), in collaboration with the University of Zurich (UZH), used the framework of disordered elastic systems to study the process of wound healing—the prolife
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Why Larry Krasner's Defeat Would be 'Disastrous' for Criminal-Justice Reform
Christopher Lee / VII / Redux PHILADELPHIA—On a recent Saturday morning, Larry Krasner was explaining to me why gun violence and murders have spiked in Philadelphia over the past year—and why the criminal-justice reforms he instituted as the city's district attorney are not to blame. The fault, he said, lies with the pandemic and its shutdown of schools, summer camps, job opportunities, and even
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CVS and Walgreens wasted 128,500 Covid vaccine doses, report finds
US pharmacy chains responsible for vast majority of the recorded 182,874 wasted doses, according to Kaiser Health News US pharmacy chains CVS and Walgreens are responsible for the vast majority of wasted vaccine doses, which total more than 180,000 reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), according to a story from Kaiser Health News. As of late March, the CDC recorded 182
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Archaeological study of mustatils reveals more complexity than assumed
A team of researchers from the University of Western Australia has found that the mustatils in northwest Saudi Arabia are more complex than has been previously believed. After studying the mustatils both on the ground and from helicopters, they have found there are also more of them than were known. They have written a paper describing their findings and have posted it on Cambridge Core.
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China Deletes Post Mocking COVID Death Toll
Mocking a Crisis In a post uploaded to social media, China's top law enforcement body mocked the humanitarian crisis going on in India right now. A crushing second wave of COVID-19 is sending India's death toll soaring, with bodies literally being burned on funeral pyres as crematoriums overflow in a horrifying reminder that this pandemic is far from over. But in a chilling post on Chinese social
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12 Pieces of Advice for Better Parenting
Editor's Note: With Lori Gottlieb on book leave, Rebecca J. Rosen, the editor of "Dear Therapist," begins another month as The Atlantic's "Dear Therapist" archivist , pointing readers to some of Lori's most beloved columns. For this month's "Dear Therapist" roundup, I've gathered together a set of columns on one of the topics Lori covers often: parenthood. Parents write to Lori frequently. They s
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Oceans' microscopic plants—diatoms—capture carbon dioxide via biophysical pathways
Diatoms are tiny unicellular plants—no bigger than half a millimeter—which inhabit the surface water of the world's oceans where sunlight penetration is plenty. Despite their modest size, they are one of the world's most powerful resources for removing carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere. They currently remove, or "fix," 10-20 billion metric tons of CO2 every year by the process of photosynth
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New model can predict carbon cycle presence on exoplanets
Life thrives at stable temperatures. On Earth, this is facilitated by the carbon cycle. Scientists at SRON, VU and RUG have now developed a model that predicts whether there is a carbon cycle present on exoplanets, provided the mass, core size and amount of CO2 are known. Publication in Astronomy & Astrophysics on May 3.
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Researchers Read the Sugary 'Language' on Cell Surfaces
When Pascal Gagneux envisions malaria parasites and other pathogens interacting with the surfaces of a host's cells, he pictures a miniature rainforest with pathogenic particles flying overhead like colorful birds. The canopy consists of branching sugary molecules that adorn the surface of the cell. "If you're a malaria parasite, you're landing on a human red blood cell," and "the first 'leaves'
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Bioactive paper coatings to replace plastic for packaging foods
The amount of plastic waste increases every year. Some of this waste is due to plastic packaging used to protect food. As part of the BioActiveMaterials project, researchers at the Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft have developed an eco-friendly coating for paper packaging. With this, not only is plastic saved, but the coating of plant-based proteins and waxes also extends the shelf life of the food. After
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Mid-latitude glaciers on Mars could supply water to human explorers
By Earth standards, the surface of Mars is the picture of desolation. It's not only irradiated and cold enough to make Antarctica look balmy, but it's also one-thousands times drier than the driest places on Earth. However, beneath the super-arid surface of the Red Planet, there are abundant supplies of water ice that could someday be accessible to human explorers (and even settlers).
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Machine-learning project takes aim at disinformation
There's nothing new about conspiracy theories, disinformation, and untruths in politics. What is new is how quickly malicious actors can spread disinformation when the world is tightly connected across social networks and internet news sites. We can give up on the problem and rely on the platforms themselves to fact-check stories or posts and screen out disinformation—or we can build new tools to
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Scientists Hold Mask-Less Rave to Test Whether It'll Spread COVID
It may sound like an egregious flaunting of COVID-19 rules — but this massive, mask-less rave without social distancing in Liverpool, England, was in fact government sanctioned. The nightclub event, featuring a crowd of around 3,000 people aged 18 to 20 listening and dancing to live music, was an experiment put on by the UK government's Events Research Program (ERP). The program is a scientific e
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Will your future clothes be made of algae?
Living materials, which are made by housing biological cells within a non-living matrix, have gained popularity in recent years as scientists recognize that often the most robust materials are those that mimic nature.
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Volunteer firefighters have higher levels of 'forever chemicals'
Volunteer firefighters — who comprise more than 65 percent of the U.S. fire service — have higher levels of 'forever chemicals,' per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), in their bodies than the general public, according to a new study. It is the first study to evaluate volunteer firefighters' exposure to PFAS.
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Psychology, Misinformation, and the Public Square
In my role as Chief Disinformation Officer of Harmony Square, I learned about the manipulation techniques people use to gain a following, foment discord, and exploit societal tensions for political purposes. Can tools like this game inoculate against misinformation, creating more resilient digital citizens?
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How plants find their symbiotic partners
What would it be like to produce fertilizer in your own basement? Leguminous plants, like peas, beans and various species of clover, obtain the organic nitrogen they need for their growth from symbiotic soil bacteria via specialized structures in their roots. A team led by the cell biologist Prof. Dr. Thomas Ott from the University of Freiburg's Faculty of Biology has now detected a factor in the
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The Dharma of Working Out
This article was published online on May 3, 2021. D eath comes, and the soul, dragged blinking from its nest of nerves, perceives its dimensions for the first time. It swoops; it stretches; it delights; it trails its wing tips in a dazzling, boundless sea. And all the dichotomies, all the infernal dualities—mind/body, I/you, subject/object, wanting/getting—are finally, finally resolved. But what
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An animal able to regenerate all of its organs even when it is dissected into three parts
An extraordinary discovery in the Gulf of Eilat: Researchers from Tel Aviv University have discovered a species of ascidian, a marine animal commonly found in the Gulf of Eilat, capable of regenerating all of its organs—even if it is dissected into three fragments. The study was led by Prof. Noa Shenkar, Prof. Dorothee Huchon-Pupko, and Tal Gordon of Tel Aviv University's School of Zoology at the
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Tailor-made therapy of multi-resistant tuberculosis
The successful treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis requires clarification in advance as to which antibiotics the pathogens are resistant to. Classic testing is very time-consuming and delays the start of therapy. Researchers have now prepared a catalogue of all mutations in the genome of tuberculosis bacteria and on the basis of a genome sequencing can quickly and cheaply predict which m
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Natural immunity to malaria provides clues to potential therapies
Researchers have identified how natural human antibodies can block malaria parasites from entering red blood cells, potentially indicating how new protective therapies could be developed against this globally significant disease. The research provides greater insight into how antibodies block the entry of Plasmodium vivax malaria parasites into young red blood cells called reticulocytes. It builds
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'Infinitely Recyclable' Plastic Could Help Solve Our Waste Crisis
The world is drowning in plastic , and part of the reason is that it's incredibly hard to recycle most of the waste we create. According to new research though, "infinitely recyclable" plastics present an economically viable alternative to the plastics we're currently using . The average person in the US generates roughly 100 kilograms of plastic waste a year, most of which goes straight to landf
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Sex differences in fear memory consolidation via Tac2 signaling in mice
Nature Communications, Published online: 03 May 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22911-9 The Tachykinin 2 (Tac2) pathway in the central amygdala is sufficient and necessary for modulating fear memory consolidation. The authors show that silencing Tac2 neurons in the amygdala of male mice reduces fear expression, while fear expression in female mice is increased when manipulations are made during proe
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Astronomers are watching a gas giant grow, right in front of their eyes
In the vastness of space, astronomers are likely to find instances of almost every astronomical phenomenon if they look hard enough. Many planetary phenomena are starting to come into sharper focus as the astronomy community continues to focus on finding exoplanets. Now a team led by Yifan Zhou at UT Austin has directly imaged a gas giant still in formation.
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Unique Bronze Age find just south of Alingsås
A unique Bronze Age find was made on 8 April in a wooded area just to the south of the town of Alingsås. Following an archaeological examination by among others Johan Ling, Professor of Archaeology at the University of Gothenburg among others, it has emerged that this is one of the most spectacular finds ever made in Sweden. It comprises around 50 artifacts that are all largely intact. These exclu
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How salty is Enceladus' ocean under the ice?
An icy satellite of Saturn, Enceladus, has been a subject of increasing interest in recent years since Cassini captured jets of water and other material being ejected out of the south pole of the moon. One particularly tantalizing hypothesis supported by the sample composition is that there might be life in the oceans under the ice shells of Enceladus. To evaluate Enceladus' habitability and to fi
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The nomological argument for the existence of God
comes from the Greek nomos or "law," because it's based on the laws of nature. There are pragmatic, aesthetic, and moral reasons for regularities to exist in nature. The best explanation may be the existence of a personal God rather than mindless laws or chance. Here's a new version of an old argument for the existence of God. It's called the "nomological argument," after the Greek nomos or "law
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EPA rule to phase out gases used in refrigerators, coolants
In the first Biden administration rule aimed at combatting climate change, the Environmental Protection Agency is proposing to phase down production and use of hydrofluorocarbons, highly potent greenhouse gases commonly used in refrigerators and air conditioners.
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Lessons learned from a simulated asteroid strike
In an alternate reality playing out at this year's international Planetary Defense Conference, a fictional asteroid crashes over Europe, 'destroying' a region about 100 km wide near the Czech Republic and German border. The scenario was imagined, but the people who took part are very real, and the lessons learnt will shape our ability to respond to dangerous asteroids for years to come.
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Research with neutrons for better mRNA medicines
mRNA can be used to produce much more than just vaccines. Around 50 different procedures for the treatment of diseases including cancer are already being studied in clinical trials. Scientists have now discovered how the subcutaneous administration of mRNA can be improved. The goal is for chronically ill patients to be able to self-administer the medication on a regular basis.
2h
200-year old poop shows rural elites in New England had parasitic infections
In the early 19th century in North America, parasitic infections were quite common in urban areas due in part to population growth and urbanization. Prior research has found that poor sanitation, unsanitary privy (outhouse) conditions, and increased contact with domestic animals, contributed to the prevalence of parasitic disease in urban areas. A new study examining fecal samples from a privy on
4h
1D model helps clarify implosion performance at NIF
In inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF), a spherical shell of deuterium-tritium fuel is imploded in an attempt to reach the conditions needed for fusion, self-heating and eventual ignition. Since theory and simulations indicate that ignition efficacy in one-dimension (1D) improves with increasing imploded fuel convergence ratio, it is useful to unde
6h
Less precipitation means less plant diversity
Water is a scarce resource in many of the Earth's ecosystems. This scarcity is likely to increase in the course of climate change. This, in turn, might lead to a considerable decline in plant diversity. Using experimental data from all over the world, a team of scientists have demonstrated for the first time that plant biodiversity in drylands is particularly sensitive to changes in precipitation.
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Unclogging the brain's 'drain' enhances Alzheimer's meds
Some investigational Alzheimer's disease therapies are more effective when paired with a treatment geared toward improving drainage of fluid—and debris—from the brain, according to a study in mice. Experimental Alzheimer's drugs have shown little success in slowing declines in memory and thinking, leaving scientists searching for explanations. The new findings in the journal Nature , however, sug
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Chinese company claims to be working on a Starship-like rocket
Last weekend, China celebrated its sixth "National Space Day" in Nanjing, an event that highlights advances China has made in space. Similar to Space Day that is held each year on the first Thursday in May (this year, it will be held on May 7th), the goal is to foster interest in space exploration and the STEMS so as to inspire the next generation of astronauts and aerospace engineers.
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Ancient food webs can chart sustainable futures
At first glance, it might seem that archaeology and ecology don't have much in common. One unearths the ancient human past; the other studies the interactions of living organisms. But taking the long view in understanding humans' influence on ecosystems and vice versa can provide new insights in both fields, according to a new study by researchers from the Santa Fe Institute, Utah State University
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Northern Red Sea corals pass heat stress test with flying colors
Even under the most optimistic scenarios, most of the coral reef ecosystems on our planet—whether in Australia, the Maldives or the Caribbean—will have disappeared or be in very bad shape by the end of this century. That's because global warming is pushing ocean temperatures above the limit that single-cell algae, which are corals' main allies, can withstand. These algae live inside coral tissue f
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Sequenced genome of extinct date palms germinated from 2,000 year-old seeds
Researchers from NYU Abu Dhabi's Center for Genomics and Systems Biology have successfully sequenced the genome of previously extinct date palm varieties that lived more than 2,000 years ago. They did so using date palm seeds that were recovered from archaeological sites in the southern Levant region and radiocarbon-dated from the 4th century BCE to the 2nd century CE. The seeds were germinated to
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Volunteer firefighters have high levels of 'forever chemicals'
Volunteer firefighters have higher levels of "forever chemicals," per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, in their bodies than the general public, according to a new study. Volunteer firefighters make up more than 65% of the US fire service. Higher chemical levels were also associated with the number of years of firefighting. The study in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Publi
21min
Bornean rajah scops owl rediscovered after 125 years
The Bornean subspecies of Rajah scops owl (Otus brookii brookii), documented in the wild for the first time since 1892, may be its own unique species and deserving of a conservation designation. Researchers reported the rediscovery and photographed this elusive subspecies in the mountainous forests of Mount Kinabalu in Sabah, Malaysia.
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Novel coronavirus' spike protein plays additional key role in illness
A new study shows that COVID-19 is a vascular disease, demonstrating exactly how the SARS-CoV-2 virus damages and attacks the vascular system on a cellular level. The findings help explain COVID-19's wide variety of seemingly unconnected complications, and could open the door for new research into more effective therapies.
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Unraveling a mystery of dinoflagellate genomic architecture
New work from a Stanford University-led team of researchers including Carnegie's Arthur Grossman and Tingting Xiang unravels a longstanding mystery about the relationship between form and function in the genetic material of a diverse group of algae called dinoflagellates. Their findings, published in Nature Genetics, have implications for understanding genomic organizational principles of all orga
36min
'Nanotraps' capture coronavirus in the body for immune system to kill
Researchers have designed a completely new potential treatment for COVID-19: nanoparticles that capture SARS-CoV-2 viruses within the body and then use the body's own immune system to destroy them. These "nanotraps" mimic the target cells the virus infects to attract the virus. When the virus binds to the nanotraps, the traps then sequester the virus from other cells and target it for destruction
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Pulse oximeters more useful in COVID screening for older adults
People have become accustomed to having their temperature checked during the pandemic because fever is a key indicator of COVID-19. A new commentary written by faculty in Washington State University's College of Nursing proposes that taking a temperature is a less useful indicator of infection in older adults and that a pulse oximeter be used instead. It said a fever may be overlooked because olde
58min
Will clothes of the future be made from algae?
For the first time, researchers have used 3D printers and a new bioprinting technique to print algae into tough, resilient living, photosynthetic materials. As the researchers report in the journal Advanced Functional Materials , the material has a variety of applications in the energy, medical, and fashion sectors. Living materials, which are made by housing biological cells within a nonliving m
1h
Discovered: A tiny, glowing, poisonous, singing toadlet
A new species of "pumpkin toadlet" is discovered skittering along the forest floor in Brazil. It's highly poisonous and brightly colored, and some if its bones glow under UV light. An analysis of the toadlets' chirp song helped scientists establish that it's something new. It's tiny, just a little bigger than a thumbnail. It's partially fluorescent. It's orange. And it's very poisonous. Led by he
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Microfossil found in Scottish Highlands could be 'missing link' in early animal evolution
A team of scientists has discovered the fossil of an organism with two distinct cell types that is likely the oldest of its kind ever recorded — revealing multicellularity perhaps 400 million years before it first appeared in animals, they report in the journal Current Biology. The discovery in the Scottish Highlands suggests that cell differentiation and segregation occurred at least one billion
2h
Study finds disparities in colorectal cancer screenings
Patients with one or more health conditions are more likely to be screened for colorectal cancer than those without comorbidities, according to new research in the Journal of Osteopathic Medicine. However, patients with five or more health conditions are also less likely to be screened than patients with two to four health conditions.
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When will your elevator arrive? Two physicists do the math
The human world is, increasingly, an urban one—and that means elevators. Hong Kong, the hometown of physicist Zhijie Feng (Boston University), adds new elevators at the rate of roughly 1500 every year…making vertical transport an alluring topic for quantitative research.
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The level of satisfaction with life in Spain is marked by household financial capacity
In recent decades, Spain has undergone rapid social changes in terms of gender equality, despite, as a result of the Franco dictatorship, starting from a more backward position than most European countries. This process is hampered by the economic downturn that began in 2008, underlining the importance of the economic context in the development of gender inequality levels. Little attention has bee
2h
Map of Milky Way's halo sheds light on dark matter 'ocean'
Astronomers have released a new map of the outermost region of our galaxy. Known as a galactic halo, this area lies outside the swirling spiral arms that make up the Milky Way's recognizable central disk, and is sparsely populated with stars. Though the halo may appear mostly empty, scientists predict it contains a massive reservoir of dark matter, an invisible material thought to make up the bul
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Social cognition plays a key role in everyday lives of people with multiple sclerosis
"We confirmed the longitudinal stability of social cognition deficits in cognitively-normal people with relapsing-remitting MS, mirroring the amygdala structural damage and psychological well-being," said Dr. Genova. "These results confirm that social cognition exerts a key role in MS, affecting individuals' everyday lives. Our research highlights the need to identify treatments to improve social
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Short-term exposure to air pollution may impede cognition; Aspirin could help
Exposure to air pollution, even over the course of just a few weeks, can impede mental performance, according to a new study led by researchers at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health. However, these adverse effects were lessened in people taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) like aspirin. The study is among the first to explore short-term air pollution exposures and
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Gener har mer betydelse för utbildning i fattigare områden
Ärftliga faktorer påverkar till viss del om en person läser vidare efter gymnasiet. I mer socioekonomiskt utsatta områden spelar dessa faktorer större roll för sannolikheten att genomgå högre utbildning. Det visar forskare vid Uppsala universitet. Utbildning är en faktor som är starkt kopplad till ekonomisk trygghet och livskvalitet. Genetiska faktorer påverkar till viss del (ungefär 11-13 procen
3h
Eco-friendly method transforms metal waste into aerogels
A new eco-friendly technique converts aluminum and magnesium waste into high-value, multi-functional aerogels. The upcycling method could be applied to all types of metal waste in powder form, such as metal chips and electronic waste, according to a new study. With the growing demand for metal products, it is crucial to promote sustainable and environmentally-friendly methods of recycling metal w
3h
Stress and mental health problems during first COVID-19-lockdown
One-third of children and adolescents experienced mental health problems during the first COVID-19 lockdown in Switzerland. Parents and young adults also perceived considerable stress, yet the perceived stresses differed from those of children and adolescents, the first Switzerland-wide representative study by the University of Zurich and La Source School of Nursing Lausanne has shown.
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Scientists find small molecule cocktail to improve stem cell use in research, medicine
The potential uses of human pluripotent stem cells in medicine are hampered by the stress of growing in a cell culture dish, which can damage their DNA and lead to cell death. NCATS researchers have devised a small-molecule cocktail that can protect stem cells from stress. They suggest that the cocktail could enhance the potential uses of stem cells, ranging from treating diseases and conditions l
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CityU scientists invent cryomicroneedles for intradermal therapeutic cell delivery
A research team led by CityU scientists recently developed a new generation of microneedles technology which allows the intradermal delivery of living cells in a minimally invasive manner. Their experiment showed that vaccination using therapeutic cells through this ground-breaking technology elicited robust immune responses against tumours in mice, paving the way for developing an easy-to-use cel
3h
Researchers wirelessly record human brain activity during normal life activities
Researchers are now able to wirelessly record the directly measured brain activity of patients living with Parkinson's disease and to then use that information to adjust the stimulation delivered by an implanted device. Direct recording of deep and surface brain activity offers a unique look into the underlying causes of many brain disorders; however, technological challenges up to this point have
3h
Human organ chips enable COVID-19 drug repurposing
A Wyss Institute-led collaboration spanning four research institutions has used the Institute's Organ Chip technology to identify the antimalarial drug amodiaquine as a potent inhibitor of infection with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. This research contributed to the inclusion of amodiaquine in ongoing COVID-19 human clinical trials in Africa, where the drug is widely available, and c
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Women and girls, you are part of the climate solution | Rumaitha Al Busaidi
What does gender equality have to do with climate change? A lot more than you might think. Empowering women and girls around the world is one of the most important ways to combat carbon pollution and is projected to reduce CO2-equivalent gases by a total of 80 billion tons. Entrepreneur, scientist and TED Fellow Rumaitha Al Busaidi looks at why women are more likely to be impacted and displaced by
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Dogs' aggressive behavior towards humans is often caused by fear
A study encompassing some 9,000 dogs conducted at the University of Helsinki demonstrated that fearfulness, age, breed, the company of other members of the same species and the owner's previous experience of dogs were associated with aggressive behavior towards humans. The findings can potentially provide tools for understanding and preventing aggressive behavior.
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Algorithm is 88% accurate at spotting dementia in how a person drives
Driving a car is a complex activity that involves perceptual and motor skills. Newly developed algorithms can identify cognitive problems in older drivers based on their driving habits with 88% accuracy. The machine learning algorithms incorporate both driving behaviors and demographic information. An older person's cognitive health is not always obvious. Cognitive impairment and dementia manifes
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Scientists warn humanity does not have effective tools to resist tsunamis
An international team of scientists from 20 countries identified 47 problems that hinder the successful prevention and elimination of the consequences of tsunamis. Based on the carried out analysis, the world's leading experts on natural hazards have outlined directions for further scientific research. The research group's review is published in a special issue of the Frontiers in Earth Science.
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Local impacts from fracking the Eagle Ford
Hydraulic fracturing to extract trapped fossil fuels can trigger earthquakes. Most are so small or far from homes and infrastructure that they may go unnoticed; others can rattle windows, sway light fixtures and jolt people from sleep; some have damaged buildings.
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Lost in the Med: Pacific grey whale ventures far from home
A young grey whale has been sighted off the southern French coast in recent days, lost in the Mediterranean and trying unsuccessfully to make it back to its natural habitat—the northern Pacific—the national network for the rescue of sea mammals said.
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Towards a treatment for myotonic dystrophy: First 3D model with patient cells
Researchers from the Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia (IBEC) in collaboration with the INCLIVA Health Research Institute in Valencia, develop the first three-dimensional model for myotonic dystrophy, a rare disease that currently has no cure. The new model combines patient cells and bioengineering techniques and represents a major advance over the use of animals and cell cultures. This ne
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When will your elevator arrive?
The human world is, increasingly, an urban one — and that means elevators. Two physicists saw this as an opportunity to explore the factors that determine elevator transport capabilities in their new paper in the Journal of Statistical Mechanics.
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Empowering citizens for successful energy transitions
The terms "co-creation" and "co-production", which denote the possibility for laypeople to participate in decision-making processes that affect their lives, have been gaining popularity. A new IIASA-led study explored options for empowering citizens as a driver for moving from awareness about the need to transform energy systems to action and participation.
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Using TikTok as an educational tool on body language can improve student learning
Paloma Escamilla, Mario Alguacil and Samuel López, researchers at the University of Valencia, conclude that the benefits of introducing TikTok are greater than the possible risks in the teaching and learning process of body expression in Physical Activity Sciences and Sports. According to their article published in the Journal of Hospitality, Leisure, Sport & Tourism Education, the use of this net
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Cube-shaped iron–sulfur clusters support multiple bond between iron and nitrogen
In a number of biological processes, iron–sulfur clusters play a vital role, where they act as cofactors to enzymes. Research published in Angewandte Chemie now shows that cubic clusters can support unusual bonding states. This study shows that the cluster copes well with a multiple bond between iron and nitrogen—a structural motif that may be involved in biological nitrogen fixation.
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Reduction in wetland areas will affect Afrotropical migratory waterbirds
Migratory waterbirds are particularly exposed to the effects of climate change at their breeding areas in the High Arctic and in Africa, according to a new study published in Bird Conservation International. The research team came to this conclusion after modeling climatic and hydrological conditions under current and future climate scenarios (in 2050) and comparing the impact on the distribution
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On the brink: Brazil's coastal rainforest
Together with Brazilian colleagues, Senckenberg scientist Raffael Ernst investigated the impact of current land use on the bird and amphibian fauna of the Atlantic rainforest in southeastern Brazil. In their study, published in the journal Biological Conservation, the team shows that afforestation with eucalyptus monocultures leads to a change in species composition and favors alien species. Accor
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uGMRT reveals for the first time the patchy environment of a rare cosmic explosion
Scientists from the National Centre for radio Astrophysics, NCRA-TIFR, Pune used the upgraded Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (uGMRT) to determine that AT 2018 cow, the first of a newly discovered class of cosmic explosions, has an extremely patchy environment. Sources like AT 2018cow release an enormous amount of energy, nonetheless fade extremely rapidly. This is the first observational evidence
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How to manage osteoporosis in hematologic stem cell transplant recipients
Impaired bone health is among the most significant long-term consequences of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT).To address this serious problem, the International Osteoporosis Foundation Working Group on Cancer and Bone Disease has published an Executive Summary which outlines major factors affecting bone health in HSCT patients, and provides expert guidance for the monitoring, evaluat
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Strong and flexible cofactors
In a number of biological processes, iron-sulfur clusters play a vital role, where they act as cofactors to enzymes. Research published in Angewandte Chemie now shows that cubic clusters can support unusual bonding states. This study shows that the cluster copes well with a multiple bond between iron and nitrogen–a structural motif that may be involved in biological nitrogen fixation.
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Risk factors for multiple drug use
A new study indicates that the accumulation of several unfavourable environmental factors increases the risk for an extreme form of multiple drug use or "polytoxicomania". Risk factors comprise sexual and physical abuse, living in a big city, experience of migration as well as the use of cannabis and alcohol before the age of 18.
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The neural mechanism of autonomous learning uncovered by researchers at IBEC
An international team led by SPECS Lab at the Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia (IBEC) reveals how the brain improves through self-supervised learning. Researchers also propose a novel brain-based solution to solve a fundamental challenge in artificial intelligence: how machines could learn without direct supervision. In their opinion article, scientists provide evidence for their hypothes
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Global virus tracker
Nature, Published online: 03 May 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01175-9 Virologist Kanta Subbarao stalks respiratory viruses around the world and in the culture dish.
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Pushing chicken doesn't get people to eat less beef
Eating poultry and fish to reduce the production of land-based meat is an environmentally friendly idea, but it's not working, research indicates. Sociologist Richard York of the University of Oregon recently conducted a new analysis of 53 years of international data. His findings appear in the journal Nature Sustainability . "If you have increases in the production of poultry and fish, it doesn'
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Increased anxiety among young Black adults from exposure to police violence
Anxiety disorders are among the most prevalent disorders for Black emerging adults 18 to 29 years of age in America. Frequent exposure to police violence among Black emerging adults puts this population at risk for increased rates of anxiety disorders, according to a new study from researchers at Washington University in St. Louis and presented at the American Psychiatric Association's Annual Meet
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New APA poll shows sustained anxiety among Americans
According to a new public opinion poll released today by the American Psychiatric Association (APA), concern about COVID-19 remains high, especially concern over loved ones, and more people are reporting mental health impacts from pandemic than last year. Parents are especially concerned about their children's mental well-being.
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How COVID is changing labor law
While most of the public debate focuses on the effects on the real economy of closing and reopening businesses, the impact of these measures on the labor market gets less attention. However, in late 2020, the European Labour Law Journal decided to dedicate a special issue to the comparison between the situation in various European countries. Elena Gramano, Professor at the Department of Legal Stud
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Folk i religiösa länder mer positiva till vaccin
Ju mer religiöst ett samhälle är desto större förtroende har befolkningen till vacciner, visar en studie av 147 länder. En förklaring till varför vaccinmotståndet varierar så kraftigt mellan länder, menar forskarna. – Det verkar som att förtroendet för vacciner är förknippat med graden av religiositet i samhället Man kan ta Sverige som exempel. I internationell jämförelse har Sverige låg religios
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Hjärnor krymper lika snabbt – oavsett utbildningsnivå
Att vara högutbildad hjälper inte mot att hjärnan krymper. Det gör den ändå obevekligen i takt med att vi åldras, oavsett utbildningsnivå, visar en ny internationell studie. – Man kan se det positivt. Den som bara fick sexårig folkskola har samma hastighet på sin hjärnas åldrande som den som har gjort akademisk karriär i ungdomen, säger Lars Nyberg, professor i neurovetenskap vid Umeå universitet
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The Science of Feel-Good Storytelling
From one perspective art is mostly a science that we understand better at an intuitive rather than analytical level. This does not reduce the creative elements off artistic expression, but it does mean there is an underlying empirical phenomenon to be understood. Storytelling, for example, has a basic structure, with elements that serve a specific purpose. One of the more famous attempts at break
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NYPD Has Gotten Rid of Its Boston Dynamics Robot Dog
Robotics firm Boston Dynamics has had a long, winding road to its first consumer product. It began doing work for DARPA and other government entities years ago, and then it was passed around from Google to Softbank, and now to Hyundai. Along the way, Boston Dynamics released Spot, a quadruped robot that you can buy for a mere $75,000. The New York Police Department leased a Spot robot, but after
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Scientific success by numbers
Nature, Published online: 03 May 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01169-7 Big data bibliometrics must take into account qualitative analyses of research as a social institution, rooted in history, economics and politics.
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Techtopia #191: Er du fremtidsparat?
Den amerikanske techjournalist Kevin Roose fra New York Times er gået fra at være techoptimist til at være slave af sin iPhone og har nu skrevet en overlevelsesguide til mennesker i en automatiseret tidsalder.
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Election campaigns: Attacks and smearing backfire and can benefit other candidates
Candidates often give in to temptation to attack opponents in electoral campaigns through negative ads (more than 55% of the ads aired by the Clinton and Trump campaigns in 2016 were negative), even if evidence of this tactic effectiveness is mixed. A study by Bocconi University professors Vincenzo Galasso, Tommaso Nannicini and Salvatore Nunnari, just published in the American Journal of Politica
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Elever tappade mycket kunskap när skolorna var stängda
Eleverna lärde sig lite eller ingenting under tiden de hade distansstudier på grund av coronapandemin. Det visar en studie som forskare gjort av nederländska elevers resultat på nationella prov. Att man hade en förhållandevis kort nedstängning av skolorna i Nederländerna, och dessutom nationella prov precis före och efter stängningen, gjorde det lämpligt att studera effekter av skolstängningen dä
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Liten risk för bebis att smittas om mamman har covid-19
Mammor som testat positivt för corona riskerar att föda för tidigt – men sannolikheten att bebisen ska smittas är mycket liten. Det visar en studie av 90000 födslar under det första pandemiåret. Forskare vid Karolinska Institutet och Folkhälsomyndigheten har undersökt hur det går för nyfödda barn vars mammor testat positivt för corona (sars-cov-2) under graviditet eller förlossning. Resultaten vi
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Population genomics provides insights into the evolution and adaptation to humans of the waterborne pathogen Mycobacterium kansasii
Nature Communications, Published online: 03 May 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22760-6 Mycobacterium kansasii can cause serious pulmonary disease. Here, the authors present a population genomics analysis of 358 environmental and clinical isolates from around the world, supporting the idea that municipal water is a main source of infection, and shedding light into the pathogen's diversity and adapta
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Epitaxy, exfoliation, and strain-induced magnetism in rippled Heusler membranes
Nature Communications, Published online: 03 May 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22784-y Single crystalline membranes enable the tuning of materials properties via strain states that are not accessible to bulk crystals or epitaxially clamped films. Here, the authors demonstrate the synthesis and strain gradient-induced magnetism in membranes of the Heusler compound GdPtSb.
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Reconfigurable magnonic mode-hybridisation and spectral control in a bicomponent artificial spin ice
Nature Communications, Published online: 03 May 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22723-x Reconfigurable magnonic crystals (RMC), comprising nano-patterned arrays of magnetic elements, can host a wide variety of spectrally-distinct microstates with great potential for functional magnonics. Here, Gartside et al, present an RMC with four distinct microstates, possessing diverse magnonic properties and e
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Cancer of unknown primary stem-like cells model multi-organ metastasis and unveil liability to MEK inhibition
Nature Communications, Published online: 03 May 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22643-w Cancer of unknown primary (CUP) is a mysterious malignancy featuring metastatic dissemination in the absence of a recognizable primary tumor. By characterizing CUP cancer stem cells we show that self-sustained long-term propagation and sensitivity to MEK inhibition are CUP common features.
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Responses of plant diversity to precipitation change are strongest at local spatial scales and in drylands
Nature Communications, Published online: 03 May 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22766-0 The responses of terrestrial ecosystems to changes in precipitation patterns are highly context-dependent. Here the authors perform a quantitative synthesis of field rainfall manipulation experiments, showing stronger effects of precipitation on plant diversity at small spatial scales and in arid biomes.
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Nonequilibrium charge-density-wave order beyond the thermal limit
Nature Communications, Published online: 03 May 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22778-w Photo-induced phase transitions triggered by an ultrafast excitation cannot be described within the quasi-equilibrium framework. Here, using time-resolved experimental probes, the authors report a transient charge-density-wave order in TbTe3 and describe it using a model with a non-equilibrium transition temperat
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Molecular and clinical determinants of response and resistance to rucaparib for recurrent ovarian cancer treatment in ARIEL2 (Parts 1 and 2)
Nature Communications, Published online: 03 May 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22582-6 The identification of biomarkers of response to PARP inhibitors can enable selection of appropriate ovarian cancer patients for treatment. In this study, the authors report clinical results and exploratory biomarker analyses from the ARIEL2 phase 2 clinical trial on the safety and efficacy of the PARP inhibitor r
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Webinar: Brain health, the next challenge of the 21st century
This webinar – organised by EBRAINS and The Brussels Times – took place on 29th April 2021 and explored the challenges facing brain research in the 21st century. The high-level panel featured Paweł Świeboda (Director General of the Human Brain Project, CEO of EBRAINS), Gitte Knudsen (Chair, Professor, MD, DMSc at Copenhagen University Hospital) and Pieter Roelfsema (Director of the Netherlands In
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Same drug can have opposite effects on memory according to sexual differences
An investigation led by the INc-UAB, carried out from the study of a drug that modifies memory of fear, shows for the first time that the neural processes and behaviours related to the formation of memory can be opposite between male and female mice. The drug reduces the ability to remember aversive events in male mice and increases this ability in female mice. The study emphasizes the need for mo
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Team from UHN, CAMH identify unique characteristics of human neurons
Scientists at the Krembil Brain Institute, part of University Health Network (UHN), in collaboration with colleagues at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH), have used precious and rare access to live human cortical tissue to identify functionally important features that make human neurons unique. This experimental work is among the first of its kind on live human neurons and one of t
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How will we control the population once we stop aging/can live to be hundreds of years old?
Radical life extension technology seems not only possible but likely and not TOO far in the future. If we as a species ever get to a point where most or all people live to be perhaps hundreds of years old, or are perhaps even effectively ageless, how do we then control the population? I think most of us would agree forced sterilizations are generally a bad thing and I think most people would even
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Ett helt år med Skeptisk måndag!
Ettårsjubileum denna vecka Den här veckan är det ett år sedan vi började med vår Skeptisk måndag-serie. Tanken var, och är fortfarande, att förse våra medlemmar och följare med en … Continued Inlägget dök först upp på Vetenskap och Folkbildning .
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Hopp för sjungande noshörning
Sumatranoshörningen är inte bara världens minsta. Den är också känd för sin speciella och lite pipiga sång. Historiskt levde den från Himalayas fot i norr till Indonesien och Malaysia i söder, men på bara två decennier har populationen minskat med 70 procent. Den hotas av både regnskogsskövling och tjuvjakt och har kallats för en av världens mest utrotningshotade däggdjursarter. Ska sången tystna
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Technique to automatically discover simulation configurations for behaviors hard to test
The research team at National Institute of Informatics developed a technique to search automatically for simulation configurations that test various behaviors of automated driving systems. This research was conducted under ERATO-MMSD project. The proposed technique iterates trials on simulations using an optimization method called evolutionary computation so that it discovers simulation configurat
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Structural racism contributes to the racial inequities in social determinants of psychosis
The legacy of systemic racism in the U.S impacts psychosis risk at the individual and neighborhood level, according to a definitive review published online today. Researchers examined U.S. based evidence connecting social and environmental factors with outcomes relating to psychotic experiences, including schizophrenia. The review examined potential risk factors and influence of structural racism
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Oceans' microscopic plants — diatoms — capture carbon dioxide via biophysical pathways
A first-of-its-kind study suggests that microscopic seawater plants, called diatoms, initially capture carbon dioxide (CO2) by biophysical, rather than biochemical, processes. Diatoms remove as much CO2 as all of the world's forests combined and it's vital to understand how this process will respond to rising CO2 levels. This study presents initial evidence about precisely which mechanisms diatoms
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The Science of Climate Change
As evidence for human interference in the Earth's climate continues to accumulate, scientists have gained a better understanding of when, where and how the impacts of global warming are being… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Bachelors Degree in Europe
Hi! I'm currently a high school senior and during the past year or so I developed a strong interest in cogsci (I've studied psychology all throughout high school and have been learning how to code so finding a field that combines my interests was super neat) I was wondering what your experience has been studying the field and what would you suggest is the best decision to make for my bachelors de
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