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No evidence for widespread island extinctions after Pleistocene hominin arrival [Anthropology]
The arrival of modern humans into previously unoccupied island ecosystems is closely linked to widespread extinction, and a key reason cited for Pleistocene megafauna extinction is anthropogenic overhunting. A common assumption based on late Holocene records is that humans always negatively impact insular biotas, which requires an extrapolation of recent…
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LATEST

From 1.8 million years ago, earliest evidence of human activity found
Researchers find evidence of early tool-making and fire use inside the Wonderwerk Cave in Africa. The scientists date the human activity in the cave to 1.8 million years ago. The evidence is the earliest found yet and advances our understanding of human evolution. One of the oldest activities carried out by humans has been identified in a cave in South Africa. A team of geologists and archaeologi
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'Out-of-control' Chinese rocket falling to Earth could partially survive re-entry
Long March 5B is doing 27,600km/h in failing orbit, with eventual crash site unknown, after launching space station hub Part of a huge rocket that launched China's first module for its Tianhe space station is falling back to Earth and could make an uncontrolled re-entry at an unknown landing point. The 30-metre high core of the Long March 5B rocket launched the "Heavenly Harmony" unmanned core mo
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The Liberals Who Can't Quit Lockdown
L urking among the jubilant Americans venturing back out to bars and planning their summer-wedding travel is a different group: liberals who aren't quite ready to let go of pandemic restrictions. For this subset, diligence against COVID-19 remains an expression of political identity—even when that means overestimating the disease's risks or setting limits far more strict than what public-health g
7h
Astronomers discover a new extragalactic circular radio source
Using the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP), astronomers have detected a new extragalactic odd radio circle (ORC). The newfound radio source, designated ORC J0102–2450, has a diameter of nearly 1 million light years. The finding is reported in a paper published April 27 on arXiv.org.
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Bats found to have innate sense of speed of sound
A pair of researchers with Tel Aviv University's School of Zoology has found that bats have an innate sense of the speed of sound. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Eran Amichai and Yossi Yovel describe experiments they conducted with both wild and lab raised bats and what they learned from them.
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Cellphone converts into powerful chemical detector
Scientists from Texas A&M have developed an extension to an ordinary cellphone that turns it into an instrument capable of detecting chemicals, drugs, biological molecules, and pathogens. The advance is reported in Reviews of Scientific Instruments.
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The genomes of ancient date palms germinated from 2,000 y old seeds [Evolution]
Seven date palm seeds (Phoenix dactylifera L.), radiocarbon dated from the fourth century BCE to the second century CE, were recovered from archaeological sites in the Southern Levant and germinated to yield viable plants. We conducted whole-genome sequencing of these germinated ancient samples and used single-nucleotide polymorphism data to examine…
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Hindbrain neuropore tissue geometry determines asymmetric cell-mediated closure dynamics in mouse embryos [Developmental Biology]
Gap closure is a common morphogenetic process. In mammals, failure to close the embryonic hindbrain neuropore (HNP) gap causes fatal anencephaly. We observed that surface ectoderm cells surrounding the mouse HNP assemble high-tension actomyosin purse strings at their leading edge and establish the initial contacts across the embryonic midline. Fibronectin…
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Scientists Detect Radio Signal Coming From Venus
NASA's Parker Solar Probe came very close to Venus during its flyby in July 2020. In fact, after scientists sifted through all the invaluable data it collected during its trip, they found that the tiny probe actually made it inside of the far reaches of the hot planet's extremely dense atmosphere. The probe got so close — just 517 miles from the surface — that it picked up what appear to be natur
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6 Questions for the Boss Who Wants You Back in Your Cubicle
Lidia Morawska has been working in her office for months. You might think that's because she's an aerosols expert, and her work is crucial for helping bring the pandemic to heel. But really, it's because she's an aerosols expert at Queensland University of Technology, in Australia. The country has recorded only three cases of community transmission of the coronavirus in the past week. Although Au
23h
China Is a Paper Dragon
China was mentioned only four times in Joe Biden's first address to a joint session of Congress, but it shadowed almost every line of the speech. "We're in a competition with China and other countries to win the 21st Century," Biden said. His aides describe the president as preoccupied with the challenge from China. "It informs his approach to most major topics and the president regularly raises
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Carolina Cuellar
Contributor is a science journalist and graduate student in the Science Communication Program at UC Santa Cruz. Before that, she worked as a Protein Engineering researcher after earning her bachelor's degree in Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology at UC Santa Cruz. In her free time, she enjoys traveling, gardening and reading. You can follow her on Twitter @Wzrd_of_Lnlynss . Author soci
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Bill Gates, Who Wants to Geoengineer the Earth, Is Getting a Divorce
Splitting Up Bill Gates, the Microsoft founder turned mega-billionaire philanthropist who's currently number four on the "world's richest person" standings and wants to actively geoengineer our planet and release gene-edited animals to fight disease , is getting a divorce. Gates announced the separation from his wife of 27 years, Melinda Gates, over Twitter on Monday . "After a great deal of thou
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Rivers Around the World Are Disappearing
As rising global temperatures eat away at the planet's glaciers, rivers are physically changing their course. The resulting "river piracy," as it's called, risks leaving communities and natural ecosystems without the sources of water they rely on, according to The Guardian . And while most instances of river piracy are expected to be mild — a bend here or a slight diversion there — new research p
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Minna Heeraman had an aggressive cancer. Did the March 2020 treatment shutdown shorten her life?
Minna's pancreatic surgery was cancelled as a result of the pandemic. By the time treatments resumed, her tumour was too big for doctors to operate When Minna Heeraman's friends knew that she was dying, they made a video for her to watch from the hospital bed she had set up in her living room. It was a goodbye video. One after another, her friends spoke to the camera with tears in their eyes. The
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Giant Asteroid Hits Europe After NASA Fails to Stop It, In a Simulation
A massive asteroid struck eastern Europe, triggering a crisis of historical proportions. Fortunately, the asteroid was purely fictional. The space rock was invented by a team of experts at NASA to evaluate whether we're ready to divert such an impact as part of an exercise last month. Their unfortunate conclusion: the technologies capable of diverting such a space rock simply don't exist yet, as
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MIT Researcher Says UFO Research Could Lead to New Laws of Physics
Breaking Physics The US military has started to take reports of "unidentified aerial objects" more seriously in recent years, even setting up a taskforce to investigate strange sightings by its personnel. Many of the reports include mysterious objects spotted by Navy pilots, traveling through the sky at astonishing speeds and seemingly defying the laws of physics. That's why, according to Rizwan
3h
A NASA Spacecraft Just "Touched" the Outer Layer of the Sun
Ouch! NASA's Parker Solar Probe just took its closest pass to the Sun yet, veering so close that it " touched " the star's blisteringly hot outer atmosphere — and gave NASA an unprecedented firsthand look at it. The car-sized spacecraft has zoomed past the Sun a few times now, veering closer and closer each time, according to CNET . Each time, it uses nearby Venus' gravitational pull as a sort of
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Cybertruck RV Attachment Sells $50 Million in Preorders
CyberLandr Tesla's much-hyped Cybertruck hasn't even rolled off the lot yet — but enthusiasts are already flocking to pre-order accessories in an effort to build out their electric pickups into truly off-the-grid homes away from home. Case in point, Las Vegas-based company Stream It has created an RV add-on called CyberLandr for the Cybertruck, cashing in on more than $50 million in future revenu
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How Gravity Is a Double Copy of Other Forces
As far as physicists have been able to determine, nature speaks two mutually unintelligible languages: one for gravity and one for everything else. Curves in the fabric of space-time tell planets and people which way to fall, while all the other forces spring from quantum particles. Albert Einstein first spoke of gravity in terms of bends in space-time in his general theory of relativity. Most th
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The Game Is Changing for Historians of Black America
I first saw the photo at a street fair in Hattiesburg, Mississippi, in October 2011. I was at the Historic Mobile Street Renaissance Festival, an annual celebration of Hattiesburg's Black downtown. That afternoon, Mobile Street filled with thousands of people spending their Saturday in the sun, drinking sweet tea and eating soul food with their friends and neighbors. I was new in town, and I was
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We've had information campaigns on Brexit and Covid. What about the climate? | George Marshall
In the runup to Cop26, public knowledge about the crisis is shallow, with few understanding the scale of the threat One of the key lessons of the Covid-19 pandemic is that strong policies require strong public engagement: people needed to understand the nature of the virus before they would tolerate constraints on their lives or provide the government with a mandate for action. Yet the world face
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Covid infection rates in UK 'very encouraging', says Neil Ferguson
Epidemiologist says he feels optimistic country will feel 'a lot more normal by summer' Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Recent data on Covid deaths and rates of infection in the UK are "very encouraging", and though a third wave of infections was possible in late summer it was unlikely to overwhelm the NHS, the leading epidemiologist Neil Ferguson has said. Prof Ferg
11h
Specific Stars Are Effectively Time Traveling
Time Travelers Stars located near the supermassive black holes at the center of a galaxy can take some pretty wild trips through the cosmos. That's especially true when two of those black holes merge together, former Harvard astronomy chair Avi Loeb wrote in Scientific American . Whether they're ejected by powerful gravitational fields or massive cosmic blasts, these stars can be sent careening t
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Severe Cancer Is on the Rise
As the coronavirus pandemic enters its 15th official month , patients who decided to avoid doctor's appointments to minimize infection risk are now being diagnosed with shockingly severe cases of cancer that unfortunately went ignored for months. Preventive cancer screenings dropped by about 94 percent during the first months of the pandemic, and as a result cancer cases went either undetected or
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Professor Warns of "Nightmare" Bots That Prey on Vulnerable People
Imagine that you make a new friend on Twitter. Their pithy statements stop you mid-scroll, and pretty soon you find yourself sliding into their DMs. You exchange a few messages. You favorite each other's tweets. If they need a hand on GoFundMe, you help out. Now imagine how you'd feel if you found out your friend didn't really exist. Their profile turns out to be a Frankensteinian mashup of verbi
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Previously unrecognized tsunami hazard identified in coastal cities
A new study found overlooked tsunami hazards related to undersea, near-shore strike-slip faults, especially for coastal cities adjacent to faults that traverse inland bays. Several areas around the world may fall into this category, including the San Francisco Bay area, Izmit Bay in Turkey and the Gulf of Al-Aqaba in Egypt.
23h
Woman Brutally Attacked With Hammer for Wearing Mask
On Sunday night, a woman in New York City approached two Asian women and bashed one over the head with a hammer, according to NBC New York , because the victim was wearing a mask to protect herself against the coronavirus pandemic that, believe it or not, is still raging on . The attack, which was caught on video , represents two of the ugliest parts of the American response to COVID-19: a distur
2h
Curses Aren't 'Just Words'
We think of profanity as a collection of what we call words. But curses are distinctly odd as words go. Often, they don't exactly mean anything, or even make sense as grammar. In What the hell is that? , what exactly does hell mean, and is it really a noun? Also, why does a word exist if we aren't supposed to utter it? Or if certain words are profane, why do so many of us use them all the time? B
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What the Sexual Violence of Game of Thrones Begot
I don't have much tolerance these days for scenes involving the casual, ritualistic degradation of women, which is why deciding to rewatch Game of Thrones was such a colossal unforced error. Idiotic! Foolhardy! Own goal! I made it through the first episode, where a sobbing Daenerys Targaryen is raped by Khal Drogo on their wedding night in front of a romantic orange sunset. I got through the part
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Scientists Say New Experiment Will Determine "Fate of the Universe"
For much of the 20th century, astronomers believed that the expansion of the universe would eventually slow due to gravity. At some point, it would stop expanding altogether, before collapsing in on itself in a "big crunch." But since then, researchers have discovered that the universe instead appears to be expanding at an exponential rate due a mysterious force later named "dark energy," which a
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As UK nears zero Covid deaths, there's good reason for optimism
Analysis: the vaccine strategy and staggered easing of restrictions have worked well. The next step is crucial Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The handling of the coronavirus crisis in the UK has provided few moments to celebrate, but the day we reach zero deaths from the disease will clearly be one to toast. That day may not be far off. On Tuesday, the UK reported f
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The Era of Mass Vaccinations Is Ending
At its peak, in late March, the mass-vaccination site at Nashville's Music City Center was giving out 2,100 doses a day. It was all hands on deck: Local nurses, volunteers, FEMA employees, and even U.S. Forest Service EMTs were redeployed to help give COVID-19 shots. But last week, the number of daily doses dropped to less than 1,300—about 1,100 second doses and only 190 first doses. Imagine thre
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The Song That Sold America to a Generation of Asian Immigrants
A fixture of saccharine Super Bowl commercials and orthodontists' waiting rooms across the country, John Denver's platinum record "Take Me Home, Country Roads" turned 50 years old last month. Kitschy, yet earnest; dated, yet eternal. In its terse descriptions of bucolic West Virginia—"Life is old there, older than the trees, younger than the mountains, blowing like a breeze"—the gentle folk tune
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Plastic pollution in the deep sea: A geological perspective
A new focus article in the May issue of Geology summarizes research on plastic waste in marine and sedimentary environments. Authors I.A. Kane of the Univ. of Manchester and A. Fildani of the Deep Time Institute write that "Environmental pollution caused by uncontrolled human activity is occurring on a vast and unprecedented scale around the globe. Of the diverse forms of anthropogenic pollution,
13h
This map is alive with the beauty of lighthouse signals
Many of the world's 23,000 lighthouses feature a distinct combination of color, frequency, and range. These unique light signatures help ships verify their positions and safeguard maritime traffic. But they also translate into this map, visualizing the ingenuity and courage of lighthouse builders and keepers. At night, the Eastern Mediterranean is awash with lighthouse signals. Credit: Geodienst
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The Power and Pitfalls of Gamification
When tech companies first adopted the technique, there was hardly any science supporting it. Now researchers know when gamelike features help—and when they hurt.
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Parker discovers natural radio emission in Venus' atmosphere
During a brief swing by Venus, NASA's Parker Solar Probe detected a natural radio signal that revealed the spacecraft had flown through the planet's upper atmosphere. This was the first direct measurement of the Venusian atmosphere in nearly 30 years—and it looks quite different from Venus past. A study published today confirms that Venus' upper atmosphere undergoes puzzling changes over a solar c
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We reviewed three at-home covid tests. The results were mixed.
Over-the-counter home tests for covid-19 are finally here. MIT Technology Review obtained kits sold by three companies and tried them out. After buying tests from CVS and online, I tested myself several times and ended up learning an important lesson: while some people worry that home tests could miss covid cases, the bigger problem may be just the opposite. These tests have "false positive" rate
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The internet is excluding Asian-Americans who don't speak English
Jennifer Xiong spent her summer helping Hmong people in California register to vote in the US presidential election. The Hmong are an ethnic group that come from the mountains of China, Vietnam, Laos, and Thailand but don't have a country of their own, and Xiong was a volunteer organizer at Hmong Innovating Politics, or HIP, in Fresno. There are around 300,000 Hmong people in the US, and she spen
11h
Greenland's Rare-Earth Election
Tunulliarfik Fjord has always played an outsize role in global history. One thousand years ago, the Viking Erik the Red settled there, the last outpost in the Norse expansion into North America. When the United States established a protectorate over Greenland during World War II, it built one of its first airports in what is now Narsarsuaq, a large town on the fjord. And now Tunulliarfik is the s
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Using social values for profit cheapens them, a new study cautions
Businesses sometimes align themselves with important values such as a clean environment, feminism, or racial justice, thinking it's a win-win: the value gets boosted along with the company's bottom line. But be careful, warns new research. Using these values primarily for self-interested purposes such as profit or reputation can ultimately undermine their special status and erode people's commitme
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No surge testing for India variants despite Hancock pledge
Following health secretary's statement last month, Public Health England confirms it is carrying out 'targeted testing' instead Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Surge testing is not being carried out in England for coronavirus variants first detected in India, despite the government claiming it would be deployed, the Guardian has learned. The coronavirus variant known
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Can't leave your phone alone? You're just trying to blend in
Keep checking your smartphone without knowing why? You may be unconsciously copying those around you, according to Italian research into the 'chameleon effect' Name: The Chameleon Effect. Age: About 22 years old. It was discovered and named by the sociologist John A Bargh and the social psychologist Tanya L Chartrand, who published a paper about it in 1999. Continue reading…
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23andMe's Huge Covid-19 Study Draws Links Between the Virus and Our Genetics
Last spring, in a race against Covid-19, 23andMe launched an ambitious study to answer a question on everyone's minds: who's likely to get sick, or to get very sick? And being 23andMe, they hunted for a genetic factor. We got answers last week. People with the O blood type—something determined by a gene called ABO—are less likely to test positive for Covid-19. Another part of the genome, packed w
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The Year That Changed Everything
In 1788, We the People of the United States ordained a Constitution to "secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity." It was the year that changed everything. Yet for the past century, posterity has profoundly misunderstood what happened then—who did what, why they did it, and how, and also what they failed to do that needed doing. Much of the confusion began in 1913, when the
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Laser light makes a comeback (literally)
Straight-line constant-speed propagation in free space is a basic characteristic of light. In a recent study published in Communications Physics, researchers from Osaka University discovered the phenomenon of reciprocating propagation of laser pulse intensity in free space.
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Study examines movement in children with autism
Researchers have used real-time 3D animation to investigate motor impairments in children who have autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The study found that when teaching or coaching new movements to an individual with autism, the teacher or coach needs to understand the individual with autism's specific motor learning characteristics.
21h
New norms needed to name never-seen fungi
What's in a name? The importance of accurate fungal taxonomy New Zealand's horticultural and agricultural economy relies on effective biosecurity. This requires keeping major pests and pathogens out of Aotearoa, as well as detailed knowledge about what organisms are already present in our natural and productive ecosystems and whether they are 'good' or 'bad' for the health of those ecosystems.
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Cleavage of Braun's lipoprotein Lpp from the bacterial peptidoglycan by a paralog of l,d-transpeptidases, LdtF [Biochemistry]
The gram‐negative bacterial cell envelope is made up of an outer membrane (OM), an inner membrane (IM) that surrounds the cytoplasm, and a periplasmic space between the two membranes containing peptidoglycan (PG or murein). PG is an elastic polymer that forms a mesh-like sacculus around the IM, protecting cells from…
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Terrawatch: midge fossils offer insight into past climates
A study of fossilised insects suggests a correlation between their body size and the temperature Most of us want to run a mile when the midges arrive, but not so for Viktor Baranov, who whips out his microscope to measure the insects. As well as measuring modern midges, Baranov has been looking at fossilised midges, and found that their size can be used to understand the climate going back hundre
13h
The power of conformity: How good people do evil things
After World War II, many psychologists wanted to address the question of how it was that people could go along with the evil deeds of fascist regimes. Solomon Asch's experiment alarmingly showed just how easily we conform and how susceptible we are to group influence. People often will not only sacrifice truth and reason to conformity but also their own health and sense of right and wrong. It's t
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Amid Drought, California Contests Nestlé's Water Rights
As drought conditions worsen across California, last month Nestlé received a draft cease-and-desist order from state officials. The company has maintained that its rights to California spring water date back to 1865. But a 2017 investigation found that Nestlé was taking far more than its share.
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Läsupplevelsen hotad i skolan
Det är mycket upp till den enskilda läraren att ge plats åt läsupplevelser i litteraturundervisningen. Risken finns att elevers litterära kompetens får stå tillbaka i en tid när mätbara resultat premieras. Undervisningen av skönlitteratur på gymnasiet präglas i stor utsträckning av mätbarhet och enskilda lärares prioriteringar. Utrymmet för elevens läsupplevelse är beroende av individuella lärari
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Mäns sårbarhet en utmaning för Räddningstjänsten
Män dör oftare i olyckor än kvinnor. Räddningstjänstens uppdrag att förebygga olyckor försvåras av samhällets syn på mansrollen. – Det är alltför lätt att vi raljerar och skyller på män som dumdristiga, säger forskaren Mathias Ericson. Män är övertaliga när det kommer till olyckor som till exempel dödsbränder och drunkning. Men trots att mäns överrepresentation i olycksstatistiken är väl känd har
8h
The Power of Refusal
June Park This article was published online on May 4, 2021. M y father died this spring. Right up until he went into the hospital, at age 88, he lived alone in a small houseboat at the end of a long pier, bare of conventional creature comforts but filled with his books and maps and hiking gear. My brother and I had worried: "Dad, you could have a heart attack and fall in the lake." Better that th
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Researchers create new lunar map to help guide future exploration missions
A new map including rover paths of the Schrödinger basin, a geologically important area of the moon, could guide future exploration missions.The map was created by a team of interns at the Lunar and Planetary Institute, including Ellen Czaplinski, a U of A graduate student researcher at the Arkansas Center for Planetary Sciences and first author of a paper published in The Planetary Science Journa
6h
Living Materials
Sometimes technology is developed to serve a specific purpose or need. At other times technology is developed simply because it can be, and then people search for an application. Probably most of the time there is a combination – the technology is developed with a vague idea of how it can be used, but then has to find specific applications. This is partly what makes the future of technology diffi
8h
Intranasal vaccination with influenza HA/GO-PEI nanoparticles provides immune protection against homo- and heterologous strains [Immunology and Inflammation]
Intranasal (i.n.) immunization is a promising vaccination route for infectious respiratory diseases such as influenza. Recombinant protein vaccines can overcome the safety concerns and long production phase of virus-based influenza vaccines. However, soluble protein vaccines are poorly immunogenic if administered by an i.n. route. Here, we report that polyethyleneimine-functionalized graphene…
2h
Spike Protein Behavior
I've been getting a lot of questions in the last few days about several Spike-protein-related (and vaccine-related) topics, so I thought this would be a good time to go into them. There's been a recent report about the vascular effects of the Spike protein alone (not coronavirus infection per se ), and another presentation on similar effects in lung tissue. These are almost certainly looking at t
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The sensitive brain at rest
You know that raw overwhelm people have been reporting after months of a pandemic, compounded by economic issues and social unrest? Does fatigue and compulsive social media scrolling strike a familiar chord?
2h
Tiny plastic particles in the environment
Wherever scientists look, they can spot them: whether in remote mountain lakes, in Arctic sea ice, in the deep-ocean floor or in air samples, even in edible fish—thousands upon thousands of microscopic plastic particles in the micro to millimeter range. This microplastic is now even considered one of the defining features of the Anthropocene, the age of the Earth shaped by modern humans.
4h
Surfaces can be designed with antiviral properties to mitigate COVID-19
If a respiratory droplet from a person infected with COVID-19 lands on a surface, it becomes a possible source of disease spread, because while 99.9 percent of the droplet's liquid content evaporates within minutes, a residual thin film that allows the virus to survive can be left behind. In a new study, researchers explore how the evaporation rate of residual thin films can be accelerated by tuni
4h
Speeding new treatments
Researchers have created an open-source online suite of computational models that will help scientists rapidly screen small molecules for their potential COVID-fighting properties.
21h
Photos: Deadly Protests Across Colombia
For several days now, people across Colombia have voiced their anger in large demonstrations. The protests—initially in response to a tax-reform proposal by President Iván Duque that many said would punish the middle class—have transformed into platforms for people to express their wider anger over the government's mishandling of unemployment, inequality, and the ongoing pandemic crisis. Demonstr
1h
Andrew Thomson obituary
Chemist who made a breakthrough in developing the anti-cancer drug cisplatin and brought about advances in spectroscopy Andrew Thomson, who has died aged 80 after a stroke, played a crucial role early in his career in the discovery of a widely used anti-cancer drug, cisplatin , before going on to do pioneering work in the field of spectroscopy, enhancing our understanding of the functioning of sub
8h
The problem with our noisy planet
Noise is a belittled threat that disrupts the functioning of people, animals, even plants. It causes stress, provokes aggression, increases the risk of heart disease. Blocking the issue of noise can bring catastrophic consequences for us. Morning coffee. I set up my laptop in the garden. All I can hear is the morning chirping of birds. Nothing to bother me. Suddenly, the roar of a chainsaw tears
2h
New 'key-hole surgery' technique to extract metals from the Earth
Researchers have developed a new method to extract metals, such as copper, from their parent ore body. The research team have provided a proof of concept for the application of an electric field to control the movement of an acid within a low permeability copper-bearing ore deposit to selectively dissolve and recover the metal in situ.
2h
The micro-environment of breast cancer in three dimensions
Cancerous tumors thrive on blood, extending their roots deep into the fabric of the tissue of their host. They alter the genetics of surrounding cells and evolve to avoid the protective attacks of immune cells. Now, researchers have developed a way to study the relationship between solid, difficult-to-treat tumors and the microenvironment they create to support their growth.
4h
Direct drug delivery with carbon nanotube porins
Modern medicine relies on an extensive arsenal of drugs to combat deadly diseases such as pneumonia, tuberculosis, HIV-AIDS and malaria. Chemotherapy agents have prolonged lives for millions of cancer patients, and in some cases, cured the disease or turned it into a chronic condition.
9h
Chiral singlet superconductivity in the weakly correlated metal LaPt3P
Nature Communications, Published online: 04 May 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22807-8 Chiral superconductors are very rare topological materials. Here, the authors report spontaneous magnetic fields inside the superconducting state and low temperature linear behavior in the superfluid density in LaPt3P, suggesting a chiral d-wave singlet superconducting state.
10h
Microplastics found in Europe's largest ice cap
In a recent article in Sustainability, scientists from Reykjavik University (RU), the University of Gothenburg and the Icelandic Meteorological Office describe finding microplastic in a remote and pristine area of Vatnajokull glacier in Iceland, Europe's largest ice cap. Microplastics may affect the melting and rheological behaviour of glaciers, thus influencing the future meltwater contribution t
9h
Algorithms improve how we protect our data
Scientists have developed algorithms that more efficiently measure how difficult it would be for an attacker to guess secret keys for cryptographic systems. The approach could reduce the computational complexity needed to validate encryption security.
1h
New look at a bright stellar nursery
This overlay shows radio (orange) and infrared images of a giant molecular cloud called W49A, where new stars are being formed. A team of astronomers led by Chris DePree of Agnes Scott College used the National Science Foundation's Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) to make new, high-resolution radio images of this cluster of still-forming, massive stars. W49A, 36,000 light-years from Earth, ha
4h
Geology helps astronomers find habitable planets
Astronomers have identified more than 4,000, and counting, confirmed exoplanets — planets orbiting stars other than the sun — but only a fraction have the potential to sustain life. Now, new research is using the geology of early planet formation to help identify those that may be capable of supporting life.
1h
Complex shapes of photons to boost future quantum technologies
Researchers have demonstrated how two interfering photons can bunch into various shapes. These complex shapes are beneficial for quantum technologies, such as performing fast photonic quantum computations and safe data transfer. The method opens new possibilities also for creating enhanced measurement and sensing techniques.
2h
A sweet solution to hard brain implants
By using silicone polymers, scientists have made the softest brain implant to date with the thickness of a thin sewing thread (~0.2 mm), and the consistency of soft pudding – as soft as the brain itself. They were then able to implant it into the brain using a trick from a cookbook.
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The Next COVID Vaccine Could Come in Pill Form
While millions of people are offering up their arms to get a shot of a COVID-19 vaccine, labs around the world are already working on the next generation of inoculations. The result is that future COVID vaccines could come in the form of a simple pill or nasal spray, making their distribution significantly easier, as The Wall Street Journal reports . Apart from being much easier to give out, gove
5min
A Blob of Dark Matter Appears to Be Floating Outside Our Galaxy
Dragging Behind Scientists have looked seemingly everywhere in space for dark matter, which is the elusive, invisible substance thought to make up most of the stuff in the universe. Now, a team of astrophysicists is looking outward, beyond our own galaxy, where they think a blob of dark matter might be hiding in plain sight, according to Live Science . Trailing behind the Large Magellanic Cloud,
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Emissive supramolecular metallacages via coordination-driven self-assembly
Metallacages prepared via coordination-driven self-assembly have received extensive attention because of their three-dimensional layout and cavity-cored nature. The construction of light-emitting materials employing metallacages as a platform has also gained significant interest due to their good modularity in photophysical properties, which bring emerging applications in fields as diverse as sens
13min
Muscle-fiber inspired pneumatic artificial muscles for multiple-mode actuations
Researchers present a class of muscle-fiber array inspired, multiple-mode, pneumatic artificial muscles (MAIPAMs), consisting of active 3D elastomer-balloon arrays reinforced by a passive 2D elastomer membrane, through planar design and one-step rolling fabrication. They introduce the prototypical designs of MAIPAMs and demonstrate their muscle-mimic structures and versatility, as well as their sc
15min
Sensor glove aims to help curb trichotillomania
A new glove device aims to help people with trichotillomania, or compulsive hair-pulling. Senior undergraduates are developing a glove-based sensor that tracks hand motion and flexing, combined with a smartphone app that tracks behavior over time. The glove incorporates flex and other sensors along with a gyroscope that sense when a hair-pull has happened. The glove sends data to the app, which k
27min
Starlink Is Just Another ISP When it Comes to Piracy
There's a lot of buzz right now around SpaceX's Starlink satellite internet, which is available across the northern US along with a few places in Canada and the UK. Hypothetically, the Starlink dish could help people bypass censorship and surveillance in their home countries, but Starlink isn't going to be a libertarian free-for-all. One Starlink subscriber shared a warning letter they got for ru
42min
MDI Biological Laboratory scientist identifies process critical to kidney function
A team led by Iain Drummond, Ph.D., of the MDI Biological Laboratory in Bar Harbor, Maine, has identified the signaling mechanisms underlying the formation of podocytes, which are tiny, highly specialized cells in the glomerulus, the cluster of blood vessels in the kidney where waste is filtered. The discovery opens the door to the development of therapies to replace or regenerate these cells, whi
58min
PI(3,4)P2-mediated membrane tubulation promotes integrin trafficking and invasive cell migration [Cell Biology]
Invadopodia are integrin-mediated adhesions with abundant PI(3,4)P2. However, the functional role of PI(3,4)P2 in adhesion signaling remains unclear. Here, we find that the PI(3,4)P2 biogenesis regulates the integrin endocytosis at invadopodia. PI(3,4)P2 is locally produced by PIK3CA and SHIP2 and is concentrated at the trailing edge of the invadopodium arc….
1h
Image-charge effects on ion adsorption near aqueous interfaces [Chemistry]
Electrostatic interactions near surfaces and interfaces are ubiquitous in many fields of science. Continuum electrostatics predicts that ions will be attracted to conducting electrodes but repelled by surfaces with lower dielectric constant than the solvent. However, several recent studies found that certain "chaotropic" ions have similar adsorption behavior at air/water…
1h
Ultrafast X-ray scattering offers a structural view of excited-state charge transfer [Chemistry]
Intramolecular charge transfer and the associated changes in molecular structure in N,N′-dimethylpiperazine are tracked using femtosecond gas-phase X-ray scattering. The molecules are optically excited to the 3p state at 200 nm. Following rapid relaxation to the 3s state, distinct charge-localized and charge-delocalized species related by charge transfer are observed. The…
1h
AI-assisted superresolution cosmological simulations [Astronomy]
Cosmological simulations of galaxy formation are limited by finite computational resources. We draw from the ongoing rapid advances in artificial intelligence (AI; specifically deep learning) to address this problem. Neural networks have been developed to learn from high-resolution (HR) image data and then make accurate superresolution (SR) versions of different…
1h
CAG RNAs induce DNA damage and apoptosis by silencing NUDT16 expression in polyglutamine degeneration [Neuroscience]
DNA damage plays a central role in the cellular pathogenesis of polyglutamine (polyQ) diseases, including Huntington's disease (HD). In this study, we showed that the expression of untranslatable expanded CAG RNA per se induced the cellular DNA damage response pathway. By means of RNA sequencing (RNA-seq), we found that expression…
1h
SIK2 orchestrates actin-dependent host response upon Salmonella infection [Biochemistry]
Salmonella is an intracellular pathogen of a substantial global health concern. In order to identify key players involved in Salmonella infection, we performed a global host phosphoproteome analysis subsequent to bacterial infection. Thereby, we identified the kinase SIK2 as a central component of the host defense machinery upon Salmonella infection….
1h
ICAM-1 induced rearrangements of capsid and genome prime rhinovirus 14 for activation and uncoating [Microbiology]
Most rhinoviruses, which are the leading cause of the common cold, utilize intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) as a receptor to infect cells. To release their genomes, rhinoviruses convert to activated particles that contain pores in the capsid, lack minor capsid protein VP4, and have an altered genome organization. The binding…
1h
Optofluidic multiplex detection of single SARS-CoV-2 and influenza A antigens using a novel bright fluorescent probe assay [Applied Biological Sciences]
The urgency for the development of a sensitive, specific, and rapid point-of-care diagnostic test has deepened during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. Here, we introduce an ultrasensitive chip-based antigen test with single protein biomarker sensitivity for the differentiated detection of both severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and influenza A…
1h
Breakthrough study shows no-take marine reserves benefit overfished reefs
A powerful, long-term study from WCS adds scientific backing for global calls for conserving 30 percent of the world's ocean. The studied no-take marine protected areas (MPAs) increased the growth of fish populations by 42 percent when fishing was unsustainable in surrounding areas, achieving the benefits of stable and high production of fish populations for fishers, while protecting threatened ec
1h
Soybean cyst nematode is the most damaging soybean pathogen—and it's rapidly spreading
The soybean cyst nematode (SCN) is the most damaging pathogen of soybeans in the United States and Canada and it is spreading rapidly, according to information compiled by Gregory Tylka and Christopher Marett, nematologists at Iowa State University. SCN was first found in the United States in 1954 and most recent estimates show that SCN results in $1.5 billion in annual yield losses.
1h
Daily briefing: Concussion risk is higher for female soccer players
Nature, Published online: 04 May 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01213-6 Female high-school soccer players are twice as likely as their male counterparts to get a concussion. Plus, China's COVID vaccines are going global and the first genetically modified mosquitoes are released in the United States.
1h
Media amplified anti-mask minority on Twitter
A recent analysis of Twitter activity between March and August 2020 showed strong support for face coverings to reduce exposure to COVID-19, but feedback from journal reviewers led researchers to dive deeper into their data. When the study was completed, they also unveiled that anti-mask sentiment on popular social media sites was associated with media stories on the polarized rhetoric of people,
1h
200-year old feces shows rural elites in New England had parasitic infections
In the early 19th century in North America, parasitic infections were quite common in urban areas due in part to population growth and urbanization. Prior research has found that poor sanitation, unsanitary privy (outhouse) conditions, and increased contact with domestic animals, contributed to the prevalence of parasitic disease in urban areas. A new study examining fecal samples from a privy on
2h
Loss of wetlands threatens migratory waterbirds
Migratory waterbirds stand to feel the effects of climate change at their breeding areas in the High Arctic and in Africa, according to a new study. The research team came to this conclusion after modeling climatic and hydrological conditions under current and future climate scenarios (in 2050) and comparing the impact on the distribution of 197 of the 255 waterbird species listed under the Agree
2h
The voltage sensor is responsible for {Delta}pH dependence in Hv1 channels [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
The dissipation of acute acid loads by the voltage-gated proton channel (Hv1) relies on regulating the channel's open probability by the voltage and the ΔpH across the membrane (ΔpH = pHex − pHin). Using monomeric Ciona-Hv1, we asked whether ΔpH-dependent gating is produced during the voltage sensor activation or permeation…
2h
Anatomy of strike-slip fault tsunami genesis [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Tsunami generation from earthquake-induced seafloor deformations has long been recognized as a major hazard to coastal areas. Strike-slip faulting has generally been considered insufficient for triggering large tsunamis, except through the generation of submarine landslides. Herein, we demonstrate that ground motions due to strike-slip earthquakes can contribute to the generation…
2h
Integrative analysis reveals unique structural and functional features of the Smc5/6 complex [Biochemistry]
Structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) complexes are critical chromatin modulators. In eukaryotes, the cohesin and condensin SMC complexes organize chromatin, while the Smc5/6 complex directly regulates DNA replication and repair. The molecular basis for the distinct functions of Smc5/6 is poorly understood. Here, we report an integrative structural study of…
2h
Compliant 3D frameworks instrumented with strain sensors for characterization of millimeter-scale engineered muscle tissues [Engineering]
Tissue-on-chip systems represent promising platforms for monitoring and controlling tissue functions in vitro for various purposes in biomedical research. The two-dimensional (2D) layouts of these constructs constrain the types of interactions that can be studied and limit their relevance to three-dimensional (3D) tissues. The development of 3D electronic scaffolds and…
2h
AIS-based profiling of fishing vessels falls short as a "proof of concept" for identifying forced labor at sea [Biological Sciences]
McDonald et al. (1) argue that labor conditions in fisheries can be discerned from the movement and characteristics of fishing vessels. We recognize the authors' effort, yet have strong reservations regarding their 1) limited dataset, 2) assumptions, and 3) model validation. Forced labor is a serious human rights violation, and…
2h
Pharmacological modulation of T cell immunity results in long-term remission of autoimmune arthritis [Immunology and Inflammation]
Chronic inflammatory diseases like rheumatoid arthritis are characterized by a deficit in fully functional regulatory T cells. DNA-methylation inhibitors have previously been shown to promote regulatory T cell responses and, in the present study, we evaluated their potential to ameliorate chronic and acute animal models of rheumatoid arthritis. Of the…
2h
Manipulating placebo analgesia and nocebo hyperalgesia by changing brain excitability [Neuroscience]
Harnessing placebo and nocebo effects has significant implications for research and medical practice. Placebo analgesia and nocebo hyperalgesia, the most well-studied placebo and nocebo effects, are thought to initiate from the dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and then trigger the brain's descending pain modulatory system and other pain regulation pathways….
2h
Molecular dynamics reveals formation path of benzonitrile and other molecules in conditions relevant to the interstellar medium [Chemistry]
Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and polycyclic aromatic nitrogen heterocycles are believed to be widespread in different areas of the interstellar medium. However, the astronomical detection of specific aromatic molecules is extremely challenging. As a result, only a few aromatic molecules have been identified, and very little is known about how they…
2h
Identification of EMT signaling cross-talk and gene regulatory networks by single-cell RNA sequencing [Systems Biology]
The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays a critical role during normal development and in cancer progression. EMT is induced by various signaling pathways, including TGF-β, BMP, Wnt–β-catenin, NOTCH, Shh, and receptor tyrosine kinases. In this study, we performed single-cell RNA sequencing on MCF10A cells undergoing EMT by TGF-β1 stimulation. Our comprehensive…
2h
Reply to Swartz et al.: Challenges and opportunities for identifying forced labor using satellite-based fishing vessel monitoring [Biological Sciences]
We appreciate Swartz et al. (1) for highlighting several key considerations for interpreting our results (2). While we discuss many of these in our paper, we are grateful to further highlight our work's strengths, limitations, and future opportunities. A major challenge with understanding fisheries labor abuses is a lack of…
2h
The aryl hydrocarbon receptor suppresses immunity to oral squamous cell carcinoma through immune checkpoint regulation [Environmental Sciences]
Immune checkpoint inhibitors represent some of the most important cancer treatments developed in the last 20 y. However, existing immunotherapy approaches benefit only a minority of patients. Here, we provide evidence that the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a central player in the regulation of multiple immune checkpoints in oral…
2h
The N terminus of Orai1 couples to the AKAP79 signaling complex to drive NFAT1 activation by local Ca2+ entry [Cell Biology]
To avoid conflicting and deleterious outcomes, eukaryotic cells often confine second messengers to spatially restricted subcompartments. The smallest signaling unit is the Ca2+ nanodomain, which forms when Ca2+ channels open. Ca2+ nanodomains arising from store-operated Orai1 Ca2+ channels stimulate the protein phosphatase calcineurin to activate the transcription factor nuclear factor…
2h
Protein structure-based gene expression signatures [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Gene expression signatures (GES) connect phenotypes to differential messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of genes, providing a powerful approach to define cellular identity, function, and the effects of perturbations. The use of GES has suffered from vague assessment criteria and limited reproducibility. Because the structure of proteins defines the functional capability…
2h
Reversed-engineered human alveolar lung-on-a-chip model [Pharmacology]
Here, we present a physiologically relevant model of the human pulmonary alveoli. This alveolar lung-on-a-chip platform is composed of a three-dimensional porous hydrogel made of gelatin methacryloyl with an inverse opal structure, bonded to a compartmentalized polydimethylsiloxane chip. The inverse opal hydrogel structure features well-defined, interconnected pores with high similarity…
2h
Delineating the heterogeneity of matrix-directed differentiation toward soft and stiff tissue lineages via single-cell profiling [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) form a heterogeneous population of multipotent progenitors that contribute to tissue regeneration and homeostasis. MSCs assess extracellular elasticity by probing resistance to applied forces via adhesion, cytoskeletal, and nuclear mechanotransducers that direct differentiation toward soft or stiff tissue lineages. Even under controlled culture conditions, MSC
2h
Membrane fusion and drug delivery with carbon nanotube porins [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Drug delivery mitigates toxic side effects and poor pharmacokinetics of life-saving therapeutics and enhances treatment efficacy. However, direct cytoplasmic delivery of drugs and vaccines into cells has remained out of reach. We find that liposomes studded with 0.8-nm-wide carbon nanotube porins (CNTPs) function as efficient vehicles for direct cytoplasmic drug…
2h
Biallelic splicing variants in the nucleolar 60S assembly factor RBM28 cause the ribosomopathy ANE syndrome [Medical Sciences]
Alopecia, neurologic defects, and endocrinopathy (ANE) syndrome is a rare ribosomopathy known to be caused by a p.(Leu351Pro) variant in the essential, conserved, nucleolar large ribosomal subunit (60S) assembly factor RBM28. We report the second family of ANE syndrome to date and a female pediatric ANE syndrome patient. The patient…
2h
Strategic placement of an obstacle suppresses droplet break up in the hopper flow of a microfluidic soft crystal [Engineering]
When granular materials, colloidal suspensions, and even animals and crowds exit through a narrow outlet, clogs can form spontaneously when multiple particles or entities attempt to exit simultaneously, thereby obstructing the outlet and ultimately halting the flow. Counterintuitively, the presence of an obstacle upstream of the outlet has been found…
2h
Cognitive impairment after focal brain lesions is better predicted by damage to structural than functional network hubs [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
Hubs are highly connected brain regions important for coordinating processing in brain networks. It is unclear, however, which measures of network "hubness" are most useful in identifying brain regions critical to human cognition. We tested how closely two measures of hubness—edge density and participation coefficient, derived from white and gray…
2h
Dysregulation of Amphiregulin stimulates the pathogenesis of cystic lymphangioma [Medical Sciences]
Along with blood vessels, lymphatic vessels play an important role in the circulation of body fluid and recruitment of immune cells. Postnatal lymphangiogenesis commonly occurs from preexisting lymphatic vessels by sprouting, which is induced by lymphangiogenic factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor C (VEGF-C). However, the key signals and…
2h
An interpreted atlas of biosynthetic gene clusters from 1,000 fungal genomes [Biochemistry]
Fungi are prolific producers of natural products, compounds which have had a large societal impact as pharmaceuticals, mycotoxins, and agrochemicals. Despite the availability of over 1,000 fungal genomes and several decades of compound discovery efforts from fungi, the biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs) encoded by these genomes and the associated chemical…
2h
A simple expression for the strength of selection on recombination generated by interference among mutations [Evolution]
One of the most widely cited hypotheses to explain the evolutionary maintenance of genetic recombination states that the reshuffling of genotypes at meiosis increases the efficiency of natural selection by reducing interference among selected loci. However, and despite several decades of theoretical work, a quantitative estimation of the possible selective…
2h
Phylogenomic conflict coincides with rapid morphological innovation [Evolution]
Evolutionary biologists have long been fascinated with the episodes of rapid phenotypic innovation that underlie the emergence of major lineages. Although our understanding of the environmental and ecological contexts of such episodes has steadily increased, it has remained unclear how population processes contribute to emergent macroevolutionary patterns. One insight gleaned…
2h
Fast and pervasive transcriptomic resilience and acclimation of extremely heat-tolerant coral holobionts from the northern Red Sea [Ecology]
Corals from the northern Red Sea and Gulf of Aqaba exhibit extreme thermal tolerance. To examine the underlying gene expression dynamics, we exposed Stylophora pistillata from the Gulf of Aqaba to short-term (hours) and long-term (weeks) heat stress with peak seawater temperatures ranging from their maximum monthly mean of 27…
2h
Insects defend against fungal infection by employing microRNAs to silence virulence-related genes [Agricultural Sciences]
Chemical insecticides remain the main strategy to combat mosquito-borne diseases, but the growing threat of insecticide resistance prompts the urgent need to develop alternative, ecofriendly, and sustainable vector control tools. Entomopathogenic fungi can overcome insecticide resistance and represent promising biocontrol tools for the control of mosquitoes. However, insects have evolved…
2h
Physical tuning of galectin-3 signaling [Biochemistry]
Galectin-3 (Gal3) exhibits dynamic oligomerization and promiscuous binding, which can lead to concomitant activation of synergistic, antagonistic, or noncooperative signaling pathways that alter cell behavior. Conferring signaling pathway selectivity through mutations in the Gal3–glycan binding interface is challenged by the abundance of common carbohydrate types found on many membrane glycoprotei
2h
Phosphorylation-dependent subfunctionalization of the calcium-dependent protein kinase CPK28 [Plant Biology]
Calcium (Ca2+)-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs or CPKs) are a unique family of Ca2+ sensor/kinase-effector proteins with diverse functions in plants. In Arabidopsis thaliana, CPK28 contributes to immune homeostasis by promoting degradation of the key immune signaling receptor-like cytoplasmic kinase BOTRYTIS-INDUCED KINASE 1 (BIK1) and additionally functions in vegetative-to-reproductive stage tr
2h
Discovery of a body-wide photosensory array that matures in an adult-like animal and mediates eye-brain-independent movement and arousal [Neuroscience]
The ability to respond to light has profoundly shaped life. Animals with eyes overwhelmingly rely on their visual circuits for mediating light-induced coordinated movements. Building on previously reported behaviors, we report the discovery of an organized, eye-independent (extraocular), body-wide photosensory framework that allows even a head-removed animal to move like…
2h
Phylogenomic and ecological analyses reveal the spatiotemporal evolution of global pines [Evolution]
How coniferous forests evolved in the Northern Hemisphere remains largely unknown. Unlike most groups of organisms that generally follow a latitudinal diversity gradient, most conifer species in the Northern Hemisphere are distributed in mountainous areas at middle latitudes. It is of great interest to know whether the midlatitude region has…
2h
Codon usage bias and nuclear mRNA concentration: Correlation vs. causation [Biological Sciences]
Much confusion in genome-wide studies results from mistakenly interpreting correlation as causation. Zhao et al. (1) observe a positive correlation between the codon bias index (CBI)—the extent to which a gene uses preferred synonymous codons—and the nuclear messenger RNA (mRNA) concentration among Neurospora crassa genes. This correlation could have originated…
2h
Reply to Qian and Zhang: Demonstration of the effect of codon usage on transcription by multiple approaches from fungi to animal cells [Biological Sciences]
We appreciate the interest from Qian and Zhang (1) in our recently published study on the role of codon usage in transcription in Neurospora (2). In our study, we demonstrate that there is a clear genome-wide positive correlation between gene codon usage biases and nuclear mRNA levels, meaning that genes…
2h
Antibiotic resistance is spreading from people to chimpanzees
Nearly half of fecal samples from wild chimpanzees contain bacteria that is resistant to a major class of antibiotics people commonly use in the vicinity of Gombe National Park in Tanzania, according to new research. "Our results suggest that antibiotic-resistant bacteria is actually spreading from people to non-human primates by making its way into the local watershed," says senior author Thomas
3h
New graphite-based sensor technology for wearable medical devices
Researchers from AMBER and Trinity College Dublin have developed next-generation, graphene-based sensing technology using their innovative G-Putty material. The team's printed sensors are 50 times more sensitive than the industry standard and outperform other comparable nano-enabled sensors in an important metric seen as a game-changer in the industry: flexibility.
3h
Bringing up baby: A crocodile's changing niche
Relatives of the giant crocodile might have been kings of the waterways during the Cretaceous period, eating anything—including dinosaurs—that got a little too close to the water's edge, but the largest of these apex predators still started off small. Figuring out how these little crocs grew up in a world surrounded by giants is no small task. Now crocs fossils from Texas are shedding light on how
3h
How big is a 'fragment'?
When a drinking glass falls on the floor and breaks, the shards will vary in size from large to extremely small. For the broken glass of a bus shelter, the story is different: all fragments have roughly the same size. Researchers from the University of Amsterdam, Unilever Vlaardingen and EPFL Lausanne investigated the breaking phenomenon, and discovered that two very different processes cause the
3h
Soybean cyst nematode is the most damaging soybean pathogen–and it's rapidly spreading
The soybean cyst nematode (SCN) is the most damaging pathogen of soybean in the United States and Canada and it is spreading rapidly, according to information compiled by Gregory Tylka and Christopher Marett, nematologists at Iowa State University. SCN was first found in the United States in 1954 and most recent estimates show that SCN results in $1.5 billion in annual yield losses.
3h
New GSA Bulletin articles published ahead of print in April
The Geological Society of America regularly publishes articles online ahead of print. For April, GSA Bulletin topics include multiple articles about the dynamics of China and Tibet; the Bell River hypothesis that proposes that an ancestral, transcontinental river occupied much of northern North America during the Cenozoic Era; new findings in the climatic history during one of Earth's coldest peri
3h
Pyrosomes: Enigmatic marine inhabitants with an important role in the Cabo Verde ecosystem
Pyrosomes, named after the Greek words for 'fire bodies' due their bright bioluminescence, are pelagic tunicates that spend their entire lives swimming in the open ocean. They are made up of many smaller animals, known as zooids, that sit together in a tubular matrix, known as tunic (hence the name pelagic tunicates). Because they live in the open ocean, they generally go unnoticed. In spite of th
4h
Confirmation of an auroral phenomenon
A new auroral phenomenon discovered by Finnish researchers a year ago is probably caused by areas of increased oxygen atom density occurring in an atmospheric wave channel. The speculative explanation offered by the researchers gained support from a new study.
4h
New study traces back the progenitor genomes causing COVID-19 and geospatial spread
In the field of molecular epidemiology, the worldwide scientific community has been steadily sleuthing to solve the riddle of the early history of SARS-CoV-2. Despite recent efforts by the World Health Organization, no one to date has identified the first case of human transmission, or 'patient zero' in the COVID-19 pandemic.
4h
Polarization and mobilization on social media affect infection figures
Measures to contain the Corona pandemic are the subject of politically charged debate and tend to polarize segments of the population. Those who support the measures motivate their acquaintances to follow the rules, while those who oppose them call for resistance in social media. But how exactly do politicization and social mobilization affect the incidence of infection? Researchers at the Max Pla
4h
With new treatments, PET imaging adds valuable information to brain metastasis monitoring
For patients with brain metastases, amino acid positron emission tomography (PET) can provide valuable information about the effectiveness of state-of-the-art treatments. When treatment monitoring with contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is unclear, adding 18F-FET PET can help to accurately diagnose recurring brain metastases and reliably assess patient response. This research was p
4h
Forty years of nursing science in HIV/AIDS: JANAC marks progress and challenges
From the very beginning of the AIDS epidemic in 1981, nurses have been at the forefront of patient care, advocacy, and research. But even in the age of antiretroviral therapy and pre-exposure prophylaxis, many challenges remain in reducing the impact of HIV and AIDS, according to the special May/June issue of The Journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care (JANAC). The official journal of th
4h
One step closer to efficient cannabis production
Micropropagation is a technique used for growing large quantities of new plants from fewer "parent" plants, yielding clones with the same, predictable qualities. The cannabis (Cannabis sativa) industry, however, has been largely left out of this beneficial technique, because this species of plant is extremely difficult to micropropagate.
4h
New neuroimaging technique studies brain stimulation for depression
Despite increased use of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in psychiatry, the rates at which patients respond to the therapy and experience remission of often-disabling symptoms have been modest at best. Now, a team of University of South Florida psychiatrists and biomedical engineers applied an emerging functional neuroimaging technology, known as diffuse optical tomography (DOT), to b
4h
Genomskinligt trä med grön kemi
Det nya genomskinliga trämaterialet består av en porös struktur av cellulosa från björk som impregneras med plast tillverkad av ett ämne från citrusskal. Forskarna har tidigare tillverkat genomskinligt trä men då med hjälp av fossilbaserad plast. – Det svåra i det här arbetet har varit att utveckla en plast som är både hållbar och fungerar tillsammans med trä, säger Lars Berglund, professor och av
4h
When did we start giving flowers for Mother's Day?
In a new book, English professor Randy Malamud explores the history and cultural significance of fresh-cut flowers. Humans have been obsessed with cut flowers for thousands of years—floral arranging dates back to ancient Egypt—but what makes a fragrant bouquet, garland, or wreath so irresistible? In his book Strange Bright Blooms: A History of Cut Flowers (Reaktion, 2021), Malamud , professor of
5h
Team cracks century-old mystery over the health struggles of explorer Ernest Shackleton
Over the years, physicians and historians have attributed Shackleton's failing health during his Antarctic expeditions to scurvy or a congenital heart defect. By studying other explorers and learning they had symptoms comparable to those of Shackleton, researchers concluded that beriberi provided a sound scientific and medical explanation for the famed explorer's health struggles.
5h
Surgery to prevent breast cancer requires a patient-doctor dialogue about risks, benefits
The decision to prevent breast cancer through a risk-reducing mastectomy is based on a woman's lifetime risk of the disease as well as on quality-of-life issues. The dialogue should include consideration of nonsurgical options such as screening and medications, according to a new article in JAMA, coauthored by a surgical oncologist from The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio.
5h
Using 4D printing to enable vascularization, bone tissue regeneration, spinal fusion
There has been an increase in the number of people over 65 who have needed spinal fusion surgery, and many have focused on trying to create a biomimetic scaffold that induces vascularization. In Applied Physics Reviews, researchers present a solution to address the challenge: They designed a microchannel scaffold made of a collagen and hydroxyapitite combination, with each strut consisting of micr
5h
Nasal spray flu vaccine may protect against a variety of strains
An influenza vaccine that is administered through the nose enhances the body's immune response to influenza virus infection, a new study with mice shows. The vaccine, made of nanoparticles, offers broad protection against different viral strains. Recurring seasonal flu epidemics and potential pandemics are among the most severe threats to public health. Current seasonal influenza vaccines induce
5h
Playlist privacy: You can be identified from just three songs
New research discovered that you can be identified from just three song choices. This type of information can be exploited by streaming services through targeted advertising. The researchers are calling for musical preference to be considered in regulations regarding online privacy. While the focus on music piracy dominated the media for years, an equally important (and far less discussed) phenom
5h
Research reveals Medicaid expansion is still improving hospital finances
A new study published in Medical Care Research and Review found that the Affordable Care Act, which expanded Medicaid programs to cover people previously uninsured, provided a financial boost to hospitals. The study is the first to investigate the effects of Medicaid expansion by comparing estimates using data from both the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid S
5h
Cheap but desirable: Generic drugs a great alternative to the brand-names for hypertension
Hypertension is a common health problem worldwide, but the cost of antihypertensive drugs can be a major barrier to treatment in low- and middle-income areas. One solution could be generic drugs, as opposed to brand-name ones, if only the debate on their efficacy is settled. In a paper recently published in Chinese Medical Journal, researchers report evidence from a longitudinal study that generic
5h
Chronic exposure to low levels of blast may be associated with neurotrauma
WRAIR scientists demonstrated that TBI biomarkers were elevated among law enforcement and military personnel, including those without a diagnosed brain injury or concussion, repeatedly exposed to low level blast. Repeated exposure have been linked to a series of reported symptoms such as headaches, fatigue, dizziness, memory difficulties, and tinnitus. Researchers hope these data are the first ste
5h
People with familial longevity show better cognitive aging
If you come from a family where people routinely live well into old age, you will likely have better cognitive function (the ability to clearly think, learn and remember) than peers from families where people die younger. Researchers affiliated with the Long Life Family Study (LLFS) recently broadened that finding in a paper published in Gerontology, suggesting that people who belong to long-lived
5h
Poor grasp of dating violence in college perpetuates 'boys will be boys' views
Dating violence—physical, sexual, psychological or emotional within a relationship, including stalking—is pervasive on college campuses with far-reaching health implications. One in five women experience a sexual assault in college and students living in sorority houses are three times more likely to experience rape. College students are vulnerable to dating violence because of the influence of th
6h
Fertility apps with hundreds of millions of users collect and share excessive information
The majority of top-rated fertility apps collect and even share intimate data without the users' knowledge or permission, a collaborative study by Newcastle University and Umea University has found. Researchers are now calling for a tightening of the categorisation of these apps by platforms to protect women from intimate and deeply personal information being exploited and sold.
6h
Snakeskin can inspire to safer buildings
It might be a good idea to look for inspiration in nature when designing load-bearing foundations for buildings. Researchers from Aarhus University and University of California Davis have delved into pile foundations and found, that piles with snake inspired surface patterns give 25-50 per cent less resistance during installation compared with the pressure they can subsequently support. The findin
6h
Staying down on the farm
Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT) researchers studied the nonlinear dynamics responsible for "power hop" instabilities in tractors. They found that bouncing, friction, and joint free-play are all critical factors for modeling this outcome. Understanding how this dynamic instability occurs can help improve industrial safety.
6h
Juvenile incarceration has mixed effects on future convictions
Harsh prison sentences for juvenile crimes do not reduce the probability of conviction for violent crimes as an adult, and actually increase the propensity for conviction of drug-related crimes, finds a new study by economists at UC Riverside and the University of Louisiana. Harsh juvenile sentences do reduce the likelihood of conviction for property crimes as an adult. But the increase in drug-re
6h
The Atlantic Publishes Chapter 2 of "Inheritance": Uncovering Black History in the Spaces and Places "Where Memories Live"
"Active racism, exclusion, and environmental injustice have systematically destroyed or buried whole sections of Black history. Many of those who gripe about 'erasing history' of Confederate monuments and other symbols in the South have no idea how much history has already been erased." A new chapter of The Atlantic 's " Inheritance " series, a multiyear project on American history, Black life, a
6h
Scientists find gene mutation linked to exfoliation syndrome,most common cause of glaucoma
A team of researchers from A*STAR's Genome Institute of Singapore (GIS) and Bioprocessing Technology Institute (BTI), and the Singapore Eye Research Institute (SERI) have identified a genetic mutation associated with exfoliation syndrome, characterised by abnormal protein material accumulating in the front of the eye. It is the most common cause of glaucoma, and a major cause of irreversible blind
6h
Help for serious shopaholics
For the first time, international experts in psychology have built a framework to diagnose Compulsive Buying-Shopping Disorder – promising help for people struggling to manage their spending behavior and mental wellbeing. The new guidelines, published in the Journal of Behavioral Addictions, confirms that excessive buying and shopping can be so serious as to constitute a disorder, giving researche
6h
COVID-19 during pregnancy raises risk of severe complications
Pregnant people infected with the SARS-CoV-2 virus face significantly higher risk of severe maternal and newborn complications compared to those without the virus, according to a new study. Researchers gathered data from 2,100 pregnant people from 43 maternity hospitals in 18 low-, middle-, and high-income countries worldwide. To determine the risk COVID-19 posed, researchers compared each person
6h
Powering Discovery: A new expert panel report from the CCA
Research funding agencies around the world are testing creative approaches to address urgent needs while laying the foundation for discoveries that will meet the unpredictable demands of the future. According to a new expert panel report from the Council of Canadian Academies (CCA), Canada can bolster its research capacity by reducing administrative burdens, experimenting with funding approaches,
7h
Pengene flyder til solid state-batterier
Ford og BMW har investeret i amerikansk batteriudvikler. Dermed følger de i halen på en lang række bilproducenter, som vil være med, når fremtidens solid state-batterier er klar til markedet.
7h
Intestinal polyps in close relatives can increase risk of colorectal cancer
Cancer of the colon and rectum is one of the deadliest forms of cancer, and has in recent years affected growing numbers of young people. In the largest registry study to date, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden and Harvard University in the USA demonstrate a possible connection between colorectal polyps in close relatives and the risk of developing colorectal cancer. The study, which
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Can US states afford to meet net-zero emissions targets by 2050?
The Commonwealth of Massachusetts recently passed a climate bill that sets a target of net-zero emissions for the state by the year 2050. The bill is one of several successful legislative efforts in Northeastern states to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by as much as 80 to 100 percent by mid-century. To achieve these ambitious targets—which align with the Paris Agreement's long-term goal of keepin
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Young, giant exoplanet chows down on gas as it grows
Thanks to the Hubble Space Telescope, astronomers have gotten a rare look at a young, Jupiter-sized planet that is growing by feeding off material surrounding a young star 370 light years from Earth. "We just don't know very much about how giant planets grow," says Brendan Bowler, an assistant professor of astronomy at the University of Texas at Austin. "This is the youngest bona fide planet Hubb
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New clinical practice guideline on community acquired pneumonia
In its latest clinical practice guideline on community-acquired pneumonia the American Thoracic Society's guidelines panel addresses the use of nucleic acid-based testing for non-influenza viral pathogens. The guideline was published online in the May 1 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. An explainer video may be viewed here.
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Parker Solar Probe Detects Radio Emission in Venus's Atmosphere
The Parker spacecraft was launched several years ago to study the sun, and that remains its primary mission. However, the solar probe has also made some close passes of the inner planets. A new study reveals that Parker got so close to Venus that it picked up a natural radar ping , proving it passed through the planet's upper atmosphere. This is the first direct measurement of Venus's atmosphere
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Konspirationsteorier präglar synen på Europa
Konspiratoriska berättelser om inre upplösning och yttre hot påverkar alltmer vår syn på EU och Europa. Vår tillit till samhället sätts på prov i kristider – som under den pågående pandemin – där olika grupper pekas ut som skyldiga till de negativa händelserna. – Vi kan till exempel se hur flyktingkrisen 2015 – 2016 ledde till ett polariserande samtalsklimat. Migrationen framställdes som ett medv
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Induce Sleep and Reduce Stress With This High Tech Neuroscience Tool
There's nothing quite as draining as a stressful , sleepless night. Around 70-percent of Americans say they struggle to fall asleep and stay asleep at least one night a month. But when sleepless nights continue night after night, it can start to affect your mental and physical game. In fact, sleep loss can lead to a variety of health issues including increased risk for obesity, type 2 diabetes, a
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Pay What You Want For A Coder's Bookshelf Of Artificial Intelligence And Python Development
Artificial intelligence is becoming so commonplace, it might soon replace CEOs . Yet we're only at the beginning of how data management, machine learning, and coding can change the world. If you want to catch up to this rapidly changing industry, the pay-what-you-want bundle on AI and Python development ebooks by Mercury Learning can help you quickly get up to speed. Mercury Learning is one of th
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Revealing the secret cocoa pollinators
The importance of pollinators to ensure successful harvests and thus global food security is widely acknowledged. However, the specific pollinators for many major crops—such as cocoa—haven't yet been identified, and there remain many questions about sustainability, conservation and plantation management to enhance their populations and, thereby, pollination services. Now, an international research
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Climate action potential in waste incineration plants
Over the coming decades, our economy and society will need to dramatically reduce greenhouse gas emissions as called for in the Paris Agreement. But even a future low-carbon economy will emit some greenhouse gases, such as in the manufacture of cement, steel, in livestock and crop farming, and in the chemical and pharmaceutical industries. To meet climate targets, these emissions need to be offset
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Photonics research harnesses the power of light
In a lab at USC, Mercedeh Khajavikhan engineers new structures that change the shape of light as it is transported. She creates groundbreaking structures in a field of science called photonics. Her work is important because it affects many things used in daily life, including lasers for imaging and sensing, fiber optic cables for advanced communications and computer chips to increase processing ca
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På A160 integreres onkologi og palliation
Når kræftpatienter bliver erklæret terminale og afsluttes fra Onkologisk Afdeling, står overlæge Kristin Enevoldsen og resten af Afsnit for Åbne Indlæggelser på Vejle Sygehus klar til at overtage, hvis patienterne har brug for palliativ hjælp og pleje.
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Suitable spawning habitat awaits salmon
In a multi-stage effort to return migratory salmon to the Upper Columbia River so the fish may rekindle self-sustaining populations, scientists recently concluded that acres of suitable habitat await the salmon, should they be able to reach it. Much work remains, however, before that goal can be realized.
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Making ordinary food extraordinary
Enjoying a glass of juice, tucking into a hearty piece of meat or having a plate of cut fruit may be part of the diet that many do not give much thought to. However, could these common food items be more nutritious or sustainable? Some final-year undergraduate students at NUS Food Science and Technology (FST) are applying their knowledge and creativity to address these needs.
9h
Daily briefing: The first billion COVID vaccinations
Nature, Published online: 30 April 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01197-3 One billion COVID vaccinations is 'an unprecedented scientific achievement'. Plus, the scientist leading Cuba's efforts towards a homegrown vaccine, and the secret of weird phage DNA.
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Kinetic resolution of indolines by asymmetric hydroxylamine formation
Nature Communications, Published online: 04 May 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22658-3 Catalytic kinetic resolution of amines is a longstanding challenge in chemical synthesis. Here, the authors report on titanium‐catalysed asymmetric oxygenation with hydrogen peroxide for kinetic resolution of secondary amines through oxygenation to produce enantiopure hydroxylamines involving N–O bond formation.
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Differential chromatin binding of the lung lineage transcription factor NKX2-1 resolves opposing murine alveolar cell fates in vivo
Nature Communications, Published online: 04 May 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22817-6 How transcription factors regulate cell fates in native tissues is unclear. Here, the authors report that differential chromatin binding of NKX2-1 determines opposing alveolar cell fates in the murine lung, showing loss of YAP/TAZ directs NKX2-1 to alternative binding sites leading to cell fate conversion.
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Visualizing delocalized correlated electronic states in twisted double bilayer graphene
Nature Communications, Published online: 04 May 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22711-1 Twisted double bilayer graphene is a novel van der Waals system that hosts an electric-field-tunable correlated state at half-filling. Here the authors reveal the delocalized nature of this state by scanning tunnelling microscopy and spectroscopy, suggesting an underlying mechanism of symmetry breaking driven by
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Temporal analysis of T-cell receptor-imposed forces via quantitative single molecule FRET measurements
Nature Communications, Published online: 04 May 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22775-z Mechanical forces acting on ligand-engaged T-cell receptors (TCRs) have previously been implicated in T-cell antigen recognition, yet their sensitivity and specificity are still poorly defined. Here, authors report a FRET-based sensor that informs directly on the magnitude and kinetics of TCR-imposed forces at th
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An Arabidopsis AT-hook motif nuclear protein mediates somatic embryogenesis and coinciding genome duplication
Nature Communications, Published online: 04 May 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22815-8 Plant somatic embryogenesis (SE) can be triggered by hormone application or overexpression of certain transcription factors such as BBM. Here Karami et al. show that AHL15 is required for induction of downstream BBM targets and promotes heterochromatin decondensation and endomitosis during the induction of SE.
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A hypothalamic-thalamostriatal circuit that controls approach-avoidance conflict in rats
Nature Communications, Published online: 04 May 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22730-y Animals constantly balance seeking food with avoiding predators. Here, the authors report that CRF positive neurons in the paraventricular thalamus projecting to the nucleus accumbens in rats are an indispensable component of a feedback circuit that can interrupt appetitive behaviour in favor of a defensive respo
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The impact of alloying on defect-free nanoparticles exhibiting softer but tougher behavior
Nature Communications, Published online: 04 May 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22707-x This work explores the impact of alloying on mechanical properties of nanoparticles in Ni-Co binary system. Combined experiment and atomistic simulation show surprising solution-softening effect in nanoparticles that contradicts the traditional solution-hardening effect in bulk alloys.
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Pandemic worsened older adults' mental health & sleep; others show long-term resilience
Nearly one in five older adults say their mental health has gotten worse since the pandemic began in March 2020, and an equal percentage say their sleep has suffered in that time too. More than one in four say they're more anxious or worried than before the COVID-19 era, according to a new poll of people age 50 to 80. But the poll also reveals hopeful signs that many older adults are showing long-
10h
Alzheimers sjukdom – på fyra olika sätt
Alzheimers sjukdom kännetecknas av onormal spridning och ansamling av proteinet tau i hjärnan. En internationell studie visar nu hur tau sprids enligt fyra distinkta mönster som leder till olika symtom med olika prognoser för de drabbade individerna. Studien publiceras i Nature Medicine. – Till skillnad mot hur vi hittills tolkat spridningen av tau i hjärnan, visar fynden från denna studie att ta
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Para sig med släktingar? I naturen är det helt okej
Vi skyr inavel – och har utgått från att djur gör samma sak. Men forskning visar att djur faktiskt inte bryr sig om det är en bror, syster, kusin eller utomstående när de väljer partner. Djur kan till och med föredra att para sig med släktingar, säger zoologen Raïssa de Boer. Inavel är skadligt och bör undvikas under alla omständigheter. Det är utgångspunkten för dagens forskning om evolution och
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Development of microsatellite markers for censusing of endangered rhinoceros
Today, the Sumatran rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) is critically endangered, with fewer than 100 individuals surviving in Indonesia on the islands of Sumatra and Borneo. To ensure survival of the threatened species, accurate censusing is necessary to determine the genetic diversity of remaining populations for conservation and management plans.
13h
Muskelgen kopplas till typ 2-diabetes
Personer med typ 2-diabetes har sämre muskelfunktion än friska personer. Nu har forskare sett att vid typ 2-diabetes har genen VPS39 stor betydelse för muskelfunktionen och muskelstamcellernas förmåga att bygga nya muskelceller. Det framkommer i en ny internationell studie ledd från Lunds universitet.
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How a bad day at work led to better COVID predictions
Dr. Sejal Morjaria, like other physicians treating COVID-19, found it hard to predict how her infected cancer patients at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSK) would react to the virus. She and her husband, CSHL Associate Professor Saket Navlakha, a computer scientist, worked together to develop a machine-learning solution that uses 50 variables available when a patient is first diagnosed t
20h
Turn Your Playlist Into A Journey With This $50 AI-Powered Music Visualizer
Artificial intelligence is everywhere and at its most advanced when dealing with visuals. AI is reanimating the past , spotting cancers , and achieving much, much more with images than we ever thought possible. And for DJs, musicians, streamers, and other performance artists, not to mention those nostalgic for Winamp's trippy visualization tools, it's changing the visual side of DJing thanks to t
21h
UTEP study examines movement in children with autism
For more than a year, researchers at The University of Texas at El Paso's Stanley E. Fulton Gait Research & Movement Analysis Lab in the College of Health Sciences have been using real-time 3D animation to investigate motor impairments in children who have autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The greatest takeaway from this study is that when teaching or coaching new movements to an individual with aut
22h
Increased use of minimally invasive non-endoscopic tests for Barrett's esophagus screening
The authors of a new commentary from Mayo Clinic suggest that more extensive use of minimally invasive non-endoscopic tests for Barrett's esophagus (BE) screening could impact early detection and prevention of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC), a particularly deadly form of cancer. This is important because BE, the only known precursor to esophageal cancer, is often asymptomatic. Their commentary is
23h
Watch Astronaut Do a Victory Dance After Climbing Out of Charred SpaceX Capsule
Astronaut Dance NASA astronaut Mike Hopkins returned from a lengthy stint on board the International Space Station inside a SpaceX Crew Dragon capsule over the weekend. When SpaceX's crews pulled him out of the capsule, Hopkins did a little dance, as caught by the space company's livestream, around the 9:27 mark. Safe Return Hopkins was the first to be recovered from the capsule. The astronaut wa
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East and West Coast mice show evolution can be predictable
Over 400 to 600 mouse generations, East and West Coast populations of European house mice have adapted to similar environmental conditions in very similar ways, research finds. The European house mouse has invaded nearly every corner of the Americas since colonizers brought it here a few hundred years ago, and it now lives practically everywhere humans store their food. Yet in that relatively sho
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New understanding of ovarian follicle development may lead to novel reproductive therapies
Mullerian inhibiting substance, a reproductive hormone, keeps follicles dormant in the ovaries until they are ready to be activated, grow, and release eggs during ovulation. Understanding the mechanism of follicle development by this hormone could allow scientists, for the first time, to identify novel therapeutic targets to preserve follicles and eggs lost to aging or chemotherapy, to improve the
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Ingenuity Mars Helicopter Aces Fourth Flight, Gets Mission Extension
NASA reported last week that its Ingenuity Mars helicopter failed to lift off for its fourth flight, but it succeeded early on Friday. Now, NASA has confirmed that it will be adding a new component to Ingenuity's Mars mission — it's no longer just a technology demonstration , and it'll get extra flight time on the red planet as an "operations demonstration." Ingenuity rode to Mars attached to the
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