Search Posts

Nyheder2021maj06

Tegn abonnement på BioNyt!

Vil du hjælpe med at finde nyheder? DO YOU WANT TO HELP FINDING SCIENCE NEWS? Email: bionyt@gmail.com Phone-sms: (45)21729908

LATEST

Scientists Claim to Spot Fungus Growing on Mars in NASA Rover Photos
The hunt for life on Mars continues, with NASA's latest rover Perseverance using its scientific instrumentation to scan the Jezero Crater, an area believed to be a dried up ancient lake, for any signs of ancient microbial life. But according to an international team of researchers, the space agencies other rovers may have already found signs of relatively advanced life — in the form of "fungus-li
3h
SpaceX Just Landed Starship Without It Exploding
SpaceX has finally launched its latest full-scale prototype of its Mars-bound Starship rocket — and this time, for the first time, it stuck the landing. The 165-foot stainless steel spacecraft, dubbed SN15, launched from the space company's test facilities in South Texas Wednesday evening at 5:25 pm local time. It climbed to ten kilometers, first obscured inside a cloud, then reemerging above it.
20h
Tweaked Moderna vaccine 'neutralises Covid variants in trials'
Limited data from small test trial shows positive results against South Africa and Brazil strains Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The first "tweaked" vaccine against the worrying coronavirus variants that emerged in South Africa and Brazil has successfully neutralised them in laboratory trials, the US company Moderna has said. The results of the small trial suggest t
23h
Debris from Chinese rocket could hit Earth at weekend, says expert
Communist party newspaper claims Long March 5B should easily burn up in atmosphere but expert warns pieces will reach Earth The White House has called for "responsible space behaviours" as a debris from a Chinese rocket, thought to be out of control, is expected to crash back to Earth on Saturday, US time. The US Space Command is tracking debris from the Long March 5B, which last week launched th
19h
Russia Announces Plans to Test Nuclear Weapon Called "Satan II"
Son of Satan The Russian military is prepared to launch three tests of its powerful new nuclear weapon, the RS-28 Sarmat, which has earned the nickname "Satan II." Tests for the new intercontinental ballistic missile will begin within the next few months, military insiders told TASS , a news outlet owned by the Russian government that refers to the weapon as "invulnerable." That's alarming news —
2h
How China turned a prize-winning iPhone hack against the Uyghurs
In March 2017, a group of hackers from China arrived in Vancouver with one goal: Find hidden weak spots inside the world's most popular technologies. Google's Chrome browser, Microsoft's Windows operating system, and Apple's iPhones were all in the crosshairs. But no one was breaking the law. These were just some of the people taking part in Pwn2Own, one of the world's most prestigious hacking co
9h
New concerns as Indian Covid variant clusters found across England
Exclusive: Leaked emails show Public Health England assessment of ongoing risk from B16172 variant is 'high' Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Clusters of the Indian variants of Covid-19 have been found across England, including in care homes, the Guardian has learned, amid growing fears about the speed with which they are spreading in communities. The latest update of
1h
Male hoopoes found to provide extra nourishment to mates who paint their eggs well
A team of researchers from Universidad de Granada and Estación Experimental de Zonas Áridas, both in Spain, has found that male hoopoes provide more nourishment to female mates who paint their eggs well. In their paper published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes their study of hoopoes in the wild.
4h
FASER is born: New experiment will study particles that interact with dark matter
The newest experiment at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, is now in place at the Large Hadron Collider in Geneva. FASER, or Forward Search Experiment, was approved by CERN's research board in March 2019. Now installed in the LHC tunnel, this experiment, which seeks to understand particles that scientists believe may interact with dark matter, is undergoing tests before data co
5h
A new method to trigger rain where water is scarce
A new method to trigger rain in places where water is scarce is being tested in the United Arab Emirates using unmanned drones that were designed and manufactured at the University of Bath. The drones carry an electric charge that is released into a cloud, giving cloud droplets the jolt they need to clump together and fall as rain.
7h
Review: Most human origins stories are not compatible with known fossils
In the 150 years since Charles Darwin speculated that humans originated in Africa, the number of species in the human family tree has exploded, but so has the level of dispute concerning early human evolution. Fossil apes are often at the center of the debate, with some scientists dismissing their importance to the origins of the human lineage (the "hominins"), and others conferring them starring
1h
Artificial color-changing material that mimics chameleon skin can detect seafood freshness
Scientists in China and Germany have designed an artificial color-changing material that mimics chameleon skin, with luminogens (molecules that make crystals glow) organized into different core and shell hydrogel layers instead of one uniform matrix. The findings, published May 6 in the journal Cell Reports Physical Science, demonstrate that a two-luminogen hydrogel chemosensor developed with this
4h
Toward 2D memory technology by magnetic graphene
In spintronics, the magnetic moment of electrons (spin) is used to transfer and manipulate information. An ultra-compact 2D spin-logic circuitry could be built from 2D materials that can transport the spin information over long distances and also provide strong spin-polarization of charge current. Experiments by physicists at the University of Groningen (The Netherlands) and Colombia University (U
4h
Fear of losing health insurance keeps 1 in 6 workers in their jobs
One out of every six adult workers (16%) in the United States are staying in jobs they might otherwise leave out of fear of losing their employer-sponsored health insurance, according to a new West Health-Gallup survey of more than 3,800 US adults. The survey finds the fear is even more pronounced among Black workers, who are 50% more likely to remain in an unwanted job than their White and Hispan
15h
Biotech Company Officially Unleashes Gene-Hacked Mosquitoes in Florida
The biotech company Oxitec has, after a decade of pushing through regulatory hurdles, unleashed its genetically-engineered mosquitoes on the Florida Keys. The experiment, which is the first release of experimental gene-hacked organisms at an ecological scale in the United States, is now underway, Live Science reports . As it continues, Oxitec and the local mosquito control board will monitor the
23h
US declares support for patent waiver on Covid-19 vaccines
Waiver yet to be approved by World Trade Organisation but Biden administration's position will have strong influence on decision Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The US has declared its support for a patent waiver on Covid-19 vaccines to boost their production and distribution around the world. The waiver will not take place immediately as it has to be approved by con
20h
Elon Musk Celebrates Starship Landing: "Needed to Make Life Multiplanetary"
It's the morning after SpaceX managed to pull of the seemingly impossible : a full-scale Starship prototype took off from the launch pad, flew to an altitude of ten kilometers, flipped itself on its side to slow its descent, and landed without a hitch. Well, the space company's automated sprinkler system did have to jump in after the prototype dubbed SN15 caught fire for several minutes following
4h
A Mysterious Brain Disease Is Spreading in Canada
The Canadian province of New Brunswick is tracking 48 cases of a mysterious new brain disease that has neurobiologists stumped, the BBC reports . The patients, with ages ranging from 18 to 85, started experiencing a variety of symptoms including aggression, anxiety, depression, muscle aches, and spasms. Some patients developed insomnia, language impairment, and even rapid weight loss and muscle a
22h
Trump Just Got Kicked Off Twitter AGAIN
Banhammer Former United States President and excommunicated serial poster Donald Trump is having a bad week. Not only did the Facebook Oversight Board extend his suspension from the site, but Trump's attempt to sneak his way back onto Twitter was immediately struck down. Trump recently launched a new mostly-functional blog launched earlier this week, according to The Verge . On it, he posts short
1h
SpaceX Could Cut Your Starlink Internet Service If You Pirate Movies
Starlink Piracy SpaceX's Starlink satellite internet service isn't going to give you a pass for downloading copyright-infringing content online. According to pirate redditor "substrate-97," SpaceX promptly sent them a notice once they attempted to download show illegally online, as PCMag reports . "We must insist that you and/or others using your Starlink service refrain from illegal downloads of
2h
How to spot the difference between a real climate policy and greenwashing guff | Damian Carrington
Unless actions by governments and corporations cut emissions in the here and now, a dose of scepticism is in order So it's goodbye climate deniers, hello – and you'll pardon me for being blunt here – climate bullshitters. The impacts of the climate emergency are now so obvious, only the truly deluded still deny them. Instead, we are at the point where everyone agrees something must be done, but m
5h
Scientific Publishing Is a Joke
A real scientific advance, like a successful date, needs both preparation and serendipity. As a tired, single medical student, I used to feel lucky when I managed two good dates in a row. But career scientists must continually create this kind of magic. Universities judge their research faculty not so much by the quality of their discoveries as by the number of papers they've placed in scholarly
8h
How Adult Children Affect Their Mother's Happiness
" How to Build a Life " is a weekly column by Arthur Brooks, tackling questions of meaning and happiness. Arthur C. Brooks will discuss the science of happiness live at 11 a.m. ET on May 20. Register for In Pursuit of Happiness here . "Y ou are … irritating and unbearable, and I consider it most difficult to live with you." So wrote Johanna Schopenhauer in a 1807 letter to her 19-year-old son Art
9h
The Problem With Patriotism
I n 2008, during a campaign rally in Madison, Wisconsin, to elect her husband as the first Black president, Michelle Obama said it was then, for the first time in her adult life, that she felt proud of her country. I was 19 years old; this would be my first election. I had never felt proud of my country. I had never heard anyone say that out loud before. I was 12 when the Twin Towers crumbled on
9h
Something Is Frizzling Up the Brains of Old White Guys
Rising levels of air pollution can have a disastrous impact on older men's memory and cognitive performance, according to an alarming new study. Scientists measured how increased concentrations of fine particulate matter — tiny particles that make up a common form of air pollution — impaired the cognition of white men with an average age of 69, according to a study published Monday in the journal
23h
New York May Ban All Bitcoin Mining
Pressing Pause A new bill before the New York state senate would impose a three-year ban on all cryptocurrency mining in the state. Upstate New York has become an unexpected hub of crypto mining lately, Gizmodo reports . Given that the total energy consumption of Bitcoin mining operations around the world has exceeded that of entire countries, the bill provides a reasonable way for New York to cu
6h
How College Became a Ruthless Competition Divorced From Learning
"I t is a truth universally acknowledged ," Jane Austen begins Pride and Prejudice , "that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife." In early-19th-century society—an aristocratic world of inherited wealth—marriage occupied center stage. A good spouse was an all-purpose resource: essential for moving up in the world, as for Austen's heroine, Elizabeth Bennet, or for
8h
Covid third wave inevitable in India, say health experts
New variants are contributing factor behind country's vicious second wave with likelihood of more emerging Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Health experts have warned that a Covid-19 third wave is "inevitable" in India, as evidence grows that new variants are a contributing factor behind the country's vicious second wave. India broke global records again on Thursday,
9h
We can't stop rising sea levels, but we still have a chance to slow them down | Tamsin Edwards
Despite pandemic-enforced isolation, scientists from around the world have produced a vital climate change forecast Sea levels are going to rise, no matter what. This is certain. But new research I helped produce shows how much we could limit the damage: sea level rise from the melting of ice could be halved this century if we meet the Paris agreement target of keeping global warming to 1.5C. The
11h
SpaceX finally launches and successfully lands its futuristic Starship
Previous test flights of the rocketship, which Elon Musk plans to use for future missions to the moon and mars, ended in explosions SpaceX launched and successfully landed its futuristic Starship on Wednesday, finally nailing a test flight of the rocketship that Elon Musk intends to use to land astronauts on the moon and send people to Mars. The previous four test flights ended in fiery explosion
17h
How to stop AI from recognizing your face in selfies
Uploading personal photos to the internet can feel like letting go. Who else will have access to them, what will they do with them—and which machine-learning algorithms will they help train? The company Clearview has already supplied US law enforcement agencies with a facial recognition tool trained on photos of millions of people scraped from the public web. But that was likely just the start. A
23h
Magnetic material breaks super-fast switching record
Researchers at CRANN (The Centre for Research on Adaptive Nanostructures and Nanodevices), and the School of Physics at Trinity College Dublin, today announced that a magnetic material developed at the Centre demonstrates the fastest magnetic switching ever recorded.
1d
Elon Musk Is Maybe, Actually, Strangely, Going to Do This Mars Thing
T he little Havanese likes to sit in a window of the one-story house, looking out onto the quiet street in Boca Chica, Texas. From its perch, it can watch neighbors passing by, glossy black grackles pecking in the grass, and palm trees swaying in the breeze. The dog's presence is usually a sign that its owner, Elon Musk, is in town. That, and the Tesla parked in the driveway. There are other, mor
9h
Liz Cheney Has Only Herself to Blame
Liz Cheney, the representative of Wyoming, the daughter of a former vice president, and a lifelong conservative Republican, is facing a purge. Cheney's transgression? She has continued to insist, truthfully, that former President Donald Trump's claims about the 2020 election are false, after having voted to impeach him in March for inciting a mob that stormed the Capitol in an attempt to overturn
1h
The United States' Birthrate Is Declining Rapidly
Researchers have been sounding alarm bells about the dropping US birthrate for some time now, but new data confirms that the coronavirus pandemic has accelerated that decline drastically. The CDC recently released data showing that the number and proportion of US births dropped for the sixth straight year. For a while, experts weren't sure what impact the pandemic would have on the birthrate, The
2h
Why mixing vaccines could help boost immunity
A dozen covid-19 vaccines are now being used around the world. Most require two doses, and health officials have warned against mixing and matching: the vaccines, they argue, should be administered the way they were tested in trials. But after emerging concerns about the very rare risk of blood clots linked to the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine, that advice may soon change. Guidance on this issue var
7h
Rapid rovers, speedy sands: Fast-tracking terrain interaction modeling
Granular materials, such as sand and gravel, are an interesting class of materials. They can display solid, liquid, and gas-like properties, depending on the scenario. But things can get complicated in cases of high-speed vehicle locomotion, which cause these materials to enter a "triple-phase" nature, acting like all three fundamental phases of matter at the same time.
23h
Hackers Broke Into Tesla Using a Drone
We're In A pair of security researchers found a shocking security vulnerability in Tesla software that allowed them to tap into and control the car's software from afar. The team found that they could hijack its touch-screen infotainment system to tinker with various driving settings, move the chair around, and most dangerously, unlock and open the car's doors and trunk from afar, according to In
33min
AI consumes a lot of energy. Hackers could make it consume more.
The news: A new type of attack could increase the energy consumption of AI systems. In the same way a denial-of-service attack on the internet seeks to clog up a network and make it unusable, the new attack forces a deep neural network to tie up more computational resources than necessary and slow down its "thinking" process. The target: In recent years, growing concern over the costly energy con
3h
How to Solve Equations That Are Stubborn as a Goat
If you've ever taken a math test, you've probably met a grazing goat. Usually it's tied to a fence post or the side of some barn, left there by an absent-minded farmer to graze on whatever grass it can reach. When you meet a grazing goat, your job is to calculate the total area of the region it can graze on. It's a math test, after all. Math teachers have stymied students by sticking goats in str
3h
Waiving IP
The announcement by the Biden administration about waiving IP rights to the coronavirus vaccines obviously calls for some comment. Keep in mind that I have been doing research in the pharma industry for over 30 years now, so my viewpoint is obviously going to be affected by that, for better and for worse. With that said, what you think about this move will depend on what you hope to accomplish by
3h
Sharks use Earth's magnetic fields to guide them like a map
Sea turtles are known for relying on magnetic signatures to find their way across thousands of miles to the very beaches where they hatched. Now, researchers reporting in the journal Current Biology on May 6 have some of the first solid evidence that sharks also rely on magnetic fields for their long-distance forays across the sea.
4h
Bidenomics Really Is Something New
S ome of the changes are obvious: Compared with the economic strategies of former Presidents Bill Clinton and Barack Obama, Joe Biden is proposing more new spending and more new taxes than either of his Democratic predecessors, and he's abandoned their support for negotiating new free-trade agreements. But Biden is also diverging from his predecessors' approaches in ways that have drawn much less
5h
EU wants to mass produce three 'course-changing' Covid drugs from October
Health commissioner says plan is to reduce hospitalisation and tackle long-term impact of Covid Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Three Covid medicines with the potential to "change the course" of the pandemic will be authorised for mass production and use in the EU by October under a European Commission plan. Stella Kyriakides, the commissioner for health, said such a
6h
The last battle of Anne of Brittany: Isotopic study of the soldiers of 1491
A multidisciplinary team of researchers from INRAP, CNRS, the universities of Ottawa, Rennes 2, Toulouse III Paul Sabatier and the Max Planck Institute has recognized the soldiers of the last battles of the siege of Rennes in 1491. These are the only witnesses of the forces involved in the conflict between the armies of Duchess Anne of Brittany and the King of France. This research and its methodo
7h
Gerrymandering – Politics vs Logic
People are extremely social animals, and being social means that you need to learn the rules that govern social interaction and society. This applies to social animal species as well. Corvids, for example, can remember the faces of animals that harm or threaten them and will punish them later . They will also punish their own members for not following the rule – fail to warn us when a predator is
7h
Why People Feel Like Victims – Issue 99: Universality
In a polarized nation, victimhood is a badge of honor. It gives people strength. "The victim has become among the most important identity positions in American politics," wrote Robert B. Horwitz, a communications professor at the University of California, San Diego. Horwitz published his study, "Politics as Victimhood, Victimhood as Politics," in 2018.1 He focused on social currents that drove vi
17h
White House Supports Waiving IP for COVID Vaccines, Sending Pharma Stocks Tumbling
The Biden administration announced today that it supports the waiving of intellectual property (IP) protections for COVID-19 vaccines, CNBC reports . The announcement sends a strong signal as much of the rest of the world is being crushed under a devastating new wave of cases and deaths. The US has rocketed ahead in securing vaccines for its population while other countries are lagging significan
22h
Are lab–grown embryos and human hybrids ethical?
In Aldous Huxley's 1932 novel " Brave New World ," people aren't born from a mother's womb. Instead, embryos are grown in artificial wombs until they are brought into the world, a process called ectogenesis. In the novel, technicians in charge of the hatcheries manipulate the nutrients they give the fetuses to make the newborns fit the desires of society. Two recent scientific developments sugges
23h
New, almost non-destructive archaeogenetic sampling method developed
An Austrian-American research team (University of Vienna, Department Evolutionary Anthropology and Harvard Medical School, Department of Genetics), in collaboration of Hungarian experts from Eötvös Loránd University, has developed a new method that allows the almost non-destructive extraction of genetic material from archeological human remains. The method allows anthropologists, archeologists and
1d
Research confirms trawl ban substantially increases the abundance of marine organisms
Biodiversity is of crucial importance to the marine ecosystem. The prohibition of trawling activities in the Hong Kong marine environment for two and a half years has significantly improved biodiversity, an inter-university study led by City University of Hong Kong (CityU) has found. Research results showed that the trawl ban could restore and conserve biodiversity in tropical coastal waters.
1d
You Can't Dissect a Virtual Cadaver – Issue 99: Universality
Last year, my first in medical school at Columbia University, I used a bone saw to slice through the top half of a cadaver's skull, revealing a gray brain lined with purple blood vessels. This was Clinical Gross Anatomy, the first-year course that has fascinated or devastated (or both) every medical student. You never forget the day you open the skull. Cutting into the brain, unlike the muscles o
17h
The Trump Decision Turned Content Moderation Into Shark Week
This morning, the oversight board, a putatively independent body funded by Facebook through a $130 million trust, announced a decision in its tenth case: The removal of Donald Trump from the social platform had been justified, it said, but poorly executed. The meaning of his "indefinite suspension" wasn't very clear, nor are any of Facebook's existing policies about world leaders. The company has
21h
Purgatory at Sea
Photographs by Paolo Pellegrin Image above : Italian law enforcement escorts 68 migrants, rescued off the coast of Sicily, to the Port of Augusta on March 31. Most of the migrants were delivered to the Rhapsody, a cruise ship now being operated by the Italian Red Cross, to begin their quarantine. (All photos in this article were shot aboard the Allegra, another quarantine ship, from March 29 to A
9h
Lunar crater radio telescope: Illuminating the cosmic dark ages
After years of development, the Lunar Crater Radio Telescope (LCRT) project has been awarded $500,000 to support additional work as it enters Phase II of NASA's Innovative Advanced Concepts (NIAC) program. While not yet a NASA mission, the LCRT describes a mission concept that could transform humanity's view of the cosmos.
7h
Homing in on the smallest possible laser
At extremely low temperatures, matter often behaves differently than in normal conditions. At temperatures only a few degrees above absolute zero (-273 degrees Celsius), physical particles may give up their independence and merge for a short time into a single object in which all the particles share the same properties. Such structures are known as Bose-Einstein Condensates, and they represent a s
4h
'Molecular glue' makes perovskite solar cells dramatically more reliable over time
A research team from Brown University has made a major step toward improving the long-term reliability of perovskite solar cells, an emerging clean energy technology. In a study to be published on Friday, May 7 in the journal Science, the team demonstrates a "molecular glue" that keeps a key interface inside cells from degrading. The treatment dramatically increases cells' stability and reliabilit
1h
Flooding might triple in the mountains of Asia due to global warming
The "Third Pole" of the Earth, the high mountain ranges of Asia, bears the largest number of glaciers outside the polar regions. A Sino-Swiss research team has revealed the dramatic increase in flood risk that could occur across Earth's icy Third Pole in response to ongoing climate change. Focusing on the threat from new lakes forming in front of rapidly retreating glaciers, a team, led by researc
4h
Jeff Bezos's Blue Origin plans space sightseeing jaunt for July
New Shepard rocket-and-capsule combo aims to fly six passengers 62 miles above Earth into space Blue Origin, Jeff Bezos's rocket company, aims to launch its first suborbital sightseeing trip on its New Shepard spacecraft on 20 July, a moment that could usher in an era of private commercial space travel. Blue Origin also said it would offer one seat on the first flight to the winning bidder of a f
10h
Socioeconomic inequality drives trade patterns in global wildlife market
A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in Hong Kong and one in Singapore has found that socioeconomic inequality is driving existing trade patterns in the global wildlife market. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes comparing data from the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) with socioe
5h
Researchers produce laser pulses with record-breaking intensity
Researchers have demonstrated a record-high laser pulse intensity of over 1023 W/cm2 using the petawatt laser at the Center for Relativistic Laser Science (CoReLS), Institute for Basic Science in the Republic of Korea. It took more than a decade to reach this laser intensity, which is ten times that reported by a team at the University of Michigan in 2004. These ultrahigh intensity light pulses wi
5h
Team directs and measures quantum drum duet
Like conductors of a spooky symphony, researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have "entangled" two small mechanical drums and precisely measured their linked quantum properties. Entangled pairs like this might someday perform computations and transmit data in large-scale quantum networks.
1h
Cells are more resilient to environmental changes than previously thought
Cells are more resilient to environmental perturbations than previously thought, Toronto researchers have found. The finding will enable scientists to translate observations of the effects of drugs or mutations on cells grown in a lab setting as they seek to gain a better understanding of cellular function and to develop new diagnostics and treatments.
1h
Shining new light on stepparent fairy-tale stereotype
Although the fairy tale of the wicked stepmother is a tale as old as time, the effects of blending children with their new stepfamilies may not be as grim as once thought. In fact, new research shows that stepchildren are not at a disadvantage compared to their peers from single-parent households and actually experience better outcomes than their half-siblings — good news for the more than 113 mi
48min
Physicists describe new type of aurora
The famed northern and southern lights have been studied for millennia, but they still hold secrets. Physicists describe a new phenomenon they call 'diffuse auroral erasers,' in which patches of the background glow are blotted out, then suddenly intensify and reappear.
1h
A deep reservoir of primordial helium in the Earth
Noble gases, including helium, neon, and argon, are characterized by high chemical inertness which causes low reactivity with other materials and high volatility. Among them, 3He, 20Ne, and 36Ar are particular isotopes which were components of the primordial solar nebula existing in space before the Earth had formed. 3He is also known to have been produced by the Big Bang and a substantial amount
4h
Novel CBD analog shows promising pain-halting effects in mice
Studies have shown that while CBD reduces pain sensation in animals, its ability to do so in humans is limited by low bioavailability, the extent to which the drug successfully reaches its site of action. Now, new research suggests this obstacle may be overcome by a novel CBD analog known as KLS-13019.
23h
Economics Professor: UFOs Could Be a Big Deal For the Economy
Taking UFOs Seriously The Pentagon is reportedly getting ready to unleash a flood of still-unreleased data on several run-ins with "unidentified aerial phenomena" that Navy pilots have had dating back to at least 2004 (the release will happen later this year). Congress even set up an entire taskforce to investigate whether the incidents represent an actual threat. In other words? The US is finall
4min
Hydrogen instead of electrification? Potentials and risks for climate targets
Hydrogen-based fuels should primarily be used in sectors such as aviation or industrial processes that cannot be electrified, finds a team of researchers. Producing these fuels is too inefficient, costly and their availability too uncertain, to broadly replace fossil fuels for instance in cars or heating houses. For most sectors, directly using electricity for instance in battery electric cars or
4h
The Ringmaster Is Gone
The internet has been a bit quiet lately. Or, more specifically, it's been quiet since the days after the Capitol riot, when Twitter, Facebook, and a string of other social-media companies banned Donald Trump from their platforms for his role in egging on the violence in Washington, D.C. And now the Facebook oversight board has ensured that social media will remain peaceful for at least a little
1h
The most 'Instagrammable bird' on the internet
A pair of researchers from the University of Konstanz and the University of Jena, respectively, have found the most "Instagrammable bird" on the internet. In their paper published in the journal i-Perception Katja Thömmes and Gregor Hayn-Leichsenring describe their analysis of "likes" by Instagram users for pictures of birds.
4h
Uncovering epigenetic mechanisms underlying cancer development
Northwestern Medicine studies published in Nature Cell Biology and Molecular Cell are improving the understanding of epigenetic mechanisms in cancer development and progression, as well as pinpointing genes that drive the development of cancers, which may help identify patients who will benefit from immunotherapy. The research was led by Qi Cao, Ph.D., associate professor of Urology.
7h
Pandemic, war, climate change fuel food fears
The economic cost of the global pandemic as well as conflict and climate change are fueling food security fears that in 2020 reached their highest level in five years, according to a report published Wednesday.
10h
Supersymmetry-inspired microlaser arrays pave way for powering chip-sized optical systems
Ring microlasers are eyed as potential light sources for photonic applications, but they first must be made more powerful. Combining multiple microlasers into an array solves only half of the problem, as this adds noisy 'modes' to the resulting laser light. Now, thanks to the math behind supersymmetry theory, engineers have achieved single-mode lasing from such an array. By calculating the necessa
23h
Mind and God: The new science of neurotheology
Neurotheology is a field that unites brain science and psychology with religious belief and practices. There are several indirect and direct mechanisms that link spirituality with improved mental health. Compassion and love are positive emotions that will make your brain healthier. The field of neurotheology continues to expand from its early origins several decades ago to the present day. In its
6h
The Largest Cells on Earth – Issue 99: Universality
Imagine you're a scientist, sitting in the cold dark belly of a ship above an ocean abyss. Your eyes are fixed on a panel of screens as a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) descends miles below your feet. First the ROV travels through the productive sunlit waters, rich with fish and jellies, but as it sinks the light fades, and all that's left of the sunlit zone are sinking bodies and waste of the c
17h
Slender-snouted Besanosaurus was an 8-meter-long marine snapper
Middle Triassic ichthyosaurs are rare, and mostly small in size. The new Besanosaurus specimens described in the peer-reviewed journal PeerJ by Italian, Swiss, Dutch and Polish paleontologists provide new information on the anatomy of this fish-like ancient reptile, revealing its diet and exceptionally large adult size: up to 8 meters, a real record among all marine predators of this geological ep
4h
How mitochondria make the cut
With the help of their custom-built super-resolution microscope, biophysicists have discovered where and why mitochondria divide, putting to rest controversy about the underlying molecular machinery of mitochondrial fission. Mitochondria either split in half or cut off their ends to self-regulate.
3h
The natural brightness of the night sky
A recent study analyzes data collected at 44 of the darkest places in the world, including the Canary Island Observatories, to develop the first complete reference method to measure the natural brightness of the night sky using low-cost photometers.
2h
Repurposing tabletop sensors to search for dark matter
Researchers across the dark matter community that have begun to wonder if they are looking for the right type of dark matter. They have proposed a new way to look for the particles that might make up dark matter by repurposing existing tabletop sensor technology.
23h
New boost in quantum technologies
In an international collaboration, researchers at the University of Stuttgart were able to detect quantum bits in two-dimensional materials for the first time. Nature Materials publishes this research in its May 6, 2021 issue.
2h
Shuvuuia: A dinosaur that hunted in the dark
Today's 10,000 species of birds live in virtually every habitat on Earth, but only a handful have adaptations enabling them to hunt active prey in the dark of night. Scientists have long wondered whether theropod dinosaurs—the group that gave rise to modern birds—had similar sensory adaptations.
1h
Just a few atoms thick: New functional materials developed
They are 50,000 times thinner than a human hair and just a few atoms thick: two-dimensional materials are the thinnest substances it is possible to make today. They have completely new properties and are regarded as the next major step in modern semiconductor technology. In the future they could be used instead of silicon in computer chips, light-emitting diodes and solar cells. Until now, the dev
2h
Evading the uncertainty principle in quantum physics
The uncertainty principle, first introduced by Werner Heisenberg in the late 1920's, is a fundamental concept of quantum mechanics. In the quantum world, particles like the electrons that power all electrical product can also behave like waves. As a result, particles cannot have a well-defined position and momentum simultaneously. For instance, measuring the momentum of a particle leads to a distu
1h
Cutting methane emissions key to slowing warming: UN
Industry could cheaply and easily slash humanity's methane emissions by at least 30 percent in a decade, the United Nations said Thursday, adding that such cuts would slow global warming and prevent hundreds of thousands of deaths.
2h
To be or not to be: An organoid
Mini-organs, or organoids, play a big role in the future of medicine. Their countless applications can help develop and implement tailored therapies for each patient. The revolutionary development of organoids started in Utrecht with a group of curious scientists. But when organoid research starting booming, confusion arose. What exactly is an organoid? Are there different types, and if so, what s
4h
Zero to hero: Overlooked material could help reduce our carbon footprint
It is now well known that carbon dioxide is the biggest contributor to climate change and originates primarily from burning of fossil fuels. While there are ongoing efforts around the world to end our dependence on fossil fuels as energy sources, the promise of green energy still lies in the future. Can something be done in the meantime to reduce the concentrations of CO2 in the atmosphere?
4h
New indicator for oxygen levels in early oceans developed
Oxygen is essential for the development of higher life. However, it was hardly present in the oceans of the young Earth. It was not until the evolution of photosynthetic bacteria that the oceans saw a significant increase in oxygen levels. By measuring tungsten isotope composition, an international research team with the participation of scientists from the University of Cologne's Institute of Geo
4h
Random close packing or jamming of spheres in a container
Scientists at the theoretical institutes, Chinese Academy of Science and Cybermedia Center at Osaka University performed extensive computer simulations to generate and examine random packing of spheres. They show that the "jamming" transition, in which a free-flowing material becomes stuck, occurs with universal features despite the diversity of their details. This work may shed light on the physi
6h
Changing carbohydrates into lipids for microalgae biofuels
A cross-institutional collaboration has developed a technique to repartition carbon resources from carbohydrates to lipids in microalgae. It is hoped that this method can be applied to biofuel production. This discovery was the result of a collaboration between a research group at Kobe University's Engineering Biology Research Center consisting of Project Assistant Professor Kato Yuichi and Profes
6h
Stabilization of the borafluorene anion with carbenes
The incorporation of boron into polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon systems leads to interesting chromophoric and fluorescing materials for optoelectronics, including organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDS) and field-effect transistors, as well as polymer-based sensors. A research team has now introduced a new anionic organoborane compound. Synthesis of the borafluorene succeeded through the use of carb
23h
The Case for Moving Back to Your Hometown
"Bumfuck nowhere," "part of the country that needs to die off already," a "nowhere place": It was a jolt to hear how other people—well-intentioned friends or bosses or random strangers I met in passing—referred to the place I knew as home. Home is writing these words at the long kitchen table that my grandfather built as a gift for my mother. It's the smell of my mom's lemon cake and coffee wafti
3h
Letter: Peter Dunn obituary
I was just starting my career in paediatrics at Southmead hospital in Bristol in 1963 when Peter Dunn was appointed. He quickly fired everyone's enthusiasm for neonatology. At the time, junior staff were trying to persuade more senior staff that low-birthweight babies should be fed early, rather than the practice of not feeding for 48 hours or until they seemed hungry. He strongly supported us an
3h
How has our thinking on the climate crisis changed? – podcast
When the Guardian began reporting on the climate crisis 70 years ago, people were worried that warmer temperatures would make it harder to complain about the weather. Today it is the biggest challenge humanity has ever faced. In the second special episode marking 200 years of the Guardian, Phoebe Weston is joined by Jonathan Watts, Prof Naomi Oreskes and Alice Bell to take a look at climate cover
4h
Lifestyle changes to keep the world from warming up
Scientists widely agree that we must limit global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius to avoid catastrophic climate impacts. Environmental scientist Laura Scherer investigates how we should change lifestyles to achieve this temperature goal. Her research is part of the 4.8-million-euro Horizon 2020 project EU 1.5° Lifestyles.
4h
Climate change: How bad could the future be if we do nothing?
The climate crisis is no longer a looming threat—people are now living with the consequences of centuries of greenhouse gas emissions. But there is still everything to fight for. How the world chooses to respond in the coming years will have massive repercussions for generations yet to be born.
4h
Comprehensive genetic analyses confirm four different giraffe species and seven subspecies
Visually, they are hardly distinguishable, but genetic analyses show: There are four distinct species of giraffe and seven subspecies. This result was obtained by an international team led by Prof. Dr. Axel Janke from the LOEWE Center for Translational Biodiversity Genomics. According to their comprehensive genome analyses, the four giraffe lineages have been evolving separately for thousands of y
5h
Smart magnetic soft materials to develop artificial muscles and therapeutic robots
Developing a new generation of artificial muscles and soft nanorobots for drug delivery are some of the long-term goals of 4D-BIOMAP, an ERC research project being undertaken by the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M).This project develops cross-cutting bio-magneto-mechanical methodologies to stimulate and control biological processes such as cell migration and proliferation, the organism's el
4h
Image: NASA's Lucy high gain antenna up close
Lucy's epic journey to observe Jupiter's Trojan asteroids requires a reliable communications link back to Earth, and so the spacecraft is outfitted with a 6.5-ft. (2-meter)-wide high gain antenna for this task.
7h
Researchers discover novel non-coding RNAs regulating blood vessel formation
Researchers at the University of Eastern Finland have discovered previously unknown non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) involved in regulating the gene expression of vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF), the master regulators of angiogenesis. The study, conducted by the research groups of Associate Professor Minna Kaikkonen-Määttä and Academy Professor Seppo Ylä-Herttuala, provides a better understandi
7h
Podcast: The Surprisingly Complex History Behind 90 Day Fiancé
Listen and subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Podcasts Dating shows often push contestants to extreme measures in pursuit of love. Reality-show producers will impose fake deadlines, physical obstacles, and manufactured drama to create the juiciest spectacle. But on TLC's 90 Day Fiancé , a high-stakes and wildly popular reality show, the producers didn't need to dream up a dea
11h
Facebook's Made-Up Court Is Better Than No Court at All
No one has set any clear standard about how badly a politician can break Facebook's rules before getting kicked off the platform, and yesterday the company's wannabe court missed a chance to fill the void. In a decision anticipated with the fervor that might attend a high-profile Supreme Court ruling, the Facebook oversight board told the platform that, while it might have been right to ban then-
11min
International SWOT satellite to survey the world's water
How much water sloshes around in Earth's lakes, rivers, and oceans? And how does that figure change over time? The upcoming Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission plans to find out. Targeting a late-2022 launch date, this SUV-size satellite will measure the height of Earth's water. SWOT will help researchers understand and track the volume and location of water—a finite resource—around
17min
Can we get rid of the flu for good?
New research may pave the way to rid the world of the flu forever. Every year, billions of doses of flu vaccine are administered to people around the world. But by the following year, the virus has mutated, and we need to create another vaccine to deal with the new strain. New research by Tijana Ivanovic, assistant professor of biochemistry at Brandeis University, and several colleagues suggests
22min
The longer the yawn, the bigger the brain
Yawning doesn't need be a sign of boredom. Rather, it appears to be a measure of brain size. Vertebrates with larger brains yawn longer, according to a study of more than one hundred species of mammals and birds. The findings of the study, which was conducted by an international team of scientists centered around biologist Jorg Massen of Utrecht University (NL) and Andrew Gallup of the State Unive
29min
Robots at Work and Play
Advancements in robotics are continually taking place in the fields of space exploration, health care, public safety, entertainment, defense, and more. These machines—some fully autonomous, some requiring human input—extend our grasp, enhance our capabilities, and travel as our surrogates to places too dangerous or difficult for us to go. Gathered here are recent images of robotic technology, inc
35min
A kernel-modulated SIR model for Covid-19 contagious spread from county to continent [Statistics]
The tempo-spatial patterns of Covid-19 infections are a result of nested personal, societal, and political decisions that involve complicated epidemiological dynamics across overlapping spatial scales. High infection "hotspots" interspersed within regions where infections remained sporadic were ubiquitous early in the outbreak, but the spatial signature of the infection evolved to…
49min
Reverse-transcribed SARS-CoV-2 RNA can integrate into the genome of cultured human cells and can be expressed in patient-derived tissues [Medical Sciences]
Prolonged detection of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) RNA and recurrence of PCR-positive tests have been widely reported in patients after recovery from COVID-19, but some of these patients do not appear to shed infectious virus. We investigated the possibility that SARS-CoV-2 RNAs can be reverse-transcribed and integrated…
49min
The intricate relationship between transcription and translation [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Two conserved processes express the genetic information of all organisms. First, DNA is transcribed into a messenger RNA (mRNA) by the multisubunit enzyme RNA polymerase (RNAP). Second, the mRNA directs protein synthesis, when the ribosome translates its nucleotide sequence to amino acids using the genetic code. Because these two processes…
49min
Microneedles are promising devices for painless drug delivery with minimal side effects
A recent study monitors progress in the development of microneedles for immunotherapy and discusses the challenges regarding their production. Researchers suggest using microneedles for immunotherapy due to the abundance of immune cells under the skin. The aim is to vaccinate or treat different diseases, such as cancer and autoimmune disorders, with minimal invasiveness and side effects.
59min
Dinosaurs that hunted in the dark
A new study led by Wits University scientist, Professor Jonah Choiniere, used CT scanning and detailed measurements of the relative size of the eyes and inner ears of nearly 100 living bird and extinct dinosaur species, to investigate how the sensory adaptations of these two groups compared. The team found that a diminutive theropod named Shuvuuia, had extraordinary hearing and night vision, sugge
1h
A rooted phylogeny resolves early bacterial evolution
A rooted bacterial tree is necessary to understand early evolution, but the position of the root is contested. Here, we model the evolution of 11,272 gene families to identify the root, extent of horizontal gene transfer (HGT), and the nature of the last bacterial common ancestor (LBCA). Our analyses root the tree between the major clades Terrabacteria and Gracilicutes and suggest that LBCA was a
1h
Sex chromosome transformation and the origin of a male-specific X chromosome in the creeping vole
The mammalian sex chromosome system (XX female/XY male) is ancient and highly conserved. The sex chromosome karyotype of the creeping vole ( Microtus oregoni ) represents a long-standing anomaly, with an X chromosome that is unpaired in females (X0) and exclusively maternally transmitted. We produced a highly contiguous male genome assembly, together with short-read genomes and transcriptomes for
1h
The early origin of a birdlike inner ear and the evolution of dinosaurian movement and vocalization
Reptiles, including birds, exhibit a range of behaviorally relevant adaptations that are reflected in changes to the structure of the inner ear. These adaptations include the capacity for flight and sensitivity to high-frequency sound. We used three-dimensional morphometric analyses of a large sample of extant and extinct reptiles to investigate inner ear correlates of locomotor ability and heari
1h
Evolution of vision and hearing modalities in theropod dinosaurs
Owls and nightbirds are nocturnal hunters of active prey that combine visual and hearing adaptations to overcome limits on sensory performance in low light. Such sensory innovations are unknown in nonavialan theropod dinosaurs and are poorly characterized on the line that leads to birds. We investigate morphofunctional proxies of vision and hearing in living and extinct theropods and demonstrate
1h
Reversible fusion and fission of graphene oxide-based fibers
Stimuli-responsive fusion and fission are widely observed in both bio-organizations and artificial molecular assemblies. However, the design of a system with structure and property persistence during repeated fusion and fission remains challenging. We show reversible fusion and fission of wet-spun graphene oxide (GO) fibers, in which a number of macroscopic fibers can fuse into a thicker one and
1h
Interfacial toughening with self-assembled monolayers enhances perovskite solar cell reliability
Iodine-terminated self-assembled monolayer (I-SAM) was used in perovskite solar cells (PSCs) to achieve a 50% increase of adhesion toughness at the interface between the electron transport layer (ETL) and the halide perovskite thin film to enhance mechanical reliability. Treatment with I-SAM also increased the power conversion efficiency from 20.2% to 21.4%, reduced hysteresis, and improved opera
1h
Direct observation of deterministic macroscopic entanglement
Quantum entanglement of mechanical systems emerges when distinct objects move with such a high degree of correlation that they can no longer be described separately. Although quantum mechanics presumably applies to objects of all sizes, directly observing entanglement becomes challenging as masses increase, requiring measurement and control with a vanishingly small error. Here, using pulsed elect
1h
Quantum mechanics-free subsystem with mechanical oscillators
Quantum mechanics sets a limit for the precision of continuous measurement of the position of an oscillator. We show how it is possible to measure an oscillator without quantum back-action of the measurement by constructing one effective oscillator from two physical oscillators. We realize such a quantum mechanics–free subsystem using two micromechanical oscillators, and show the measurements of
1h
Reversible oxygen migration and phase transitions in hafnia-based ferroelectric devices
Unconventional ferroelectricity exhibited by hafnia-based thin films—robust at nanoscale sizes—presents tremendous opportunities in nanoelectronics. However, the exact nature of polarization switching remains controversial. We investigated a La 0.67 Sr 0.33 MnO 3 /Hf 0.5 Zr 0.5 O 2 capacitor interfaced with various top electrodes while performing in situ electrical biasing using atomic-resolution
1h
The impact of population-wide rapid antigen testing on SARS-CoV-2 prevalence in Slovakia
Slovakia conducted multiple rounds of population-wide rapid antigen testing for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) in late 2020, combined with a period of additional contact restrictions. Observed prevalence decreased by 58% (95% confidence interval: 57 to 58%) within 1 week in the 45 counties that were subject to two rounds of mass testing, an estimate that remained rob
1h
X-ray screening identifies active site and allosteric inhibitors of SARS-CoV-2 main protease
The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) caused by SARS-CoV-2 is creating tremendous human suffering. To date, no effective drug is available to directly treat the disease. In a search for a drug against COVID-19, we have performed a high-throughput x-ray crystallographic screen of two repurposing drug libraries against the SARS-CoV-2 main protease (M pro ), which is essential for viral replication. In
1h
Extreme altitudes during diurnal flights in a nocturnal songbird migrant
Billions of nocturnally migrating songbirds fly across oceans and deserts on their annual journeys. Using multisensor data loggers, we show that great reed warblers ( Acrocephalus arundinaceus ) regularly prolong their otherwise strictly nocturnal flights into daytime when crossing the Mediterranean Sea and the Sahara Desert. Unexpectedly, when prolonging their flights, they climbed steeply at da
1h
Unearthing Neanderthal population history using nuclear and mitochondrial DNA from cave sediments
Bones and teeth are important sources of Pleistocene hominin DNA, but are rarely recovered at archaeological sites. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) has been retrieved from cave sediments but provides limited value for studying population relationships. We therefore developed methods for the enrichment and analysis of nuclear DNA from sediments and applied them to cave deposits in western Europe and sou
1h
Fossil apes and human evolution
Humans diverged from apes (chimpanzees, specifically) toward the end of the Miocene ~9.3 million to 6.5 million years ago. Understanding the origins of the human lineage (hominins) requires reconstructing the morphology, behavior, and environment of the chimpanzee-human last common ancestor. Modern hominoids (that is, humans and apes) share multiple features (for example, an orthograde body plan
1h
The coding and long noncoding single-cell atlas of the developing human fetal striatum
Deciphering how the human striatum develops is necessary for understanding the diseases that affect this region. To decode the transcriptional modules that regulate this structure during development, we compiled a catalog of 1116 long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs) identified de novo and then profiled 96,789 single cells from the early human fetal striatum. We found that D1 and D2 medium sp
1h
Environmental robustness of the global yeast genetic interaction network
Phenotypes associated with genetic variants can be altered by interactions with other genetic variants (GxG), with the environment (GxE), or both (GxGxE). Yeast genetic interactions have been mapped on a global scale, but the environmental influence on the plasticity of genetic networks has not been examined systematically. To assess environmental rewiring of genetic networks, we examined 14 dive
1h
A high-tech textile to stay comfortable outdoors
Clothing, from tank tops to parkas, helps people adapt to temperatures outdoors. But you can only put on or take off so much of it, and fluctuations in weather can render what you are wearing entirely inadequate. Researchers now describe a high-tech alternative: a reversible textile they designed to trap warmth in the cold and reflect it during hot weather, all while generating small amounts of el
1h
An uncrackable combination of invisible ink and artificial intelligence
Coded messages in invisible ink sound like something only found in espionage books, but in real life, they can have important security purposes. Yet, they can be cracked if their encryption is predictable. Now, researchers have printed complexly encoded data with normal ink and a carbon nanoparticle-based invisible ink, requiring both UV light and a computer that has been taught the code to reveal
1h
SMART evaluates impact of competition between autonomous vehicles and public transit
Researchers at Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART) and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) conducted a case study in the first-mile mobility market from origins to subway stations in Tampines, Singapore, to find out the impact of competition between public transit and shared autonomous vehicles. The study revealed that with the right conditions, the competition can b
1h
Prediabetes may not be as benign as once thought
People with prediabetes were significantly more likely to suffer a heart attack, stroke or other major cardiovascular event when compared with those who had normal blood sugar levels, according to new research. Researchers said the findings should serve as a wake-up call for clinicians and patients alike to try to prevent prediabetes in the first place.
1h
One bone fracture increases risk for subsequent breaks in postmenopausal women
Current guidelines for managing osteoporosis specifically call out hip or spine fractures for increasing the risk for subsequent bone breaks. But a new study suggests that fractures in the arm, wrist, leg and other parts of the body should also set off alarm bells. A fracture, no matter the location, indicates a general tendency to break a bone in the future at a different location.
1h
Why some fish have two eyes on one side of their head
If you've ever looked at a flatfish like a flounder or sole and wondered why both its eyes are on one side of its head, new research has your answer. "Flatfishes are some of the weirdest vertebrates on the planet, and they got weird very, very fast by changing multiple traits at once over a short period of time," says Kory Evans, an assistant professor of biosciences at Rice University who specia
1h
A new window to see hidden side of magnetized universe
New observations and simulations show that jets of high-energy particles emitted from the central massive black hole in the brightest galaxy in galaxy clusters can be used to map the structure of invisible inter-cluster magnetic fields. These findings provide astronomers with a new tool for investigating previously unexplored aspects of clusters of galaxies.
1h
Ancient DNA reveals origin of first Bronze Age civilizations in Europe
The first civilisations to build monumental palaces and urban centres in Europe are more genetically homogenous than expected, according to genomes gathered from archaeological sites around the Aegean. Individuals from the northern Aegean were considerably different by the Middle Bronze Age, sharing half their ancestry with people from the Pontic-Caspian steppe. These populations were highly simil
1h
Legendary Sargasso Sea may be sea turtles' destination during mysterious 'lost years'
New research indicates that the legendary Sargasso Sea, which includes part of the Bermuda Triangle and has long featured in fiction as a place where ships go derelict, may actually be an important nursery habitat for young sea turtles. Researchers presented evidence of baby green sea turtles arriving at the Sargasso Sea after entering the ocean off the east coast of Florida.
1h
PCB levels in Icelandic orcas depend on what they eat
Some Icelandic killer whales have very high concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls in their blubber, according to a new study. But it seems that other orcas from the same population have levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) that are much lower. It mainly depends on what they eat. PCBs are industrial chemicals banned decades ago, after they were found to affect the health of both humans
2h
Protected by nanobrushes
The ability of antibodies to recognize specific cancer cells is used in oncology to specifically target those cells with small active agents. Research published in the journal Angewandte Chemie shows that scientists have now built a transport system that delivers even large protein-based drugs into cancer cells. This study demonstrates how proteins can arrive at their target intact, protected from
2h
SpaceX Starship SN15 Lands in One Piece After High-Altitude Flight
It's taken a few tries, but the new SpaceX Starship rocket has successfully landed following a high-altitude test, bringing Elon Musk's spaceflight firm one step closer to the Moon. The success of Starship SN15 comes after four previous landing attempts ended in fiery crashes, but that didn't stop SpaceX from putting its test flights on display for all to see. It paid off this time, as the world
2h
The Atlantic Daily: Trump Made Content Moderation Into Reality TV
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox. Donald Trump remains banned from Facebook—for now. The company's oversight board upheld the former president's suspension, which was put into place in January following the riots at the United Sta
2h
Archaeal enzyme that produces membrane lipids is spectacularly promiscuous
Cells of all life forms are surrounded by a membrane that is made of phospholipids. One of these are the cardiolipins, which form a separate class due to their unique structure. When studying the enzyme that is responsible for producing cardiolipins in archaea (single-cell organisms that constitute a separate domain of life), biochemists at the University of Groningen made a surprising discovery.
2h
Cell cytoskeleton as target for new active agents
Through a unique combination of computer simulations and laboratory experiments, researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) have discovered new binding sites for active agents—against cancer, for example—on a vital protein of the cell cytoskeleton. Eleven of the sites hadn't been known before. The study appears today in the journal Angewandte Chemie International Edition.
2h
Unusual semimetal shows evidence of unique surface conduction states
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology experimentally verify the existence of exotic surface conduction states in topological semimetals (TSMs), materials that lie at the boundary between conductors and insulators, by performing voltage scans of these surface states on a thin film sample of a TSM. The findings can pave the way for future study and exploitation of such conduction states in rea
2h
2D materials offer unique stretching properties
Like most materials, an elastic band gets thinner when it is stretched. But some materials behave in the opposite way—they grow thicker when stretched and thinner when compressed. These counterintuitive substances, known as auxetic materials, tend to have a high resistance to shear or fracture and are used in applications such as medical implants and sensors. But typically, this auxetic effect is
2h
New method boosts syngas generation from biopolyols
Photocatalytic biomass conversion is an ideal way of generating syngas (H2 and CO) via C-C bond cleavage, which is initiated by hydrogen abstraction of the O/C-H bond. However, the lack of efficient electron-proton transfer limits its efficiency. Conversional gasification of biomass into syngas needs to be performed at high temperatures (400-700 °C).
3h
On-demand synthesis of phosphoramidites
Nature Communications, Published online: 12 May 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22945-z The poor bench stability of phosphoramidites is a drawback for fast automised chemical oligonucleotide synthesis. Here, the authors report a method for on-demand flow synthesis of phosphoramidites within short reaction times, in near-quantitative yields and sufficient purity for integration with DNA synthesizers.
3h
How cell phone data can help redesign cities
A treasure trove of mobility data from devices like smartphones has allowed the field of "city science" to blossom. I recently was part of team that compared mobility patterns in Brazilian and American cities. We found that, in many cities, low-income and high-income residents rarely travel to the same geographic locations. Such segregation has major implications for urban design. Almost 55 perce
3h
Blocking viruses' exit strategy
The Marburg virus, a relative of Ebola, likewise causes a dangerous and often fatal disease. In a study co-led by the University of Pennsylvania's Ronald Harty, an experimental antiviral drug, which prevents the virus from exiting host cells and spreading to new cells, showed promising results. The researchers are also encouraged by similarities in the drug's response against SARS-CoV-2, the virus
3h
The COVID-19 pandemic: Even mild disease impacts mental health
A significant level of symptoms of depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress may follow COVID-19 independent of any previous psychiatric diagnoses. Exposure to increased symptomatic levels of COVID-19 may be associated with psychiatric symptoms after the acute phase of the disease. This is the largest study to evaluate depressive, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress symptoms in tandem among pat
3h
Cryptic sense of orientation of bats localized: the sixth sense of mammals lies in the eye
Mammals see with their eyes, hear with their ears and smell with their nose. But which sense or organ allows them to orient themselves on their migrations, which sometimes go far beyond their local foraging areas and therefore require an extended ability to navigate? Scientific experiments now show that the cornea of the eyes is the location of such an important sense in migrating bats.
3h
In the Alps, climate change affects biodiversity
A team of ecologists has published a review that quantifies seasonal changes and elevational movements of more than 2,000 species of plants, animals and fungi that live in the Alps. This review shows that species have shifted their life cycles earlier during the season and their distribution higher along the elevational gradient, but that the average velocity of range shift, which varies from spec
4h
Not so wicked after all?
Although the fairy tale of the wicked stepmother is a tale as old as time, the effects of blending children with their new stepfamilies may not be as grim as once thought.In fact, new research shows that stepchildren are not at a disadvantage compared to their peers from single-parent households and actually experience better outcomes than their halfsiblings — good news for the more than 113 mill
4h
The origin of reproductive organs
Early in fetal development, a mass of cells known as the bipotential gonad has the possibility of giving rise either to ovaries or testes, reproductive organs that contribute to many of the characteristics that define a person's sex. In a new study, the University of Pennsylvania's Kotaro Sasaki and colleagues pinpoint the origins of that precursor gland.
4h
Researchers identify cause and drug targets for bewildering rare children's disease
Researchers have finally cracked the code of a bewildering pediatric disease that sets off a characteristic cytokine storm–a harmful immune system overaction resembling one that arises in COVID-19 cases–and can lead to catastrophic multisystem organ failure or neurodegeneration. Their study, which identifies the cause of the cytokine storm and possible treatments, was published in Nature Medicin
4h
JAMA Health Forum now peer-reviewed journal
What The Editorial Says: JAMA Health Forum debuts this week as a peer-reviewed, open-access, online journal focused on health policy, health care systems, and global and public health. The journal has transitioned from an online health policy channel and is the newest member of the family of JAMA Network specialty journals.
4h
Trial demonstrates early AI-guided detection of heart disease in routine practice
Heart disease can take a number of forms, but some types of heart disease, such as asymptomatic low ejection fraction, can be hard to recognize, especially in the early stages when treatment would be most effective. The ECG AI-Guided Screening for Low Ejection Fraction, or EAGLE, trial set out to determine whether an artificial intelligence (AI) screening tool developed to detect low ejection frac
4h
Towards 2D memory technology by magnetic graphene
In spintronics, the magnetic moment of electrons is used to transfer and manipulate information. An ultra-compact 2D spin-logic circuitry could be built from 2D materials that can transport the spin information over long distances and provide strong spin-polarization of charge current. Experiments by physicists suggest that magnetic graphene can be the ultimate choice for these 2D spin-logic devic
4h
To Advance AI We Need to Better Understand Human Intelligence, and Fix These 4 Fallacies
Artificial intelligence has been all over headlines for nearly a decade, as systems have made quick progress in long-standing AI challenges like image recognition, natural language processing, and games. Tech companies have sown machine learning algorithms into search and recommendation engines and facial recognition systems, and OpenAI's GPT-3 and DeepMind's AlphaFold promise even more practical
4h
Discarded COVID masks and gloves are really bad for the environment
When it comes to COVID-19 masks, gloves, and disinfectants, the transformation from protection to pollution happens quickly, but the damage can last for centuries. We've all seen these discarded gloves and masks littering parking lots and sidewalks. Some of them make their way to rivers and oceans and wash up in remote, wild places. Invisibly, powerful disinfectants also end up in the water—and p
4h
'Breaking the links' in the chain of violence: Journal of Psychiatric Practice continues series on therapeutic risk management approach
With mass shootings and other seemingly meaningless acts of violence in the headlines all too frequently, strategies to assess the risk and reduce the potential for violent acts are sorely needed. The fourth in a series of five columns devoted to therapeutic risk management of violence – focusing on a method called chain analysis to identify and target pathways leading to violent thoughts and beha
4h
The never-ending trip: LSD flashbacks and a psychedelic disorder that can last forever
LSD flashbacks have been studied for decades, though scientists still aren't quite sure why some people experience them. A subset of people who take psychedelics and then experience flashbacks develop hallucinogen persisting perception disorder (HPPD), a rare condition in which people experience regular or near-constant psychedelic symptoms. There's currently no cure for the disorder, though some
4h
Why children of immigrants experience guilt — and strategies to cope | Sahaj Kaur Kohli
Children of immigrants in the US often experience a unique kind of guilt, brought on by the pressures of navigating different cultures, living up to their parents' expectations and taking on extra family responsibilities. Mental health advocate Sahaj Kaur Kohli offers helpful strategies for dealing with these difficult feelings — starting with defining your own values and creating space for self-
4h
Immune system paints SARS-CoV-2 spike protein with antibodies
New research brings into focus the most complete picture yet of how antibodies produced in people who effectively fight off SARS-CoV-2 work to neutralize the part of the virus responsible for causing infection. Researchers say the finding represents good news for designing the next generation of vaccines to protect against variants of the virus or future emerging coronaviruses. "There's an evolut
4h
Defective epithelial barriers linked to two billion chronic diseases
Humans are exposed to a variety of toxins and chemicals every day. According to the epithelial barrier hypothesis, exposure to many of these substances damages the epithelium, the thin layer of cells that covers the surface of our skin, lungs and intestine. Defective epithelial barriers have been linked to a rise in almost two billion allergic, autoimmune, neurodegenerative and psychiatric disease
4h
ATTR amyloidosis during the COVID-19 Pandemic: Insights from a global medical roundtablp
COVID-19 primarily involves the respiratory system, dysfunction in multiple organ systems is common, particularly in the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, immune, renal, and nervous systems. Patients with transthyretin amyloidosis (ATTR) (a disease caused by an abnormal misfolded protein that causes buildup of amyloid deposits in the heart, peripheral nervous system including the autonomic nervous
4h
Researchers find association between financial strain due to COVID-19 and depression
Researchers have found an independent association between COVID-19-related income loss and financial strain and depression, according to the latest study from the COVID-19 Resilience Project, run by the Lifespan Brain Institute (LiBI) of Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and Penn Medicine. This association was found in two separate cohorts – one primarily in the United States and one in I
4h
Greater effectiveness in the treatment of arrhythmia with radio frequency energy and catheterization
An article published in International Journal of Hyperthermia proposes a more effective protocol for the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias when applying radiofrequency energy at the site of the arrhythmia by catheterization. The research results from the final year project on the bachelor's degree in Biomedical Engineering by Sergi Coderch Navarro, supervised by Ana González Suárez and Oscar Camara
4h
How has our thinking on the climate crisis changed?
When the Guardian began reporting on the climate crisis 70 years ago, people were worried that warmer temperatures would make it harder to complain about the weather. Today it is the biggest challenge humanity has ever faced. In the second special episode marking 200 years of the Guardian, Phoebe Weston is joined by Jonathan Watts, Prof Naomi Oreskes and Alice Bell to take a look at climate covera
4h
Air pollution exposure as a kid may up risk of mental illness later
A multidecade study of young adults living in the United Kingdom has found higher rates of mental illness symptoms among those exposed to higher levels of traffic-related air pollutants, particularly nitrogen oxides, during childhood and adolescence. Previous studies have identified a link between air pollution and the risk of specific mental disorders, including depression and anxiety, but this
4h
Inactivating pathogens using low-energy electrons
Vaccines are currently a great source of hope for many people, as it is believed they will help to protect society against COVID-19 and pave the way back to a normal life. The current focus is clearly on coronavirus—but vaccines are also fundamental to combating other pathogens. A team of researchers from three Fraunhofer Institutes has now developed a method of producing vaccines that is faster,
4h
Så testas covid-vaccinerna
Vaccinerna mot covid-19 har tagits fram på samma sätt som andra vacciner, men på rekordtid. Finns det några risker med det? Och hur testas de egentligen för att bli godkända för människor? Vacciner utvecklas precis som andra läkemedel i en noggrann process som styrs av ett strikt regelverk. Den stora skillnaden mot andra läkemedel är att vacciner ges till friska människor. – Det gör att man behöv
4h
More than one way for animals to survive climate change
As climate change continues to trigger the rise in temperature, increase drier conditions and shift precipitation patterns, adapting to new conditions will be critical for the long-term survival of most species. Researchers at the University of New Hampshire found that to live in hotter more desert-like surroundings, and exist without water, there is more than one genetic mechanism allowing animal
5h
Twitter data unveils issues nursing mothers face, informs proposed interventions
Social media has become a platform for new mothers to openly share their experiences of the joys and challenges of parenthood. Researchers at Penn State and Dalhousie University have unraveled the sentiments in nursing mothers' tweets to better understand the factors influencing breastfeeding behaviors. They hope the findings can inform policies and interventions to support and improve resources f
5h
Novavax COVID-19 vaccine trial results show efficacy against the B.1.351 variant in SA study
The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) today published findings of the Phase 2b clinical trial conducted in South Africa.NEJM is recognised as the world's leading medical journal.Shabir Madhi, Professor of Vaccinology, co-author of the study, and the Director of the Vaccines & Infectious Diseases Analytics Research Unit (Wits VIDA), led the Novavax Covid-19 vaccine trial in South Africa.
5h
Pioneering study explores passengers' experiences of self-driving cars in winter conditions
Trust, safety and security are the most important factors affecting passengers' attitudes towards self-driving cars. Younger people felt their personal security to be significantly better than older people.The findings are from a Finnish study into passengers' attitudes towards, and experiences of, self-driving cars. The study is also the first in the world to examine passengers' experiences of se
5h
T-GPS processes a graph with trillion edges on a single computer?
A KAIST research team has developed a new technology that enables to process a large-scale graph algorithm without storing the graph in the main memory or on disks. Named as T-GPS (Trillion-scale Graph Processing Simulation) by the developer Professor Min-Soo Kim from the School of Computing at KAIST, it can process a graph with one trillion edges using a single computer.
5h
Phonon imaging in 3D with a fiber probe
Scientists at the University of Nottingham have developed an ultrasonic imaging system which can be deployed on the tip of a hair-thin optical fibre. The device is the first ultrasonic fibre imaging tool to breach the GHz frequency range; a regime in which mechanical vibrations begin to behave as particles (phonons). This frequency range unlocks unprecedented imaging resolution for ultrasonic fibr
5h
Alzheimer's study: A Mediterranean diet might protect against memory loss and dementia
Alzheimer's disease is caused by protein deposits in the brain and the rapid loss of brain matter. But a Mediterranean diet rich in fish, vegetables and olive oil might protect the brain from these disease triggers. Experts from the DZNE report on this in a recent study. Their findings are published in the May 5, 2021 online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neuro
5h
UNH research: More than one way for animals to survive climate change
Researchers at the University of New Hampshire found that to live in hotter more desert-like surroundings, and exist without water, there is more than one genetic mechanism allowing animals to adapt. This is important not only for their survival but may also provide important biomedical groundwork to develop gene therapies to treat human dehydration related illnesses, like kidney disease.
5h
Antarctic ice melt could cause 'catastrophic' sea level rise
The Antarctic ice sheet is much less likely to become unstable and cause dramatic sea-level rise in upcoming centuries if the world follows policies that keep global warming below a key 2015 Paris climate agreement target, according to a new study. But if global warming exceeds the target—2 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit)—the risk of ice shelves around the ice sheet's perimeter melting w
6h
Fashion designers are actually not 'dictators of taste,' study finds
Most of the literature on innovation develops in the context of technology, where the degree of radical or incremental change in terms of functionality of the product can be evaluated according to objective and predictable models. In creative industries, a valuable source of competitive advantage lies in aesthetic innovation. In the world of fashion in particular, innovation is reflected in the wa
6h
High-risk, disadvantaged groups face barriers to preventing spread of COVID-19
Social factors such as education, financial stability, food security and the neighborhood where someone resides were strongly correlated with whether or not individuals with heart disease adopted measures to prevent the spread of COVID-19, including wearing masks and working from home, according to a study presented at the American College of Cardiology's 70th Annual Scientific Session. The resear
7h
Mental health may play big role in recovery after a heart attack
Young and middle-aged adults who reported severe psychological distress–such as depression or anxiety–after suffering a heart attack were more than twice as likely to suffer a second cardiac event within five years compared with those experiencing only mild distress, according to a study presented at the American College of Cardiology's 70th Annual Scientific Session.
7h
Men with chest pain receive faster, more medical attention than women
Among younger adults visiting the emergency department for chest pain, women may be getting the short end of the stick. Compared with men of similar age, women were triaged less urgently, waited longer to be seen, and were less likely to undergo basic tests or be hospitalized or admitted for observation to diagnose a heart attack, according to new research being presented at the American College o
7h
Have high blood pressure? You may want to check your meds
Nearly 1 in 5 adults with high blood pressure, a leading risk factor for heart disease and stroke, also take a medicine that could be elevating their blood pressure, according to new research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 70th Annual Scientific Session. The results underscore the need for patients to routinely review all of the medications they take with their care team, includ
7h
Alcohol in moderation may help the heart by calming stress signals in the brain
Moderate alcohol intake–defined as no more than one alcoholic drink for women and two for men per day–has been associated with a lower risk of dying from cardiovascular disease when compared with individuals who abstain from drinking or partake in excessive drinking, according to a new study being presented at the American College of Cardiology's 70th Annual Scientific Session.
7h
AI is not perfect — Domain knowledge is a key in engineering
The Korea Institute of Civil Engineering and Building Technology (KICT) has announced the development of a fully-automated peak-picking method for cable monitoring. The developed method will improve reliability of the method. Such as Incheon Bridge in South Korea, Cable-stayed bridges have received significant attention as efficient structural systems worldwide. In this regard, newly developed cab
7h
How to strengthen housing safety nets
U.S. homeowners and renters need stronger safety nets than existing social insurance programs provide to prevent housing insecurity during economic downturns, according to a new paper based on a study by Wharton real estate professor Benjamin Keys and co-authors at the University of Notre Dame and New York University.
7h
Förbud mot nollflöde i vattenkraftverk kan rädda djurliv
I långa perioder står vattenkraftverken helt stilla – nolltappning torrlägger strömfåror och stör ekosystemet. Ett krav på minimiflöde genom vattenkraftverken skulle spara på de strömlevande arternas miljö, menar forskare. I utbyggda älvar kan vattenflöden och vattenstånd skifta snabbt vilket orsakar stress och störningar för vattendragens djur- och växtarter. Men det innebär också långa perioder
7h
Always Have Backup Power With This Ultimate All-In-One Charger
The dream of ever-lasting batteries will almost certainly become reality eventually. In the meantime, we find ourselves with a growing proliferation of devices that are hungry for power, especially when you're on the go and away from an outlet. The ScoutPro can keep any of your devices well-fed, no matter how power-hungry they may be, and right now, it's available for just $99 . The ScoutPro is b
7h
Breakthrough Listen Project Scans 60 Million Stars, Finds Zero Aliens
Parkes Observatory and the Milky Way, perfectly lined up Scientists with the Breakthrough Listen project took up the mantle of the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) several years ago, continuing the decades-long search for E.T. The project has just released its largest survey to date, consisting of more than 60 million stars… and no aliens . There are numerous ways we might detect a
7h
5:2 diet helps reduce skin symptoms in Psoriasis patients
New research investigating for the first time the effects of modified intermittent fasting (MIF) on the skin of people with psoriasis has yielded promising results. Preliminary study findings presented today at the EADV Spring Symposium, show a significant reduction in scaling and thickness in patients with mild psoriasis after following a MIF 5:2 diet (eating normally for 5 days and restricting c
9h
The Silent Epidemic of Premature Death in Black Men
Even before the pandemic, Black men in the U.S. lived, on average, five years fewer than White men and a decade shorter than women overall. Research suggests this disparity reflects the experiences of men whose emotional wellbeing is rarely attended to, and whose contributions aren't properly recognized.
9h
Intrinsic coupling between spatially-separated surface Fermi-arcs in Weyl orbit quantum Hall states
Nature Communications, Published online: 06 May 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22904-8 The spatial distribution of the quantized transport due to the presence of Weyl orbits in topological semimetals remains elusive. Here, the authors report concomitant modulation of doubly-degenerate quantum Hall states, evidencing intrinsic coupling between two spatially separated surface states in the Weyl orbit
9h
Interplay of two transcription factors for recruitment of the chromatin remodeling complex modulates fungal nitrosative stress response
Nature Communications, Published online: 06 May 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22831-8 Plant and animal tissues produce nitric oxide and reactive nitrogen species that induce nitrosative stress in pathogens. Here, Jian et al. identify two transcriptional regulators in the phytopathogen Fusarium graminearum that control the nitrosative stress response by modulating the recruitment of a chromatin-rem
9h
Structural coordination between active sites of a CRISPR reverse transcriptase-integrase complex
Nature Communications, Published online: 06 May 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22900-y In some systems, a single protein comprising reverse transcriptase (RT), integrase and maturase enables concerted sequence integration and crRNA production. Here, analyses including the structure of a Cas6-RT-Cas1—Cas2 complex suggest coordination between all three active sites and capacity to acquire CRISPR sequ
9h
On the optimality of 2°C targets and a decomposition of uncertainty
Nature Communications, Published online: 06 May 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22826-5 Determining attractive response strategies for international climate policy is a complex task. Here, the authors develop a meta-model that disentangles the main uncertainties using full literature ranges and use it to directly compare the insights of the cost-minimising and cost-benefit modelling communities.
9h
Inferring experimental procedures from text-based representations of chemical reactions
Nature Communications, Published online: 06 May 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22951-1 In organic chemistry, synthetic routes for new molecules are often specified in terms of reacting molecules only. The current work reports an artificial intelligence model to predict the full sequence of experimental operations for an arbitrary chemical equation.
9h
Isolerade öar ytterst känsliga för mänsklig påverkan
Människans kolonisering av avlägsna och isolerade öar har resulterat i enorma förändringar i öarnas ekosystem. En studie från Lunds universitet visar nu att öarna sannolikt inte kommer att återgå till ett naturligt tillstånd – även om all mänsklig påverkan upphör. I den nya studien som publiceras i den vetenskapliga tidskriften Science har ett forskarlag undersökt hur människan påverkat öars vege
10h
Alzheimers sjukdom – fyra distinkta subtyper
Alzheimers sjukdom kännetecknas av onormal spridning och ansamling av proteinet tau i hjärnan. En internationell studie visar nu hur tau sprids enligt fyra distinkta mönster som leder till olika symtom med olika prognoser för de drabbade individerna.
12h
Elon Musk's Starship lands successfully for first time – video
SpaceX launches and successfully lands its futuristic Starship SN15 for the first time. The previous four test flights for the rocketship had ended in explosions for the vehicle that SpaceX founder Elon Musk hopes will eventually transport humans to Mars. This latest upgraded version of SpaceX's full-scale, stainless steel, bullet-shaped rocketship reached a maximum altitude of over six miles (10
13h
We need to build more EV fast-charging stations, researchers say
A team of engineers recommends expanding fast-charging stations for electric vehicles as campuses and businesses start planning for a post-pandemic world. The recommendation is based on a study of charging patterns for electric vehicles on the University of California San Diego campus from early January to late May of 2020, after the university moved most of its operations online. Researchers say
15h
Buy? Sell? Hold? Stop Guessing, Start Investing
If you're a regular reader of this website, you've undoubtedly heard stories about bedroom retail traders becoming millionaires overnight, often on the back of a meme stock or cryptocurrency that was worth pennies one day and billions the next. It's an alluring proposition, but for every day trader who got in (and out) at the exact right moment, there are thousands–if not millions–of armchair mon
18h
Breathing problems are the second most common symptom of heart attacks
One in four heart attack patients have atypical symptoms such as breathing difficulties, extreme exhaustion, and abdominal pain, according to a study published today in European Heart Journal — Acute Cardiovascular Care, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). Patients with atypical symptoms were less likely to receive emergency help and more likely to die within 30 days compared t
20h
Is PTSD overdiagnosed?
Some clinicians are concerned that post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) diagnosis has risen throughout Western society since the late 1980s. Is this correct? And if so, has the true incidence of PTSD really spiralled out of control, or has it simply become overdiagnosed? Experts debate the issue in The BMJ this week.
20h
Currency Heatwave Puts Cutting-Edge Financial Tools In Your Hand For $10
Modern technology has created a world of finance where fortunes can be made or lost in literally less than a second . It's also enabled new financial tools in cutting-edge markets that before were limited by access to information. Currency Heatwave, currently 50% off for a lifetime subscription , brings modern tech to a durable concept. Currency Heatwave is a set of tools for analyzing foreign ex
21h
I'm absolutely terrified of the future and technology – is it justified?
Hi, I'm 22yo and more recently I've been feeling this huge sense of dread over the future and technology. I really want to ask some advice and opinions from people who know more, and I hope someone can help ease my mind a bit. In recent years I've become almost anti-tech. I feel I have to push as hard as I can against this constant march of progress. It's not to be "alternative" or anything, I am
22h
If Covid-19 becomes endemic in Europe and the Americas, what could be predictable and possible enexpected consequences of this?
There is talk that Covid-19 might become endemic in many areas, since the proportion of people which opt for vaccination (around 60%-70%)is too low even when using very effective vaccines (with an efficiency >= 95%). This can be estimated even if using very simplified models like these . Assuming that Covid-19 becomes endemic in the US, South and Central America, India, and Europe, but possibly n
22h
Gender pay gaps in nonprofits are even greater when there is room for salary negotiations
With increased media attention and political campaigns focusing on the gender pay gap, the fact that women — on average — are paid less than men, has become an important public discussion. While much of the focus has been on the corporate sector, a new study that looked at executive compensation at nonprofit organizations found that women earn 8.9% less than men with the gap becoming greater whe
23h
Large study links dementia to poor kidney function
Older people with kidney disease have a higher risk of dementia, and the risk increases with the rate and stage of kidney function decline. That is according to a large observational study by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden, published in the journal Neurology. The findings stress the significance of screening and monitoring for dementia in persons with kidney disease, the researcher
23h
Some parents are lax about alcohol when teens hit puberty early
Parents of teens who go through puberty early may be more lenient when it comes to letting them drink alcohol, according to a new study. But even if adolescents appear more mature, drinking alcohol is still not safe for them, researchers say. The study in Child Development aimed to discover why adolescents who go through puberty early are more likely than their peers to drink alcohol. "A surprisi
23h
Nanoscope presents novel gene delivery and electrophysiology platforms at ARVO
Nanoscope Technologies LLC, a biotechnology company developing gene therapies for treatment of retinal diseases, is featuring multiple scientific presentations highlighting its groundbreaking research on optical gene delivery for vision restoration and OCT-guided electrophysiology platforms for characterization of retinal degeneration and assessment of efficacy of cell-gene therapy at the 2021 ARV
23h
Detailed look at how charge transfer distorts a molecule's structure
When light hits certain molecules, it dislodges electrons that then move from one location to another, creating areas of positive and negative charge. This 'charge transfer' is highly important in many areas of chemistry, photosynthesis and semiconductor devices and solar cells. A new study reveals how a molecule's structure changes as charge is redistributed, with some chemical bonds getting long
23h
Ostrich eggshells hold clues to our earliest ancestors
The shells of ostrich eggs offer a timeline for some of the earliest Homo sapiens who settled down to utilize marine food resources along the South African coast more than 100,000 years ago. Archeologists have learned a lot about our ancestors by rummaging through their garbage piles, which contain evidence of their diet and population levels as the local flora and fauna changed over time. One co
23h
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Leave a Reply