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Sporing af f.eks. en tabt smartphone kan ske uden at mobiltelefonen selv udsender et sporingssignal.

 
The feature to find a lost phone or laptop has extended to objects that can not send tracking signals themselves. This feature with attaching tracers to personal items has become more popular, the range of possibilities has increased and so have safety features.
https://www.wired.com/story/all-the-ways-find-lost-phone-airtags-tile/
 
 
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LATEST

Sharks use Earth's magnetic field as 'GPS' guidance system, study says
Florida scientists use juvenile bonnetheads for research Authors say findings applicable to other ocean-going sharks Scientists in Florida have concluded that sharks possess an internal navigation system similar to GPS that allows them to use Earth's magnetic forces to travel long distances with accuracy. Related: Below the surface: reports of rising shark attacks don't tell the whole story Conti
1h
The 1,000 rivers contributing the most to ocean plastics
A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in the Netherlands and one in Germany has created a list of the 1000 rivers around the globe that are pouring the most plastics into the world's oceans. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes their study of the factors that introduce plastics into the ocean, and the methods they used to figure out whi
3h
Supernova remnant G53.41+0.03 investigated in detail
Astronomers have conducted detailed X-ray observations of a recently discovered supernova remnant (SNR) known as G53.41+0.03. Results of the observational campaign provide important insights into the properties of this object. The study was detailed in a paper published May 7 on the arXiv pre-print server.
6h
Greenhouse gases are shrinking the stratosphere
An international team of climate scientists has found evidence showing that human-created greenhouse gases have led to a shrinking stratosphere. In their paper published in the journal Environmental Research Letters, the group describes analyzing data from satellites to create computer models.
4h
England ban on indoor gatherings may need to be reimposed, warns expert
Sage member suggests latest Covid lockdown easing may be reversed if hospital admissions rise Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage A leading scientific adviser to the UK government has warned that Monday's lockdown easing in England may have to be reversed and also cautioned against meeting indoors. Speaking on BBC Radio 4's Today programme, Sir Jeremy Farrar, director of
9h
Elon Musk Implies Tesla Is Selling Its Bitcoin, Causing Huge Price Drop, Then Says Actually It's Not
Damage is Done The damage was already done. Last night, Tesla CEO Elon Musk replied "indeed" to a tweet suggesting that Tesla had sold — or was planning to sell — its considerable Bitcoin holdings. The tweet, just one word long, had a devastating effect on the cryptocurrency, with the value of Bitcoin dropping below $45,000 for the first time in almost three months, as Bloomberg reports — the lat
3h
What Kamala Harris Has Learned About Being Vice President
A ir Force Two is a smaller plane than Air Force One. The exterior is the same light-blue and white, but unlike the commander in chief's plane, the vice president's aircraft is open plan—from the back, you can see all the way to the front, where a small office doubles as a bedroom. Kamala Harris spends most of her Air Force Two flights in that office, with the door closed. She doesn't work the pl
7h
Animals are our overlooked allies in the fight against Covid | Melanie Challenger
It's important to recognise the vital role they've played in development of vaccines and treatments A few weeks ago, I received my first shot of a vaccine against Covid-19. As the newly vaccinated exited the clinic, there was a mix of relief and elation on people's faces. We exchanged little smiles of solidarity. If we could have burst into spontaneous applause, I'm sure we would have done. Recen
9h
My daughter was one of thousands of Australians let down by inadequate UTI testing | Deirdre Pinto
Half of all adult women will experience at least one urinary tract infection in their lifetime, yet it remains misdiagnosed, mismanaged and under-researched As a health policy analyst and a woman who suffered for many years with a once poorly-recognised chronic disease – endometriosis – I am dismayed to have stumbled upon another public health crisis severely impacting women's lives. Like endomet
15h
Bill Gates Reportedly Left Microsoft Board Amid Sex Allegations
When mega-billionaire software guy Bill Gates stepped down from the boards of Microsoft and Berkshire Hathaway last year, he said that his intention was to spend more time on his charity efforts. But a blockbuster Wall Street Journal investigation — coming out in the context of Gates' high-profile divorce — has now found that his resignation from Microsoft came as the board was investigating him
38min
No 10 says vaccine hesitancy is low in UK, amid Bolton concerns
Government says it has deployed thousands more vaccine doses to areas with rising cases due to India variants Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Vaccine hesitancy remains extremely low in the UK, despite concerns over hospitalised patients in some areas who have not taken the Covid-19 jab, No 10 has said. No 10 said it had deployed thousands of additional vaccine doses
4h
'They Learn to Parrot What They Know They're Supposed to Say'
Erin McLaughlin, an educator in Pennsylvania, believes that, in school and in life, people should study what others think and why. But in her estimation, many educational institutions that purport to value diversity and inclusion fail to treat viewpoint diversity—which she defines as "the recognition that nobody's worldview is complete, and that no one marker of identity actually defines the way
7h
The Redemption of the 'Ugly American' Tourist
"It's a great time to be an American tourist." Such a statement would have been nonsensical a year ago, when the COVID-19 surge in the United States was so grim that Americans, who are accustomed to traveling most places without issue, were considered personae non gratae across much of the rest of the world. But Tom Jenkins, the CEO of the European Tourism Association, stands by it: When European
7h
China has landed a rover on Mars for the first time—here's what happens next
On March 14, China's space program took a huge leap forward when it landed a rover on Mars for the first time, according to state media. China is now only the second country to land successfully on Mars. The rover, named Zhurong (after the god of fire in ancient Chinese mythology), joins NASA's Curiosity and Perseverance rovers as the only wheeled robots trekking around the surface of the planet.
8h
If we loosen restrictions too early, there is a real risk of a third wave in the UK | Devi Sridhar
Not enough people are vaccinated against Covid as a new variant spreads, requiring us to remain vigilant for a little longer Just when it felt like we could begin to relax again, Covid-19 has thrown us yet another curveball. While we've been debating in the UK where to go for a holiday and booking long-overdue nights out with friends, the virus has been causing havoc across the world. The Kent va
2h
Covid has led to record levels of antidepressant use – but withdrawal can be difficult | David Taylor
I know from personal experience that coming off these medications can be horrible. I also researched ways to make it easier Prof David Taylor is director of pharmacy and pathology at the south London and Maudsley NHS foundation trust One of the impacts of the Covid lockdowns since March 2020 has been a widespread worsening of mental health, with anxiety and depression the most common symptoms rep
2h
Report urges California to act to protect marine ecosystems against microplastics
Roughly 8 million metric tons of plastic enter the ocean each year, and the U.S. is one of the top contributors to plastic pollution. It's been found in the seafloor and surface water, on beaches and shorelines. Microplastics—tiny plastics less than 5 millimeters in size —are pervasive worldwide and have been found inside marine animals, in drinking water and food.
5h
Do animals laugh?
Human laughter may trace its evolutionary beginnings to vocalizations made during play. This type of "laughing" is found in many mammals and even in some birds.
6h
How antimaskers weaponize techniques of scientific analysis to attack mask mandates
There's a new paper out analyzing how antimask activists weaponize the tools of data visualization and scientific argumentation to produce convincing antimask propaganda. Antimaskers are claiming that it shows that they are more "scientific" than those supporting the consensus viewpoint with respect to COVID-19 and masks. What it really shows is that they are good at weaponizing the tools of data
11h
Can you solve it? Are you smart enough to opt out of cookies?
Puzzles about internet deviousness UPDATE: Solutions can be read here. It's a depressing fact of online life that websites are often shameless in using shady practices, like misdirection and obfuscation, to get us to sign up to, or to agree to, something we do not want. Today's puzzles exaggerate the cunning tricks websites use to extract our personal data – but only just! Continue reading…
11h
The Country's Largest Nurses Union Says the CDC's New Mask Rules Are Terrible
The largest union of registered nurses in the United States has publicly condemned the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention over the weekend for ditching most mask recommendations for those who have been fully vaccinated, The New York Times reports . National Nurses United (NNU) called out the decision to allow fully vaccinated Americans to go almost anywhere without a mask as "not based on
1h
Scientists construct first-ever synthetic DNA-like polymer
Double helical covalent polymers—which are spiraling collections of nature's building blocks—are fundamental to life itself, and yet, despite decades of research, scientists have never been able to synthesize them in their entirety like their non-helical brethren—until now.
4h
Can Machines Control Our Brains?
The raging bull locked its legs mid-charge. Digging its hooves into the ground, the beast came to a halt just before it would have gored the man. Not a matador, the man in the bullring standing eye-to-eye with the panting toro was the Spanish neuroscientist José Manuel Rodriguez Delgado, in a death-defying public demonstration in 1963 of how violent behavior could be squelched by a radio-controll
30min
Våld i kärleksrelationer vanligt bland unga
Bland ungdomar i åldern 15–19 år har nästan 60 procent varit utsatta för våld eller trakasserier i den egna kärleksrelationen. Det framkommer i den första större svenska studien om ungas våld i relationer. I studien, som är en del i en avhandling av Sibel Korkmaz, Stockholms universitet, rapporterar många unga om olika former av våld i relationer. Nästan 60 procent av ungdomarna mellan 15 och 19
8h
Scientists Find Extraterrestrial Isotopes on Ocean Floor
This montage features images of five different objects, ranging from a distant galaxy to a relatively close supernova remnant. Each image contains X-rays from Chandra along with data from other telescopes that detect different types of light. These images were released to commemorate the start of the International Year of Light 2015, a year-long celebration declared by the United Nations. These i
6h
Fraktur vanligare bland barn i stadsfamilj med hög inkomst
Tillgång till studsmattor, skidor och cyklar kan förklara varför barn i familjer med högre inkomst oftare drabbas av benbrott. Det visar en avhandling från Umeå universitet som studerat frakturer hos barn. – Frakturmönstret speglar barnens aktiviteter i olika åldrar men också årstider och tillväxt. Sambandet mellan inkomst och frakturer kan eventuellt förklaras av att familjer med högre inkomst o
8h
Quantum computing: Cold chips can control qubits
Researchers and engineers from QuTech in the Netherlands and from Intel Corp., jointly designed and tested a chip to control qubits that can operate at extremely low temperatures, and opens the door to solving the "wiring bottleneck," an important step toward a scalable quantum computer. Their results are published in the scientific journal Nature.
4h
Direct-acting antiviral to treat COVID-19 developed in QLD
An international team of scientists from the Menzies Health Institute Queensland (MHIQ) at Griffith University and from City of Hope, a research and treatment center for cancer, diabetes and other life-threatening diseases in the US, has developed an experimental direct-acting antiviral therapy to treat COVID-19.
5h
60 years later, is it time to update the Drake equation?
On November 1, 1961, a number of prominent scientists converged on the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Green Bank, West Virginia, for a three-day conference. A year earlier, this facility had been the site of the first modern SETI experiment (Project Ozma), where famed astronomers Frank Drake and Carl Sagan used the Green Bank telescope (aka "Big Ear") to monitor two nearby sun-like stars—
4h
Starwatch: Corvus, Crater and Hydra tangled in ancient tale of figs and lies
Faint constellations representing crow, cup and serpent feature in classical Greek and Roman myth This week offers us the opportunity to locate three of the fainter constellations that are linked by myth: Corvus, the crow; Crater, the cup; and Hydra, the serpent. Corvus is one of the oldest recognised constellations, dating back to Babylonian star charts from at least 1100BC. Hydra was also recog
12h
Future sparkles for diamond-based quantum technology
Marilyn Monroe famously sang that diamonds are a girl's best friend, but they are also very popular with quantum scientists—with two new research breakthroughs poised to accelerate the development of synthetic diamond-based quantum technology, improve scalability, and dramatically reduce manufacturing costs.
5h
Recycling gives new purpose to spent nuclear fuel
Imagine filling up your gas tank with 10 gallons of gas, driving just far enough to burn a half gallon and discarding the rest. Then, repeat. That is essentially the practice that the U.S. nuclear industry is following.
5h
Space law protects you from falling debris, but there are no legal penalties for leaving junk in orbit
On May 8, 2021, a piece of space junk from a Chinese rocket fell uncontrolled back to Earth and landed in the Indian Ocean near the Maldives. A year ago, in May 2020, another Chinese rocket met the same fate when it plummeted out of control into the waters off the West African coast. No one knew when or where either of these pieces of space junk were going to hit, so it was a relief when neither c
3h
Researchers develop engineered strain to optically control bacteria's movement behavior
A research team led by Jin Fan from the Shenzhen Institute of Advanced Technology (SIAT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, in collaboration with Liu Zhi's group from Huazhong University of Science and Technology, designed an engineered strain based on Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which could optically control the movement behavior of the bacteria and its infection on the host.
6h
Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) starts 5-year survey
A five-year quest to map the universe and unravel the mysteries of "dark energy" is beginning officially today, May 17, at Kitt Peak National Observatory near Tucson, Arizona. To complete its quest, the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) will capture and study the light from tens of millions of galaxies and other distant objects in the universe.
3h
Save our oceans to protect our health: Scientists call for global action plan
An interdisciplinary European collaboration called the Seas Oceans and Public Health In Europe (SOPHIE) Project has outlined the initial steps that a wide range of organizations could take to work together to protect the largest connected ecoInsystem on Earth. They call for the current UN Ocean Decade to act as a meaningful catalyst for global change, reminding us that ocean health is intricately
5h
30 grunts and sounds that may have been the first language
What did the first person who wanted to speak say? New research suggests that there are lots of sounds that everyone understands. These sounds may have allowed the first exchanges that gave birth to language. As hard as it is sometimes to get a conversation started, imagine how difficult it must have been before words existed. Linguists have long wondered how verbal language began. Some form of c
4h
Solar Orbiter images first coronal mass ejections
The Solar Orbiter launched on 10 February 2020 and is currently in cruise phase ahead of the main science mission, which begins November this year. While the four in situ instruments have been on for much of the time since launch, collecting science data on the space environment in the vicinity of the spacecraft, the operation of the six remote sensing instruments during cruise phase is focused pr
2h
New Tesla Prototype Has Retractable Spoiler
Adjustable Wing We still don't know exactly when Tesla's long-awaited Model S Plaid will officially roll off the lot — but the hype couldn't be any higher. The electric car enthusiasts at YouTube channel The Kilowatts spotted the latest high-performance version of the car company's best-selling electric sedan doing laps at the Laguna Seca Raceway in California. According to a tweet by the channel
1h
New epigenetic regulatory mechanisms involved in multiple myeloma growth
An international team of researchers has analyzed the function of the histone demethylase KDM5A in multiple myeloma, one of the three major hematological cancers, and clarified the mechanism by which it promotes myeloma cell proliferation. They also developed a novel KDM5 inhibitor and showed that it inhibits cancer cell growth in a myeloma mouse model. The researchers expect that new therapies ta
2h
Shortcut for dendritic cells
During an inflammatory response, things need to happen quickly: researchers have recently discovered that certain immune cells that function as security guards can use a shortcut to get from the tissue to lymph nodes.
5h
New NASA data sheds light on climate models
Have you ever worn a dark T-shirt on a sunny day and felt the fabric warm in the sun's rays? Most of us know dark colors absorb sunlight and light colors reflect it—but did you know this doesn't work the same way in the sun's non-visible wavelengths?
5h
'Preprints are works in progress': The tale of a disappearing COVID-19 paper
When a Twitter user tipped us off last week to the mysterious disappearance of a preprint of a paper on a potential new therapy to treat Covid-19, we were curious. Was it a hidden retraction, or something else? The article, titled "Effectiveness of ZYESAMI™ (Aviptadil) in Accelerating Recovery and Shortening Hospitalization in Critically-Ill Patients with … Continue reading
8h
The incredible return of Griffon Vulture to Bulgaria's Eastern Balkan Mountains
Considered extinct from the Eastern Balkan Mountains of Bulgaria in the 1970s, the Griffon Vulture has claimed the area back with 23-25 breeding pairs, distributed in five different colonies and two more frequently used roosting sites. This astonishing success was achieved through an ambitious long-term restoration program and the release of 153 vultures between 2010-2020.
5h
NMR observation of methyl groups in proteins from eukaryotic and cell-free expression systems
An international research team involving the working group of biophysicist Dr. Manuel Etzkorn from Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf (HHU) has developed an approach for using NMR spectrometry to analyze important molecules that have not been accessible before now. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, the authors describe a simpler and efficient means of labeling the molecules with methyl groups as
6h
Fight against drug-resistant typhoid aided by new genomic resource
A new online resource gives the public health community the power to track antimicrobial resistance in Salmonella Typhi (S. Typhi), the bacterium that causes typhoid fever, using genomic sequencing. Improving surveillance in this way enables early interventions to minimize the spread of the disease.
9h
Mandela-effekten
Kollektiva falska minnen Det finns exempel på att flera olika människor delar samma felaktiga minne. Effekten har fått namn av hur Fiona Broome, en självutnämnd "paranormal konsult", i detalj beskrev … Continued Inlägget dök först upp på Vetenskap och Folkbildning .
12h
The psychological cost of corruption in developing countries
Corruption is a crime which slows economic growth, undermines development, and causes inequality. With a cost to the global economy estimated at around US$2.6 trillion (£1.8 trillion) a year, it is often linked to politics and profiteering by large corporations. The Panama Papers, for example, exposed the vast and powerful reach of the financial secrecy industry.
4h
Making Sense of the Great Whip Spider Boom
The fact that many species of amblypygids, or whip spiders, haven't yet been described has more to do with scientific fashion than with the creatures themselves. Though it might seem abstract, what does or does not get attention in the pages of the Journal of Arachnology, can affect the natural world.
8h
How plankton hold secrets to preventing pandemics
Whether it's plankton exposed to parasites or people exposed to pathogens, a host's initial immune response plays an integral role in determining whether infection occurs and to what degree it spreads within a population, new research suggests.
1h
Life in the deep freeze: The revolution that changed our view of glaciers forever
I've been fascinated by glaciers since I was 14, when geography textbooks taught me about strange rivers of ice that crept down yawning valleys like giant serpents stalking their next meal. That kernel of wonder has carried me through a career of more than 25 years. I've traveled to the world's peaks and its poles to see over 20 glaciers. Yet, when I first started out as a researcher in the early
3h
Micrometer-size molecular modeling kit shows real chemical reactions
Molecules are so small that we cannot even see them with ordinary microscopes. This makes studying molecules or chemical reactions difficult: researchers are limited to either indirect observations or computer models. A team of researchers from the University of Amsterdam and New York University have now found a way to build micrometer-size model molecules using 'patchy particles'. This allows for
4h
This Ingenious Metabolism Tracker Lets You Optimize Your Weight Loss Routine
As we age, our metabolism tends to slow down, which often leads to weight gain. But what if we could fine tune our metabolism to keep it working at an optimal level? Dr. Chih-Hao Lee, professor of genetics and complex diseases at Harvard's T.H. Chan School of Public Health, thinks it's possible. He believes that the greatest factors of a slowing metabolism is a combination of poor diet and inacti
3min
Blood clots are more likely after COVID-19 than after vaccine
The rare blood clot disorder reported by some Johnson & Johnson coronavirus vaccine recipients is also a risk of COVID-19 infection, according to a new report. For the study, researchers synthesized existing data from more than 81 million patients and found that risk of developing CVST blood clots is eight to 10 times higher following a COVID-19 infection as compared to the risk associated with r
36min
Multi-gene testing could detect more hereditary cancer syndromes
Up to 38.6% of people with colon cancer who have a hereditary cancer syndrome–including 6.3% of those with Lynch syndrome–could have their conditions remain undetected with current universal tumor-screening methods, and at least 7.1% of people with colorectal cancer have an identifiable inherited genetic mutation, according to new data published by scientists at The Ohio State University Compreh
47min
How space debris created the world's largest garbage dump
Space debris is any human-made object that's currently orbiting Earth. When space debris collides with other space debris, it can create thousands more pieces of junk, a dangerous phenomenon known as the Kessler syndrome. Radical solutions are being proposed to fix the problem, some of which just might work. (See the video embedded toward the end of the article.) In 1957, the Soviet Union launche
1h
In slow motion against antibiotic resistance
Whether bacteria are resistant to antibiotics is often decided at the cell membrane. This is where antibiotics can be blocked on their way into the cell interior or catapulted from the inside to the outside. Macrocyclic peptides, a novel class of antibiotics, bioactive cytotoxins and inhibitors, shed light on how this transport process occurs at the membrane, how it is influenced and how it can be
1h
Educational intervention enhances student learning
In a study of low-income, urban youth in the U.S., researchers at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health found that students exposed to Photovoice, an educational intervention, experienced greater improvements in STEM-capacity scores and environmental awareness scores compared to a group of youth who were not exposed to the activity. The results suggest that the Photovoice activities
1h
Looking for something? A team at MIT develop a robot that sees through walls
In recent years, robots have gained artificial vision, touch, and even smell. "Researchers have been giving robots human-like perception," says MIT Associate Professor Fadel Adib. In a new paper, Adib's team is pushing the technology a step further. "We're trying to give robots superhuman perception," he says. The researchers have developed a robot that uses radio waves, which can pass through wa
1h
Caroline Thomas obituary
My wife, Caroline Thomas, who has died aged 89 of cancer, was an applied psychologist who worked on safety and accident prevention, championing the role of consumers in the development of standards. Known professionally as Caroline Warne, she played a pivotal role in consumer safety and accident prevention over six decades, beginning with research into industrial and household accidents, and culm
1h
Ancient human faeces reveal gut microbes of the past
Nature, Published online: 17 May 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01266-7 Appreciation is growing of how our gut microbes shape health and disease. Now, a study of ancient human faeces sheds light on how microbial populations in the gut have changed during the past 2,000 years.
1h
Type of heart failure may influence treatment strategies in patients with AFib
Among patients with both heart failure and atrial fibrillation (AFib), treatment strategies focused on controlling the heart rhythm (using catheter ablation) and those focused on controlling the heart rate (using drugs and/or a pacemaker) showed no significant differences in terms of death from any cause or progression of heart failure, according to a study presented at the American College of Car
1h
Brigham-led clinical trials take center stage at the American College of Cardiology
Top experts from Brigham and Women's Hospital presented outcomes from some of the most-anticipated clinical trials in cardiology at the virtual American College of Cardiology's 70th Annual Scientific Session. In four Late-Breaking Clinical Trial presentations, Brigham cardiologists shared their latest findings on strategies to prevent future cardiovascular events in at-risk patient populations, re
1h
COVID-19 vaccination: Thrombosis can be prevented by prompt treatment, researchers report
A rare syndrome has been observed in people following vaccination against COVID-19. This involves thrombosis at unusual sites in the body, associated with a low thrombocyte count and a clotting disorder. In medical jargon, this syndrome is referred to as VITT (vaccine-induced thrombotic thrombocytopenia). Doctors at MedUni Vienna and Vienna General Hospital have now successfully treated an acute i
1h
Immune response may clarify odd COVID reaction in kids
New research may help solve one of the enduring mysteries of the COVID-19 pandemic: why most children tend to experience fewer symptoms than adults after infection with the coronavirus. The immune system response that occurs in the rare cases in which children experience life-threatening reactions after infection may offer an important insight, a new study suggests. While many children infected w
1h
Hidden diversity
The ocean is a big place with many deep, dark mysteries. Humans have mapped no more than 20% of the sea, and explored less. Even the kelp forests of Southern California — among the best studied patches of ocean on the planet — hide species not yet described by science.
1h
'Hyperinvasive' care improves survival in refractory out-of-hospital cardiac arrest
A subgroup of patients who experienced an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) that did not respond to standard advanced cardiac life support (ACLS), were immediately transported to a cardiac care center, and placed on a device similar to a heart-lung bypass machine were more likely to have survived with good brain function six months later than similar patients who received standard care at the
1h
Therapeutic hypothermia below guidelines did not improve outcomes after cardiac arrest
In patients receiving therapeutic hypothermia after suffering out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, those who were cooled below 31 degrees Celsius (about 88 degrees Fahrenheit) for 24 hours showed no difference in terms of death or poor neurological outcomes at six months compared with patients receiving guideline-recommended cooling of 34 C (about 93 F). These findings are part of a study presented at
2h
How COVID-19 survival improved in UK hospitals during first wave
The likelihood of people surviving COVID-19 in UK hospitals has been improving over time, a new study has found.Research published in The Lancet Respiratory Medicine by the ISARIC Coronavirus Clinical Characterisation Consortium found that in-hospital mortality declined from 32% at the start of the first wave (Mar-Apr 2020) to 16% at the end of the first wave (Jun-Jul 2020).
2h
Routine testing before surgery remains common despite low value
Before undergoing surgery, patients often go through a number of tests: blood work, sometimes a chest X-ray, perhaps tests to measure heart and lung function.In fact, about half of patients who had one of three common surgical procedures done in Michigan between 2015 and the midway point of 2019 received at least one routine test beforehand.Yet plenty of evidence suggests that preoperative testing
2h
Anisotropic zoning in the upper crust of the Tianshan Tectonic Belt
The collision between the Indian and Eurasian plates resulted in the formation of the Tianshan Tectonic Belt; however, the formation mechanism of Tianshan and the construction of a dynamic model explaining it remain to be realized and an integrated understanding has not been reached. A new study adopted shear-wave splitting system to collect and analyze shear-wave splitting parameters of 33 statio
2h
Scientists explain why climate models can't reproduce the early-2000s global warming slowdown
A new study led by Dr. Wei and Dr. Qiao from the First Institute of Oceanography, Ministry of Natural Resources provides an evaluation of the performance of the newly released CMIP6 models in simulating the global warming slowdown observed in the early 2000s. This study reveals that the key in simulating and predicting near-term temperate change is to correctly separate and simulate the two distin
2h
An asthma vaccine effective in mice
Inserm teams led by Laurent Reber (Infinity, Toulouse) and Pierre Bruhns (Humoral Immunity, Institut Pasteur, Paris) and French company NEOVACS have developed a vaccine that could induce long-term protection against allergic asthma, reducing the severity of its symptoms and thus significantly improving patient quality of life. Their research in animals has been published in the journal Nature Comm
2h
Rare COVID-19 response in children explained
One of the enduring mysteries of the COVID-19 pandemic is why most children tend to experience fewer symptoms than adults after infection with the coronavirus. The immune system response that occurs in the rare cases in which children experience life-threatening reactions after infection may offer an important insight, a Yale-led study published in the journal Immunity suggests.
2h
Omecamtiv Mecarbil brings greater benefits for severe heart failure
The experimental heart failure drug omecamtiv mecarbil reduced heart failure hospitalizations by a greater margin among patients with more severely reduced ejection fraction, a measure indicating severe impairment in the heart's pumping ability, compared with those who had moderately reduced ejection fraction, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 70th Annual Scie
2h
Singularity Is Relaunching the 'Singularity Radio' Podcast Network
While Covid-19 has reshaped many aspects of our lives, one thing that hasn't changed is the desire to learn and stay entertained while juggling our many day-to-day obligations. To make sure we're doing our part to keep you up-to-date and inspired, Singularity is relaunching our world-ranked podcast network: Singularity Radio . For those of you who may not already be subscribers, the first season
2h
Sotagliflozin shows benefit for difficult-to-treat form of heart failure
Patients with both diabetes and heart failure who were treated with sotagliflozin, a novel investigational drug for diabetes, for a median of nine to 16 months experienced reductions of 22% to 43% in the risk of death or worsening heart failure compared with similar patients who were treated with a placebo, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 70th Annual Scienti
2h
New evidence of how and when the Milky Way came together
New research provides the best evidence to date into the timing of how our early Milky Way came together, including the merger with a key satellite galaxy.Using relatively new methods in astronomy, the researchers were able to identify the most precise ages currently possible for a sample of about a hundred red giant stars in the galaxy.
2h
A connection between senescence and stem cells caused by a breast cancer-initiating protein
Researchers from the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) and the IDIBELL, led by Eva González-Suárez at the CNIO, have found that the hyperactivation of the RANK pathway plays a double function in breast cells: in the early stages of cancer, it activates senescence, which has a protective effect and delays the appearance of tumours; in more advanced stages, RANK-induced senescence favou
2h
Treatment With MDMA
A theme that I return to every so often on the blog is the degree to which we don't understand the molecular mechanisms of psychiatric syndromes. I've found that many people outside of the biomedical world are surprised by this – depression, for example, is something that's distinctive enough, widespread enough, and certainly has enough of a presence in most people's consciousness as something re
2h
Climate policies, transition risk, and financial stability
The way in which banks react to climate risks and uncertainty could impact financial stability as well as the world's transition to a low-carbon economy. A new study by researchers from IIASA and the Vienna University of Economics and Business explored the role that banks' expectations about climate-related risks will play in fostering or hindering an orderly low-carbon transition.
3h
The Great Resignation: COVID revealed how abnormal the modern workplace is
The Great Resignation is an idea proposed by Professor Anthony Klotz that predicts a large number of people leaving their jobs after the COVID pandemic ends and life returns to "normal." French philosopher Michel Foucault argued that by establishing what is and is not "normal," we are exerting a kind of power by making people behave a certain way. If working from home becomes the new normal, we m
3h
Fruit flies and mosquitoes are a lot brainier than people think
The tiny brains of mosquitoes and fruit flies have about 200,000 neurons and other cells, researchers report. By comparison, a human brain has 86 billion neurons, and a rodent brain contains about 12 billion. In research made possible when COVID-19 sidelined other projects, researchers meticulously counted brain cells in fruit flies and three species of mosquitoes, revealing a number that would s
3h
The perfect blend: Optimizing gas mixtures for hydrogen storage in clathrate hydrates
In a recent study, Dr. Park's group explored a feasible solution to the problem of using clathrate hydrates as vessels for H2 storage. However, the enclathration of pure H2 is still a slow process. To improve upon this strategy, the team set out to find the best hydrogen-natural gas blend (HNGB) for the energy-efficient formation of clathrate hydrates. They carefully analyzed the clathrate formati
3h
Fast, affordable solution proposed for transparent displaysand semiconductors
The Korea Institute of Machinery & Materials(KIMM) developed a roll-based damage-free transfer technique that allows two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials to be transferred into wafer scale without damage. The proposed technique has a variety of applications from transparent displays and semiconductors to displays for self-driving cars, and is expected to accelerate the commercialization of 2D nanoma
3h
Regulation of Supplements Lacking
A recent audit of natural products manufacturers in Canada reveals how lacking regulations are in this industry. Scott Gavura does a good review of this over at SBM . I want to amplify some of what he says and add further context. For background, so that everyone knows where I am coming from, I tend to take a nuanced approach to regulation. I believe in the power of capitalism and a free market t
3h
Skoltech researchers developed an enriched method for increasing the capacity of next-generation metal-ion battery cathode materials
Scientists at Skoltech Center for Energy Science and Technology have developed an enriched and scalable approach for increasing the capacity of a broad range of metal-ion battery cathode materials. An important advantage of the approach is its scalability. The process requires no sophisticated conditions and is relatively safe. Additionally, the reducing agents can be recycled after they react wit
3h
New combination immunotherapy plus ART expand innate cells critical to controlling HIV
Yerkes NPRC/Emory University and Institut Pasteur researchers have determined adding a combination immunotherapy to antiviral therapy (ART) is effective in generating highly functional natural killer (NK) cells that can help control and reduce simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) in animal models. This finding is key for reducing reliance on ART and developing additional treatment options to contro
3h
High-intensity intermittent training improves spatial memory in rats
Despite lower exercise volume, HIIT was as effective as endurance running for improving exercise capacity and spatial memory. Researchers at the University of Tsukuba found that activity-specific physiological adaptations in the muscles and increased signaling and neurogenesis in the hippocampus underlie these improvements. Findings also suggested that benefits can potentially be optimized by tail
3h
Team uses seaweed stuff to make 3D-printed gel
Researchers merged micro- and nano-sized networks of the same materials harnessed from seaweed to create 3D-printable gels with improved and highly controlled properties. The printed jelly could have applications in biomedical materials—think biological scaffolds for growing cells—and soft robotics. Described in the journal Nature Communications , the findings show that these water-based gels—cal
3h
Escape from the endosome: Innovative approach could prove valuable for developing new medicines
Most drugs are small. But large molecules could be enormously useful medicines—if we could only get them inside our cells. Now, a group of researchers in biomedical engineering—a shared department with the UConn School of Dental Medicine, School of Medicine, and School of Engineering—has developed a non-toxic way to do just that.
3h
Cysteinylated albumin: A new early diagnostic marker for diabetic kidney disease
Japanese researchers have discovered that cysteinylated albumin (oxidized albumin) in serum can be used as an early diagnostic marker for diabetic kidney disease. Compared with urinary albumin, serum oxidized albumin not only reflects renal pathology at an earlier stage, but can also predict the progression of renal pathology by its degree of elevation. The researchers believe that it can be used
3h
COVID-19 vaccination: Thrombosis can be prevented by prompt treatment
A rare syndrome has been observed in people following vaccination against Covid-19. This involves thrombosis at unusual sites in the body, associated with a low thrombocyte count and a clotting disorder. In medical jargon, this syndrome is referred to as VITT (vaccine-induced thrombotic thrombocytopenia). Doctors at MedUni Vienna and Vienna General Hospital have now successfully treated an acute i
3h
Sex work, part of the online gig economy, is a lifeline for marginalized workers
More people are getting involved in more types of sex work, especially with the help of the internet, despite criminalization of their occupations and activist opposition, some of which threatens people's lives. My research interviewing a wide range of sex workers finds that more people are involved in the industry, including marginalized people who are finding it a literal lifeline in tough econo
3h
Global land use more extensive than estimated
Humans leave their "footprints" on the land area all around the globe. These land-use changes play an important role for nutrition, climate, and biodiversity. Scientists at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) combined satellite data with statistics from the past 60 years and found that global land-use changes affect about 32 percent of the land area. This means that they are about four tim
4h
No benefit to FFR-guided PCI in STEMI patients with multi-vessel disease
In patients who had a coronary stent inserted after experiencing the most severe type of heart attack, the use of a technique that measures blood flow and pressure through a partially blocked artery to determine if a second stenting procedure is needed did not improve outcomes and was more costly than using angiography, or a heart X-ray, alone to guide the procedure, according to research presente
4h
Rivaroxaban reduces first and total ischemic events in patients with peripheral artery disease
Rivaroxaban, in addition to low-dose aspirin, significantly reduced the occurrence of total severe events of the heart, limb or brain and issues related to other vascular complications in patients with symptomatic peripheral artery disease (PAD) who underwent lower extremity revascularization, a procedure to open blocked arteries in the leg. The findings, presented at the American College of Cardi
4h
Tailored cardiac rehab program improves function and quality of life in older heart failure patients
Older patients hospitalized with acute heart failure who participated in a novel 12-week physical rehabilitation (rehab) program tailored to address their specific physical impairments had significant gains not only in physical functioning but also quality of life and depression compared with those receiving usual care, regardless of their heart's ejection fraction, according to a new study presen
4h
Dapagliflozin did not significantly reduce organ failure or death in high-risk patients hospitalized
Dapagliflozin, a sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitor, did not significantly reduce the risk of organ failure or death or improve recovery in patients hospitalized with COVID-19 who are at high risk of developing serious complications compared to placebo, according to data presented at the American College of Cardiology's 70th Annual Scientific Session.
4h
Sacubitril/valsartan does not outperform ACE inhibitor after heart attack
The heart failure drug sacubitril/valsartan did not significantly reduce the rate of heart failure or cardiovascular death following a heart attack compared to ramipril, an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor proven effective in improving survival following heart attacks. Findings from the PARADISE-MI trial were presented at the American College of Cardiology's 70th Annual Scientific Ses
4h
Left atrial appendage occlusion reduces stroke after heart surgery
Patients with an elevated risk of stroke due to heart rhythm problems, or atrial fibrillation (AFib), were much less likely to suffer a stroke after undergoing heart surgery if doctors concurrently performed an additional procedure, called left atrial appendage occlusion (LAAO), according to the results of a trial presented at the American College of Cardiology's 70th Annual Scientific Session.
4h
Left atrial appendage occlusion associated with low rate of stroke
Transcatheter left atrial appendage occlusion (LAAO) with a WATCHMAN device was associated with a low rate of stroke at one year even among older patients with atrial fibrillation (AFib) who faced a high risk for stroke or bleeding based on their previous health history, according to new data presented at the American College of Cardiology's 70th Annual Scientific Session.
4h
SpaceX Rocket Flies 10 Times as Reusability Gets Surprisingly Routine
Industry pioneer SpaceX has hit a significant milestone after one of its Falcon 9 rockets complete d its 10 th mission. The ability to reuse its launch vehicles has been at the heart of the company's recent successes, and it seems others are starting to take note. For decades, space rockets have been a single-use technology left to burn up on re-entry to the atmosphere once their mission is done.
4h
Why it pays to notice emotions in the workplace
Alisa Yu first became intrigued with emotional acknowledgment while interviewing nurses working in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford. The nurses told her that verbally acknowledging their young patients' fears and stress created trust, which enabled them to do their jobs more effectively. "From then on, I began to see emotional acknowledgment every
4h
Impoverished meadow and forest flora threaten insects
The intensification of land use poses a major threat to biodiversity, including herbivorous insects and their host plants. If beetles, Orthoptera (grasshoppers/crickets), Heteroptera (true bugs) and Auchenorrhyncha (cicadas/leafhoppers/treehoppers/planthoppers/spittlebugs) specialize in only one or just a few plant species, they have to migrate or else they become locally extinct when their host p
4h
Designing nano-sized chemotherapy
Nature, Published online: 17 May 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01322-2 Nanoparticles carrying chemotherapeutic drugs could help people with cancer escape some of the drugs' side effects, hopes Silvia Giordani.
4h
Higher blood levels of omega-3 fatty acids from prescription fish oil showed no effect on CV events
Patients at high risk for cardiovascular events who had the highest levels of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) in their blood one year after taking daily omega-3 carboxylic acid, a prescription-grade fish oil, had similar rates of major cardiovascular events as people taking a corn oil placebo, according to a secondary analysis of the STRENGTH trial presented at the American College of Cardiology's 70t
4h
No improvement in outcomes with rapid, high-sensitivity troponin T testing protocol at one year
Using more sensitive and frequent repeat testing of a blood test that indicates heart injury to guide the treatment of low-risk patients with symptoms of a possible heart attack resulted in patients being discharged earlier and receiving fewer cardiac stress tests but did not improve patient outcomes after one year, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 70th Annua
4h
Clopidogrel superior to aspirin for long-term post-stent maintenance
Clopidogrel outperformed aspirin in what is believed to be the first and largest randomized trial to compare the effectiveness of the two antiplatelet drugs as long-term maintenance therapy for patients who had no adverse events after one year of dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) following the insertion of a coronary stent, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 70t
4h
Burnout rates double for cardiology clinicians amid COVID-19
The coronavirus pandemic has upended nearly every aspect of everyday life and continues to have devastating effects worldwide. It has also taken a significant toll on cardiovascular clinicians, many of whom provide direct care to patients with COVID-19, according to results of a new survey presented at the American College of Cardiology's 70th Annual Scientific Session.
4h
Low- and high-dose aspirin achieve similar protection, safety for those with heart disease
As presented at ACC.21 and published in NEJM, the findings from ADAPTABLE are from the largest aspirin dosing trial conducted in routine care and clinical settings using PCORnet, a national resource advancing more efficient clinical research. The study and trial were funded by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute and conducted by a research team led by the Duke Clinical Research Instit
4h
Renal denervation lowers blood pressure in medication-resistant hypertension
Two months after undergoing renal denervation (RDN), patients with high blood pressure who did not respond to treatment with multiple medications had a greater reduction in daytime systolic blood pressure than patients who did not receive RDN, with no difference in major adverse effects, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 70th Annual Scientific Session.
4h
Lidar and maps reveal population of ancient Angkor
Archaeologists report that 700,000-900,000 people lived in Cambodia's medieval Greater Angkor region. The sprawling tropical city, which covered 3,000 square kilometers (1,158 square miles), thrived from the 9th to the 15th centuries before being abandoned, possibly due to climate change. The paper, which combines more than 30 years of data with recent airborne lidar sensing, appears in the journ
4h
Add This Free Browser Extension to Save Money When Shopping Online
No one has time to price-check items on their shopping list between various stores—it takes trial and error to realize that one supermarket may sell cheaper ice cream, while another sells cheaper tomatoes. While the Internet seems more conducive to research and price-checking, it can actually have the opposite effect: access to too much information and too many options can be overwhelming, creati
6h
Terpen-tales: The mystery behind the unique fragrance of lavender
Even the mention of lavender evokes the distinct fragrance of the flower. This beautiful flower has been used to make perfumes and essential oils since time immemorial. The aesthetics of the flower have captured imaginations worldwide. So what makes this flower so special? What are the "magical" compounds that gives it its unique fragrance? What is the genetic basis of these compounds?
6h
Hjälp forskare att fånga hummer
Sverige behöver mer kunskap om hummerbeståndet på västkusten. Nu vänder sig forskare vid SLU till allmänheten för att få svar på hur många och hur stora humrarna är i olika delar av utbredningsområdet. Under tre veckor i augusti 2021 kan utvalda privatpersoner få bedriva provfiske efter hummer samtidigt som SLU:s eget provfiske pågår. Projektet heter LOBSERVE. Fisket efter europeisk hummer är omf
8h
Prenatal detection of heart defects lower in rural, poor areas and among Hispanic women
Living in rural areas, neighborhoods with lower socioeconomic levels or being of Hispanic ethnicity are associated with lower prenatal detection and later diagnosis of a congenital heart defect known as transposition of the great arteries.Similarly, living in neighborhoods with lower socioeconomic levels was linked with decreased detection of a condition known as hypoplastic left heart syndrome, a
8h
Genetic fate-mapping reveals surface accumulation but not deep organ invasion of pleural and peritoneal cavity macrophages following injury
Nature Communications, Published online: 17 May 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23197-7 Body cavity macrophages reside on the serous surfaces of organs and believed to participate in organ repair following injury. Here the authors show with a fate-mapping reporter system that these cells, although accumulate at the surfaces of injured liver or lung, don't penetrate deeply into the tissue.
9h
Polymer-free corticosteroid dimer implants for controlled and sustained drug delivery
Nature Communications, Published online: 17 May 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23232-7 Polymer-based systems are often considered a necessity for controlled drug delivery, but have well-known limitations. Here, the authors report on drug delivery implants formed solely from corticosteroid dimers, which demonstrate controlled release and overcome many of the challenges of polymer-based systems.
9h
A universal strategy towards high–energy aqueous multivalent–ion batteries
Nature Communications, Published online: 17 May 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23209-6 Rechargeable multivalent-ion batteries are promising candidates for future energy storage technologies. Here, the authors develop various aqueous multivalent-ion cells using concentrated aqueous gel electrolytes, sulfur-containing anodes, and high-voltage metal oxide cathodes.
9h
A global resource for genomic predictions of antimicrobial resistance and surveillance of Salmonella Typhi at pathogenwatch
Nature Communications, Published online: 17 May 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23091-2 Whole genome sequencing data are increasingly becoming routinely available but generating actionable insights is challenging. Here, the authors describe Pathogenwatch, a web tool for genomic surveillance of S. Typhi, and demonstrate its use for antimicrobial resistance assignment and strain risk assessment.
9h
Early turbulence and pulsatile flows enhance diodicity of Tesla's macrofluidic valve
Nature Communications, Published online: 17 May 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23009-y Nguyen et al. take a fresh look at Tesla's concept of an asymmetric fluidic conduit. They show that for alternating flow at high frequencies the device can almost be operated as a diode, enabled by a transition to turbulent-like flow at rather low Reynolds numbers.
9h
COVID-19 har pustet frisk luft i en gammel sag: Nu skal lungepatienter løftes med en helhjertet indsats
I år er det 120 år siden, Lungeforeningen blev stiftet for at bekæmpe den smitsomme sygdom tuberkulose, men aldrig har lungesagen været mere aktuel end i det ­forløbne år. Det er under coronapandemien blevet tydeligt for de fleste, hvor vigtigt raske lunger er. Lad os sammen stå på fundamentet af den indsigt og den utrolige innovation og kampgejst, som sundhedsvæsenet har vist det seneste år og p
9h
Gode råd om MBA: Skal, skal ikke?
PLUS. Hvad vil du bruge en MBA til? Har du erfaring nok? Og hvad får din arbejdsgiver ud af at betale? Læs her, hvad to MBA'ere, en headhunter, en forsker og en udbyder råder dig til, før du går i gang med studiet.
10h
Save our oceans to protect our health – scientists call for global action plan
An interdisciplinary European collaboration called the Seas Oceans and Public Health In Europe (SOPHIE) Project, led by the University of Exeter and funded by Horizons 2020, has outlined the initial steps that a wide range of organisations could take to work together to protect the largest connected ecoInsystem on Earth. They call for the current UN Ocean Decade to act as a meaningful catalyst for
10h
From the Dawn of Time, to this year – we are scheduled to make in excess of 298 billion times more Technological Progress than we have made from the Dawn of Humankind, to now – in the next 10 years – according to Computer Science. Ray Kurzweil states we have entered the Technological Singularity.
And as a Computer Scientist – not according to Ray Kurzweil – The Era of Exponential Gains has taken flight. Computer Science is in fact an entire field of Science devoted to studying/improving this Era of Computational Transgression so that once it begins, its recursively improves itself – we did this (Computer Scientists) to ensure a staggering era of progression catalyzes that can not be halte
12h
Ruler of the Aging Papermill
Smut Clyde congratulates Aging: "This is bespoke tailoring, in contrast to the off-the-rack products cranked out by the average papermill […] no shame befalls the journals that accept these confections."
12h
VICE: Visual Identification and Correction of Neural Circuit Errors
A connectivity graph of neurons at the resolution of single synapses provides scientists with a tool for understanding the nervous system in health and disease. Recent advances in automatic image segmentation and synapse prediction in electron microscopy (EM) datasets of the brain have made reconstructions of neurons possible at the nanometer scale. However, automatic segmentation sometimes strugg
13h
Learn How Startups Are Launched, Funded, And Grow With This Training
Startups have been changing the world for decades. These small, nimble businesses can grow quickly and turn into established pillars of industry, yet in their early years, finding funding and support can be a struggle if they're not properly organized and presented. The Complete CEO Startups Venture Capital Bundle lays out how to launch a startup, keep it funded, and make it thrive. The bundle is
15h
Bring Your Art Into The Digital Realm With A Beginner's Guide To NFTs
The art world was shocked when a non-fungible token, or NFT, of a JPG by viral artist Beeple sold for $69 million . Yet perhaps they shouldn't have been. NFTs are changing how art is sold online, and even if you're planning to keep your art in the real world, you should understand how they work. This beginner's guide offers the perfect entry into NFTs and how they help artists manage digital righ
17h
Could It Be That A Sort Of Cognitive Stack Effect Is Possible?
Is this being studied? Basically I'll explain it like this. Belief in a greater effect —-> Skewed Perception —-> Skewed Evidence (repeat) I've been studying occult religions and some of them seem to use this to produce hallucinations. I've spoken to people who claimed to see all sorts of stuff. It's usually done through some ritual, often repeated. Not sure if this falls under neuroscience or
18h
The Lancet: Experts call for urgent action to reduce global burden of cardiovascular disease in women by 2030
In the first-ever global report on cardiovascular disease (CVD) in women, researchers call for urgent action to improve care and prevention, fill knowledge gaps, and increase awareness to tackle the worldwide leading cause of death among women. The all female-led Commission report was published in The Lancet and presented during a plenary session at the American College of Cardiology's 70th Annual
19h
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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