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With gene therapy and special goggles, doctors successfully did a partial sight recovery on a patient with retinitis pigmentosa disease. The treatment has to still develop, but gives promising results.
 
While testing the quality of water near Greenland, researchers discovered unusually large amounts of toxic mercury that was released from melting ice glaciers. They are speculating about the consequences on sea food quality and how to manage the levels of mercury.
 
Study of life in Earth's subsurface revealed that it's possible for microbial life to exist deep underground. These microbes get energy from water molecules being split by unstable rock atoms creating energy as replacement for Sun's energy and other remaining products that are able to sustain life. Based on this, scientists predict that life on other rocky planets in their subsurface is possible, if there is water.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

Faster than a PCR test: dogs detect Covid in under a second
Study in London used six enthusiastic dogs in a double-blind trial Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Faster than PCR and more accurate than lateral flow tests, the latest weapons against Covid-19 have four legs and a wet nose. A study published on Monday found that people who are infected with coronavirus give off a distinct odour, which these highly trained dogs can d
16h
Other Regimes Will Hijack Planes Too
Even when our most basic civilizational values are in dispute, there are a few sets of rules and regulations that we nevertheless manage to share. The laws of the sea, for example, or the norms governing the conduct of air-traffic controllers. Pilots of any nationality, even when flying to Caracas, Havana, or Pyongyang, have no reason to believe that the instructions they receive from the ground
4h

LATEST

Israel's Problems Are Not Like America's
R ereading Exodus , the schmaltzy 1958 best seller about Israel that became a Hollywood movie starring Paul Newman, I was surprised by something I hadn't noticed as a teenager. The author, Leon Uris, describes a utopia of brave young pioneers in khaki shorts, farming when possible and fighting when necessary, quoting Bible verses as they hook up in ancient ruins, and so forth. But the novel isn't
11h
If Democracy Is Dying, Why Are Democrats So Complacent?
If you've followed recent Democratic messaging, you'll have heard that American democracy is under serious attack by the Republican Party, representing an existential threat to the country. If you've followed Democratic lawmaking, you'd be forgiven for thinking that the threat is actually a rather piddling one. The disconnect, in this case, isn't attributable to Democratic embellishment, but to i
10h
A blind man can perceive objects after a gene from algae was added to his eye
The 58-year-old man was blind, barely able to perceive whether it was day or night. After receiving gene therapy to add light-sensing molecules to one of his retinas, he could locate a notebook set on a table. Scientists in Europe and the US are reporting today what they describe as the first successful use of optogenetics to improve a person's vision. The feat involved introducing a gene from al
6h
The Colonial pipeline ransomware hackers had a secret weapon: self-promoting cybersecurity firms
On January 11, antivirus company Bitdefender said it was "happy to announce" a startling breakthrough. It had found a flaw in the ransomware that a gang known as DarkSide was using to freeze computer networks of dozens of businesses in the US and Europe. Companies facing demands from DarkSide could download a free tool from Bitdefender and avoid paying millions of dollars in ransom to the hackers
12h
Spacewatch: total lunar eclipse and largest supermoon of the year
Although the full supermoon will be easily seen from Europe and Africa, sadly the eclipse will not be The moon will be full on 26 May. This will coincide with the largest supermoon of the year, and also the first total lunar eclipse since January 2019. Although precise definitions vary, a supermoon is said to occur when the full moon takes place near the closest point in its orbit to the Earth. T
16h
NASA Rover Finds Likely Remnants of Organic Compounds on Mars
Needs Pepper A team of NASA researchers suspect that they've made a huge discovery about Mars: traces of organic salts on the surface. If that's true — the scientists haven't completely ruled out other compounds yet — then it would lend much more credibility to the hypothesis that Mars once supported life . These salts, according to research published in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Plane
6h
Population Decline Is Turning Earth Into a Ghost Town, Experts Say
Countries around the world are beginning to reckon with a years-long drop in new births that has skewed population demographics heavily toward older age groups. Thanks to that near-global drop in fertility rates, experts suggest that the planet's population could enter a period of continued decline for the first time in known human history by the second half of the 21st century, The New York Time
3h
Wuhan Lab Workers Were Hospitalized Right Before the Pandemic
A previously-undisclosed US intelligence report reveals that multiple researchers at the Wuhan Institute of Virology became sick and went to the hospital right around the time that COVID-19 is thought to have started circulating in China. The report specified that three researchers from the lab were hospitalized in November 2019 "with symptoms consistent with both COVID-19 and common seasonal ill
4h
Research reveals why some find the sound of others eating so irritating
Scans show some brains have a stronger link between the part that processes sound and that which controls the mouth and throat Scientists have shed light on why everyday sounds such as chewing, drinking and breathing can be so maddening to some people that it drives them to despair. While the familiar munching and slurping of the dinner table are innocuous enough to most, those with misophonia –
5h
A Clue to Why the 1918 Pandemic Came Back Stronger Than Before
The three teenagers—two boys and a girl—could not have known what clues their lungs would one day yield. All they could have known, or felt, before they died in Germany in 1918 was their flu-ravaged lungs failing them, each breath getting harder and harder. Tens of millions of people like them died in the flu pandemic of 1918; they happened to be three whose lungs were preserved by a farsighted p
5h
How 24 Hours of Racist Violence Caused Decades of Harm
The Tulsa Race Massacre of 1921 was over in less than 24 hours, but the damage that the city's Black citizens suffered went on for decades. Indeed, the full magnitude of the community's economic loss is still coming into focus even on the centennial of the event —in part because new digital tools allow scholars to mine census records for data about its aftermath. On May 31, 1921, a mob of more th
10h
WHO and global faith leaders call for fair access to Covid vaccines
Declaration warns that the world is at a turning point in saving poorer countries from devastation Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Global faith leaders and senior health and humanitarian figures are calling on countries to ensure the equitable distribution of Covid vaccines, warning that the world is "at a turning point". The signatories of an international declarati
22h
Blind man has sight partly restored after pioneering treatment
Man regains ability to recognise objects in first example of successful optogenetic therapy in humans A blind man has had his sight partly restored after a form of gene therapy that uses pulses of light to control the activity of nerve cells – the first successful demonstration of so-called optogenetic therapy in humans. The 58-year-old man, from Brittany in northern France, was said to be "very
6h
Radioactivity May Fuel Life Deep Underground and Inside Other Worlds
Scientists poke and prod at the fringes of habitability in pursuit of life's limits. To that end, they have tunneled kilometers below Earth's surface, drilling outward from the bottoms of mine shafts and sinking boreholes deep into ocean sediments. To their surprise, "life was everywhere that we looked," said Tori Hoehler , a chemist and astrobiologist at NASA's Ames Research Center. And it was p
5h
Dominic Raab asnwers
Latest updates: Downing Street says Johnson focused on delivering rail reforms and transform high streets Britons should not be holidaying in Spain yet, says UK minister Which countries are on the green, amber and red lists – interactive Half of UK children play out less with friends since Covid pandemic Dogs detect Covid in under a second Global coronavirus updates – live 3.30pm BST Dominic Raab
8h
UFOs Are Back – And They Are Still Nothing
One of the unofficial functions of the skeptical movement is to serve as a form of institutional memory. Pseudoscience tends to come around in cycles. Each generation or two gets fascinated with the same topics only to eventually tire of them when they ultimately come to nothing. The die-hards stay on and keep the flame going until the next generation. Each time a paranormal or dubious topic rear
9h
Covid travel: which countries are on the green, amber and red lists?
England has a new traffic light system for international travel – but do the rules match case and vaccine data? Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage England's new traffic light system for travel allows people to travel abroad once again, with green, amber and red lists that set out the rules for testing and quarantining travellers. Which list a country is put on depends o
11h
Astronomer Warns of Physics Experiment That Could Destroy Our Entire Galaxy
Collateral Damage If you're ever having a bad day, remember that we could suddenly be blinked out of existence by an advanced alien civilization's science experiment gone wrong. That's according to former Harvard astronomy chair Avi Loeb — notorious for insisting that various space phenomena is evidence of alien life — who wrote in a new Scientific American op-ed that a gigantic, advanced particl
26min
Milky Way not unusual, astronomers find
The first detailed cross-section of a galaxy broadly similar to the Milky Way, published today, reveals that our galaxy evolved gradually, instead of being the result of a violent mash-up. The finding throws the origin story of our home into doubt.
6h
Researchers find Greenland glacial meltwaters rich in mercury
New research shows that concentrations of the toxic element mercury in rivers and fjords connected to the Greenland Ice Sheet are comparable to rivers in industrial China, an unexpected finding that is raising questions about the effects of glacial melting in an area that is a major exporter of seafood.
6h
How we made: Sleeping Satellite by Tasmin Archer
'Getting to No 1 was a high – but I wouldn't for one minute compare it with going into space' I'd had quite a few jobs to pay the bills while writing music – including working in the front kiosk at Leeds magistrates' court, collecting fines and doing a bit of admin – and I was helping out at Flexible Response Studios when an engineer introduced me to my future bandmates, John Beck and John Hughes
7h
Scientists Added a Sense of Touch to a Mind-Controlled Robotic Arm
Most people probably underestimate how much our sense of touch helps us navigate the world around us. N ew research has made it crystal clear after a robotic arm with the ability to feel was able to halve the time it took for the user to complete tasks. In recent years, rapid advance s in both robotics and neural interfaces have brought the dream of bionic limbs ( like the one sported by Luke Sky
7h
Research may help illuminate origins of life on Earth
One of the fundamental themes in astrobiology is to seek to ascertain the origin and distribution of life in the cosmos. As part of this, the field also deals with how life may be transferred from one planetary system to another. Recent research may give insight into how we could detect traces of this intriguing process in the future.
8h
Scientists tap supercomputing to study exotic matter in stars
At the heart of some of the smallest and densest stars in the universe lies nuclear matter that might exist in never-before-observed exotic phases. Neutron stars, which form when the cores of massive stars collapse in a luminous supernova explosion, are thought to contain matter at energies greater than what can be achieved in particle accelerator experiments, such as the ones at the Large Hadron
8h
Vertical farming: disrupting agriculture
Vertical farming leverages cutting-edge technology to grow food in a new and better way. One of its many benefits is that it can increase crop yield by 700 percent. Vertical farming can help relieve pressure on scarce resources and boost Earth's biodiversity. One day soon, you could eat bananas grown in downtown Manhattan. It's a way of growing food that turns traditional agriculture on its head.
8h
Mitt Romney's Family Plan and the Death of D.C. Dealmaking
Republicans aren't exactly pumping out fresh policy innovations these days. If anything motivates congressional Republicans, it's retaking the majority in 2022 and placating the put-upon ex-president Donald Trump. "One hundred percent of my focus is standing up to this administration," Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell said earlier this month, succinctly capturing the spirit on Capitol Hil
11h
Virgin Galactic's SpaceShipTwo has flown to the edge of space
On May 22, Virgin Galactic took two people to the very edge of suborbital space for the first time in more than two years, and its third time overall. It's the first of four planned crewed missions slated for this year. What happened: Virgin Galactic's SpaceShipTwo took off from Spaceport America in New Mexico at 10:34 a.m. US Eastern Time Saturday. The spacecraft, named VSS Unity, was carried in
12h
Observations shed more light on the properties of pulsar PSR J0740+6620
An international team of astronomers has carried out X-ray observations of a massive millisecond pulsar known as PSR J0740+6620. Results of the observational campaign, presented in a paper published May 14 on the arXiv pre-print repository, deliver important information regarding the properties of this pulsar.
8h
Experimental broadcast of whitewater river noise drives bats and birds away
While many might consider a walk in the woods to be a quiet, peaceful escape from their noisy urban life, we often don't consider just how incredibly noisy some natural environments can be. Although we use soothing natural sounds in our daily lives—to relax or for meditation—the thunder of a mountain river or the crash of pounding surf have likely been changing how animals communicate and where th
12h
Tornseglaren slår hastighetsrekord för flyttfåglar
Tornseglare håller högre hastighet, det vill säga flyger längre per dag, än någon annan flyttfågel. I genomsnitt flyger de 570 km/dag under hela vårflyttningen till Sverige. Det konstaterar forskare vid Lunds universitet. Fåglar som flyttar från övervintringsområdena i södra Afrika till häckningsplatserna i Sverige tar ungefär två månader på sig att tillryggalägga sträckan inräknat raster för att
12h
Study shows dogs can detect COVID-positive arrivals
Dogs can be trained to detect more than 90 percent of COVID-19 infections even when patients are asymptomatic, according to research published Monday, which authors hope could help replace the need to quarantine new arrivals.
14h
Plasma jets reveal magnetic fields far, far away
For the first time, researchers have observed plasma jets interacting with magnetic fields in a massive galaxy cluster 600 million light years away, thanks to the help of radio telescopes and supercomputer simulations. The findings can help clarify how such galaxy clusters evolve.
7h
Advent of gillnets has led to significant numbers of coelacanth captures
A trio of researchers with Resolve sarl, Ivandry Business Center, The Honorary Research Associate, South African Institute for Aquatic Biodiversity and Makhanda, and Resolve sarl, Ivandry Business Center, Antananarivo has found that due to the advent of gillnet use in the waters around Madagascar, incidences of coelacanth captures have increased. In their paper published in the South African Journ
7h
The real-life superheroes helping Syrian refugees | Feras Fayyad
Society has a set of stories it tells itself about who refugees are and what they look like, says documentarian and TED Fellow Feras Fayyad. With his films, he's on a mission to surface the facts about refugees from fiction, as a form of resistance — for himself, his daughter and the millions of other Syrian refugees across the world. A harrowing account, a quest to end injustice and a testament
7h
The Milky Way Might Have a Core of Dark Matter Instead of a Black Hole
The second of three images of ESO's GigaGalaxy Zoom project is a new and wonderful 340-million-pixel vista of the central parts of our galactic home, a 34 by 20-degree wide image that provides us with a view as experienced by amateur astronomers around the world. Taken by Stéphane Guisard, an ESO engineer and world-renowned astrophotographer, from Cerro Paranal, home of ESO's Very Large Telescope
9h
Telomere length, a longevity measure, may be determined early in life
One of the first studies to examine telomere length (TL) in childhood finds that the initial setting of TL during prenatal development and in the first years of life may determine one's TL throughout childhood and potentially even into adulthood or older age. The study also finds that TL decreases most rapidly from birth to age 3, followed by a period of maintenance into the pre-puberty period, al
5h
The birth of a subnanometer-sized soccer ball
Ever since the existence of molecules was proven and molecular reactions were predicted, humans have wanted to visually observe how such events proceed. Such observations of single-molecule reactions are highly important for the fundamental understanding of chemical sciences, which would aid in the development of novel catalysts, materials, or drugs, and help us decipher the complex biochemical pr
7h
Evidence found of superfluidity in extremely cold 2D gas of fermions
A team of researchers working at the Institut für Laserphysik, Universität Hamburg, has found evidence of superfluidity in an extremely cold 2D gas of fermions. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes their work with a 2D Fermi gas and what they learned from it.
7h
NASA rocket mission studying escaping radio waves
A NASA rocket mission, launching May 26, 2021, will study radio waves that escape through the Earth's ionosphere impacting the environment surrounding GPS and geosynchronous satellites, such as those for weather monitoring and communications.
10h
New quantum material discovered
In everyday life, phase transitions usually have to do with temperature changes—for example, when an ice cube gets warmer and melts. But there are also different kinds of phase transitions, depending on other parameters such as magnetic field. In order to understand the quantum properties of materials, phase transitions are particularly interesting when they occur directly at the absolute zero poi
6h
The future diagnostic lab … inside your body | Aaron Morris
We need an inside-out approach to how we diagnose disease, says immuno-engineer and TED Fellow Aaron Morris. Introducing cutting-edge medical research, he unveils implantable technology that gives real-time, continuous analysis of a patient's health at the molecular level. "We're creating a diagnostic lab inside your body," Morris says — and it may pave the way to diagnosing and treating disease
8h
A feminist reimagining of Kenya's colorful "matatu" minibuses | Naomi Mwaura
Kenya's minibuses — known as "matatus" — offer a convenient, affordable and colorful way for people to get around. But they also pose safety risks and accessibility issues for many of their passengers, especially women. Bringing a feminist perspective, activist and TED Fellow Naomi Mwaura calls for a revolution in public transportation by making routes transparent, protecting passengers from har
8h
'Regrettably it took too long to investigate and retract this paper.'
A journal has expressed regret over its sluggish response to image hijinx in a 2017 paper on the antimalarial properties of a kind of pea plant. The article, "Antimalarial efficacy of Pongamia pinnata (L) Pierre against Plasmodium falciparum (3D7 strain) and Plasmodium berghei (ANKA)," was written by P. V. V. Satish and K. Sunita, of … Continue reading
11h
The Costly Success of Israel's Iron Dome
In the 12 days that preceded Thursday's announcement of a cease-fire, the Palestinian militant groups Hamas and Islamic Jihad launched 4,369 rockets of various sizes and ranges from Gaza toward Israel. According to Israel's military, nearly two-thirds of these missed their target, hitting fields and other open areas, or malfunctioning and falling short. That still leaves about 1,500 rockets that
6h
Environmental exposure during travel
is an emerging research field with strong contribution potential to urban and transport planning. The new research field benefits from contemporary location-aware sensor technology that enables to collect data about both human mobility and environmental conditions.
7h
Synchrotron X-ray experiment reveals a small nudge with big consequences
In a study published in the Nature Research journal Communications Materials, QUT researchers Dr. Christoph Schrank, Dr. Oliver Gaede, from the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, and Master of Science graduate Katherine Gioseffi teamed up with the Australian Synchrotron and colleagues from the University of New South Wales and the University of Warsaw to study how gypsum dehydrates much fas
7h
The renewable heating system right below your feet | Kathy Hannun
Of all the mundane yet astonishing marvels of human ingenuity, knowing what it takes to heat a room to a comfortable temperature is TED Fellow Kathy Hannun's favorite. She takes us on a journey across the planet and under the sea to emphasize the dangers of modern heating, and offers a safer, planet-friendly alternative that taps into the geothermal energy right below our feet.
7h
Maternal and child health is a human right | Aparna Hegde
Overcrowded clinics, extensive wait times and overworked doctors are taking a devastating toll on mothers and children in India. In this eye-opening talk, gynecologist and TED Fellow Aparna Hedge exposes the systemic gaps that lead to preventable deaths every minute — and introduces a scalable, affordable and empowering tech solution that improves maternal health habits, upends patriarchal family
7h
What should humans take to space (and leave behind)? | Jorge Mañes Rubio
One day, humans will explore space en masse and live scattered across the solar system on planets like Mars and beyond. Inspired by his time as artist-in-residence at the European Space Agency, TED Fellow Jorge Manes Rubio wants to rethink what we need to bring on this grand journey — and more importantly, what we should leave behind. Rubio takes us on an Earthbound journey through cultural pract
7h
A new approach to defending the human rights of migrants | Itamar Mann
In this gripping talk, litigator and TED Fellow Itamar Mann details the perilous boat migrations of asylum seekers crossing the Mediterranean Sea. With a surplus of evidence gathered by researchers and activists, he explains how lawyers are making progress in prosecuting human rights abuses happening on militarized coasts. On a basic human level, Mann speaks to the obligation we have to defend eac
8h
Vaccine waitlist Dr. B collected data from millions. But how many did it help?
When Joanie Schaffer heard about Dr. B, a free covid-19 vaccine standby service, she was running out of options. It was early February, and vaccine appointments were scarce, so Schaffer, who was already vaccinated herself, was volunteering her time to help friends, family, and even strangers secure their shots. She had read stories about people across the country stumbling upon vaccines that were
7min
RMRS scientists recommend approach to adapt to uncertainty in wildland management
Scientists from the Rocky Mountain Research Station collaborated to explore how research and management can confront increasing uncertainty due to climate change, invasive species, and land use conversion. In new research published in Frontiers in Forests and Global Change, the authors recommend a more inclusive and collaborative governance model that would increase public and stakeholder particip
31min
Evacuating under dire wildfire scenarios
As climate change intensifies, wildfires in the West are behaving in ways that were unimaginable in the past — and the common disaster response approaches are woefully unprepared for this new reality. Researchers now proposed a framework for simulating dire scenarios, which the authors define as scenarios where there is less time to evacuate an area than is required.
33min
Accurate evaluation of CRISPR genome editing
Researchers have developed a new software tool to detect, evaluate and quantify off-target editing activity, including adverse translocation events that can cause cancer. The software is based on input taken from a standard measurement assay, involving multiplexed PCR amplification and Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS).
33min
Columbia Engineering team builds first hacker-resistant cloud software system
Columbia Engineering researchers have developed SeKVM, the first system that guarantees–through a mathematical proof–the security of virtual machines in the cloud. "This is the first time that a real-world multiprocessor software system has been shown to be mathematically correct and secure," said Computer Science Professor Jason Nieh. "This means that users' data are correctly managed by softwa
53min
The Head of US Space Command Fears China's Giant Robot Arms
The core module of China's upcoming Tiangong space station has a powerful robot arm attached, and US military leadership is sounding the alarm that it could be used to tamper with other spacecraft. James Dickinson, the commander of the US Space Command, warned Congress last month that robot arms like it, such as the one attached to the Chinese spacecraft Shijian-17, could have nefarious purposes
55min
Rubisco proton production can enhance carbon dioxide acquisition
Rubisco is arguably the most abundant—and most important—protein on Earth. This enzyme drives photosynthesis, the process that plants use to convert sunlight into energy to fuel crop growth and yield. Rubisco's role is to capture and fix carbon dioxide (CO2) into sugar that fuels the plant's activities. However, as much as Rubisco benefits plant growth, it also can operate at a notoriously slow pa
59min
Two invasive beachgrasses are hybridizing
Two species of sand-stabilizing beachgrasses introduced to the Pacific Northwest starting in the early 1900s are hybridizing, raising new questions about impacts to the coastal ecosystems the non-native plants have been engineering for more than a century.
1h
New study shines light on hazards of Earth's largest volcano
Scientists from the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science analyzed ground movements measured by Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) satellite data and GPS stations to precisely model where magma intruded and how magma influx changed over time, as well as where faults under the flanks moved without generating significant earthquakes. The GPS netwo
1h
Master of None and the Common Flaw in Breakup Stories
This article contains spoilers through the third season of Master of None . Of all the unnerving things I've witnessed in the anxiety cauldron that is New York's Penn Station, one stands out. Back in 2019, I noticed a couple arguing in the middle of the squalid Amtrak waiting area. There was something transfixing about their escalating row—even before one of them stormed off, presumably leaving t
1h
'SHREAD' system makes tumors destroy themselves
Researchers have developed a new technology that enables the body to produce anti-cancer therapeutic agents on demand at the exact location where they're needed. The innovation could reduce the side effects of cancer therapy. It may also hold the solution to better delivery of COVID-related therapies directly to the lungs. "We trick the tumor into eliminating itself through the production of anti
1h
Researchers identify the causes of the extreme drought that affected the Pantanal
The extreme drought suffered by the Pantanal in 2019-20, considered the worst in the last 50 years, was caused by natural climate conditions similar to those underlying the 2014-16 water crisis in São Paulo state. The Pantanal is one of the world's largest wetlands. The Brazilian portion is located in the Center-West region, mainly Mato Grosso do Sul state.
1h
Team links popular weed killer chemical to preterm births
Exposure to a chemical found in the weed killer Roundup and other glyphosate-based herbicides is significantly associated with preterm births, according to a new study. The researchers found that the presence of the chemical in women's urine in late pregnancy was linked to an increased risk for premature birth, while the association was inconsistent or null earlier in the pregnancy. "Since most p
1h
In 55 countries, only 1 in 10 people receive diabetes care
Only 1 in 10 people with diabetes in 55 low- and middle-income countries received the type of comprehensive care that's been proven to reduce diabetes-related problems, researchers report. A comprehensive package of care—low-cost medicines to reduce blood sugar, blood pressure, and cholesterol levels, and counseling on diet, exercise, and weight—can help lower the health risks of under-treated di
1h
Lundquist investigator Wei Yan solves longstanding fallopian tube transport debate
Yan research group has solved a longstanding scientific debate about the mechanism underlying the gamete and embryo transport within the Fallopian tube. Using a mouse model where the animals lacked motile cilia in the oviduct, they demonstrated that motile cilia in the very distal end of the Fallopian tube, the infundibulum, are essential for oocyte pickup. The finding was published in the Proceed
2h
Enzymes of a feather: CRISPR-Cas components work together to enhance protection from viruses
Researchers from Skoltech and their colleagues from Russia and the US have shown that the two components of the bacterial CRISPR-Cas immunity system, one that destroys foreign genetic elements such as viruses and another that creates "memories" of foreign genetic elements by storing fragments of their DNA in a special location of bacterial genome, are physically linked. This link helps bacteria to
2h
An Unorthodox Strategy to Stop Cars From Hitting Deer
The thousand or so wolves that live in Wisconsin may inadvertently be doing a service to humanity, saving the lives of dozens of people. On average, 19,757 Wisconsinites collide with deer every year, leading to about 477 injuries and eight deaths. But according to Jennifer Raynor, a natural-resource economist at Wesleyan University, more would do so if wolves weren't around. "Some lives are saved
2h
This Advanced Energy Drink Contains the Nootropics Your Brain Needs To Thrive
Everything is more difficult when you are tired and worn down . Whether it's little everyday tasks like making dinner or going to the gym, or bigger things like deadlines at work or renovating your house, it all feels overwhelming and impossible when you are running on fumes. So what should you do when you feel overcome by exhaustion? Obviously you can walk into any convenience or grocery store i
2h
CRISPR-Cas components work together to enhance protection from viruses
Researchers from Skoltech and their colleagues from Russia and the U.S. have shown that the two components of the bacterial CRISPR-Cas immunity system, one that destroys foreign genetic elements such as viruses and another that creates "memories" of foreign genetic elements by storing fragments of their DNA in a special location of bacterial genome, are physically linked. This link helps bacteria
2h
Dogs: The New COVID-19 Rapid Test
Two studies this month point to pooches' quick detection of SARS-CoV-2 on material that touched the skin of infected participants, although the pups' accuracy does not match that of RT-PCR.
2h
Water crisis 'couldn't be worse' on Oregon-California border
The water crisis along the California-Oregon border went from dire to catastrophic this week as federal regulators shut off irrigation water to farmers from a critical reservoir and said they would not send extra water to dying salmon downstream or to a half-dozen wildlife refuges that harbor millions of migrating birds each year.
2h
COVID-19 infection rates of dentists remain lower than other health professionals
More than a year after COVID-19 appeared in the U.S., dentists continue to have a lower infection rate than other front-line health professionals, such as nurses and physicians, according to a study published online ahead of the June print issue in The Journal of the American Dental Association. The study, "COVID19 among Dentists in the U.S. and Associated Infection Control: a six-month longitudin
2h
Clean water and toilets for healthy shelters
The devastating Great East Japan Earthquake on March 11, 2011 displaced some 500,000 people to evacuation shelters. A research team that conducted regular visits to shelters to assess their status and inhabitants well-being have analyzed their data and found that about half of shelters had inadequate clean tap water and toilets, leading to worsening health outcomes for inhabitants.
3h
Photos: Lava Flows From Mount Nyiragongo
Mount Nyiragongo, a volcano in the Democratic Republic of Congo, erupted over the weekend, lighting up the night sky and sending rivers of rocky lava down its slopes toward Goma, a city with nearly 2 million residents. Tens of thousands of people fled from their homes overnight. The flow of lava halted on the outskirts of Goma the following day, damaging several outlying villages and destroying m
3h
For young adults, chronic fatigue may follow COVID-19
Young adults and adolescents who get COVID-19 may also exhibit symptoms of a complex, multisystem disorder previously known as chronic fatigue syndrome, three new case studies show. With more of this age group being treated for COVID-19, clinicians are concerned they will start showing post-COVID—or " long haul "—symptoms from their bouts with the virus. The review in Frontiers in Medicine provid
3h
Weight-loss treatment prevents accumulation of lipid linked to cardiac mortality
Researchers at the Karolinska Institutet, University of Oxford and University of Copenhagen have shown that elevated levels of lipids known as ceramides can be associated with a ten-fold higher risk of death from cardiovascular disease. Treatment with liraglutide could keep the ceramide levels in check, compared with placebo. The results have been published in the Journal of the American College o
3h
Impact of school nutrition policies in California varies by children's ethnicity
California state school nutrition policies and federal policies for school meals have mixed impacts on childhood obesity in children of Pacific Islander (PI), Filipino (FI) and American Indian/Alaska native (AIAN) origins, according to a new study published this week in the open access journal PLOS Medicine by Mika Matsuzaki of Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, USA, and colleagues.
3h
Twitter shows splits over #StopAsianHate hashtag
In a new study, researchers refine how information from Twitter users can help document public reaction to attacks on Chinese and other Asians in the US in the wake of COVID-19. Specifically, they examine public opinion toward #StopAsianHate and #StopAAPIHate, the hashtags and websites that provide information, resources, places to donate, and places to report hate crimes. In a paper posted at ar
3h
Bladlöss spottar upp sig mot växternas inbyggda försvar
Genen SLI1 skyddar växten backtrav mot angrepp. Och får bladlöss att spotta tjugo gånger innan de förmår sörpla i sig av den sockerrika saften från bladen. Forskarna tror spottet hjälper lössen att bryta ned växtens inbyggda försvar mot angrepp. Forskare har upptäckt att resistensgenen SLI1 i växten backtrav skyddar mot angrepp från persikbladlöss och två andra sorters växtlöss. Tobaksmjöllöss oc
3h
Documentary films that explore trauma — and make space for healing | Almudena Toral
Through documentary films following survivors of trauma, TED Fellow Almudena Toral makes invisible psychological scars seen. She shares the heartbreaking story of Adayanci Pérez, a six-year-old girl from Guatemala suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) due to her encounter with US immigration enforcement. A powerful call to give voice to those who are silenced — and pressure governm
3h
Latest Virgin Galactic Test Puts Commercial Space Flights Within Reach
It seems like Richard Branson might have gotten interested in space too early. Since the mid-2000s, Branson's Virgin Galactic has been inching toward high-altitude spaceplane flights that will offer a few minutes of weightlessness. Fellow billionaires Elon Musk and Jeff Bezos have more recently gotten into commercial rockets that have the potential to take passengers into space. Regardless, Brans
4h
Will virtual reality be the death of truth?
Philosopher Robert Nozick asked if we would rather live in the real world or inside a virtual reality machine of never-ending pleasure. Frederich Nietzsche asked if truth is really the greatest virtue. People seem to be hard-wired to want the truth, no matter how brutal or unpleasant. The year is 2045, and an eccentric billionaire has revealed to the world an incredible new invention. It's called
4h
Regular physical activity linked to better organized preteen brains
Regular physical activity has positive effects on children's developing brain circuits, finds a Boston Children's Hospital study using neuroimaging data from nearly 6,000 early adolescents. Physical activity of any kind was associated with more efficiently organized, flexible, and robust brain networks, the researchers found. The more physical activity, the more "fit" the brain.
4h
New research shows ridesharing services reduce sexual assault
Contrary to portraits painted in popular media, new research involving ridesharing services shows they provide an additional level of protection for potential sexual assault victims, particularly in neighborhoods with inadequate public transportation or in circumstances that are more prone to sex crimes.
4h
New fishing tech may pose risks to fisheries
New developments in recreational fishing technology — from the use of aerial drones and social media scouting reports to advances in hook design — are creating challenges for fisheries management and effective policy making, according to a new study.
5h
New insights on animals in the African past
In order to understand foodways and subsistence strategies of humans in the past, as well as distributions of ancient animal species, it is critical for archaeologists to accurately identify animal taxa in archaeological sites. Many sites across sub-Saharan Africa have fragmented and poorly preserved animal bones, leaving the majority of specimens unidentifiable. Sub-Saharan Africa is also home to
5h
Study: Fluorescent light clarifies relationship between heat stress and crop yield
Scientists report that it is possible to detect and predict heat damage in crops by measuring the fluorescent light signature of plant leaves experiencing heat stress. If collected via satellite, this fluorescent signal could support widespread monitoring of growth and crop yield under the heat stress of climate change, the researchers say.
5h
Microscopic fossils record ancient climate conditions
Fifty-six million years ago, as the Earth's climate warmed by five to eight degrees C, new land mammals evolved, tropical forests expanded, giant insects and reptiles appeared and the chemistry of the ocean changed. Through it all, bacteria in the ocean in what is now New Jersey kept a record of the changes in their environment through forming tiny magnetic particles. Now, those particles and thei
5h
New optimization approach helps design lighter carbon fiber composite materials
Carbon is vital to the existence of all living organisms, since it forms the basis of all organic molecules that, in turn, form the basis of all living beings. While that alone is pretty impressive, it has recently found surprisingly novel applications in disciplines such as aerospace and civil engineering with the development of carbon fibers that are stronger, stiffer, and lighter than steel. Co
5h
How school board meetings could attract more diverse audiences and boost public trust
Schools in the U.S. are set to receive $123 billion in federal pandemic relief funding. Across the country, parents and school administrators are engaging in spirited debates about whether to teach critical race theory. And Americans are bitterly divided in their opinions about how and when to resume in-person instruction following rising rates of vaccination against COVID-19.
5h
Decolonising ecology? How to adopt practices that make science more equitable
Knowledge systems outside of those sanctioned by Western universities have often been marginalized or simply not engaged with in many science disciplines, but there are multiple examples where Western scientists have claimed discoveries for knowledge that resident experts already knew and shared. This demonstrates not a lack of knowledge itself but rather that, for many scientists raised in Wester
5h
Researchers first synthesize conjoined bismacrocycle with all phenylene units
The research team led by Prof. Du Pingwu from the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) first successfully synthesized an all-phenylene bismacrocycle (bis- means two) with Siamese-twin structure and used fullerene as guest molecules to assemble a peanut-shaped supramolecular complex. This study was published in Angewandte Chemie.
5h
Electromagnetic anomalies that occur before an earthquake
It has been documented over hundreds of years that various electromagnetic anomalies occur a few weeks before the occurrence of a large earthquake. These electromagnetic anomalies are variations that appear in telluric current, geomagnetism, electromagnetic waves etc. before the earthquake.
5h
Researchers identify facilitators for rehabilitation care for people with spatial neglect
After a stroke, many people experience spatial neglect, a disabling complication that disrupts a person's 'internal GPS' causing them to have difficulties in navigating the environment. Peii Chen, PhD: "By taking steps to detect spatial neglect and intervene early, rehabilitation facilities can help individuals recovering from stroke get maximal benefit from their stay. Ensuring continuity of care
5h
Surge in nitrogen has turned sargassum into the world's largest harmful algal bloom
Using a unique historical baseline (1983-2019), scientists have discovered dramatic changes in the chemistry and composition of Sargassum, floating brown seaweed, transforming this vibrant living organism into a toxic 'dead zone.' Results suggest that increased nitrogen availability from natural and anthropogenic sources, including sewage, is supporting blooms of Sargassum and turning a critical n
5h
Risk of second stroke can be reduced with prevention efforts based on cause of first stroke
Having a stroke caused by blocked blood vessels or a transient ischemic attack (TIA) greatly increases your chances of having a future stroke. Identifying the cause or causes of the first stroke is key to developing strategies to prevent additional strokes. Managing blood pressure levels, reducing or quitting smoking, eating a healthy diet, and regular physical activity will reduce the risk of a s
5h
Sour milk mirrors how veins of gold form
A new discovery explains how gold veins form so quickly, researchers report. Gold deposits typically form over tens to hundreds of thousands of years. But some can form in years, months, or even days. For decades, the formation of these rare hyper-enriched gold deposits in places like Ballarat in Australia, Serra Palada in Brazil, and Red Lake in Ontario, Canada has puzzled scientists. Studying e
5h
How to cope with anxiety in the return to 'normal' life
Life is slowly returning to what it was pre-pandemic, but some people may be feeling anxious about the transition. Behavioral scientist Chris Segrin explains why. Not everyone will feel comfortable ditching their masks or gathering in large groups, even after vaccination, and it's important that we be understanding of one another, says Segrin , a professor and head of the communication department
5h
People with alcohol use disorder go largely untreated
Even though the vast majority of people with alcohol use disorder see their doctors regularly for a range of issues, fewer than one in 10 ever get treatment for drinking, according to a new study. Some 16 million Americans are believed to have alcohol use disorder, and an estimated 93,000 people in the US die from alcohol-related causes each year. Both of those numbers are expected to grow as a r
6h
Bile acids trigger satiety in the brain
EPFL scientists have discovered a new role for bile acids: they curb appetite by entering the brain. Their findings, which were recently published in Nature Metabolism, provide new insights into the signals and mechanisms by which satiety is controlled and may have implications for treating obesity.
6h
How "paralyzed" immune cells can be reactivated against brain tumors
Brain tumor cells with a certain common mutation reprogram invading immune cells. This leads to the paralysis of the body's immune defense against the tumor in the brain. Researchers from Heidelberg, Mannheim, and Freiburg discovered this mechanism and at the same time identified a way of reactivating the paralyzed immune system to fight the tumor. These results confirm that therapeutic vaccines o
6h
Contact-tracing apps have serious physical, biological limitations
The COVID-19 pandemic witnessed the widespread adoption of contact-tracing apps. Research shows that these apps aren't as accurate as we might think. There are several physical and biological factors than can interfere with the accuracy of contact-tracing apps. The following is an excerpt adapted from People Count: Contact-Tracing Apps and Public Health . To stop an epidemic, public health author
6h
Generating electricity from heat using a spin Seebeck device
Thermoelectric (TE) conversion offers carbon-free power generation from geothermal, waste, body or solar heat, and shows promise to be the next-generation energy conversion technology. At the core of such TE conversion, there lies an all solid-state thermoelectric device which enables energy conversion without the emission of noise, vibrations, or pollutants. To this, a POSTECH research team propo
6h
Plant-microbe homeostasis: A delicate balancing act
Plants grown in soil are colonized by diverse microbes collectively known as the plant microbiota, which is essential for optimal plant growth in nature and protects the plant host from the harmful effects of pathogenic microorganisms and insects. However, in the face of an advanced plant immune system that has evolved to recognize microbial associated-molecular patterns (MAMPs)—conserved molecule
6h
Is 'Closing the Gap' working?
Gaping policy shortfalls in the Australian Government's 'Closing the Gap' program have seen it fail to reduce disparities in Indigenous health, income, employment, child removal and incarceration, Flinders University researchers say.
6h
Study reveals potential new treatment target in the fight against COVID-19
The swift development of vaccines has provided a vital tool to combat the spread of the deadly SARS-CoV-2 virus, but challenges to reaching herd immunity posed by the rise of new mutations and the inability of immunosuppressed people to develop an effective immune response following vaccination point to a need for additional solutions to maximize protection.
6h
Dental crowding: Ancient baleen whales had a mouth full
A strange phenomenon happens with modern blue whales, humpback whales and gray whales: they have teeth in the womb but are born toothless. Replacing the teeth is baleen, a series of plates composed of thin, hair- and fingernail-like structures growing from the roof of their mouths that act as a sieve for filter feeding small fish and tiny shrimp-like krill.
6h
Inre motståndskraft minskar behov av bekämpningsmedel
Tricket är att hitta just den gen som skyddar växten mot sjukdom. Det ökar möjligheten att odla utan kemiska bekämpningsmedel, menar forskare bakom resistensförädling av grödor som potatis, vete och ärter. Att identifiera den genetiska koden för sjukdomsresistens hos växter är knepigt. En enda gen kan vanligtvis bara erbjuda skydd mot en specifik sjukdom eller parasit. Därför är bred kunskap om v
7h
Supersensitive connection causes hatred of noises
An increased connectivity in the brain between the auditory cortex and the motor control areas related to the face, mouth and throat has been discovered in people with misophonia by researchers led by Newcastle University, UK. Their hatred of "trigger noises" can lead to an extreme reaction including anger and disgust. This is the first time such a connection in the brain has been identified and i
7h
Games, computing, and the mind: How search algorithms reflect game playing
The ways in which we approach games reveal much about the inner working of our mind and serve a testbed for researching artificial intelligence and computing algorithms. In a recent study, scientists at JAIST applied novel search indicators in search tree algorithms and used them for solving turn-based games such as Checkers and Connect 4, while also exploring the relationship with subjective play
7h
MD Anderson researchers present new findings in targeted and combination therapies at 2021 ASCO Annual Meeting
Several Phase II clinical trials conducted by researchers from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center show promising results for patients with melanoma, breast cancer, HER2-positive tumors and ovarian cancer. The results of these studies, which will be presented at the virtual 2021 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting, highlight new advances in drug therapy resear
7h
New use of imaging technique could allow early detection of aortic aneurysms
An international research collaboration led by the University of Tsukuba have used Raman microspectroscopy and Raman imaging to detect changes in the elastic and collagen fibers in the aortic wall characteristic of ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms (aTAAs). This has the potential to be used as a low-risk, early diagnostic tool to detect pre-aneurysmal lesions before serious complications develop
7h
3D printing stem cells to transform neuroscience
3D printing, also called additive manufacturing, has become widespread in recent years. By building successive layers of raw material such as metals, plastics, and ceramics, it has the key advantage of being able to produce very complex shapes or geometries that would be nearly impossible to construct through more traditional methods such as carving, grinding, or molding.
7h
Scientists discover a new feature that distinguishes modern humans from Neanderthals
Skoltech scientists and their colleagues from Germany and the United States have analyzed the metabolomes of humans, chimpanzees, and macaques in muscle, kidney, and three different brain regions. The team discovered that the modern human genome undergoes mutation which makes the adenylosuccinate lyase enzyme less stable, leading to a decrease in purine synthesis. This mutation did not occur in Ne
7h
SARS-CoV-2 'frameshifting' could be a critical weakness
Researchers have obtained molecular insights into a special process the SARS-CoV-2 relies on and shown that chemical compounds can inhibit it. Inhibiting the process would significantly reduce viral replication in infected cells. Viruses require the resources of an infected cell to replicate and then infect further cells, and transfer to other individuals. One essential step in the viral life cyc
7h
Stressigt stadsliv påverkar talgoxars gener
Street-smarta egenskaper har valts ut och förts vidare från generation till generation. Därför skiljer sig talgoxar i stan genetiskt från sina kusiner från landet. Forskarna konstaterar också att det inte spelar någon roll om talgoxarna lever i Malmö, Milano eller Madrid: För att klara av att leva i en miljö skapad av människor har fåglarna utvecklats på liknande sätt. Gener kopplade till viktiga
7h
The infinite alchemy of storytelling | Zahra Al-Mahdi
TED Fellow Zahra Al-Mahdi was raised by screens — "storytelling machines" like TV and the internet that shaped her sense of self and reality. Now a multimedia artist and filmmaker, she challenges common historical narratives and brings a multiplicity of perspectives to the surface. In this dynamic talk, Al-Mahdi traces her development as a storyteller using satire, dark humor and tactile collage
7h
Keeping it rolling
Osaka University researchers use machine learning methods to generate predicted remaining useful life curves for rolling bearings. By combining the results from convolutional neural networks using Bayesian hierarchical modeling, the team was able to improve the predictions of remaining useful life. This research may lead to more intelligent maintenance and less industrial waste.
7h
New immune players involved in metabolic liver disease
In a recent study reported in Nature Medicine, Prof. Ido Amit and team members have discovered that a subtype of immune cells, called dendritic cells, becomes activated in the liver in NASH patients and in animal models, and promotes the progression of this condition. This finding may in the future help develop new treatments for NASH.
7h
NASA Believes Organic Salts 'Likely Present' on Mars
NASA has announced that certain organic salts are "likely present" on Mars. While this is not proof that organic life once existed on the surface of the Red Planet, it illustrates that the appropriate types of chemical reactions likely once took place on Mars' surface. The organic salts NASA thinks Curiosity detected don't just speak to the planet's current habitability, they have implications fo
8h
New method to analyze nucleosomes
Northwestern Medicine scientists have developed a new method to analyze the protein composition of intact nucleosomes without losing combinatorial information present in chromatin. The technique, called Nuc-MS, could help scientists more efficiently uncover the mechanisms behind mutation-driven diseases such as some cancers, according to Neil Kelleher, Ph.D., professor of Medicine in the Division
8h
Study links classroom ventilation, air quality with academic performance
Each year, more than 50 million K-12 students spend upward of 1,000 hours in U.S. classrooms. Even before the coronavirus pandemic, research was establishing suggestive links between academic performance and a classroom's air quality, possibly due to the latter affecting students' concentration and illness-related absences.
8h
Electronic pills that could transform how we treat disease | Khalil Ramadi
Could a small jolt of electricity to your gut help treat chronic diseases? Medical hacker and TED Fellow Khalil Ramadi is developing a new, noninvasive therapy that could treat diseases like diabetes, obesity, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's with an electronic pill. More targeted than a traditional pill and less invasive than surgery, these micro-devices contain electronics that deliver "bionudges" —
8h
Higher dose of DHA associated with lower early preterm birth rate, NIH-funded study finds
Women taking 1,000 mg of docosohexanoic acid (DHA) daily in the last half of pregnancy had a lower rate of early preterm birth than women who took the standard 200 mg dose, according to a study funded by the National Institutes of Health. Women who entered the study with the lowest DHA level had the greatest reduction in early preterm birth, which is birth before 34 weeks of pregnancy and which in
8h
Is closing the gap working?
Gaping policy shortfalls in the Australian Government's 'Closing the Gap' program have seen it fail to reduce disparities in Indigenous health, income, employment, child removal and incarceration, Flinders University researchers say. Their five-year study examined why the targets of Australia's national Closing the Gap strategy to reduce or eliminate inequalities in health, education and employmen
8h
Myopia link to poor sleep, and screen time
New research from Australia indicates people with myopia are more likely to experience poorer sleep quality than people with normal vision.The study indicates that people with short-sightedness have more delayed circadian rhythms and lower production of melatonin, a hormone secreted in the brain and responsible for regulating sleep at night, compared to people with normal vision.
8h
A natural food supplement may relieve anxiety
A natural food supplement reduces anxiety in mice, according to a new Weizmann Institute of Science study. The plant-derived substance, beta-sitosterol, was found to produce this effect both on its own and in synergic combination with an antidepressant known under the brand name Prozac.
8h
The search for microscopic aliens | Sarah Rugheimer
Astrophysicist and TED Fellow Sarah Rugheimer searches for aliens — but not the cartoony green kind. She's looking for extraterrestrial microbes by studying how planets like Venus emit gases, which could reveal evidence of these single-celled organisms. Wondering if we're really alone in the universe, Rugheimer identifies two big hurdles to confirming life on another world and offers insight into
8h
The multibillion-dollar US prison industry — and how to dismantle it | Bianca Tylek
A phone call to a US prison or jail can cost up to a dollar per minute — a rate that forces one in three families with incarcerated loved ones into debt. In this searing talk about mass incarceration, criminal justice advocate and TED Fellow Bianca Tylek exposes the predatory nature of the billion-dollar prison telecom industry and presents straightforward strategies to dismantle the network of c
8h
A long-term study shows strong links between gestational diabetes during pregnancy and type-1 and type-2 diabetes later in life
A 23 year study being presented at the 23rd European Congress of Endocrinology (e-ECE 2021), on Monday 24 May 2021 at 14:40 CET (www.ece2021.org), has found that women who experience gestational diabetes (GDM) when they are pregnant, are more prone to developing type-1 and type-2 diabetes later in life. The long-term study suggests that autoantibody testing should be considered for women who exper
8h
COVID-19 vaccine benefits still outweigh risks, despite possible rare heart complications
Late last week, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) alerted health care professionals that they are monitoring the Vaccine Adverse Events Reporting System (VAERS) and the Vaccine Safety Datalink (VSD) for cases of young adults developing the rare heart-related complication myocarditis, after receiving a COVID-19 vaccine manufactured by Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna.
8h
New research reveals that a low-calorie ketogenic diet can help testosterone levels in overweight men
A very low-calorie ketogenic diet can help testosterone and sex hormone (SHBG) levels in overweight men, according to a study being presented at the 23rd?European Congress of Endocrinology (e-ECE 2021), on Monday 24 May 2021 at 14:06 CET (www.ece2021.org). The study found that after following a recommended low-calorie ketogenic diet for four weeks, body weight, fat mass and body mass index (BMI) s
9h
Beslutsförmåga hos unga kopplas till social förmåga
Hög beslutsskärpa är kopplat till god social förmåga, enligt en ny studie från bland annat Karolinska Institutet. Forskarna vid Karolinska Institutet och UCL har identifierat en allmän faktor som påverkar unga människors beslutsförmåga, oberoende av IQ. De har valt att kalla den allmänna beslutsförmågan, som ligger till grund för flera typer av beslutsfattande, för " decision acuity ", ungefär be
9h
Learn how to guide your business through challenging times
In the business world, white papers are the ideal way to stay current, informed, and innovative as a leading professional and financial decision-maker. Designed to help readers understand complex issues and make a considerate decision, white papers are one of the multitudinous ways that NetSuite is the number one cloud enterprise resource planning (EPR) entity in the industry. NetSuite's EPR syst
10h
Scientists successfully breed corals with goal of disease resistance
For the first time, grooved brain corals rescued from a disease outbreak and maintained in human care have been bred with wild corals that survived the disease, in a collaborative restoration initiative between scientists at the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science and the Florida Aquarium Center for Conservation.
10h
Finer touch for tuning stem cell 'fate' with substrates of varying stiffness
Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University have been quantifying how different batches of mesenchymal stem cells respond to the mechanical stiffness of their environments. They focused on how certain proteins were "localized" in cell nuclei and found key trends in how this changed with stiffness. Their findings explain inconsistencies between previous findings and may guide how scientists cont
10h
How close are we to cybernetics?
How close are we to enhancing humans and combining man and machine? Ive read a lot of answers and many said 20+ years, some said just 8-10 years away, and ive heard a lot of people even say that in 2030 is when people will be looking at cybernetics. But in order for people to willingly cut off their own parts and replace them,there would have to be decades of research to make sure what long term
11h
Probing the Na metal solid electrolyte interphase via cryo-transmission electron microscopy
Nature Communications, Published online: 24 May 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23368-6 The solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) strongly affects the cycling behaviour of rechargeable alkali metal cells. Here, the authors investigate via cryo-electron microscopy the SEI formed on a Na metal electrode using fluoroethylene carbonate-containing electrolyte.
12h
Electrochemical C−C bond cleavage of cyclopropanes towards the synthesis of 1,3-difunctionalized molecules
Nature Communications, Published online: 24 May 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23401-8 Electrochemical oxidative C–C bond cleavage and functionalization are rarely developed due to the inertness and weak electronic bias of C–C bonds. In this study, the authors report the electrochemical C–C bond cleavage and 1,3-difluorination, 1,3-oxyfluorination and 1,3-dioxygenation of arylcyclopropanes under ca
12h
All-dielectric chiral-field-enhanced Raman optical activity
Nature Communications, Published online: 24 May 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23364-w Raman optical activity (ROA) is useful for studying conformational structure and behavior of chiral molecules, but is limited by the weak signals. Here, the authors demonstrate 100x signal enhancement via an all-dielectric approach, using a silicon nanodisk array and exploiting its dark mode.
12h
Construction 7-membered ring via Ni–Al bimetal-enabled C–H cyclization for synthesis of tricyclic imidazoles
Nature Communications, Published online: 24 May 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23371-x Transition metal-catalyzed C−H cyclization for medium-ring synthesis has been limited to reactive C−H bonds, the activation of unreactive C−H bonds still remains a challenge. Here the authors show the direct construction of 7-membered rings via Ni−Al co-catalyzed unreactive C−H cyclization of benzoimidazoles with
12h
Structural understanding of non-nucleoside inhibition in an elongating herpesvirus polymerase
Nature Communications, Published online: 24 May 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23312-8 Various herpesvirus therapeutics target the viral DNA polymerase. Here, the authors present the crystal structure of herpesvirus polymerase in the elongating state with bound primer-template DNA and the broad-spectrum non-nucleoside inhibitor PNU-183792, which is of interest for further drug design.
12h
Kallt klimat i norr ger problem i händerna
Vita fingrar drabbar många i norra Sverige. Tillståndet ger attacker med onormal sammandragning av fingrarnas blodkärl, och är starkt kopplat till utsatthet för kyla och tidigare förfrysning. Övervikt kan ge ett visst skydd, enligt en avhandling vid Umeå universitet. – Resultaten talar tydligt för att det är viktigt att skydda händerna med rätt klädsel vid kyla. Det är inte så att man vänjer sig
12h
Defective gene slows down brain cells
Although many forms of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are thought to have genetic causes, the cellular and molecular functions of the identified genes remain unclear. Scientists at the Institute of Science and Technology (IST) Austria studied a high-risk gene and discovered its important role during a critical phase of brain development.
12h
Predicting chemotherapy response and tailoring treatments for pancreatic cancer patients
After discovering critical epigenetic elements involved in chemotherapy resistance of pancreatic cancer, researchers from Dartmouth's and Dartmouth-Hitchcock's Norris Cotton Cancer Center have invented a novel biomarker platform that rapidly assesses these elements as a means to predict chemotherapy response and select pancreatic cancer patients who are most likely to benefit from traditional chem
12h
Dengue immune function discovery could benefit much-needed vaccine development
Despite a daunting more than 130 million cases of SARS-CoV-2 infections to date worldwide, another global pathogen – the mosquito-borne dengue virus – saw a record number of over 400 million cases in 2019. But vaccine development has been challenging due to the need to protect equally against all four dengue strains. The discovery of new possible biomarkers to predict clinical and immune responses
12h
Spontan självförbränning
Personer som spontant fattar eld Spontan själv­förbränning (engelska: Spontaneous Human Combustion eller SHC) är idén att en levande mänsklig kropp riskerar att fatta eld av sig själv och helt brinna … Continued Inlägget dök först upp på Vetenskap och Folkbildning .
13h
Obesity and cancer: Studies highlight different aspects of the connection
Multi-factorial metabolic and inflammatory abnormalities in obesity, independently or in combination, seems to be the critical biological link of obesity, cancer and racial/gender health disparities. However, the specific cross-talk between these factors remain elusive. Because of the extraordinary relevance in understanding the relationship between obesity-associated inflammation and comorbiditie
14h
Question: the impact of Robotics & AI on jobs and job (re)training
The capability growth from GPT 2 to GPT 3, the capabilities of Alphafold, and the appearance of rapidly improving cost/capabilities in robotics suggests massive change in jobs in the future. The trajectory of Wright's Law in communication, robotics, solar power, energy storage, genomics, additive manufacturing etc suggests (at least to me) an increasing frequency for waves of job change. The "can
14h
COVID-19 mortality associated with 2 signs easily measured at home
A study of 1,095 patients hospitalized with COVID-19 found that two easily measured signs of health – respiration rate and blood-oxygen saturation – predict higher mortality. This context is lacking in current CDC guidance, which tells people with COVID-19 to seek medical care when they experience symptoms such as "trouble breathing" and "persistent pain or pressure in the chest" – indications tha
15h
Consumer Psychology Newsletter for Entrepreneurs – Would you Pay?
I am planning to start a Consumer Psychology Newsletter for Entrepreneurs. Would you pay to get actionable content ( No Bullshit ) on how you can use psychology to get more sales and conversions? ​ We all make systematic errors in decision-making because of how our brain processes information. This is called Cognitive Bias. ​ By studying Cognitive Bias and implementing them, Entrepreneurs can get
16h
Aubrey de Grey destroys the idea of truly effective rejuvenation therapies being available only to the wealthy once they are effective. Aside from in his book Ending Aging, this is the clearest explanation I've heard him give on the topic.
https://youtu.be/aCffvy0pxqo?t=11m16s Key points, badly summarized by me: As opposed to current high tech medical therapies, which don't actually extend maximum lifespan or keep people from getting and staying sick, these therapies will actually work. So the public will clamor for passing laws making this paid for. And this will be arranged well before the therapies are fully developed for human
18h
GPT real applications?
GPT-3/DALL-E and similar stuff look amazing in the demos, truly revolutionary, and yet all the applications that are popping are either closed betas, or seem a bit gimmicky or proof of concept at most. With GPT-4 rumored to be released this year, when will we see these applications being readily available to the public? Stuff like NPC's in games or chatbots that feel human, or digital assistants
18h
Western diet may damage these immune cells in gut
Eating a Western diet impairs the gut immune system in ways that could increase the risk of infection and inflammatory bowel disease, new research in mice and humans indicates. The study shows that a diet high in sugar and fat causes damage to Paneth cells, immune cells in the gut that help keep inflammation in check. When Paneth cells aren't functioning properly, the gut immune system is excessi
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