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Just 2% of SARS-CoV-2-positive individuals carry 90% of the virus circulating in communities [Microbiology]
We analyze data from the fall 2020 pandemic response efforts at the University of Colorado Boulder, where more than 72,500 saliva samples were tested for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) using qRT-PCR. All samples were collected from individuals who reported no symptoms associated with COVID-19 on the day…
40min

LATEST

Zero daily Covid deaths reported in England, Northern Ireland and Scotland
Experts caution figures subject to time lags but say news reflects impact of lockdowns and vaccination Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage England has recorded zero daily Covid deaths for the first time since July, in a situation welcomed by experts who said it reflected the impact of lockdowns and vaccination against the disease. Monday marked the first time since 30 Ju
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Melinda Gates Met With Divorce Lawyers Around the Time of Epstein's Arrest
"Irretrievably Broken" Melinda and Bill Gates announced their plans to get a divorce last week, but it turns out that the powerful couple's separation has been in the works for years now. While there's no official, publicly-available reasoning for the upcoming divorce, The Wall Street Journal reports that Bill Gates' relationship with financier and convicted sex criminal Jeffrey Epstein seems to
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The Texas Republican Asking His Party to Just Stop
Will Hurd is the kind of politician who loves to find the middle ground. He spent six years as a Republican congressman from one of the most competitive districts in the country, a sprawling expanse that traces the southwest border of Texas along the Rio Grande. He's got the jocular manner of a student-body president—which he was, at Texas A&M—and styles himself as a wonkish policy guy. "You said
21h
No connection between father-son relationships, adherence to masculine norms
A team of researchers at Federation University in Australia has found that there is no connection between the relationship boys have with their father as they grow up and their adherence to masculine norms later on in life. In their paper published in the journal Personality and Individual Differences the group describes developing a questionnaire aimed at assessing views on masculinity and the ty
4h
The process of combining maternal and paternal genetic information is surprisingly error-prone
Only one in three fertilizations leads to a successful pregnancy. Many embryos fail to progress beyond early development. Cell biologists at the Max Planck Institute (MPI) for Biophysical Chemistry in Göttingen (Germany), together with researchers at the Institute of Farm Animal Genetics in Mariensee and other international colleagues, have now developed a new model system for studying early embry
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New material to treat wounds can protect against resistant bacteria
Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have developed a new material that prevents infections in wounds, a specially designed hydrogel that works against all types of bacteria, including antibiotic-resistant strains. The new material offers great hope for combating a growing global problem.
5h
Tracking the recruitment and evolution of snake toxins using the evolutionary context provided by the Bothrops jararaca genome [Evolution]
Venom is a key adaptive innovation in snakes, and how nonvenom genes were co-opted to become part of the toxin arsenal is a significant evolutionary question. While this process has been investigated through the phylogenetic reconstruction of toxin sequences, evidence provided by the genomic context of toxin genes remains less…
40min
The evolution and changing ecology of the African hominid oral microbiome [Anthropology]
The oral microbiome plays key roles in human biology, health, and disease, but little is known about the global diversity, variation, or evolution of this microbial community. To better understand the evolution and changing ecology of the human oral microbiome, we analyzed 124 dental biofilm metagenomes from humans, including Neanderthals…
40min
Barnavårdsutredningar görs allt oftare av privata konsulter
Att socialtjänsten tar hjälp av privata konsulter för att göra barnavårdsutredningar har blivit vanligare. Forskare har undersökt vad det beror på, och hur det påverkar socialtjänstens uppdrag. – I Sverige har utvecklingen skett ganska tyst trots att myndighetsutövning enligt svensk lag är ett ansvar för kommunal och statlig förvaltning, säger Ulrika Järkestig Berggren, lektor i socialt arbete vi
8h
Team links gut bacteria to neurodegenerative diseases
Researchers have established, for the first time, a link between specific gut bacteria species and physical manifestations of neurodegenerative diseases. Neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and ALS affect millions of adults, but scientists still do not know what causes these diseases, which poses a significant roadblock to developing treatments or preventative measures. R
21h
Doctors Alarmed by Outbreak of "Black Fungus" That Infects Patients' Brains
India, already in the midst of a catastrophic wave of COVID-19 infections, is now facing a dual health crisis: dangerous "black fungus" infections developing in recovered patients' brains. Typically, mucormycosis is an extremely rare infection caused when mold takes root in a person's brain, lungs, or sinuses, The BBC reports . A healthy person's immune system can typically fend it off ­— the act
21h
NASA Detects "Hum" Coming From Beyond Solar System
Almost a decade ago, NASA's Voyager 1 spacecraft left the outer edge of our Solar System to enter interstellar space. It marked the first time a spacecraft had ever done so, a culmination of almost 35 years of traveling through space. Now, researchers are digging through all the fascinating data from it that's making its way back to Earth — and they've found something strange: a background "hum"
23h
SpaceX Is Getting Ready to Fly Starship SN15 Again
Second Flight It was a proud moment for SpaceX — the Elon Musk-led space company managed to pull off a near-perfect launch and landing of its Starship prototype SN15 last week. Aside from a small and contained post-landing fire, SN15's maiden voyage went largely by without a hitch. But it's job isn't over. According to a Friday tweet by Musk, the company "might try to refly SN15 soon" — an early
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Cornell Scientist: NASA May Have Accidentally Spread Life to Mars
Tiny Stowaways NASA is working hard toward its goal of bringing humans to Mars in the near future — but it may have accidentally sent other forms of life to the Red Planet in the meantime. NASA takes extreme care to clean its spacecraft piece by piece as they're assembled, but it's impossible to actually get the number of microbes in an area down to zero, Cornell geneticist Christopher Mason wrot
1h
Humanity's most distant space probe captures a strange sound
Voyager 1, humankind's most distant space probe, detected an unusual "hum" in the data from interstellar space. The noise is likely produced by interstellar gas. Further investigation may reveal the hum's exact origins. Voyager 1, humanity's most faraway spacecraft, has detected an unusual "hum" coming from outside our solar system. Fourteen billion miles away from Earth, the Voyager's instrument
16h
China: Actually, Our Hurtling Deathrocket Was Totally Fine
Crash Landing Pieces of a Chinese Long March 5B rocket crashed down into the Indian Ocean Saturday night after a week-long uncontrolled re-entry into the Earth's atmosphere. The descent drew the ire of the global community, as speculation about a disastrous crash mounted and took the focus away from what had otherwise been a successful mission to space. "It is clear that China is failing to meet
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First discovery of methanol in a warm planet-forming disk
An international team of researchers led by Alice Booth (Leiden University, the Netherlands) have discovered methanol-ijs in the warm part of a planet-forming disk. The methanol cannot have been produced there and must have originated in the cold gas clouds from which the star and the disk formed. Thus, the methanol is inherited. If that is common, it could give the development of life a flying st
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Elon Musk Hints Tesla Might Soon Accept Dogecoin
Accepting Doge In a poll posted to Twitter , Tesla CEO Elon Musk asked his millions of followers whether his electric car company should start accepting the joke-but-maybe-not-a-joke cryptocurrency Dogecoin . The price of the meme-themed token rallied some 20 percent after Musk posted the poll, recovering to levels last seen before his Saturday Night Live appearance, as Insider reports . Unsurpri
2h
UK travellers complain of 'prison-like' conditions in quarantine hotels
Concerns raised over food, lack of fresh air and social distancing after coming back from red list countries Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Travellers staying in quarantine hotels in the UK after returning from "red list" countries have complained of "prison-like" conditions, including windows that do not open, a lack of fresh air, exercise and decent food. The Guar
6h
The Steep Cost of Decades of Discrimination
T he rich have grown richer and the poor poorer during the pandemic, and institutions of higher education have been no exception. Colleges that primarily serve students who are an unexpected expense away from leaving school bore the brunt of the crisis. Community-college enrollments were down 9.5 percent last fall; historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) saw a decline of 5 percent .
17h
Nasa spacecraft leaves asteroid Bennu with a belly full of space rock samples
Osiris-Rex has been flying around the ancient asteroid since 2018 and collected nearly a pound of rubble last fall With rubble from an asteroid tucked inside, a Nasa spacecraft fired its engines and began the long journey back to Earth on Monday, leaving the ancient space rock in its rearview mirror. The trip home for the robotic prospector, Osiris-Rex, will take two years. Continue reading…
18h
Scientist: We Should Be Searching for the Alien Version of Elon Musk
North Star As SpaceX blankets the night sky with more and more of its Starlink satellites , we may be creating a beacon of light for some theoretical spacefaring alien civilization to spot. And turning that around, our own search for alien life ought to focus on finding other satellite constellations out there, according to preprint research shared online by Free University of Tbilisi and Georgia
22h
Unfortunate Woman Mistakenly Got SIX Doses of COVID Vaccine
An incredibly unlucky woman was mistakenly given six doses of the Pfizer/BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine at a hospital in Massa, Italy, CBS News reports . The unfortunate incident was reportedly the result of a distracted nurse. Fortunately, the 23-year-old woman didn't experience any serious side effects after receiving all six doses all at once. "This person at this time will certainly not have side
23h
How COVID-19 transformed the future of medicine | Daniel Kraft
The pandemic forced the world to work together like never before and, with unprecedented speed, bore a new age of health and medical innovation. Physician-scientist Daniel Kraft explains how breakthroughs and advancements like AI-infused antiviral discoveries and laboratory-level diagnostic tools accessible via smartphones are paving the way for a more democratized, connected and data-driven futur
23h
Active cavity solitons: Ultra-stable, high-power optical pulses for measuring light waves
Unlike the oscillations of sound waves, the oscillations of light are so fast that extremely complex equipment is needed to observe them directly. However, it is possible to measure the frequencies of these oscillations indirectly with frequency combs. These combs are made up of a set of regularly spaced 'teeth' where each tooth corresponds to a frequency. Used as a graduated ruler, they offer the
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How Mathematicians Use Homology to Make Sense of Topology
At first, topology can seem like an unusually imprecise branch of mathematics. It's the study of squishy play-dough shapes capable of bending, stretching and compressing without limit. But topologists do have some restrictions: They cannot create or destroy holes within shapes. (It's an old joke that topologists can't tell the difference between a coffee mug and a doughnut, since they both have o
3h
Man Unlocks Smartphone Using Severed Finger
Still Works It sounds like something from a corny action flick. Kieran Higgins, a retiree living in rural Spain, used the severed tip of his index finger to successfully unlock his Samsung Galaxy A20 smartphone, The Register reports . Higgins lost the tip of his index finger two weeks earlier in an industrial accident involving a crane. He chose to keep what remained of his crushed digit in a vat
4h
The woman who will decide what emoji we get to use
Emoji are now part of our language. If you're like most people, you pepper your texts, Instagram posts, and TikTok videos with various little images to augment your words—maybe the syringe with a bit of blood dripping from it when you got your vaccination, the prayer (or high-fiving?) hands as a shortcut to "thank you," a rosy-cheeked smiley face with jazz hands for a covid-safe hug from afar. To
6h
Authorities Seize "Atomik" Booze Made Near Chernobyl Disaster
Atomik Authorities in Ukraine have sized more than 1,500 bottles of a spirit made out of apples grown near the Chernobyl nuclear disaster site, USA Today reports . The high proof booze, called Atomik , is the first consumer product to come out of the area since the disaster in 1986, according to the company behind the drink, called The Chernobyl Spirit Company. The batch was meant to be shipped t
21h
Animal production responsible for vast majority of air quality-related health impacts from US food
Poor air quality caused by food production in the United States is estimated to result in 16,000 deaths annually, 80 percent of which are related to animal production, according to a new study led by researchers at the University of Minnesota. The research also found there are measures farmers and consumers alike can take to reduce the air quality-related health impacts of the food we eat.
22h
Johnson says England guidance on hugging will change, pubs and restaurants can serve indoors – as it happened
Latest updates: prime minister unveils new easing of restrictions from 17 May in next steps in England's roadmap out of lockdown Full report: Boris Johnson confirms further lockdown easing in England Lockdown easing in England: what will change from 17 May Zero Covid deaths reported in England, Northern Ireland and Scotland Summary of Downing Street lobby briefing Starmer's plan to demote Rayner
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DNA's Histone Spools Hint at How Complex Cells Evolved
Molecular biology has something in common with kite-flying competitions. At the latter, all eyes are on the colorful, elaborate, wildly kinetic constructions darting through the sky. Nobody looks at the humble reels or spools on which the kite strings are wound, even though the aerial performances depend on how skillfully those reels are handled. In the biology of complex cells, or eukaryotes, th
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Researchers reconstruct the oral microbiomes of Neanderthals, primates, and humans
Living in and on our bodies are trillions of microbial cells belonging to thousands of bacterial species, known as the microbiome. These microbes play key roles in human health, but little is known about their evolution. In a new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, a multidisciplinary international research team led by scientists at the Max Planck Institute for
22h
Tony Hawk Reveals Electric Minivan With Built-In Electric Longboard
Switching to Electric Skateboard legend Tony Hawk has collaborated with German carmaker Mercedes-Benz for a new ad featuring the brand's new EQT Concept — and a futuristic, electric longboard. In the ad, Hawk can be seen zipping through an urban landscape on the advanced form of transport. "Hey Tony, why did you switch to electric?" an onlooker asks Hawk. "I got my reasons," he replies, before th
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Bronze Age migrations changed societal organization, genomic landscape in Italy
A new study in Current Biology from the Institute of Genomics of the University of Tartu, Estonia has shed light on the genetic prehistory of populations in modern day Italy through the analysis of ancient human individuals during the Chalcolithic/Bronze Age transition around 4,000 years ago. The genomic analysis of ancient samples enabled researchers from Estonia, Italy and the UK to date the arr
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Russia Says It's Quitting the ISS, But It's Also Testing a New ISS Module
Russian space agency Roscosmos has announced that it has begun vacuum testing a new module intended to build out the Russian segment of the International Space Station — a strange choice in light of Russia's recent decision to ditch the ISS for its own upcoming space station. The agency's Multipurpose Laboratory Module (MLM), also known as the Nauka (that's Russian for "Science") segment, has bee
1h
The Doctors Who Bet Their Patients' Lives on COVID-19 Test Results
When the third coronavirus surge hit the U.S. last fall, the midwestern states were among the worst affected. Thousands of people in the region were being hospitalized with the virus every day. It was at this inauspicious time that a team of transplant doctors at University Hospital in Ann Arbor, Michigan, received a pair of healthy-seeming lungs. According to a published case report , the donor
4h
Research sheds more light on the nature of a complex planetary nebula
Astronomers have performed high-resolution observations of a complex planetary nebula known as NGC 1514. Results of the study provide essential information about morpho-kinematical structure and chemical composition of this nebula, which could help researchers to better understand its nature. The research was published May 4 on arXiv.org.
5h
Unearthing an Origin Story for Gentrification
Historians have always assumed that the medieval city of Angkor, today located in Cambodia, was huge, simply based on how much land its kings commanded. From the ninth to the 15th centuries, Angkor was the capital of the Khmer empire, which at its zenith stretched across modern Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, and Vietnam. The city was thronged with visitors from all over Southeast Asia—royalty and peas
6h
The Story Behind Stacey Abrams's Fiction Career
Lauren Tamaki This article was published online on May 11, 2021. O n the afternoon of my first conversation with Stacey Abrams, she had just moved house. She sat in front of a bay window, sunlight pouring in around the sides of drawn blinds. We were talking over Zoom, and the little square of our interaction was spare and tidy—that is, until she turned her camera around to show me a long, rectang
7h
Identifying the rise of multi drug resistant E. coli
Antibiotic resistance in E. coli has been steadily increasing since the early 2000s despite attempts to control it, a new study suggests. In the biggest genomic survey of E. coli to date, that took more than 16 years in Norway, researchers have successfully tracked the spread of antibiotic resistant genes and have shown that these genes are being transferred between E. coli strains.
19h
Cancer cells hijack the 3D structure of DNA
In cancer, a lot of biology goes awry: Genes mutate, molecular processes change dramatically, and cells proliferate uncontrollably to form entirely new tissues that we call tumors. Multiple things go wrong at different levels, and this complexity is partly what makes cancer so difficult to research and treat.
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Researchers realize coherent storage of light over one hour
Remote quantum distribution on the ground is limited because of the loss of photons in optical fibers. One solution for remote quantum communication lies in quantum memories: photons are stored in long-lived quantum memory (quantum flash drive) and then quantum information is transmitted by the transportation of the quantum memory. Given the speed of aircraft and high-speed trains, it is critical
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Graphene key for novel hardware security
As more private data is stored and shared digitally, researchers are exploring new ways to protect data against attacks from bad actors. Current silicon technology exploits microscopic differences between computing components to create secure keys, but artificial intelligence (AI) techniques can be used to predict these keys and gain access to data. Now, Penn State researchers have designed a way
10h
Mathematicians find core mechanism to calculate tipping points
Climate change, a pandemic or the coordinated activity of neurons in the brain: In all of these examples, a transition takes place at a certain point from the base state to a new state. Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have discovered a universal mathematical structure at these so-called tipping points. It creates the basis for a better understanding of the behavior of netwo
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3 Explanations for the Vaccine Slowdown
For a few weeks this spring, the United States was a world leader in vaccines, administering shots to a larger share of its population than even the United Kingdom or Israel. But since the middle of April, our vaccine campaign has stalled. The average number of people getting a first or single dose is down almost 50 percent from its peak on April 13. What's notable about that date? Well, it just
6h
For $50, convert your phone into a powerful chemical, pathogen detector
Spectroscopy provides a non-invasive way to study the chemical composition of matter. These techniques analyze the unique ways light interacts with certain materials. If spectrometers become a common feature of smartphones, it could someday potentially allow anyone to identify pathogens, detect impurities in food, and verify the authenticity of valuable minerals. The quality of smartphone cameras
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In the emptiness of space, Voyager I detects plasma 'hum'
NASA's Voyager I spacecraft has long since zipped past the edge of the solar system through the heliopause – the solar system's border with interstellar space – into the interstellar medium. Now, its instruments have detected the constant drone of interstellar gas (plasma waves).
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The Secret Origins of Amazon's Alexa
In 2011, Jeff Bezos dreamt up a talking device. But making the virtual assistant sound intelligent proved far more difficult than anyone could have imagined.
6h
America's Is-Ought Problem
T he job of a news reporter today is to declare what you can't yet know to people convinced that they already do. Journalism on deadline has always been stressful. A gruff editor orders a reporter to simplify controversy, and submit the copy in a couple of hours. The shortcut is this: When you fail to become an expert, phone one. So journalists hold the mic up (officials) and down ("man on the st
7h
Volcanoes on Mars could be active, raising possibility Mars was recently habitable
New observations reveal that Mars could still be volcanically active, raising the possibility for habitable conditions in the near surface of Mars in recent history. Ongoing research investigates the possibility that the most recent volcanic activity on Mars, which occurred about 50,000 years ago, might have been triggered by a nearby asteroid impact that happened around the same time.
17h
E-waste recycling matter of national security: report
Recovering precious elements from e-waste is a security imperative for Europe that should be written into law, according to a report Monday that said it was "crucial" to ensure industry competitiveness and sustain tech-dependent lifestyles in the region.
23h
Stimulators could aid spinal cord, heart therapies
Engineers develop a new version of their wireless implant that allows for multiple stimulators to be programmed and magnetically powered from a single transmitter outside the body. The implants could be used to treat spinal cord injuries or as pacemakers.
20h
Integration Into the Human Genome?
I've had several requests for comment on this recent PNAS paper , which talks about integration of SARS-CoV-2 sequences into the DNA of human cells. I'm glad to do it, but right off I have to note that a lot of the attention that it's getting seems (sadly) to be coming from anti-vaccine activists, who are trying to whip up fear that getting the vaccine somehow means that you will be Permanently C
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Global declines in coral reef calcium carbonate production under ocean acidification and warming [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Ocean warming and acidification threaten the future growth of coral reefs. This is because the calcifying coral reef taxa that construct the calcium carbonate frameworks and cement the reef together are highly sensitive to ocean warming and acidification. However, the global-scale effects of ocean warming and acidification on rates of…
40min
A Blood Test for Fibromyalgia?
The FM/a test is advertised as a definitive test to diagnose fibromyalgia. It isn't definitive. It is expensive. It has not been shown to change patient outcomes. The post first appeared on Science-Based Medicine .
6h
Study may help boost peptide design
Peptides, which are short strings of amino acids, play a vital role in health and industry with a huge range of medical uses including in antibiotics, anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer drugs. They are also used in the cosmetics industry and for enhancing athletic performance. Altering the structure of natural peptides to produce improved compounds is therefore of great interest to scientists and i
22h
The 'key' to new COVID-19 vaccine development
Scientists are researching a new COVID-19 vaccine that would target only a small portion of the virus's spike protein. The vaccine has shown promise in laboratory experiments, and more vaccines could be necessary in the years ahead as additional SARS-CoV-2 variants emerge.
23h
Development of human white matter pathways in utero over the second and third trimester [Neuroscience]
During the second and third trimesters of human gestation, rapid neurodevelopment is underpinned by fundamental processes including neuronal migration, cellular organization, cortical layering, and myelination. In this time, white matter growth and maturation lay the foundation for an efficient network of structural connections. Detailed knowledge about this developmental trajectory in…
40min
The Atlantic Daily: What Would It Take to End the Lost Cause's Twisted Narratives?
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox. Lies about the Civil War have been festering for more than a century. My colleague Clint Smith traveled around the United States to find out why—and what it would take to end the Lost Cause's twis
2h
Fifty shades of reading: Who reads contemporary erotic novels and why?
Soon after E.L. James's "Fifty Shades of Grey" appeared in 2015, the book market was inundated with a flood of erotic bestsellers. People from all corners began wondering what this type of novel's secret of success could be. Now, a research team at the Max Planck Institute for Empirical Aesthetics (MPIEA) in Frankfurt/Main, Germany, has taken a closer look at the readership of erotic novels and in
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California expands drought emergency to large swath of state
California Gov. Gavin Newsom on Monday expanded a drought emergency to a large swath of the nation's most populous state while seeking more than $6 billion in multiyear water spending as one of the warmest, driest springs on record threatens another severe wildfire season across the American West.
8h
Researchers achieve 51.5dB nonreciprocal isolation
Chinese researchers achieved 51.5dB nonreciprocal isolation in the atomic ensemble, which is the highest isolation ratio in the non-magnetic nonreciprocal field. They discussed the quantum noise problem in nonreciprocal devices for the first time.
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Homeroom: My Kid's School Is Full of Cheats
Editor's Note: Every Tuesday, Abby Freireich and Brian Platzer take questions from readers about their kids' education. Have one? Email them at homeroom@theatlantic.com. Dear Abby and Brian, I'd like to ask you about cheating. My son is in high school, and he's working incredibly hard to get the grades that will get him into the college of his choice. The problem is, the other kids at his school
7h
Magnetic nanoparticles pull valuable elements from water sources
A clever idea to use magnetic nanoparticles to capture valuable materials from brines has blossomed into industrial-scale pilot projects that could help make the U.S. a producer of critical minerals used in electronics and energy production. Today, most of these minerals are obtained from international sources, many of which are high-conflict regions.
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Almost all kinds of air pollution hit people of color hardest
Air pollution exposure disparities among people of color and white people are driven by nearly all, rather than only a few, emission source types, a new study shows. Previous studies have shown that people of color are disproportionately exposed to air pollution in the United States. However, it was unclear whether this unequal exposure is due mainly to a few types of emission sources or whether
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Glyphosate inhibits symbiotic bacteria in beetles
Saw-toothed grain beetles live in a symbiotic association with bacteria. Their bacterial partners provide important building blocks for the formation of the insect's exoskeleton, which protects the beetles from their enemies as well as from desiccation. In a new study, a team of scientists from the Johannes Gutenberg University in Mainz, the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena, and t
3h
Indigenous practices protect Native Americans' health from racism
Culturally specific health behaviors and activities may improve the health of Native Americans, report researchers. Stress, trauma, and racism occur at high rates within Indigenous communities and have not been explored as potential contributors to cardiometabolic disease (CMD). But new research examines this link and found increasing evidence that culturally specific health behaviors and activit
22h
Lichens slow to return after wildfires
Lichen communities may take decades—and in some cases up to a century—to fully return to chaparral ecosystems after wildfire, finds a study from the University of California, Davis, and Stanford University.
5h
Researchers use optical data to reveal the basic structure of spacetime in rotating frames
One of the most basic structural aspects of relativistic spacetime is the description of how time and distances are altered by motion. The theory of special relativity describes a spacetime framework for linear constant motion in which time dilates and lengths contract in response to motion. This framework is described by the Lorentz transformation, which encompasses mathematical formulas that des
1h
The Aqueduct of Constantinople: Managing the longest water channel of the ancient world
Aqueducts are very impressive examples of the art of construction in the Roman Empire. Even today, they still provide us with new insights into aesthetic, practical, and technical aspects of construction and use. Scientists investigated the longest aqueduct of the time, the 426-kilometer-long Aqueduct of Valens supplying Constantinople, and revealed new insights into how this structure was maintai
4h
Fluorinated interphase bolsters water-based zinc battery
A research team in the University of Maryland (UMD) Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering (ChBE) has achieved another breakthrough in metallic zinc battery chemistry—after innovating a zinc-air battery cathode reported in Science earlier this year—this time specific to the anode.
5h
Authentication and repatriation of a ceremonial shrunken head from the US to Ecuador
A ceremonial tsantsa—or shrunken head—was authenticated and repatriated to Ecuador in 2019, after it had been discovered amongst stored exhibits at Mercer University. The history of the artefact and the process of its authentication—which involved CT scans and assessment of 33 criteria such skin and hair features—are described in a study published in Heritage Science.
17h
Biomarker detects severe COVID-19 early on
Severe cases of COVID-19 can now be detected at an early stage. Researchers have identified the first biomarker that can reliably predict which patients will develop severe symptoms. This can help to improve the treatment of severe cases of COVID-19.
23h
Protein remodels intracellular membrane to help Legionella bacteria survive in host cells
Scientists at UT Southwestern have discovered a key protein that helps the bacteria that causes Legionnaires' disease to set up house in the cells of humans and other hosts. The findings, published in Science, could offer insights into how other bacteria are able to survive inside cells, knowledge that could lead to new treatments for a wide variety of infections.
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Glesare sådd ger livsviktiga pollinatörer – och lika stor skörd
Det går att gynna ogräs och pollinerande insekter i en spannmålsåker – och ändå få en lika stor skörd. Hemligheten är färre frön och glesare mellan plantorna, visar forskning. Det har visat att ekologisk odling ofta innebär en högre förekomst av blommande ogräs och pollinerande insekter men lägre skördar. I en ny svensk studie har en grupp forskare vid Lunds universitet och Hushållningssällskapet
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Differences between leopards are greater than between brown bears and polar bears
New research demonstrates that African and Asian leopards are more genetically differentiated from one another than polar bears and brown bears. Indeed, leopards are so different that they ought to be treated as two separate species, according to a team of researchers, among them, scientists from the University of Copenhagen. This new knowledge has important implications for better conserving this
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This Amazing Laser Therapy Cap Helps Fight Baldness From the Comfort of Home
If you're among the 42 percent of men between the ages of 18-to-49 who are experiencing moderate to extensive hair loss , there's a pretty good chance you've hit up Google to see if there's anything you can do about it. Unfortunately, as you have no doubt discovered, the Internet is full of all kinds of pills and creams and serums that claim to restore or thicken hair without any scientific evide
18h
UEA team reads minds to understand human tool use
Researchers have made an astonishing new discovery about how our brains control our hands. The team used MRI data to study which parts of the brain are used when we handle tools.The findings could help shed light on the regions of the brain that evolved in humans and set us apart from primates, and could pave the way for the development of next-generation prosthetic limbs that tap into the brain's
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A comprehensive map of the SARS-CoV-2 genome
In early 2020, a few months after the Covid-19 pandemic began, scientists were able to sequence the full genome of the virus that causes the infection, SARS-CoV-2. While many of its genes were already known at that point, the full complement of protein-coding genes was unresolved.
1h
Researchers generate tunable twin particles of light
Identical twins might seem 'indistinguishable,' but in the quantum world the word takes on a new level of meaning. While identical twins share many traits, the universe treats two indistinguishable quantum particles as intrinsically interchangeable. This opens the door for indistinguishable particles to interact in unique ways—such as in quantum interference—that are needed for quantum computers.
2h
Low temperature physics gives insight into turbulence
A novel technique for studying vortices in quantum fluids has been developed by physicists. Turbulence in quantum systems, for example in superfluid helium 4, takes place on microscopic scales, and so far scientists have not had tools with sufficient precision to probe eddies this small. But now the team, working at temperature of a few thousandths of a degree above absolute zero, has harnessed na
4h
'Unmaking' a move: Correcting motion blur in single-photon images
Single-photon imaging is the future of high-speed digital photography and vastly surpasses conventional cameras in low-light conditions. However, fixing the blurring caused by the motion of independent objects remains challenging. Recently, researchers at developed an innovative de-blurring approach that accurately estimates the motion of individual objects and adjusts the final image accordingly.
23h
Microneedle patch delivers antibiotics locally in the skin
MRSA skin infections are often treated with intravenous injection of antibiotics, which can cause significant side effects and promote the development of resistant bacterial strains. To solve these problems, researchers are developing a microneedle patch that delivers antibiotics directly into the affected skin area. New results show that the microneedle patch effectively reduces MRSA bacteria in
23h
Rapid lifestyle changes during early COVID-19 pandemic had no impact on climate change, study finds
Despite the rapid and significant changes in consumption patterns witnessed during the initial months of the COVID-19 pandemic, Japanese households maintained their normal levels of greenhouse gases emissions. The 'anthropause' — reduction of human activity due to the pandemic — made headlines last summer, but factory shutdowns and broken global supply chains did not translate into the adoption
23h
Mapping citrus microbiomes: The first step to finding plant-microbiome treasures
Due to their complexity and microscopic scale, plant-microbe interactions can be quite elusive. Each researcher focuses on a piece of the interaction, and it is hard to find all the pieces let alone assemble them into a comprehensive map to find the hidden treasures within the plant microbiome. This is the purpose of review, to take all the pieces from all the different sources and put them togeth
1d
Why kids take board games so seriously
Lawrence Kohlberg's experiments gave children a series of moral dilemmas to test how they differed in their responses across various ages. He identified three separate stages of moral development from the egoist to the principled person. Some people do not progress through all the stages of moral development, which means they will remain "morally undeveloped." Has your sense of right and wrong ch
1d
Space-based system can provide seismic monitoring for large earthquakes and tsunamis
Researchers have developed a global earthquake monitoring system that uses the Global Navigational Satellite System (GNSS) to measure crustal deformation. The monitoring system within seconds can rapidly assess earthquake magnitude and fault slip distribution for earthquakes of magnitude 7.0 and larger, making it a potentially valuable tool in earthquake and tsunami early warning for these damagin
16min
Study: You would spend 90 extra days in jail in a private prison
Private prisons in Mississippi tend to hold prisoners 90 days longer than public ones. The extra days eat up half of the expected cost savings of a private prison. The study leaves several open questions, such as what affect these extra days have on recidivism rates. The United States of America, land of the free, is home to 5 percent of the world's population but 25 percent of its prisoners. The
18min
Scientists Turned HIV Into a Life-Saving Gene Therapy
An experimental treatment gives kids with the genetic condition Severe Combined Immunodeficiency Syndrome (SCID), better known as "bubble baby disease," a chance to go about life without the risk of constant infection and sickness. SCID can be caused by a wide variety of genetic mutations that essentially disable a patient's immune system. That makes everyday pathogens deadly to them, and kids wi
27min
Novel ancient shark discovered
This rare fossil find comes from the Kimmeridge Clay Formation in England, a series of sedimentary rocks that was formed in a shallow, tropical-subtropical sea during the Upper Jurassic, about 150 million years ago. The fossil shark skeleton was found more than 20 years ago on the southern coast of England and is now held in the Etches Collection. Additional fossil shark specimens from it will be
36min
How do you rate your medical care? Your answer might be affected by your insurance
For patients seen at a urology clinic, patient satisfaction scores vary by insurance status – with higher scores for patients on Medicare and commercial insurance, but lower scores for those on Medicaid, reports a study in Urology Practice®, an Official Journal of the American Urological Association (AUA). The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.
38min
Using phages to discover new antifreeze proteins
Controlling, and mitigating the effects of ice growth is crucial to protect infrastructure, help preserve frozen cells and to enhance texture of frozen foods. An international collaboration of Warwick scientists working with researchers from Switzerland have used a phage display platform to discover new, small, peptides which function like larger antifreeze proteins. This presents a route to new,
39min
Carceral-community epidemiology, structural racism, and COVID-19 disparities [Social Sciences]
Black and Hispanic communities are disproportionately affected by both incarceration and COVID-19. The epidemiological relationship between carceral facilities and community health during the COVID-19 pandemic, however, remains largely unexamined. Using data from Cook County Jail, we examine temporal patterns in the relationship between jail cycling (i.e., arrest and processing of…
40min
2'-O methylation of RNA cap in SARS-CoV-2 captured by serial crystallography [Biochemistry]
The genome of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) coronavirus has a capping modification at the 5′-untranslated region (UTR) to prevent its degradation by host nucleases. These modifications are performed by the Nsp10/14 and Nsp10/16 heterodimers using S-adenosylmethionine as the methyl donor. Nsp10/16 heterodimer is responsible for the…
40min
COVID-19 induces lower levels of IL-8, IL-10, and MCP-1 than other acute CRS-inducing diseases [Biological Sciences]
Kang et al. (1) investigate the relations between the cytokine release syndrome (CRS), cytokines, and different acute diseases that cause CRS. Their study finds strikingly elevated levels of four proinflammatory cytokines, including IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and MCP-1, in 91 patients with CRS associated with sepsis, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS),…
40min
Reply to Cheng et al.: COVID-19 induces lower extent of cytokines, but damages vascular endothelium by IL-6 signaling [Biological Sciences]
We appreciate the constructive comments by Cheng et al. (1), who performed an intensive statistical analysis of cytokine levels in patients with COVID-19. Their work applies the inverse-variance weighted (IVW) method and an MR-Egger regression on a large number of patients for a statistical analysis to identify COVID-19 risk factors….
40min
Scale-free movement patterns in termites emerge from social interactions and preferential attachments [Systems Biology]
As the number or density of interacting individuals in a social group increases, a transition can develop from uncorrelated and disordered behavior of the individuals to a collective coherent pattern. We expand this observation by exploring the fine details of termite movement patterns to demonstrate that the value of the…
40min
Capsular polysaccharide correlates with immune response to the human gut microbe Ruminococcus gnavus [Microbiology]
Active inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) often coincides with increases of Ruminococcus gnavus, a gut microbe found in nearly everyone. It was not known how, or if, this correlation contributed to disease. We investigated clinical isolates of R. gnavus to identify molecular mechanisms that would link R. gnavus to inflammation. Here,…
40min
Wild-type {alpha}-synuclein inherits the structure and exacerbated neuropathology of E46K mutant fibril strain by cross-seeding [Biochemistry]
Heterozygous point mutations of α-synuclein (α-syn) have been linked to the early onset and rapid progression of familial Parkinson's diseases (fPD). However, the interplay between hereditary mutant and wild-type (WT) α-syn and its role in the exacerbated pathology of α-syn in fPD progression are poorly understood. Here, we find that…
40min
The persistence of ancient settlements and urban sustainability [Sustainability Science]
We propose a dedicated research effort on the determinants of settlement persistence in the ancient world, with the potential to significantly advance the scientific understanding of urban sustainability today. Settlements (cities, towns, villages) are locations with two key attributes: They frame human interactions and activities in space, and they are…
40min
TSG101 negatively regulates mitochondrial biogenesis in axons [Neuroscience]
There is a tight association between mitochondrial dysfunction and neurodegenerative diseases and axons that are particularly vulnerable to degeneration, but how mitochondria are maintained in axons to support their physiology remains poorly defined. In an in vivo forward genetic screen for mutants altering axonal mitochondria, we identified tsg101. Neurons mutant…
40min
GABAergic synapses suppress intestinal innate immunity via insulin signaling in Caenorhabditis elegans [Immunology and Inflammation]
GABAergic neurotransmission constitutes a major inhibitory signaling mechanism that plays crucial roles in central nervous system physiology and immune cell immunomodulation. However, its roles in innate immunity remain unclear. Here, we report that deficiency in the GABAergic neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) of Caenorhabditis elegans results in enhanced resistance to pathogens, whereas…
40min
CYK-1/Formin activation in cortical RhoA signaling centers promotes organismal left-right symmetry breaking [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Proper left–right symmetry breaking is essential for animal development, and in many cases, this process is actomyosin-dependent. In Caenorhabditis elegans embryos active torque generation in the actomyosin layer promotes left–right symmetry breaking by driving chiral counterrotating cortical flows. While both Formins and Myosins have been implicated in left–right symmetry breaking…
40min
The circadian clock ensures successful DNA replication in cyanobacteria [Microbiology]
Disruption of circadian rhythms causes decreased health and fitness, and evidence from multiple organisms links clock disruption to dysregulation of the cell cycle. However, the function of circadian regulation for the essential process of DNA replication remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus, a model organism…
40min
Presynaptic coupling by electrical synapses coordinates a rhythmic behavior by synchronizing the activities of a neuron pair [Neuroscience]
Electrical synapses are specialized structures that mediate the flow of electrical currents between neurons and have well known roles in synchronizing the activities of neuronal populations, both by mediating the current transfer from more active to less active neurons and by shunting currents from active neurons to their less active…
40min
Responsive manipulation of neural circuit pathology by fully implantable, front-end multiplexed embedded neuroelectronics [Neuroscience]
Responsive neurostimulation is increasingly required to probe neural circuit function and treat neuropsychiatric disorders. We introduce a multiplex-then-amplify (MTA) scheme that, in contrast to current approaches (which necessitate an equal number of amplifiers as number of channels), only requires one amplifier per multiplexer, significantly reducing the number of components and…
40min
Summer warmth of the past six interglacials on Greenland [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
The relative warmth of mid-to-late Pleistocene interglacials on Greenland has remained unknown, leading to debates about the regional climate forcing that caused past retreat of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS). We analyze the hydrogen isotopic composition of terrestrial biomarkers in Labrador Sea sediments through interglacials of the past 600,000 y…
40min
TMEM16C is involved in thermoregulation and protects rodent pups from febrile seizures [Neuroscience]
Febrile seizures (FSs) are the most common convulsion in infancy and childhood. Considering the limitations of current treatments, it is important to examine the mechanistic cause of FSs. Prompted by a genome-wide association study identifying TMEM16C (also known as ANO3) as a risk factor of FSs, we showed previously that…
40min
Hierarchical transitions and fractal wrinkling drive bacterial pellicle morphogenesis [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Bacterial cells can self-organize into structured communities at fluid–fluid interfaces. These soft, living materials composed of cells and extracellular matrix are called pellicles. Cells residing in pellicles garner group-level survival advantages such as increased antibiotic resistance. The dynamics of pellicle formation and, more generally, how complex morphologies arise from active…
40min
Weak selection on synonymous codons substantially inflates dN/dS estimates in bacteria [Evolution]
Synonymous codon substitutions are not always selectively neutral as revealed by several types of analyses, including studies of codon usage patterns among genes. We analyzed codon usage in 13 bacterial genomes sampled from across a large order of bacteria, Enterobacterales, and identified presumptively neutral and selected classes of synonymous substitutions….
40min
Mucosal acidosis elicits a unique molecular signature in epithelia and intestinal tissue mediated by GPR31-induced CREB phosphorylation [Cell Biology]
Metabolic changes associated with tissue inflammation result in significant extracellular acidosis (EA). Within mucosal tissues, intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) have evolved adaptive strategies to cope with EA through the up-regulation of SLC26A3 to promote pH homeostasis. We hypothesized that EA significantly alters IEC gene expression as an adaptive mechanism to…
40min
A modular computational framework for medical digital twins [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
This paper presents a modular software design for the construction of computational modeling technology that will help implement precision medicine. In analogy to a common industrial strategy used for preventive maintenance of engineered products, medical digital twins are computational models of disease processes calibrated to individual patients using multiple heterogeneous…
40min
Risk of groundwater contamination widely underestimated because of fast flow into aquifers [Environmental Sciences]
Groundwater pollution threatens human and ecosystem health in many regions around the globe. Fast flow to the groundwater through focused recharge is known to transmit short-lived pollutants into carbonate aquifers, endangering the quality of groundwaters where one quarter of the world's population lives. However, the large-scale impact of such focused…
40min
Structural basis of the protochromic green/red photocycle of the chromatic acclimation sensor RcaE [Biochemistry]
Cyanobacteriochromes (CBCRs) are bilin-binding photosensors of the phytochrome superfamily that show remarkable spectral diversity. The green/red CBCR subfamily is important for regulating chromatic acclimation of photosynthetic antenna in cyanobacteria and is applied for optogenetic control of gene expression in synthetic biology. It is suggested that the absorption change of this…
40min
Human-relevant near-organ neuromodulation of the immune system via the splenic nerve [Immunology and Inflammation]
Neuromodulation of immune function by stimulating the autonomic connections to the spleen has been demonstrated in rodent models. Consequently, neuroimmune modulation has been proposed as a new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of inflammatory conditions. However, demonstration of the translation of these immunomodulatory mechanisms in anatomically and physiologically relevant models…
40min
Equatorial auroral records reveal dynamics of the paleo-West Pacific geomagnetic anomaly [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Localized regions of low geomagnetic intensity such as the South Atlantic Anomaly allow energetic particles from the Van Allen radiation belt to precipitate into the atmosphere and have been linked to a signature in the form of red aurora–like airglow visible to the naked eye. Smoothed global geomagnetic models predict…
40min
AGO2 promotes tumor progression in KRAS-driven mouse models of non-small cell lung cancer [Medical Sciences]
Lung cancer is the deadliest malignancy in the United States. Non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for 85% of cases and is frequently driven by activating mutations in the gene encoding the KRAS GTPase (e.g., KRASG12D). Our previous work demonstrated that Argonaute 2 (AGO2)—a component of the RNA-induced silencing complex…
40min
Physiological concentrations of cyanide stimulate mitochondrial Complex IV and enhance cellular bioenergetics [Pharmacology]
In mammalian cells, cyanide is viewed as a cytotoxic agent, which exerts its effects through inhibition of mitochondrial Complex IV (Cytochrome C oxidase [CCOx]). However, the current report demonstrates that cyanide's effect on CCOx is biphasic; low (nanomolar to low-micromolar) concentrations stimulate CCOx activity, while higher (high-micromolar) concentrations produce the…
40min
Comprehensive pregnancy monitoring with a network of wireless, soft, and flexible sensors in high- and low-resource health settings [Engineering]
Vital signs monitoring is a fundamental component of ensuring the health and safety of women and newborns during pregnancy, labor, and childbirth. This monitoring is often the first step in early detection of pregnancy abnormalities, providing an opportunity for prompt, effective intervention to prevent maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality….
40min
Novel functional sequences uncovered through a bovine multiassembly graph [Agricultural Sciences]
Many genomic analyses start by aligning sequencing reads to a linear reference genome. However, linear reference genomes are imperfect, lacking millions of bases of unknown relevance and are unable to reflect the genetic diversity of populations. This makes reference-guided methods susceptible to reference-allele bias. To overcome such limitations, we build…
40min
Resetting proteostasis with ISRIB promotes epithelial differentiation to attenuate pulmonary fibrosis [Medical Sciences]
Pulmonary fibrosis is a relentlessly progressive and often fatal disease with a paucity of available therapies. Genetic evidence implicates disordered epithelial repair, which is normally achieved by the differentiation of small cuboidal alveolar type 2 (AT2) cells into large, flattened alveolar type 1 (AT1) cells as an initiating event in…
40min
Widespread deep seismicity in the Delaware Basin, Texas, is mainly driven by shallow wastewater injection [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Industrial activity away from plate boundaries can induce earthquakes and has evolved into a global issue. Much of the induced seismicity in the United States' midcontinent is attributed to a direct pressure increase from deep wastewater disposal. This mechanism is not applicable where deep basement faults are hydraulically isolated from…
40min
Successful DNA replication in cyanobacteria depends on the circadian clock
A new study from the University of Chicago has found that the photosynthetic bacterium Synechococcus elongatus uses a circadian clock to precisely time DNA replication, and that interrupting this circadian rhythm prevents replication from completing and leaves chromosomes unfinished overnight. The results, published online on May 10 in Proceedings of the National Academy of the Sciences, have impl
42min
Investigators Release New Details About Deadly Tesla Crash
Federal investigators have released a preliminary report into a deadly crash involving a Tesla Model S that killed two men in Texas last month. Early reports suggested at the time that neither of the two passengers were sitting behind the wheel at the time of the crash, prompting speculation surrounding Tesla's controversial Autopilot feature. The new report , however, suggests that footage from
48min
Social isolation has a profound and increasingly negative impact on physical functioning in older adults
Social isolation among older adults is associated with poor health and premature mortality, but the connection between social isolation and physical functioning is poorly understood. New research generates more robust evidence about the associations between social isolation and physical functioning and how this accelerates over time, reports the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, published b
52min
Lighting up biology from within
A biochemical reaction between an enzyme called luciferase and oxygen causes fireflies to glow and is considered one of the most well-known examples of bioluminescence in nature. Now, an international team of researchers led by Elena Goun at the University of Missouri is working to harness the power of bioluminescence in a low-cost, noninvasive portable medical imaging device that could one day be
52min
Dartmouth engineering study shows renewable energy will enhance power grid's resilience
A new Dartmouth Engineering study shows that integrating renewable energy into the American Electric Power System (AEPS) would enhance the grid's resilience, meaning a highly resilient and decarbonized energy system is possible. The researchers' analysis is based upon the incremental incorporation of architectural changes that would be required to integrate renewable energy into AEPS.
52min
New research outlines a critical driver in an immune cell's defense against melanoma
Researchers at Huntsman Cancer Institute have found critical new insights into how cells defend against melanoma. In a report published in Nature Communications, the team describes how an enzyme called nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, or NAMPT, initiates antitumor activity. The researchers suggest that new therapies strengthening this pathway in immune cells could be the foundation for more
52min
St. Vincent and the Limits of Rock-and-Roll Mystique
If you've searched St. Vincent on Twitter in the past few weeks, you haven't seen chatter about the goofy soul sound of the 38-year-old rock star's latest singles. You've seen snarky tweets about an interview that is mainly of interest to die-hard fans and people addicted to Twitter drama. In late April, the journalist Emma Madden posted—and then deleted—a Q&A with St. Vincent that the artist's p
57min
Community composition of microbial microcosms follows simple assembly rules at evolutionary timescales
Nature Communications, Published online: 17 May 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23247-0 Evolution affects microbial community composition, but it is still unknown how commonly compositions change, and how predictable such changes are. Using experimental evolution, Meroz et al. show that compositional changes typically occur within ~400 generations, and are predictable by a bottom-up approach.
1h
Your brain plays 'tricks' to sync sights and sounds
To make sense of complex environments, brain waves constantly adapt, compensating for drastically different sound and vision processing speeds, researchers report. Every high-school physics student learns that sound and light travel at very different speeds. If the brain did not account for this difference, it would be much harder for us to tell where sounds came from, and how they are related to
1h
Genetics: Biosynthesis pathway of a new DNA nucleobase elucidated
DNA is composed of nucleobases represented by the letters A, T, G and C. They form the basis of the genetic code and are present in all living beings. But in a bacteriophage, another base, represented by the letter Z, exists. This exception, the only one observed to date, has long remained a mystery. Scientists from the Institut Pasteur and the CNRS, in collaboration with CEA, have now elucidated
1h
Meditative practice and spiritual wellbeing may preserve cognitive function in aging
It is projected that up to 152 million people worldwide will be living with Alzheimer's disease (AD) by 2050. To date there are no drugs that have a substantial positive impact on either the prevention or reversal of cognitive decline. A growing body of evidence finds that targeting lifestyle and vascular risk factors have a beneficial effect on overall cognitive performance. A new review in the J
1h
Swarm of 'dumb' robots work together to get stuff done
New robot swarm research shows that, as magnetic interactions increase, dispersed "dumb robots" called BOBbots can gather in compact clusters to accomplish complex tasks. Getting swarms of robots to work collectively can be challenging, unless researchers carefully choreograph their interactions—like planes in formation—using increasingly sophisticated components and algorithms. But what can be r
1h
When conservation work pays off: After 20 years, the Saker Falcon breeds again in Bulgaria
The Saker Falcon (Falco cherrug) is a bird of prey living in plains and forest-steppes in the West and semi-desert montane plateaus and cliffs in the East. The majority of its Central and Eastern European population is migratory and spends winters in the Mediterranean, the Near East and East Africa. With its global population estimated at 6,100-14,900 breeding pairs, the species is considered enda
1h
Researchers reveal how PIF proteins regulate cytokinesis
To protect their newly formed fragile organs, dark-grown dicotyledonous plants form an apical hook when penetrating through the soil. The apical hook of pifq (pif1 pif3 pif4 pif5) mutant was fully opened, even in complete darkness, suggesting that PIF proteins are required for maintaining the apical hook in the darkness and are involved in regulation of the apical hook opening. But the underlying
1h
Coral reef restorations can be optimized to reduce flood risk
New guidelines for coral reef restoration aiming to reduce the risk of flooding in tropical coastal communities have been set out in a new study that simulated the behavior of ocean waves traveling over and beyond a range of coral reef structures. Published in Frontiers in Marine Science, these guidelines hope to optimize restoration efforts not only for the benefit of the ecosystem, but also to p
1h
Scientists publish unique data set on the northern Chilean subduction zone
Northern Chile is an ideal natural laboratory to study the origin of earthquakes. Here, the Pacific Nazca plate slides underneath the South American continental plate with a speed of about 65 millimeters per year. This process, known as subduction, creates strain between the two plates and scientists thus expected a mega-earthquake here sooner or later, like the last one in 1877. But although nort
1h
Model bias corrections for reliable projection of extreme El Niño frequency change
A reliable projection of extreme El Niño frequency change in a future warmer climate is critical to managing socio-economic activities and human health, strategic policy decisions, environmental and ecosystem managements, and disaster mitigations in many parts of the world. Unfortunately, long-standing common biases in CMIP5 models, despite enormous efforts on the numerical model development over
1h
New marine sulfur cycle model after the Snowball Earth glaciation
The Sturtian Snowball Earth glaciation (~717-660 million years ago) represents the most severe icehouse climate in Earth's history. Geological evidence indicates that, during this glaciation, ice sheets extended to low latitudes, and model simulations suggest global frozen oceans as well as a prolonged shut-down of the hydrological cycles. The Snowball Earth hypothesis poses that the Sturtian glob
1h
Improved air quality during first wave of COVID prevented 150 premature deaths in major Spanish cities
Air quality in Spain temporarily improved during the first wave of COVID-19, largely as a result of mobility restrictions. Until recently, however, the effect of this improvement on the health of the population was poorly understood. A new study led by the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal), a center supported by the "la Caixa" Foundation, together with the Barcelona Supercomputing C
1h
Disparities persisted as orthopaedic visits shifted to telemedicine
Like other medical specialties at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, orthopaedic surgery rapidly pivoted from in-person visits to remote appointments via telemedicine. Analysis of that initial experience finds that some groups of patients faced persistent or worsening disparities as the shift to telemedicine occurred, reports Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research® (CORR®), a publication of T
1h
Gene therapy restores immune function in children with rare immunodeficiency
An investigational gene therapy can safely restore the immune systems of infants and children who have a rare, life-threatening inherited immunodeficiency disorder, according to research supported in part by the National Institutes of Health. The researchers found that 48 of 50 children who received the gene therapy retained their replenished immune system function two to three years later and did
1h
Using phage to discover new antifreeze proteins
Controlling, and mitigating the effects of ice growth is crucial to protect infrastructure, help preserve frozen cells and to enhance texture of frozen foods. An international collaboration of Warwick Scientists working with researchers from Switzerland have used a phage display platform to discover new, small, peptides which function like larger antifreeze proteins. This presents a route to new,
1h
New gene editing strategies developed for Duchenne muscular dystrophy
DALLAS – April 30, 2021 – UT Southwestern scientists successfully employed a new type of gene therapy to treat mice with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), uniquely utilizing CRISPR-Cas9-based tools to restore a large section of the dystrophin protein that is missing in many DMD patients. The approach, described online today in the journal Science Advances, could lead to a treatment for DMD and in
1h
An Outside Perspective
Since I mentioned retrotransposons and accumulated retroviral genomic litter in yesterday's post , I'll get a bit philosophical about that today. I've had a couple of interactions with people who read about all this and didn't realize what state our genomes are in, and they were struck by all this. As they should be! It really is weird that we are all carrying around eroded bits of DNA sequences
1h
Bone-deep: Mineral found in human bone can help fight toxic organic compounds
One of the most prominent evils of rapid industrialization has been the emission of toxic pollutants into the surrounding biosphere, with often disastrous consequences for human beings. Several industrial processes, such as chemical manufacturing and printing, along with facilities such as power plants emit volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that are known to be cancer-causing and raise an importan
1h
To enhance creativity, keep your research team fresh
Teamwork is becoming increasingly common in modern science. In this context, the effect of different characteristics of a team on its research performance has been studied extensively. Various factors such as team size, number of countries involved, universities, disciplines, and workload distribution have been found to have a significant contribution on the paper's role in advancing science.
1h
Researchers reveal Knl1 gene function in plants
Dr. Han Fangpu's group from the Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences reports the identification and functional study of the maize Knl1 gene in an article published online in PNAS. The gene is a major component of the KMN network that links centromeric DNA and the plus-ends of spindle microtubules. It also plays an important role in kinetochore protein
1h
Ventilation assessment by carbon dioxide levels in dental treatment rooms
Carbon dioxide (CO2) is a byproduct of human metabolism and exists in high levels in exhaled air, and is therefore often used as a proxy for indoor air quality. The study "Ventilation Assessment by Carbon Dioxide Levels in Dental Treatment Rooms," published in the Journal of Dental Research (JDR), evaluated CO2 levels in dental operatories and determined the accuracy of using CO2 levels to assess
1h
In the blood: Which antibodies best neutralize the coronavirus in COVID-19 patients?
Blood tests to detect antibodies against SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, are an important tool for diagnosing the disease, developing potential treatments, and checking vaccine efficacy. Although such tests are available, we have very little understanding on how different antibodies interact with virus antigens. Scientists from Fujita Health University set out to assess various antigen
1h
Researchers develop magnetic thin film for spin-thermoelectric energy conversion
A team of researchers, affiliated with UNIST has recently introduced a new class of magnetic materials for spin caloritronics. Published in the February 2021 issue of Nature Communications, the demonstrated STE applications of a new class of magnets will pave the way for versatile recycling of ubiquitous waste heat. This breakthrough has been led by Professor Jung-Woo Yoo and his research team in
1h
Light-controlled nanoparticles will play key role in biosensor development
Scientists from ITMO University have developed a production method for biointegrable nanoparticles that can be controlled via heat. With light irradiation, these particles change not only their shape, but their color, too. This discovery will be beneficial to the development of non-invasive biosensors, signal systems, and non-toxic dyes. The results of the study were published in the journal Angew
2h
Transferability of surface-functionalized metallic nanoparticles
Announcing a new article publication for BIO Integration journal. In this review the authors Muhammad Arif Asghar, Rabia Ismail Yousuf, Muhammad Harris Shoaib, Muhammad Arif Asghar and Nazish Mumtaz from Jinnah Sindh Medical University, Karachi, Pakistan, University of Karachi, Karachi, Pakistan, Food and Marine Resources Research Centre, Pakistan and Benazir Bhutto Shaheed University, Karachi, Pa
2h
Online CBT effective against OCD symptoms in the young
Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) in children and adolescents is associated with impaired education and worse general health later in life. Access to specialist treatment is often limited. According to a study from Centre for Psychiatry Research at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden and Region Stockholm, internet-delivered cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) can be as effective as conventional CBT.
2h
The brain game: What causes engagement and addiction to video games?
While video games can be engaging, some have a higher potential of becoming addictive. However, the mechanisms underlying this addiction are difficult to analyze mathematically. Now, researchers from JAIST, Japan apply the concept of "motion in the mind" to investigate the subjective aspects of different games via analogies with physical models of motion. Their findings explain what makes certain
2h
Zebrafish brain shows that new neurons are formed in the brain in a coordinated manner
Researchers found that the process of activation of stem cells in the brain responsible for the production of neurons (nerve cells) is not random, but coordinated. According to the researchers, these findings are very important for understanding the proper development of the brain. The findings may form the basis for the development of future treatments using brain stem cells, such as for brain ca
2h
Scientists will protect the "Smart City" from cyber threats
St. Petersburg, like other cities in the Russian Federation, is actively participating in the establishment of the "Smart City" program, which will provide new services for residents of the megalopolis, increasing the safety of citizens. Digital services are essential for such a system. Due to the Internet of Things (IoT) systems, the environment can adapt to the needs of humanity on its own accor
2h
Strong quake, small tsunami
The most energetic earthquakes occur where oceanic plates submerge beneath continental plates during plate tectonics. Quakes in these subduction zone settings commonly carry the risk of triggering severe tsunamis. But when the earth shook with a moment magnitude of 8.1 near the northern Chilean city of Iquique on 1 April 2014, the resulting tsunami was relatively small. A unique seismological data
2h
Bioengineering approach for functional muscle regeneration
When trauma, illness, or injury causes significant muscle loss, reconstructive procedures for bioengineering functional skeletal muscles can fall short, resulting in permanent impairments. Finding a synergy in the importance of biochemical signals and topographical cues, researchers developed an efficient technique for muscle regeneration and functional restoration in injured rats. They describe r
2h
Box fan air cleaner greatly reduces virus transmission
Improved ventilation can lower the risk of transmission of the COVID-19 virus, but large numbers of decades-old public school classrooms lack adequate ventilation systems. A systematic modeling study of simple air cleaners using a box fan reported in Physics of Fluids shows these inexpensive units can greatly decrease the amount of airborne virus in these spaces, if used appropriately.
2h
For the brain, timing is everything
New study from Joshua Jacobs (Columbia Engineering) and Itzhak Fried (UCLA) demonstrates the existence of phase precession in the human brain for the first time, and show sthat this neural code not only links sequential positions, as in animals, but also abstract progression towards specific goals. Says lead author Salman Qasim, "We were convinced that phase precession held a lot of promise as a w
2h
Horseradish flea beetle: Protected with the weapons of its food plant
When horseradish flea beetles feed on their host plants, they take up not only nutrients but also mustard oil glucosides, the characteristic defense compounds of horseradish and other brassicaceous plants. Using these mustard oil glucosides, the beetles turn themselves into a 'mustard oil bomb' and so deter predators. A team of researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena
2h
1.5° C degrowth scenarios suggest need for new mitigation pathways
The first comprehensive comparison of 'degrowth' scenarios with established pathways to limit climate change highlights the risk of over-reliance on carbon dioxide removal, renewable energy and energy efficiency to support continued global growth—which is assumed in established global climate modeling.
2h
Millennials commit less crime than past generations
Crime has dropped since 1990, but not for the reasons some might think, according to a new study. The research suggests crime reduction efforts account for less than half of the crime drop since 1990 and essentially none of the crime drop since 2000. The researchers also discovered that millennials commit less crime than prior generations. "It's time we shifted focus from stopping bad guys to hel
2h
Wealth inequality is key driver of global wildlife trade
It was commonly assumed that wildlife products are exported from low-income countries to meet the demand of consumers in wealthy economies, and therefore, a widening wealth gap may drive up the volume of global trade and endanger wildlife. Recently, a research team co-led by the University of Hong Kong and Lingnan University corroborated this premise by analysing global wildlife trade databases. T
2h
Want to live 100+ years? You may need unusually good DNA repair
Researchers conduct genetic analyses of 81 Italian people who are over 105 years in age. Five unusual genetic differences were discovered. The differences are implicated in the routine repair of DNA, which seems to work unusually well in these people. The oldest living person is Kane Tanaka of Fukuoka, Japan, who just celebrated her 116th birthday. The handful of people who live to be 105 years o
2h
Pepsin-degradable plastics of bionylons from itaconic and amino acids
Marine plastic waste problems have been more serious year by year. One of the worst issues is that creatures in ocean are going extinct by mistakenly swallowing them. Conventional biodegradable plastics are degradable in digestive enzymes, but their performances are too low to use in society. In this study, researchers from JAIST have used bio-derived resources such as itaconic acid and amino acid
3h
Så får rökare hjärtinfarkt – varningstecken i blodet flera år i förväg
En ny orsak till hjärtinfarkt hos rökare och personer med högt blodtryck har upptäckts. Forskare vid Örebro universitet har studerat en ny biomarkör som går att se i blodet många år innan en infarkten. – Den är en väldigt stark varningssignal om en framtida hjärtinfarkt, säger forskaren Liza Ljungberg. Ett stort antal prover med blodplasma förvaras i 80 minusgrader i frysar i norra delen av Sveri
3h
A New Gene Editing Tool Rivals CRISPR, and Can Make Millions of Edits at Once
With CRISPR's meteoric rise as a gene editing marvel, it's easy to forget its lowly origins: it was first discovered as a quirk of the bacterial immune system. It seems like bacteria has more to offer. This month, a team led by the famed synthetic biologist Dr. George Church at Harvard University hijacked another strange piece of bacteria biology. The result is a powerful tool that can—in theory—
3h
Of mice and spacemen: Understanding muscle wasting at the molecular level
Skeletal muscles undergo atrophy, or wasting, under conditions of reduced gravity, such as during spaceflight. Researchers from the University of Tsukuba explored the effects of microgravity and artificial gravity (1 g) on mice housed at the International Space Station for 35 days. Artificial gravity successfully prevented the gross and molecular changes observed in the muscles of mice subjected t
3h
Why people with privilege overstate past obstacles
When confronting evidence of systemic inequality, people with privilege may react by overstating the obstacles they've faced, research shows. When we think about economic and social inequality in the United States, there's a tendency to consider it from the angle of how it affects people at the bottom, whose lives are harder because of their skin color or ethnic identity, or because they come fro
3h
CRISPR tech could enable early diagnosis of devastating citrus disease
Penn State and U.S. Department of Agriculture scientists have used cutting-edge CRISPR/Cas technology to develop a diagnostic test that could enable early diagnosis of citrus greening, or Huanglongbing, a serious disease that threatens worldwide citrus production, which is valued at roughly $17 billion from the sale of fresh fruit and juices.
3h
Tanzanian farmers boost diets, mental health with sustainable methods
An innovative practice of farmers mentoring farmers on sustainable agricultural methods, nutrition and social equity has been proven beneficial in improving children's diets and decreasing food insecurity in a region of Tanzania where nearly half of households fail to meet minimum nutrition requirements. It also reduced depression among women.
4h
Hidden within African diamonds, a billion-plus years of deep-Earth history
Diamonds are sometimes described as messengers from the deep earth; scientists study them closely for insights into the otherwise inaccessible depths from which they come. But the messages are often hard to read. Now, a team has come up with a way to solve two longstanding puzzles: the ages of individual fluid-bearing diamonds, and the chemistry of their parent material. The research has allowed t
4h
Discovered: 78,000 years ago, the oldest known burial ritual in Africa
The oldest known burial ritual in Africa has been discovered on the coast of Kenya. A small child appears to have been buried intentionally in a cave 78,000 years ago. This new research offers insights into ancient funerary practices. How did the emergence of Homo sapiens affect ideas around death? What legacies have been passed down from ancient times? And can these give us insights into the ori
4h
Melting away: understanding the impact of disappearing glaciers
Prompted by an illness that took her to the brink of death and back, Jemma Wadham recalls 25 years of expeditions around the globe. Speaking to the professor about her new book, Ice Rivers, Shivani Dave uncovers the importance of glaciers – and what they should mean to us. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod
4h
Charlotte Suppli Ulrik er ny lærestolsprofessor
Der bliver mere tid til at 'puffe' unge forskere mod en forskerkarriere, når Charlotte Suppli Ulrik bliver ny lærestolsprofessor i lungemedicin ved Københavns Universitet. Hun slår fast, at hun ikke slipper den tætte patientkontakt.
4h
Millennials commit less crime than prior generations
Crime has dropped since 1990, but not for the reasons some might think, according to a new study. Research from the LBJ School of Public Affairs at The University of Texas at Austin suggests crime reduction efforts account for less than half of the crime drop since 1990 and essentially none of the crime drop since 2000. Researchers also discovered that millennials commit less crime than prior gene
4h
How has COVID-19 changed 'superstar cities?'
Just over a year since the pandemic led to shut-downs and stay-at-home orders across the world, the rollout of vaccines and gradual reopening of long-shuttered parts of the economy have many wondering when life will return to a pre-pandemic normal. But amidst the numerous changes this past year to how people work, shop, travel, and go about their day-to-day routines, how close is society to gettin
5h
Convective transport explains 'missing' ice near the tropical tropopause
The lowest level of the atmosphere, the troposphere, contains almost all of Earth's weather. In the stratosphere above, moisture drops to almost zero. The boundary that separates these two layers—the tropopause—is defined as the point at which water ceases to cool as altitude increases. In the tropics, the tropopause is exceptionally cold and usually occurs at a higher altitude (around 17 kilomete
5h
People are persuaded by social media messages, not view numbers
People are more persuaded by the actual messages contained in social media posts than they are by how many others viewed the posts, a new study suggests. Researchers found that when people watched YouTube videos either for or against e-cigarette use, their level of persuasion wasn't directly affected by whether the video said it was viewed by more than a million people versus by fewer than 20.
5h
Stop the emerging AI cold war
Nature, Published online: 11 May 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01244-z Proliferating military artificial intelligence will leave the world less safe — so we must focus on ethics and global cooperation.
5h
Magnets and Fusion
Technology is often interdependent. Electric cars are dependent on battery technology. Tall skyscrapers were not possible without the elevator. Modern rocketry requires computer technology. And the promise of fusion reactors is largely dependent on our ability to make really powerful magnets. Recent progress in powerful magnet technology may be moving us closer to the reality of commercial fusion
5h
The formation of the Amazon Basin influenced the distribution of manatees
All three species of manatee now present on Earth share a common ancestor from which they split some 6.5 million years ago, when a huge lake in Amazonia, then linked to the Caribbean, was cut off from the sea. The African manatee Trichechus senegalensis is not as genetically close to the West Indian manatee T. manatus as was thought, and adaptation to this complex environment by the Amazonian mana
5h
How to blow the whistle on an academic bully
Nature, Published online: 11 May 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01252-z Standing up to a persecutor is tough, particularly if they are your supervisor. But you can take steps to report abuse and protect yourself.
7h
Clinical trial paper that made anemia drug look safer than it is will be retracted
A study that a pharmaceutical company admitted last month included manipulated data will be retracted, Retraction Watch has learned. The paper, "Pooled Analysis of Roxadustat for Anemia in Patients With Kidney Failure Incident to Dialysis," was published in Kidney International Reports in December 2020. The study analyzed data from a clinical trial for roxadustat, a … Continue reading
7h
New genetic copycatchers detect efficient and precise CRISPR editing in a living organism
Scientists have developed a novel genetic sensor called a "CopyCatcher," which capitalizes on CRISPR-based gene drive technology, to detect instances in which a genetic element is copied precisely from one chromosome to another throughout cells in the body of a fruit fly. Next-generation CopyCatcher systems have the potential to measure how often such perfect copying might take place in different
8h
1.5°C degrowth scenarios suggest need for new mitigation pathways: Research
The first comprehensive comparison of 'degrowth' scenarios with established pathways to limit climate change highlights the risk of over-reliance on technological innovation to support continued global growth – which is assumed in established global climate modelling. Findings include: Technologically less risky 'degrowth' limits global warming to 1.5C while global GDP declines by 0.5% annually; a
8h
Protecting local water quality has global benefits
Nature Communications, Published online: 11 May 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22836-3 Clean water is a fundamental resource, yet the economic impacts of pollution, drinking water availability, and greenhouse gas emissions from freshwaters are unknown. Here the authors combine models with economic assessments and find trillions of dollars in savings by mitigating lake methane emissions.
8h
On the use of plume models to estimate the flux in volcanic gas plumes
Nature Communications, Published online: 11 May 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22159-3 Monitoring the flux of gas from volcanoes is a fundamental component of volcano monitoring programs and is used as a basis for eruption forecasting. Here, the authors present a new method using video images of volcanic gas plumes to measure the speed of convective structures and to estimate volcanic fluxes.
8h
Hierarchical communication of chirality for aromatic oligoamide sequences
Nature Communications, Published online: 11 May 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22984-6 Communication of chirality at a molecular level is the fundamental for transmitting chirality information but one-step communication modes in many artificial systems limits further processing the chirality information. Here, the authors report chirality communication of aromatic oligoamide sequences within interp
8h
Nanoscale real-time detection of quantum vortices at millikelvin temperatures
Nature Communications, Published online: 11 May 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22909-3 Previous work has shown the detection of quantum turbulence with mechanical resonators but with limited spatial and temporal resolution. Here, the authors demonstrate real-time detection of single quantum vortices in superfluid 4He with millisecond and micron resolution at temperatures of 10 millikelvin.
8h
Deriving the skyrmion Hall angle from skyrmion lattice dynamics
Nature Communications, Published online: 11 May 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22857-y Skyrmions, when driven by any applied force, experience an addition sideways motion known as the skyrmion hall effect. Here, Brearton et al. present a reciprocal space method for determining the strength of the skyrmion hall effect, making measurement possible for skyrmion lattices.
8h
MIT artificial intelligence tech can generate 3D holograms in real-time
Despite years of hype, virtual reality headsets have yet to topple TV or computer screens as the go-to devices for video viewing. One reason: VR can make users feel sick . Nausea and eye strain can result because VR creates an illusion of 3D viewing although the user is in fact staring at a fixed-distance 2D display. The solution for better 3D visualization could lie in a 60-year-old technology r
8h
Sådan lyder en helikopter på Mars
Nasa har frigivet en lydoptagelse af Ingenuity-helikopteren under dens fjerde flyvetur. Som den første Mars-rover er Perseverance udstyret med mikrofoner, så nu kan vi også lytte til den røde planet.
9h
Turning virtual reality into an effective learning tool for classrooms
For Jaskirat Batra, the desire to pursue teaching was firmly cemented during childhood. Being a child of career educators, he was often immersed in the world of classrooms, chalkboards and textbooks. While deeply inspired by his parents, Batra's desire was always to go beyond conventional pedagogy. As a graduate student in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Texas A&M University
10h
Rural school districts swifter to return to in-person instruction than urban districts
About 42% of rural school districts in the U.S. offered fully in-person instruction as of February, compared with only 17% for urban districts, according to a new RAND Corporation survey of school district leaders. The opposite pattern held for fully remote learning: 29% of urban districts offered fully remote instruction compared with 10% of rural districts and 18% of suburban districts.
10h
I developed a mental health related app from my personal experience!
So basically last year I was feeling a bit low. I really didn't know how to become better since I had never faced this before. I used to not get proper sleep and woke up after having dreams due to my anxiety. So I just started noting what activities I did and whom I did it with in a google doc. Slowly I also started rating how I felt about the interaction. Soon I started to notice a pattern that
15h
Yale PRIME Clinic CAPR Study
​ https://preview.redd.it/ar2wuwgpkcy61.png?width=1500&format=png&auto=webp&s=d83dbf6d399f47233e7f058d48a0f3142d21d3ef submitted by /u/PRIME-Clinic-Studies [link] [comments]
15h
The Lancet Infectious Diseases: Non-hospitalised COVID-19 patients have low-risk of serious long-term effects, but report more visits to general practitioner following infection
A new study published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases journal has found that the risk of delayed acute complications after non-hospitalised SARS-CoV-2 infection is low, but persistent symptoms in this group could lead to increased visits to general practitioners or outpatient clinics in the six months following infection. The study assessed only those complications that led to contact with hospi
18h
High rates of childhood obesity alarming given anticipated impact of COVID-19 pandemic
In some countries of the WHO European Region, 1 in 3 children aged 6 to 9 years is living with overweight or obesity. Mediterranean countries have the highest rates of obesity, but the situation there is starting to improve. These are some of the findings of a new WHO European Childhood Obesity Surveillance Initiative (COSI) report presented at this week's European Congress on Obesity.
19h
Informed tourists make whale watching safer for whales
According to the International Whaling Commission, whale-watching tourism generates more than $2.5 billion a year. After the COVID-19 pandemic, this relatively safe outdoor activity is expected to rebound. Two new studies funded by a collaborative initiative between the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) in Panama and Arizona State University (ASU) show how science can contribute to wh
20h
New mapping technique reveals epigenetic drivers of cancers
Scientists have made major advances in understanding and developing treatments for many cancers by identifying genetic mutations that drive the disease. Now a team led by researchers at Weill Cornell Medicine, NewYork-Presbyterian and the New York Genome Center (NYGC) has developed a machine learning technique for detecting other modifications to DNA that have a similar effect.
20h
Volcanoes on Mars could be active
New observations reveal that Mars could still be volcanically active, raising the possibility for habitable conditions in the near surface of Mars in recent history. Ongoing research investigates the possibility that the most recent volcanic activity on Mars, which occurred about 50,000 years ago, might have been triggered by a nearby asteroid impact that happened around the same time.
20h
Solving the cocktail party problem
Conducting a discussion in a crowded room can be challenging when other conversations and background noise interfere with our ability to focus attention on our conversation partner. Can we absorb information from a few speakers in parallel, or are we limited to understanding speech from only one speaker at a time? Researchers have now moved closer to understanding how the brain deals with the abun
21h
New theory may revolutionize treatment of endometriosis
Endometriosis, a disease found in up to 10 per cent of women, has been enigmatic since it was first described. A new theory developed by researchers at Simon Fraser University suggests a previously overlooked hormone — testosterone — has a critical role in its development. The research could have direct impacts on diagnosis and treatment of the disease, signaling hope for women with endometriosi
22h
Grand Challenge research harnesses AI to fight breast cancer
BreastPathQ Challenge participants were tasked with developing an automated method for analyzing microscopy images of breast tissue and ranking them according to their tumor cell content, to provide a reliable assessment score. As reported in SPIE's Journal of Medical Imaging (JMI), the challenge produced encouraging results that indicate a path toward integrating artificial intelligence (AI) to s
22h
New neuroelectronic system can read and modify brain circuits
Responsive neurostimulation is becoming increasingly effective at probing neural circuit function and treating neuropsychiatric disorders, such as epilepsy and Parkinson's disease. A new approach from Columbia Engineering researchers shows great promise in improving the limitations of current bulky devices. They have built a high-performance implantable system that enables reading and manipulation
22h
India's Desperate Fend for Themselves Amid Covid Mismanagement
Across India, families and volunteers have quickly mobilized to help patients and hospitals obtain oxygen and medical supplies. They are working day and night to fill a huge gap in public services as supply chain issues combined with governmental inefficiency have exacerbated an already precarious situation.
22h
Timing is everything in new implant tech
Rice University engineers develop a new version of their wireless implant that allows for multiple stimulators to be programmed and magnetically powered from a single transmitter outside the body. The implants could be used to treat spinal cord injuries or as pacemakers.
22h
New material avoids AR/VR glasses 'bug eyes'
Researchers have come up with a new technology to deliver augmented and virtual reality glasses that don't look like "bug eyes." "Image" is everything in the $20 billion market for AR/VR glasses. Consumers are looking for glasses that are compact and easy to wear, delivering high-quality imagery with socially acceptable optics. In a new paper in Science Advances , researchers describe imprinting
23h
As global climate shifts, forests' futures may be caught in the wind
Forests' ability to adapt to the disruptions wrought by climate change may depend, in part, on the eddies and swirls of global wind currents, suggests a new study. The study compared global wind patterns with previously published genetic data of nearly 100 tree and shrub species collected from forests around the world, finding significant correlations between wind speed and direction and genetic d
23h
SARS-CoV-2 research: Second possible effective mechanism of remdesivir discovered
After infection, SARS-CoV-2 causes the host cell to produce new virus particles and suppresses host cell defence mechanisms. Virus protein nsP3 plays a central role in the latter process. Using structural analyses, researchers have now discovered that a decomposition product of the remdesivir binds to nsP3. This previously unknown effective mechanism may be important for the development of new dru
23h
How Legionella makes itself at home
Scientists have discovered a key protein that helps the bacteria that causes Legionnaires' disease to set up house in the cells of humans and other hosts. The findings could offer insights into how other bacteria are able to survive inside cells, knowledge that could lead to new treatments for a wide variety of infections.
23h
Monash study may help boost peptide design
Peptides play a vital role with a huge range of medical uses including in antibiotics and anti-cancer drugs. Altering the structure of natural peptides to improve compounds is of great interest to scientists and industry. But how these peptides are produced still isn't clearly understood. Monash University researchers have revealed a key aspect of peptide machineries in a paper published in Nature
23h
Signs in the blood predict when labor will begin
For the first time, researchers have found a way to predict when a pregnant woman will go into labor by analyzing immune and other biological signals in a blood sample, according to a study. The findings shed light on how labor begins, a biological process that until now has been a mystery. They also lay the groundwork for a clinical blood test that could tell women with healthy, full-term pregna
23h
Light emitters for quantum circuits
The promise of a quantum internet depends on the complexities of harnessing light to transmit quantum information over fiber optic networks. A potential step forward was reported today by researchers who developed integrated chips that can generate light particles on demand and without the need for extreme refrigeration.
23h
Mars Helicopter Completes First One-Way Flight
NASA's Mars helicopter has started a new phase of its mission. Late last week, Ingenuity lifted off from Wright Brothers Field, but unlike all its previous flights, this fifth one didn't end in the same place . This first one-way flight ended in another landing zone 423 feet (129 meters) to the south. This comes as NASA has extended Ingenuity's mission into the summer, ensuring we'll see more rec
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Universal equation for explosive phenomena
Climate change, a pandemic or the coordinated activity of neurons in the brain: In all of these examples, a transition takes place at a certain point from the base state to a new state. Researchers have discovered a universal mathematical structure at these so-called tipping points. It creates the basis for a better understanding of the behavior of networked systems.
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TB immune response discovery could significantly reduce disease harm
A pioneering study has discovered the presence of a harmful inflammatory protein in patients with symptomatic tuberculosis (TB). Researchers say, by targeting the IL-17 cytokine, a component produced naturally by the immune system in response to infection, excessive and damaging lung inflammation caused by TB may be significantly reduced to help speed up patient recovery.
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It is time to create contracts all users can understand
Contracts today are complex and not user-friendly. The documents are written in black and white text, using 'legalese' language, and lack page layout design. The result is that contracts are often left in drawers and are not used. So how can contracts be designed so everyone can read and understand them? This is the question Milva Finnegan explores in her doctoral dissertation at the University of
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Why Germany's coal compromise failed to end the debate
Can expert commissions develop solutions for controversial issues that will enjoy broad democratic support? A team of researchers from the Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies (IASS) has analyzed the work of Germany's "Coal Exit Commission" using a set of new criteria. While the authors view positively the Commission's success in reaching a compromise, they criticize its failure to delive
1d
Why hotter clocks are more accurate
A new experiment shows that the more energy consumed by a clock, the more accurate its timekeeping. This is the first time that a measurement has been made of the entropy — or heat loss — generated by a minimal clock tens of nanometers thick and 1.5 millimeters long. Understanding the thermodynamic cost involved in timekeeping is a central step along the way in the development of future technolo
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New gauge on weather forecasts
Studies of long-term hydro-climatic patterns provide fresh insights into the causes of Australia's strong climate variability which affect extreme wet or dry weather and other conditions vital to water supply, agriculture, the environment and the nation's future.
1d
Tweets fuel super accurate morning traffic prediction
Researchers have used information extracted from tweets to provide unparalleled accuracy for predicting morning traffic patterns. The morning commute period is one of the busiest times of day for traffic; however, it has also proven to be the most difficult time to predict traffic patterns. This is because most methods for traffic prediction rely on having a consistent flow of traffic data from t
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Do purines influence cancer development?
Numerous disease development processes are linked to epigenetic modulation. One protein involved in the process of modulation and identified as an important cancer marker is BRD4. A recent study by researchers at the CeMM Research Center for Molecular Medicine of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, now shows that the supply of purines as well as the purine synthesis of a cell can influence BRD4 acti
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Study led by Penn Medicine reveals new mechanism of lung tissue regeneration
New research performed in mice models at Penn Medicine shows, mechanistically, how the infant lung regenerates cells after injury differently than the adult lung, with alveolar type 1 (AT1) cells reprograming into alveolar type 2 (AT2) cells (two very different lung alveolar epithelial cells), promoting cell regeneration, rather than AT2 cells differentiating into AT1 cells, which is the most wide
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New tools enable rapid analysis of coronavirus sequences and tracking of variants
Widespread sequencing of SARS-CoV-2 genomes presents new opportunities for tracing global and local transmission dynamics, but analyzing so much genomic data is challenging. The sheer number of coronavirus genome sequences and their rapid accumulation makes it hard to place new sequences on a "family tree" showing how they are all related. But researchers at the UC Santa Cruz Genomics Institute ha
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Bronze Age migrations changed societal organization and genomic landscape in Italy
A new study from the Institute of Genomics of the University of Tartu, Estonia has shed light on the genetic prehistory of populations in modern day Italy through the analysis of ancient human individuals around 4,000 years ago. The genomic analysis of ancient samples enabled researchers from Estonia, Italy, and the UK to date the arrival of the Steppe-related ancestry component to 3,600 years ago
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Long-lasting medications may improve treatment satisfaction for opioid use disorder
A commentary from leaders at the National Institute on Drug Abuse discusses a new study showing that an extended-release injection of buprenorphine, a medication used to treat opioid use disorder, was preferred by patients compared to immediate-release buprenorphine, which must be taken orally every day. Extended-release formulations of medications used to treat opioid use disorder may be a valuab
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Vilken roll spelar serotonin vid depression?
Serotoninbrist i hjärnan är en vanlig förklaring till depression. En hjärnavbildningsstudie visar att det kan ha en annan roll. – En möjlighet är att serotoninsystemet inte orsakar depression utan är en del av hjärnans försvarsmekanism mot depression, säger Jonas Svensson, forskare vid Karolinska institutet. Låga nivåer av serotonin i hjärnan anses vara en möjlig förklaringsmodell till depression
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Even small bills for health insurance may cause healthy low-income people to drop coverage
Twenty dollars a month might not seem like a lot to pay for health insurance. But for people getting by on $15,000 a year, it's enough to make some drop their coverage – especially if they're healthy, a new study of Medicaid expansion participants in Michigan finds. That could keep them from getting preventive or timely care, and could leave their insurance company with a sicker pool of patients t
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Scientists invent cryomicroneedles for intradermal therapeutic cell delivery
Scientists recently developed a new generation of microneedles technology which allows the intradermal delivery of living cells in a minimally invasive manner. Their experiment showed that vaccination using therapeutic cells through this ground-breaking technology elicited robust immune responses against tumors in mice, paving the way for developing an easy-to-use cell therapy and other therapeuti
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Once we're past the fear stage, where do we place the blame for the COVID-19 pandemic?
In a recent study, conducted in Poland in 2020 and published in the peer-reviewed journal Social Psychological Bulletin, scientists concluded it was the government and the system that most of the participants attributed responsibility to for the COVID-19 incidence rates. Furthermore, political views and party preferences are reported to play an incomparably more significant role in their responses
1d
Super hot salt might cut solar power costs
Researchers are developing ways to improve how facilities called concentrated solar power plants produce electricity. Solar power accounts for about 2% of US electricity, but it could become more widespread if it were cheaper to generate this electricity and make it readily available on cloudy days and at nighttime. Concentrated solar power plants provide power at off-peak times by storing heat c
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