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A piece of space junk, so small that couldn't have been detected, hit the International Space Station. The damage was minor, but the danger of space debris is growing. Space agencies are focusing on finding a solution to ensure safe and sustainable space use.
 
 
I'm a Pediatrician. Get Your Child Vaccinated.
When I was in medical school in the 1980s, a surgeon came to my clinical-medicine course to talk about how to guide patients in making decisions. He presented a scenario in which a patient with breast cancer had to decide between a lumpectomy and a mastectomy. The surgeon suggested that we cite statistics and discuss risk, but he advised us to resist answering a personal question: Tell me, doctor
5h
Vietnam discovers new hybrid Covid variant, state media reports
Strain is a combination of UK and India variants and is said to spread quickly Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Vietnam has discovered a new Covid-19 variant which spreads quickly by air and is a combination of variants first identified in India and the UK, state media has reported. The country is struggling to deal with fresh outbreaks across more than half of its te
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LATEST

Amazon Says Sad Workers Can Shut Themselves in "Despair Closet"
Amazon is being roasted for sharing a video of its "AmaZen," a phonebooth-sized box where employees can go to "focus on their mental wellbeing." In other words, one of the largest companies in the world is offering its overworked employees a, well, box to sit in to watch mindfulness videos. It's a out-of-touch move for a company that already has a poor track record of squeezing every last drop of
22h
Police Raid Suspected Weed Growery, Find Bitcoin Mine Instead
Three Guesses Police in the UK made a surprising miscalculation when they raided what they thought was an indoor pot farm. Instead of weed plants growing under intense lamps, the cops say they found about 100 computers dedicated to mining Bitcoin, according to CNBC . Though weed is still illegal in the UK, it still seems like a decidedly 21st-century turn to see Bitcoin farms taking the place of
21h
Democracy Defeated, 35–54
Three times in the past year, American democracy has been tested. Once, and most consequentially, it emerged victorious. The subsequent two tests have not turned out as well, and that is a bleak omen for whenever the next test arrives. The first test came after last fall's election, when more Americans voted for the Democratic candidate, Joe Biden, than for any other presidential candidate in his
19h
Curiosity rover captures shining clouds on Mars
Cloudy days are rare in the thin, dry atmosphere of Mars. Clouds are typically found at the planet's equator in the coldest time of year, when Mars is the farthest from the Sun in its oval-shaped orbit. But one full Martian year ago—two Earth years—scientists noticed clouds forming over NASA's Curiosity rover earlier than expected.
18h
Another Ship Just Got Stuck in the Suez Canal
Mayday Another day, another gigantic container ship broken down in the Suez Canal. On Friday, a ship called the Maersk Emerald experienced engine troubles near Ismailia, Egypt while it passed through the canal, Reuters reports . Thankfully, unlike when the Ever Given got stuck and totally blocked anyone else from using the canal back in March, the canal remains open and unobstructed this time aro
21h
Expert who helped change No 10 Covid policy in first wave warns over risk of easing
Exclusive: Prof Sir Tim Gowers says 'things will get bad very quickly' after June if variant spread underestimated Gowers' herd immunity document sent to Dominic Cummings See all our coronavirus coverage The Cambridge professor whose argument against a herd immunity strategy helped trigger England's first lockdown has voiced concerns about the risks of easing restrictions next month. Prof Sir Tim
23h
New Evidence About the Universe Suggests Einstein Was Wrong
According to a new detailed map of dark matter , the universe may be smoother and more spread out than theories have previously predicted, the BBC reports . The survey, which covered about a quarter of the southern hemisphere's sky, may serve to undermine Einstein's theory of general relativity and could potentially force us to alter understanding of the cosmos. "If this disparity is true then ma
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US Soldiers Accidentally Reveal Nuclear Weapon Secrets
Study Guide For years, US soldiers stationed at military bases in Europe armed with nuclear weapons were unknowingly sharing secret protocols and details on the bases themselves online. It turns out that the military personnel were relying on flashcard apps to study and memorize the details of the nuclear weapon systems without realizing that the flashcards of highly confidential information woul
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The rigged test of leadership | Sophie Williams
The glass cliff: an experience of taking on a leadership role only to find that your chances of success have been limited before you've even begun. Equality activist Sophie Williams explores the research-backed reasons behind this workplace phenomenon and how it overwhelmingly affects underrepresented groups, despite a facade of progress and inclusion. Learn more about the biases and behaviors tha
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New NASA Satellite Will Blast Earth With Flashes You Can See From the Ground
North Star NASA is launching a bizarre satellite that will allow anyone to trigger a blinding flash of light in space that will be visible from the ground with the naked eye. The toaster-sized CubeSat, named LightCube, will launch sometime between 2022 and 2025, according to a NASA press release . The satellite, which was designed by the startup Vega Space Systems and Arizona State University stu
22h
Farewell to Masks (For Now)
Two weeks ago, for the first time in a year, I intentionally walked out of my front door without a mask. I didn't even have one in my pocket. I have been vaccinated and was planning to be outdoors only, and so I was certain that going unmasked posed no risk to anyone. Still, the moment was eerie and profound. And not just because I had that phantom sense of having left the house without my keys,
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Why the 'lab-leak' theory of Covid's origins has gained prominence again | Stephen Buranyi
Both sides in the 'natural versus manmade' debate remain deadlocked as the search for the source of Sars-CoV-2 goes on Joe Biden wants to know if the coronavirus pandemic originated in a laboratory. On Thursday, the president ordered US intelligence agencies to "redouble" their efforts to find exactly when and how the virus jumped into humans, and the two scenarios he suggested were an infected a
9h
Twisted humor and life advice from Diogenes the Cynic
The Cynics were an ancient Greek school who believed that society suppressed, corrupted, and buried the human spirit. Diogenes of Sinope was the best known Cynic, and he resorted to some incredible shock tactics to jolt people from their societal stupor. Today, we're swamped and overwhelmed by the sheer scale of everything, and there are lessons to be found in Cynicism. Have you ever wasted an ho
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Image: Hubble captures a captivating spiral
This image shows the spiral galaxy NGC 5037, in the constellation of Virgo. First documented by William Herschel in 1785, the galaxy lies about 150 million light-years away from Earth. Despite this distance, we can see the delicate structures of gas and dust within the galaxy in extraordinary detail. This detail is possible using Hubble's Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3), whose combined exposures create
23h
Study: Wake Up an Hour Earlier, Cut Your Depression Risk by 23 Percent
Anyone who's not a morning person knows how patently wrong the 9-to-5 schedule of the world can feel. After all, the early bird gets the worm , and the Snooze button (a least to us non-morning people) is less a simple extension of sleep, and more an opioid-like drip of shelter for five more minutes from the hellish break of day. So we'll take all the motivation we can get — like this new finding,
15h
Researchers develop better ways to culture living heart cells on the International Space Station
As part of preparing for an experiment aboard the International Space Station, researchers explored new ways to culture living heart cells for microgravity research. They found that cryopreservation, a process of storing cells at -80°C, makes it easier to transport these cells to the orbiting lab, providing more flexibility in launch and operations schedules. The process could benefit other biolog
19h
Climate Change Champion Bernie Sanders Demands Ridiculously Cold Air Conditioning
Chilling Report Senator Bernie Sanders like his hotel rooms cold. Really cold. According to excerpts of a new book detailing the 2020 Democratic presidential candidates by The Atlantic staff writer Edward-Isaac Dovere, Sanders preferred ultra-low temperatures of just 60 degrees Fahrenheit — even if that required aides to keep windows open for some time in the middle of winter. In addition to blas
21h
Brain study strengthens link between lithium and suicide
Lithium appears essential to brain activity, but how it works remains a mystery. A team of researchers analyzed where in the brain lithium tends to accumulate in two healthy controls and one suicide victim. The healthy controls had more lithium in their white matter than gray matter. Lithium is known to students of chemistry as the lightest solid element, to electronics enthusiasts as a fine mate
22h
Protons' travel route in polymers could lead the way to clean fuels
Protons—subatomic particles with a positive electric charge—are one of the first particles to have formed after the universe began and are a constituent of every atom in existence today. The movement of protons plays a key role in energy conversion processes, such as photosynthesis and respiration, in biological systems. In addition, proton conduction is an important factor for hydrogen fuel cells
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Using the environment to control quantum devices
Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD) researchers have uncovered how the environment can impact highly sensitive quantum behaviors like localisation. Their findings, published in Chaos, could lead to future innovations in the design of superconducting materials and quantum devices, including super precise sensors.
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Watch me move it, move it: Gliding structure in Mycoplasma revealed
Much of human invention and innovation has been the result of our discovery and replication of natural phenomena, from birds in flight to whales that dive deep into the ocean. For the first time, researchers have captured at the nanometer level the gliding machinery of the bacterium Mycoplasma mobile. Their findings were published in mBio. It illuminates the origin and operating principle of motil
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The Atlantic Daily: 8 Buzzy Books to Add to Your Summer Reading List
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox. Memorial Day weekend typically serves up a cocktail of sun and fruit, burgers and fun, giving Americans their first taste of summer. This year's celebrations may bring extra relief as the country
12min
China Launches First Cargo Resupply Mission to New Space Station
Heavenly Vessel Takes Off China has successfully launched a resupply craft to its orbiting space station module — marking another step forward to building a formidable rival for the International Space Station (ISS). The Tianzhou-2, or "Heavenly Vessel," took off from the Wenchang Space Launch Center in Hainan, China on Saturday morning, according to Reuters . Its goal is to autonomously dock its
28min
The jobless future – depending on how it is confronted it can be a Utopia or a Dystopia
Curretly there are some 190 Million people worldwide without a job. At the same time population is expected to increase from 8 Billion next year to 10 Billion in 2055. At the same time automation is and will destroy Millions of Jobs in the coming decades because there is no where else for all those people to go. When agriculture required only 5% of all people instead of 90% – people went into man
1h
Prisutdelning Årets folkbildare 2020
I samband med årsmötet för Vetenskap och Folkbildning delades priset för Årets folkbildare 2020 ut till pristagarna Åsa Wikforss och Christer Sturmark. Prisutdelningen skedde på Van Der Nootska Palatset i … Continued Inlägget dök först upp på Vetenskap och Folkbildning .
2h
Ugens debat: Modulært eller sært?
Et konsortium ledet af Rolls-Royce fortsætter med at forbedre på sit design af hvad de kalder 'små modulære atomreaktorer'. Debatten på ing.dk fortsætter med at spænde vidt, når emnet er på banen.
2h
Weekend reads: Gibberish papers persist; the academic who faked Cherokee heritage; 'organised fraud hits scientific journals'
Before we present this week's Weekend Reads, a question: Do you enjoy our weekly roundup? If so, we could really use your help. Would you consider a tax-deductible donation to support Weekend Reads, and our daily work? Thanks in advance. The week at Retraction Watch featured: 'Regrettably it took too long to investigate and retract this … Continue reading
2h
5 ways we all live like royalty
This article was originally published on our sister site, Freethink. Freethink has partnered with the Build for Tomorrow podcast, to go inside new episodes each month. Subscribe here to learn more about the crazy, curious things from history that shaped us, and how we can shape the future. Jason Feifer, Entrepreneur Magazine Editor-in-Chief and host of the Build for Tomorrow podcast, has a fun ho
2h
This Simple Attachment Turns Your Phone Into A High-Tech Thermal Camera
You can only pick up so much going on around you with your smartphone . It might seem like a magical device that can do practically anything, but without a FLIR ONE Pro-Grade Thermal Camera there's an entire world of thermal imaging that's escaping your naked eye. The FLIR ONE Pro is the top of the FLIR line, and will turn your smartphone into an advanced thermal camera worthy of professional-gra
2h
Get Ready For The Ultimate Summer With These Memorial Day Deals
Memorial Day is almost like the unofficial start of summer. The three-day weekend gives us time to unwind, catch up with loved ones, or simply relax. To celebrate, we have a bunch of Memorial Day deals to help you get the most out of the outdoor season. Yet you'll need to act fast, as these deals end June 2nd! Firepod: Portable Multi-Functional Pizza Oven The Firepod, pictured above, is a modular
4h
50 years of progress in women's health
Cynthia A. Stuenkel, MD, clinical professor of medicine at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, and JoAnn E. Manson, MD, DrPH, professor of epidemiology at Harvard T.H. Chan School Of Public Health, review in a perspective article publishing the New England Journal of Medicine .
4h
Research finds narcissists are not just self-absorbed, they're also more likely to be aggressive
We recently reviewed 437 studies of narcissism and aggression involving a total of over 123,000 participants and found narcissism is related to a 21% increase in aggression and an 18% increase in violence . Narcissism is defined as " entitled self-importance ." The term narcissism comes from the mythical Greek character Narcissus , who fell in love with his own image reflected in still water. Agg
4h
Health experts urge caution on giving Covid vaccines to UK children
As the US and Europe approve plans to immunise teenagers, scientists in Britain advise delay Launching a programme of Covid-19 immunisations for children should be considered only in special circumstances, leading health experts have warned. They say UK medical authorities, who are currently studying how vaccines for adolescents might be administered, should move with great care over the implemen
4h
Athletes Will Never Be Quiet Again
George Floyd's murder last Memorial Day persuaded a lot of people in sports to use their public profile to fight racism in America. So it was fitting that the NBA, its players' union, and the WNBA players' union joined together Tuesday, the first anniversary of Floyd's death, to publicly challenge Congress to pass the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act. Among all of America's professional sport
5h
Caffeine isn't actually going to help you combat sleep deprivation
Relying on caffeine to get you through the day isn't always the answer, according to a new study. The researchers assessed how effective caffeine was in counteracting the negative effects of sleep deprivation on cognition. As it turns out, caffeine can only get you so far. The study in the most recent edition of Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, & Cognition assessed the impact
5h
When Justice Is Out of Reach
Some years ago, I was given an assignment by Vanity Fair to track down war criminals and former dictators who, despite being ousted from power, hadn't yet seen justice. As I hunted down their villas on the French Riviera, one of the most beautiful stretches of coastline in the world, or in the cobbled side streets of Paris's 16th arrondissement, I was reminded, not for the first time, that after
5h
Coronavirus news: expert warns against lifting England restrictions too soon; Vietnam detects hybrid of UK and India variants
Victoria records five new cases of Covid-19 taking Melbourne outbreak to 35; UK MPs urge action to save music festivals from another 'lost summer' What is the impact of lifting restrictions in England on 21 June? See all our coronavirus coverage 10.08am BST The Philippines on Saturday said the country's workers could again go to work in Saudi Arabia , reversing a brief deployment ban after the ki
7h
Less is more? New take on machine learning helps us "scale up" phase transitions
Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University have enhanced "super-resolution" machine learning techniques to study phase transitions. They identified key features of how large arrays of interacting "particles" behave at different temperatures by simulating tiny arrays before using a convolutional neural network to generate a good estimate of what a larger array would look like using "correlation
11h
Deepfake/AI will disrupte the Film Industry
So I've been thinking alot about ai/deepfakes/gaming/music/film industries in the future and there's some things I wanted to share about how different it will be. No physical set, sets are created and animated in 3d. See Unity/Unreal engine for example to see how realistic these spaces are *currently* You can even sell these sets as NFTs to some die-hard fans if the film is successful or if it be
14h
[Academic] Game and Survey for a Study in Cognitive Science (Everyone)
Hello all, We are working on a master's project in cognitive science and have conducted an online game/survey for which we need participants. The game can be challenging, as it requires patience. It only takes 7 minutes to complete, though (please don't mind that the bar may keep saying 3% – it is not the case). We hope that you will enjoy the game and are able to challenge your patience for 7 mi
16h
Is cognition a zero-sum phenomenon?
In other words, are cognitive resources finite? Let's say, hypothetically, our mind is only processing 2 tasks: word retrieval and executive decision-making. If I have to dedicate cognitive resources to word retrieval, does that necessarily mean it is taking away resources from executive decision-making? submitted by /u/YourWelcomeOrMine [link] [comments]
16h
Imperial College London researcher fired for research misconduct
Eric Lam, a highly-published cancer specialist, has been fired from his post at Imperial College London following a university investigation that found misconduct, Retraction Watch has learned. Lam's work has been the subject of scrutiny on PubPeer for some three years, dating back to a 2018 post pointing out suspicious images in a 2003 paper … Continue reading
17h
Bacterium causing deadly rabbit fever remains virulent for months in cold water, researchers report
Disease ecologists have published study results showing how they were able to prove, by replicating environmental conditions in the lab, that Francisella tularensis can persist for months in cold water without any nutrients and remain fully virulent. Their results provide a plausible explanation for how the deadly pathogen, which causes rabbit fever, can overwinter in the environment outside of a
17h
These High Tech Sneakers Will Protect Your Feet Like Work Boots All Summer Long
Now that the weather is better, and you can actually go places and do things again, it's time to start catching up on all the stuff you promised yourself you'd do while you were trapped inside all winter. And whether that means tackling big home reno and landscaping projects, or finally taking the kids on that camping or fishing trip so they can detox from their screens, or even just going to the
17h
Study uses candy-like models to make STEM accessible to visually impaired students
About 36 million people have blindness including 1 million children. Additionally, 216 million people experience moderate to severe visual impairment. However, STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) education maintains a reliance on three-dimensional imagery for education. Most of this imagery is inaccessible to students with blindness. A breakthrough study by Bryan Shaw, Ph.D., professo
18h
Daily briefing: The NAS expels a member for the first time
Nature, Published online: 28 May 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01472-3 The US National Academy of Sciences has terminated astronomer Geoffrey Marcy's membership, in light of sexual-harassment complaints. Plus, hundreds of gibberish papers lurk in the literature and a research-integrity specialist faces legal action.
18h
SpaceX CRS-22 mission to space station launches water bears, squid, solar panels
The 22nd SpaceX cargo resupply mission carrying scientific research and technology demonstrations launches to the International Space Station from NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida no earlier than June 3. Experiments aboard include studying how water bears tolerate space, whether microgravity affects symbiotic relationships, analyzing the formation of kidney stones, and more.
19h
Future Upgrades Imagined
Imagine that in the 2030s that the only diseases for which no cure is available are diseases we've yet to discover. (No incurable cancers, for example) Imagine hospitals become housing for homeless Imagine parking garages becoming repurposed as 275 million cars in the U S are replaced by 25 million battery powered, autonomous , driverless, on-demand cabs Imagine that we change our government to o
20h
This Sub Has Become Completely Dominated By Doomers
This sub has basically become another r/collapse with the amount doomers always dominating the conversation in the comments. Literally every single post about some fantastic discovery or accomplishment in every field is followed by "yEaH, BUt MY lIFe SuCKs!! SoCiETy sUCKs!! huMAnS ArE dOOmeD anYwAY!" I can't tell you how many conversations I've had with people who come to the comments just to arg
20h
New GSA Bulletin articles published ahead of print in May
The Geological Society of America regularly publishes articles online ahead of print. For April, GSA Bulletin topics include multiple articles about the dynamics of China and Tibet; new insights into the Chicxulub impact structure; and the dynamic topography of the Cordilleran foreland basin. You can find these articles at https://bulletin.geoscienceworld.org/content/early/recent.
20h
India-China collision raised world's 'roof' almost 2,000 feet
The 'Roof of the World' appears to have risen by up to 600 meters [1,968.5 feet], new research indicates. Tibet is referred to as the Roof of the World for good reason. With an average altitude of 4,500 meters [14,763.78 feet] above sea level and the world's two highest peaks, Mount Everest and K2, the vast Himalayan mountain range towers higher than anywhere else on Earth. But the Tibetan platea
20h
Frequent loss of heterozygosity in CRISPR-Cas9-edited early human embryos [Colloquium Papers (free online)]
CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing is a promising technique for clinical applications, such as the correction of disease-associated alleles in somatic cells. The use of this approach has also been discussed in the context of heritable editing of the human germ line. However, studies assessing gene correction in early human embryos report…
20h
A nonsense TMEM43 variant leads to disruption of connexin-linked function and autosomal dominant auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder [Neuroscience]
Genes that are primarily expressed in cochlear glia-like supporting cells (GLSs) have not been clearly associated with progressive deafness. Herein, we present a deafness locus mapped to chromosome 3p25.1 and an auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder (ANSD) gene, TMEM43, mainly expressed in GLSs. We identify p.(Arg372Ter) of TMEM43 by linkage analysis…
20h
High-dimensional mass cytometry analysis of NK cell alterations in AML identifies a subgroup with adverse clinical outcome [Medical Sciences]
Natural killer (NK) cells are major antileukemic immune effectors. Leukemic blasts have a negative impact on NK cell function and promote the emergence of phenotypically and functionally impaired NK cells. In the current work, we highlight an accumulation of CD56−CD16+ unconventional NK cells in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), an aberrant…
20h
The history and evolution of the Denisovan-EPAS1 haplotype in Tibetans [Evolution]
Recent studies suggest that admixture with archaic hominins played an important role in facilitating biological adaptations to new environments. For example, interbreeding with Denisovans facilitated the adaptation to high-altitude environments on the Tibetan Plateau. Specifically, the EPAS1 gene, a transcription factor that regulates the response to hypoxia, exhibits strong signatures…
20h
Dimensions of invasiveness: Links between local abundance, geographic range size, and habitat breadth in Europe's alien and native floras [Ecology]
Understanding drivers of success for alien species can inform on potential future invasions. Recent conceptual advances highlight that species may achieve invasiveness via performance along at least three distinct dimensions: 1) local abundance, 2) geographic range size, and 3) habitat breadth in naturalized distributions. Associations among these dimensions and the…
20h
Distinct contribution of cone photoreceptor subtypes to the mammalian biological clock [Neuroscience]
Ambient light detection is important for the synchronization of the circadian clock to the external solar cycle. Light signals are sent to the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN), the site of the major circadian pacemaker. It has been assumed that cone photoreceptors contribute minimally to synchronization. Here, however, we find that cone…
20h
Coral bleaching response is unaltered following acclimatization to reefs with distinct environmental conditions [Environmental Sciences]
Urgent action is needed to prevent the demise of coral reefs as the climate crisis leads to an increasingly warmer and more acidic ocean. Propagating climate change–resistant corals to restore degraded reefs is one promising strategy; however, empirical evidence is needed to determine whether stress resistance is affected by transplantation…
20h
Chemotactic movement of a polarity site enables yeast cells to find their mates [Cell Biology]
How small eukaryotic cells can interpret dynamic, noisy, and spatially complex chemical gradients to orient growth or movement is poorly understood. We address this question using Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where cells orient polarity up pheromone gradients during mating. Initial orientation is often incorrect, but polarity sites then move around the cortex…
20h
Polar in-plane surface orientation of a ferroelectric nematic liquid crystal: Polar monodomains and twisted state electro-optics [Applied Physical Sciences]
We show that surface interactions can vectorially structure the three-dimensional polarization field of a ferroelectric fluid. The contact between a ferroelectric nematic liquid crystal and a surface with in-plane polarity generates a preferred in-plane orientation of the polarization field at that interface. This is a route to the formation of…
20h
Genetic mechanisms of HLA-I loss and immune escape in diffuse large B cell lymphoma [Medical Sciences]
Fifty percent of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) cases lack cell-surface expression of the class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC-I), thus escaping recognition by cytotoxic T cells. Here we show that, across B cell lymphomas, loss of MHC-I, but not MHC-II, is preferentially restricted to DLBCL. To identify the…
20h
Unveiling the spatial distribution of molecular coherences at conical intersections by covariance X-ray diffraction signals [Chemistry]
The outcomes and timescales of molecular nonadiabatic dynamics are decisively impacted by the quantum coherences generated at localized molecular regions. In time-resolved X-ray diffraction imaging, these coherences create distinct signatures via inelastic photon scattering, but they are buried under much stronger background elastic features. Here, we exploit the rich dynamical…
20h
Intracounty modeling of COVID-19 infection with human mobility: Assessing spatial heterogeneity with business traffic, age, and race [Social Sciences]
The COVID-19 pandemic is a global threat presenting health, economic, and social challenges that continue to escalate. Metapopulation epidemic modeling studies in the susceptible–exposed–infectious–removed (SEIR) style have played important roles in informing public health policy making to mitigate the spread of COVID-19. These models typically rely on a key assumption…
20h
Cybertruck Patents Reveal "Armor Glass," Retractable Solar Panels
Solar Pickup New details about Tesla's long-awaited Cybertruck have emerged through the publication of several patent applications dating back to 2020, as spotted by The Verge . The electric car company's brutalist pickup truck could come with fun options like solar panels integrated into the retractable cover for the truck bed — a sign that the pickup could still have plenty of surprises in stor
21h
Elucidating how the production of antibodies is regulated, one cell at a time
A study coordinated by Luís Graça, principal investigator at the Instituto de Medicina Molecular (iMM; Portugal) used lymph nodes, tonsils and blood, to show how the cells that control production of antibodies are formed and act. The results published now in the scientific journal Science Immunology unveiled key aspects about the regulation of antibody production, with significant importance for d
21h
Exoskeleton therapy improves mobility, cognition and brain connectivity in people with MS
A team of multiple sclerosis (MS) experts led a pilot randomized controlled trial of robotic-exoskeleton assisted exercise rehabilitation (REAER) effects on mobility, cognition, and brain connectivity in people with substantial MS-related disability. Their results showed that REAER is likely an effective intervention, and is a promising therapy for improving the lives of those with MS.
21h
Who do you trust? Wild birds use social knowledge to avoid being deceived
Many species give deceptive warning calls, enabled by the high risk of ignoring them. In Siberian jays, a territorial, group-living bird, individuals give warning calls toward perched predators and mob them. However, intruding neighbors can emit these warning calls in the absence of predators to access food, but breeders often ignore these calls. Playback field experiments show that breeders flee
21h
Improved estimates of preindustrial biomass burning reduce the magnitude of aerosol climate forcing in the Southern Hemisphere
Fire plays a pivotal role in shaping terrestrial ecosystems and the chemical composition of the atmosphere and thus influences Earth's climate. The trend and magnitude of fire activity over the past few centuries are controversial, which hinders understanding of preindustrial to present-day aerosol radiative forcing. Here, we present evidence from records of 14 Antarctic ice cores and 1 central A
21h
Gestational low-dose BPA exposure impacts suprachiasmatic nucleus neurogenesis and circadian activity with transgenerational effects
Critical physiological processes such as sleep and stress that underscore health are regulated by an intimate interplay between the endocrine and nervous systems. Here, we asked how fetal exposure to the endocrine disruptor found in common plastics, bisphenol A (BPA), causes lasting effects on adult animal behaviors. Adult mice exposed to low-dose BPA during gestation displayed notable disruption
21h
Ambient noise Love wave attenuation tomography for the LASSIE array across the Los Angeles basin
The Los Angeles basin is located within the North America–Pacific plate boundary and contains multiple earthquake faults that threaten greater Los Angeles. Seismic attenuation tomography has the potential to provide important constraints on wave propagation in the basin and to provide supplementary information on structure in the form of the distribution of anelastic properties. On the basis of t
21h
Cortical response to naturalistic stimuli is largely predictable with deep neural networks
Naturalistic stimuli, such as movies, activate a substantial portion of the human brain, invoking a response shared across individuals. Encoding models that predict neural responses to arbitrary stimuli can be very useful for studying brain function. However, existing models focus on limited aspects of naturalistic stimuli, ignoring the dynamic interactions of modalities in this inherently contex
21h
Real-time imaging of Na+ reversible intercalation in "Janus" graphene stacks for battery applications
Sodium, in contrast to other metals, cannot intercalate in graphite, hindering the use of this cheap, abundant element in rechargeable batteries. Here, we report a nanometric graphite-like anode for Na + storage, formed by stacked graphene sheets functionalized only on one side, termed Janus graphene. The asymmetric functionalization allows reversible intercalation of Na + , as monitored by opera
21h
Relations between absorption, emission, and excited state chemical potentials from nanocrystal 2D spectra
For quantum-confined nanomaterials, size dispersion causes a static broadening of spectra that has been difficult to measure and invalidates all-optical methods for determining the maximum photovoltage that an excited state can generate. Using femtosecond two-dimensional (2D) spectroscopy to separate size dispersion broadening of absorption and emission spectra allows a test of single-molecule ge
21h
Membrane-confined liquid-liquid phase separation toward artificial organelles
As the basic unit of life, cells are compartmentalized microreactors with molecularly crowded microenvironments. The quest to understand the cell origin inspires the design of synthetic analogs to mimic their functionality and structural complexity. In this work, we integrate membraneless coacervate microdroplets, a prototype of artificial organelles, into a proteinosome to build hierarchical pro
21h
Cost-effective implementation of the Paris Agreement using flexible greenhouse gas metrics
Greenhouse gas (GHG) metrics, that is, conversion factors to evaluate the emissions of non-CO 2 GHGs on a common scale with CO 2 , serve crucial functions in the implementation of the Paris Agreement. While different metrics have been proposed, their economic cost-effectiveness has not been investigated under a range of pathways, including those substantially overshooting the temperature targets.
21h
Declining diversity of wild-caught species puts dietary nutrient supplies at risk
Although biodiversity loss adversely influences a variety of ecosystem functions, how declining wild food diversity affects nutrient supplies for people is poorly understood. Here, we analyze the impact of declining biodiversity on nutrients supplied by fish using detailed information from the Peruvian Amazon, where inland fisheries provide a critical source of nutrition for many of the region's
21h
Tissue-engineered vascular microphysiological platform to study immune modulation of xenograft rejection
Most of the vascular platforms currently being studied are lab-on-a-chip types that mimic capillary networks and are applied for vascular response analysis in vitro. However, these platforms have a limitation in clearly assessing the physiological phenomena of native blood vessels compared to in vivo evaluation. Here, we developed a simply fabricable tissue-engineered vascular microphysiological
21h
Realization of a complete Stern-Gerlach interferometer: Toward a test of quantum gravity
The Stern-Gerlach effect, found a century ago, has become a paradigm of quantum mechanics. Unexpectedly, until recently, there has been little evidence that the original scheme with freely propagating atoms exposed to gradients from macroscopic magnets is a fully coherent quantum process. Several theoretical studies have explained why a Stern-Gerlach interferometer is a formidable challenge. Here
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Molecular mechanisms of metabotropic GABAB receptor function
Metabotropic -aminobutyric acid G protein–coupled receptors (GABA B ) represent one of the two main types of inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors in the brain. These receptors act both pre- and postsynaptically by modulating the transmission of neuronal signals and are involved in a range of neurological diseases, from alcohol addiction to epilepsy. A series of recent cryo-EM studies revealed cr
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Control of neurogenic competence in mammalian hypothalamic tanycytes
Hypothalamic tanycytes, radial glial cells that share many features with neuronal progenitors, can generate small numbers of neurons in the postnatal hypothalamus, but the identity of these neurons and the molecular mechanisms that control tanycyte-derived neurogenesis are unknown. In this study, we show that tanycyte-specific disruption of the NFI family of transcription factors ( Nfia/b/x ) rob
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Conductance-stable liquid metal sheath-core microfibers for stretchy smart fabrics and self-powered sensing
Highly conductive and stretchy fibers are crucial components for smart fabrics and wearable electronics. However, most of the existing fiber conductors are strain sensitive with deteriorated conductance upon stretching, and thus, a compromised strategy via introducing merely geometric distortion of conductive path is often used for stable conductance. Here, we report a coaxial wet-spinning proces
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Two ligand-binding sites in CO-reducing V nitrogenase reveal a general mechanistic principle
Besides its role in biological nitrogen fixation, vanadium-containing nitrogenase also reduces carbon monoxide (CO) to hydrocarbons, in analogy to the industrial Fischer-Tropsch process. The protein yields 93% of ethylene (C 2 H 4 ), implying a C–C coupling step that mandates the simultaneous binding of two CO at the active site FeV cofactor. Spectroscopic data indicated multiple CO binding event
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Immunization with RBD-P2 and N protects against SARS-CoV-2 in nonhuman primates
Since the emergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2), various vaccines are being developed, with most vaccine candidates focusing on the viral spike protein. Here, we developed a previously unknown subunit vaccine comprising the receptor binding domain (RBD) of the spike protein fused with the tetanus toxoid epitope P2 (RBD-P2) and tested its efficacy in rodents and
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SARS-CoV-2 can recruit a heme metabolite to evade antibody immunity
The coronaviral spike is the dominant viral antigen and the target of neutralizing antibodies. We show that SARS-CoV-2 spike binds biliverdin and bilirubin, the tetrapyrrole products of heme metabolism, with nanomolar affinity. Using cryo–electron microscopy and x-ray crystallography, we mapped the tetrapyrrole interaction pocket to a deep cleft on the spike N-terminal domain (NTD). At physiologi
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Order from disorder in the sarcomere: FATZ forms a fuzzy but tight complex and phase-separated condensates with {alpha}-actinin
In sarcomeres, α-actinin cross-links actin filaments and anchors them to the Z-disk. FATZ (filamin-, α-actinin-, and telethonin-binding protein of the Z-disk) proteins interact with α-actinin and other core Z-disk proteins, contributing to myofibril assembly and maintenance. Here, we report the first structure and its cellular validation of α-actinin-2 in complex with a Z-disk partner, FATZ-1, wh
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Visualizing 3D imagery by mouth using candy-like models
Handheld models help students visualize three-dimensional (3D) objects, especially students with blindness who use large 3D models to visualize imagery by hand. The mouth has finer tactile sensors than hand, which could improve visualization using microscopic models that are portable, inexpensive, and disposable. The mouth remains unused in tactile learning. Here, we created bite-size 3D models o
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The most detailed 3D map of the Universe ever made
Nature, Published online: 28 May 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01466-1 Cosmologists have unveiled a trove of fresh data, but the measurements do not settle earlier questions about the Universe's unexpected smoothness.
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Surprising local groups can offer environmental learning
A wide range of organizations—focused on social justice, religion, the arts, etc.—offer opportunities to learn about and taking action on environmental issues, a study finds. A new study in the journal Environmental Education Research identifies nearly 1,000 organizations in the San Francisco Bay area alone that create an interconnected web of these opportunities. "Many, if not most, environmenta
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Living near fast food doesn't increase weight gain
People don't gain or lose weight because they live near a fast-food restaurant or supermarket, according to a new study. Additionally, living in a more "walkable", dense neighborhood likely only has a small impact on weight. "…when thinking about ways to curb the obesity epidemic, our study suggests there's likely no simple fix from the built environment, like putting in a playground or supermark
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Humans are making it tough for seabirds to breed
Many seabirds in the Northern Hemisphere are struggling to breed—and in the Southern Hemisphere, they may not be far behind. These are the conclusions of a study in Science analyzing more than 50 years of breeding records for 67 seabird species worldwide. The researchers discovered that reproductive success decreased in the past half century for fish-eating seabirds north of the equator. The Nort
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Starting local
Corals are in trouble. All across the globe the diverse and dynamic ecosystems are taking huge hits year after year. The Great Barrier Reef has lost half of its coral since 1995. Scientists are seeing similar declines in reefs from Hawai'i to the Florida Keys and across the Indo-Pacific region.
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Big Chief vs. Axman | Street Outlaws: America's List
Stream Full Episodes of Street Outlaws: America's List: discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/street-outlaws-americas-list Discovery ► https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/street-outlaws-americas-list/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https
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How a Simple Arithmetic Puzzle Can Guide Discovery
In the April Insights puzzle, I tried to guide readers down a path that might be best described as "experimental mathematics." The goal was to rediscover two constants by iterating simple arithmetic procedures. Readers found that the procedures ended in a repeating cycle — either in a single number (a "cycle" of one) or in a cycle of two or more numbers. The first constant, 6174… Source
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Stem cell drugs surprise researchers: Could lead to better drugs in the future
Chemotherapy destroys stem cells, which then cannot develop into immune cells and become part of the body's defenses. There are drugs that can remedy this, but previously we did not know exactly how these drugs worked. Now, a new study details their function providing new knowledge that may improve stem cell transplantation and lead to better drug design in the future.
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Has anyone used Psytoolkit? (code included)
Hello, I am a graduate student and I am using Psytoolkit to create an experiment. Basically, I would like to show my participants one of the three visual stimuli groups (neutral, positive, and negative) randomly. And also, the stimuli should be randomized within the groups as well. So, I thought arrays could be good for this. But, I cannot compile and run it. There are two groups of stimuli in th
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Revenge of the seabed burrowers
The ancient burrowers of the seafloor have been getting a bum rap for years. These prehistoric dirt churners — a wide assortment of worms, trilobites, and other animals that lived in Earth's oceans hundreds of millions of years ago — are thought to have played a key role in creating the conditions needed for marine life to flourish. Their activities altered the chemical makeup of the sea itself
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Light sensor proteins let plants take over the world
New research reveals more information about how proteins called phytochromes help plants sense and react to light and temperature. Plants contain several types of specialized light-sensitive proteins that measure light by changing shape upon light absorption. Chief among these are the phytochromes. Phytochromes help plants detect light direction, intensity, and duration; the time of day; whether
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Does low testosterone make COVID-19 worse for men?
A new study suggests that, among men, low testosterone levels in the blood are linked to more severe COVID-19. The study contradicts widespread assumptions that higher testosterone may explain why men, on average, develop more severe COVID-19 than women do. "The groups of men who were getting sicker were known to have lower testosterone across the board." Throughout the pandemic, doctors have see
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Cheap alloy rivals expensive platinum to boost fuel cells
As the cleanest renewable energy, hydrogen energy has attracted special attention in recent research. Yet the commercialization of traditional proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs), which consume hydrogen and produce electricity, is seriously restricted due to the chemical reaction of PEMFCs cathode largely reliying on expensive platinum-based catalysts.
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A non-invasive procedure allows obtaining archaeological information without excavating
An international archaeological study, led by researchers from the Culture and Socio-Ecological Dynamics (CaSEs) research group at Pompeu Fabra University, has advanced in the understanding and preservation of archaeological sites and in improving their analysis and surveying, thanks to the application of pXRF (portable X-ray fluorescence analysis) to anthropogenic sediments in Africa. It is a rap
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Direct evidence of segregated oceanic crust trapped within the mantle transition zone
Professor Yao Huajian's research group from the School of Earth and Space Sciences of the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC), in cooperation with Dr. Piero Poli from Grenoble-Alpes University of France, combined the unique resolution reflected body waves (P410P and P660P) retrieved from ambient noise interferometry with mineral physics modeling, to shed new light on transition zo
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The most detailed dark-matter map of our universe is weirdly smooth
Trying to describe dark matter is like trying to describe a ghost that lives in your house. You can't see it at all, but what you can see is all the stuff it's moving around. And the only explanation is an invisible force you can't observe or measure or interact with directly. We know dark matter exists because we can observe its effects on all the stuff that's swirling around in the universe. Sc
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The Books Briefing: What to Read This Summer
Whether you're in the mood to burst out the door or curl up on a couch this summer, The Atlantic 's writers and editors have reading recommendations to match. Do you want to feel wonder about the universe, or be transported to another place? Maybe you're craving smart observations about life, a deep dive, or just a bit of human connection. If you're looking to embrace high drama or rediscover an
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Even mild COVID may lead to lifelong antibody protection
Months after recovering from mild cases of COVID-19, people still have immune cells in their body pumping out antibodies against the virus that causes COVID-19, according to a new study. Those cells could persist for a lifetime, churning out antibodies all the while. The findings in Nature , suggest that mild cases of COVID-19 leave those infected with lasting antibody protection and that repeate
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Mechanically imprinting atoms in ceramic
Electroceramics such as capacitors are essential components in electronic devices. Intervening in their crystalline structure can change specific properties. A stable shape can be created by replacing a whole series of atoms rather than just a single one. An international team of researchers under the leadership of the TU Darmstadt has, for the first time, succeeded in inserting a dislocation into
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MS experts call for increased focus on progressive MS rehabilitation research
Experts highlight four major symptoms affecting people with progressive MS that should be the focus of new research: fatigue, mobility and upper extremity impairment, pain, and cognitive impairment. "We have ample evidence from research in other clinical areas that rehabilitation can improve quality of life and find support from diverse payers and stakeholders," noted Dr. John DeLuca. "Our aim is
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ECOG-ACRIN research highlights at ASCO 2021
Platinum chemotherapy fails for triple-negative breast cancer, basal-like subtype. The first racially diverse trial to look at severe joint pain from aromatase inhibitors shows more postmenopausal Black and Asian women with early breast cancer developed this common/significant syndrome. Less intense therapy for HPV-associated throat cancer shows outstanding three-year survival and quality of life.
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Providing more low-value care doesn't lead to higher patient experience ratings
Many healthcare providers and policy makers fear that increased pressure to please patients — and ensure high satisfaction ratings as a result — could lead to overuse of low-value care that doesn't provide any clinical benefit while unnecessarily ratcheting up medical bills. But new research from the University of Chicago and Harvard Medical School may alleviate some of those concerns.
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The Coronavirus Lab-Leak Hypothesis Goes Mainstream
A new report published by The Wall Street Journal on Sunday has fueled suspicions that SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes Covid-19, may have originated from within China's Wuhan Institute for Virology, a high-security facility where researchers study coronaviruses, among other pathogens.
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Better choice of contraceptives can prevent breast cancer
There is a strong link between hormonal contraceptives and breast cancer risk. The main culprit are progestins, synthetic mimics of the pregnancy hormone progesterone that stimulate cell growth in the breast. An EPFL study into the distinct biological effects of different progestins on the breast shows that contraceptive-related breast cancer can be prevented by more informed choices about the com
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Climate change: 6 priorities for pulling carbon out of the air
To reach net zero emissions by 2050, global emissions must be cut faster and deeper than the world has yet managed. But even then, some hard-to-treat sources of pollution—in aviation, agriculture and cement making—may linger for longer than we would like. It will take time for clean alternatives to arrive and replace them.
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New insights into switchable MOF structures
Metal-organic framework compounds (MOFs) consist of inorganic and organic groups and are characterized by a large number of pores into which other molecules can be incorporated. MOFs are therefore interesting for many applications, for example for the storage of gasses, but also for substance separation, sensor technology or catalysis. Some of these MOF structures react to different guest molecule
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Research suggests social factors important for human-wildlife coexistence
In bear country, it's normal to find bruins munching down on temptations left out by humans—from a backyard apple tree to leftovers in the trash bin—but these encounters can cause trouble for humans and bears alike. One method to reduce human-bear conflicts is to secure attractants like garbage and livestock feed.
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The Atlantic Daily: Why the Lab-Leak Theory Matters
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox. The lab-leak theory, once dismissed as conspiracism, is entering the mainstream. More scientists and journalists are now willing to admit that it's plausible. Even President Joe Biden is calling f
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How to accelerate the world into the 5G era
Demand for 5G smartphones is reaching an all-time high In 2021, consumers and institutions alike are fast-tracking a digital revolution in an unprecedented era of social distancing and remote work—a trend that may continue long after the pandemic subsides. The time is ripe for many commercialized products and services to ride the wave of unparalleled high-speed connectivity and minimal latency en
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A Newspaper by Teens, for Teens
Updated at 8:24 p.m. ET on May 28, 2021. Each installment of " The Friendship Files " features a conversation between The Atlantic 's Julie Beck and two or more friends, exploring the history and significance of their relationship. This week she talks with the founder, a former editor, and several former student journalists of L.A. Youth , an independent nonprofit newspaper for and by teens in th
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Nano tech could get zero-carbon energy from sea water
A new technique could enable the production of robust, high-performance membranes to harness sea water as an abundant source of renewable energy, researchers report. Blue energy, also known as osmotic energy, capitalizes on the energy naturally released when two solutions of different salinities mix—conditions that occur in countless locations around the world where fresh and salt water meet. The
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Quark-gluon plasma flows like water
What does quark-gluon plasma – the hot soup of elementary particles formed a few microseconds after the Big Bang – have in common with tap water? Scientists say it's the way it flows.
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A new light-sheet microscopy unit enables an extended field of view and reduced photodamage
A research group led by Takashi Saito, of the Ehime University Graduate School of Medicine, developed a 2-photon excitation light-sheet fluorescence microscope which (1) lowers phototoxicity, (2) extends the field of view, and (3) heightens spatial resolution. This microscope, when used for the observation of medaka fish, made it possible to observe the whole body of the embryo (an extended field
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Study takes genes-first approach to mapping livestock diseases
Genetic disorders compromise the welfare of farm animals and have impacts on the production and management of these animals. One such way of reducing this risk is to map the genes responsible for different syndromes. However, until now, this has been a reactive process, with farmers alerting vets or breeding companies once a genetic disorder is suspected, and researchers then aiming to confirm the
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Corporate social responsibility and COVID-19: India's business sector takes action
Researchers at Jaipur National University have examined how companies have been affected by COVID-19 lockdown in terms of their programs of corporate social responsibility. Manish Kumar Dwivedi and Vineet Kumar writing in the International Journal of Indian Culture and Business Management looked at this issue from the psychological, social, cultural, and economic perspectives.
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A Cave Site in Kenya's Forests Reveals the Oldest Human Burial in Africa
Africa is often referred to as the cradle of humankind, the birthplace of our species, Homo sapiens . There is evidence of the development of early symbolic behaviors such as pigment use and perforated shell ornaments in Africa, but so far most of what we know about the development of complex social behaviors such as burial and mourning has come from Eurasia. However, the remains of a child burie
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