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Australia confirms extinction of 13 more species, including first reptile since colonisation
Christmas Island forest skink and 12 mammals on list, which also includes the desert bettong, broad-cheeked hopping mouse and Nullarbor barred bandicoot The Australian government has officially acknowledged the extinction of 13 endemic species, including 12 mammals and the first reptile known to have been lost since European colonisation. The addition of the dozen mammal species confirms Australi
10h
Utah Considers State Park Named For Utahraptor Dinosaur
Utah is considering naming a new park in honor of dinosaurs discovered there. Researchers expect to uncover more Utahraptor bones — provided they can get them out of a massive block of rock. (Image credit: Utah Geological Survey)
19h
Billionaire Says He'll Fly Eight People Around the Moon for Free
Round Trip Japanese billionaire Yusaku Maezawa announced yesterday that he's inviting eight members of the public to get onboard a SpaceX Starship with him and fly around the Moon as soon as 2023. "I'm inviting you to join me on this mission," Maezawa says in an announcement video , alongside SpaceX CEO Elon Musk. The Japanese fashion tycoon is feeling generous and is willing to "pay for the enti
3h
The best defense against authoritarianism? More educated citizens.
It's difficult to overstate the impact of technology and artificial intelligence. Smart machines are fundamentally reshaping the economy—indeed, society as a whole. Seemingly overnight, they have changed our roles in the workplace, our views of democracy—even our family and personal relationships. In my latest book , I argue that we can—and must—rise to this challenge by developing our capacity f
18h
What's in a vaccine and what does it do to your body?
There are all sorts of different vaccines but many of them share specific types of ingredients. Josh Toussaint-Strauss talks to Prof Adam Finn to find out what is in most conventional vaccines, as well as what's going on in our bodies when we take them – and why the Covid jabs work differently Continue reading…
8h
Cuttlefish have ability to exert self-control, study finds
Delaying gratification may have evolved in the squid-like creature to maximise efficiency Humans, chimps, parrots and crows have evolved to exert self-control, a trait linked to higher intelligence. Now, researchers say cuttlefish – chunky squid-like creatures with eight arms – also have the ability to delay gratification for a better reward. Researchers used an adapted version of the Stanford ma
18h
Scientists Suggest Farming Fish on the Moon
Fishy Situation A team of French scientists has a pressing concern. When the European Space Agency constructs its planned Moon Village , what exactly are the astronauts supposed to eat? Thankfully, they have a plan: farming fish on the Moon using live eggs shipped from Earth and water harvested from the lunar surface, Hakai Magazine reports . It sounds outlandish to consider raising animals on th
22h
There's Something Very Different About Tomorrow's Starship Test
Third Time SpaceX is ramping up to launch its third full-scale Starship rocket this week — but this time, the company will attempt a new strategy. The prototype, called SN10, could be rocketing high into the sky from its launch pad in Boca Chica, Texas as early as Wednesday afternoon, Teslarati reports , according to flight restrictions announced by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). This
23h
Trump Is Gone, but Democracy Is in Trouble
After November 3, I allowed myself to dream that the battered troops of democracy would regain their courage and go on the offensive. For a decade or more, authoritarian populists around the globe had won one upset victory after another. They rose to power in India and Brazil, in the Philippines and the United States. And though Jair Bolsonaro and Rodrigo Duterte were at first mocked as incompete
4h
Stockton's Basic-Income Experiment Pays Off
Two years ago, the city of Stockton, California, did something remarkable: It brought back welfare. Using donated funds, the industrial city on the edge of the Bay Area tech economy launched a small demonstration program, sending payments of $500 a month to 125 randomly selected individuals living in neighborhoods with average incomes lower than the city median of $46,000 a year. The recipients w
4h
Democrats' Only Chance to Stop the GOP Assault on Voting Rights
T he most explosive battle in decades over access to the voting booth will reach a new crescendo this week, as Republican-controlled states advance an array of measures to restrict the ballot, and the U.S. House of Representatives votes on the federal legislation that represents Democrats' best chance to stop them. It's no exaggeration to say that future Americans could view the resolution of thi
4h
Unions attack 'sinister' plan to force NHS staff to have Covid vaccine
Government reportedly considering making jab mandatory for health and care workers in England Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage A government plan to force all NHS and care staff in England to get vaccinated against Covid-19 has been criticised as "sinister" and likely to increase the numbers refusing to have the jab. Health unions and hospital bosses urged the health s
4h
The climate crisis can't be solved by carbon accounting tricks | Simon Lewis
Disaster looms if big finance is allowed to game the carbon offsetting markets to achieve 'net zero' emissions An astonishing global shift is under way: 127 countries have now stated that by mid-century their overall emissions of carbon dioxide will be zero. That includes the EU, US, and UK by 2050 – and China by 2060. Companies are enthusiastically signing up to similar "net zero" goals . Finall
9h
Study: COVID-19 Can Kill Heart Cells
Even though we're nearly a full calendar year into the COVID pandemic, scientists still don't fully understand how the coronavirus targets and attacks different parts of our bodies. Now, doctors have uncovered that SARS-CoV-2 can attack the heart directly, according to a massive study led by Washington University School of Medicine researchers that was published in the journal JACC: Basic to Tran
20h
Despite Rebounding Cases of COVID, TX to Open State "100 Percent"
The governors of both Texas and Mississippi announced they will be lifting both states' mask mandates and rolling back COVID-19 health mandates, NBC News reports . "It is now time to open Texas 100 percent," Texas governor Greg Abbott told a largely unmasked crowd at a Mexican restaurant in Lubbock, Texas. The news comes just one day after the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warned
20h
Catholic Archdiocese Calls COVID Vaccine "Morally Compromised"
There are now three COVID-19 vaccines approved for use by the United States government. By all accounts, this is great news — unless, apparently, you're responsible for the Archdiocese of New Orleans, in which case you're busy telling your community that the newly-approved Johnson & Johnson vaccine is "morally compromised." The Archdiocese released a statement urging Catholics to avoid the Johnso
21h
New UK science body could be used as 'cover for cronyism'
Advanced Research & Innovation Agency will be exempt from existing procurement rules for 'maximum flexibility', says government A new £800m government science and defence research agency will be exempt from existing procurement rules, prompting warnings from Labour that it could be used as "cover for cronyism". Originally the brainchild of Dominic Cummings, the Advanced Research & Innovation Agen
22h
Unusual earthquakes highlight central Utah volcanoes
If you drive south through central Utah on Interstate 15 and look west somewhere around Fillmore, you'll see smooth hills and fields of black rock. The area is, aptly, named the Black Rock Desert. It may not look like much, but you're looking at some of Utah's volcanoes.
23h
Imaginary Numbers May Be Essential for Describing Reality
Mathematicians were disturbed, centuries ago, to find that calculating the properties of certain curves demanded the seemingly impossible: numbers that, when multiplied by themselves, turn negative. All the numbers on the number line, when squared, yield a positive number; 2 2 = 4, and (-2) 2 = 4. Mathematicians started calling those familiar numbers "real" and the apparently impossible breed of
3h
America's Andrew Cuomo Problem
Updated at 12:00 p.m. ET on March 3, 2021. Cable-news shows treated Andrew Cuomo like a living legend this summer, thanks to his supposedly superlative handling of the coronavirus pandemic, yet his past few weeks really have been the stuff of myth. But which myth? Is he Icarus, flying too close to the sun in his premature attempt to claim credit for New York's public-health prowess, only to have
4h
Japanese billionaire looking for people who 'push the envelope' for moon flight
Yusaku Maezawa, an online fashion tycoon, needs to fill eight spare seats on the lunar spaceship being developed by SpaceX It's the sort of chance that comes along just once in a blue moon: a Japanese billionaire is throwing open a private lunar expedition to eight people from around the world. Yusaku Maezawa , an online fashion tycoon, was announced in 2018 as the first man to book a spot aboard
15h
Can you still spread coronavirus after getting the vaccine?
Editor's note: So you've gotten your coronavirus vaccine, waited the two weeks for your immune system to respond to the shot and are now fully vaccinated. Does this mean you can make your way through the world like the old days without fear of spreading the virus? Deborah Fuller is a microbiologist at the University of Washington School of Medicine working on coronavirus vaccines. She explains wh
10h
Quick-learning cuttlefish pass 'the marshmallow test'
Much like the popular TikTok challenge where kids resist eating snacks, cuttlefish can do the same! Cuttlefish can delay gratification—wait for a better meal rather than be tempted by the one at hand—and those that can wait longest also do better in a learning test, scientists have discovered.
18h
Scientists: There's Something Lurking in the Center of Earth's Core
Innermost Core In school, you probably learned that our planet is made up of four distinct layers: the crust, the mantle, the outer core, and the inner core. But new research by a team of scientists from The Australian National University (ANU) is shaking up the game: like a Russian doll, they say, the inner core has yet another core hidden inside of it. This "innermost inner core" may have been
53min
Researchers unveil issues with nuclear theory, observe no magic behavior at N=32 in charge radii of potassium isotopes
Measuring the size of atomic nuclei has sometimes been useful to probe aspects of nucleon-nucleon interaction and the bulk properties of nuclear matter. The charge radius of atomic nuclei, which can be extracted using laser spectroscopy techniques, is sensitive to both the bulk properties of nuclear matter and particularly subtle details of the interactions between protons and neutrons.
4h
Call of the rewild: releasing Britain's rivers to ease flooding
Confining rivers creates valuable agricultural land but can lead to greater flood risk downstream For many of us across the UK it has felt like another wet winter; yet again homes have flooded and politicians are under pressure to improve flood protection. Engineering our rivers and building defences might bring reassurance, but recent research shows that doing nothing is often more effective at
10h
Kazuo Ishiguro's Radiant Robot
Na Kim This article was published online on March 2, 2021. G irl AF Klara , an Artificial Friend sold as a children's companion, lives in a store. On lucky days, Klara gets to spend time in the store window, where she can see and be seen and soak up the solar energy on which she runs. Not needing human food, Klara hungers and thirsts for the Sun (she capitalizes it) and what he (she also personif
19h
White House Says US Will Have Enough Vaccine For All Adults by May
On Tuesday, President Joe Biden announced that the United States would have enough doses of the various coronavirus vaccines to inoculate every adult in the country by the end of May. That's a significant improvement over Biden's previous prediction — that the US would secure enough vaccines by the end of July — which he made just last month, according to CNBC . It's some much-needed good news ab
10min
Ice Age testing reveals challenges in climate model sensitivity
Key to the usefulness of climate models as tools for both scientists and policymakers is the models' ability to connect changes in atmospheric greenhouse gas levels to corresponding shifts in temperature. Equilibrium climate sensitivity (ECS) is one such measure, representing the predicted warming after a doubling of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) levels.
5h
Indoors, outdoors, 6 feet apart? Transmission risk of airborne viruses can be quantified
The rush for scientific understanding of the novel coronavirus has focused on biological mechanisms: how people get infected, the response of the human body, and the fastest path to a vaccine. As an aerosol scientist, Tami Bond went a different route, convening a research team that would treat the virus like any other aerosol. This team set out to quantify the dynamics of how aerosols like viruses
20h
The strongest fishing knots you can tie
When it comes to finding the strongest fishing knot, sometimes you've got to do a bit of experimenting. (C D-X/Unsplash/) This story was originally featured on Field & Stream . Fishing line has advanced remarkably in the past few decades. Nylon monofilament, fluorocarbon, and so-called "superline" give fishermen tremendous advantages in strength, visibility, and ease of use. Each of the three pri
21h
COVID-19 can kill heart muscle cells, interfere with contraction
A new study provides evidence that COVID-19 patients' heart damage is caused by the virus invading and replicating inside heart muscle cells, leading to cell death and interfering with heart muscle contraction. The researchers used stem cells to engineer heart tissue that models the human infection and could help in studying the disease and developing possible therapies.
22h
MUSE sheds more light on central kinematics of Messier 15
Using the Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE), astronomers have performed observations of an old globular cluster known as Messier 15. The observational campaign delivered essential information about stellar kinematics of the central region of this cluster. The results were published February 24 on arXiv.org.
4h
New study gives the most detailed look yet at the neuroscience of placebo effects
A large proportion of the benefit that a person gets from taking a real drug or receiving a treatment to alleviate pain is due to an individual's mindset, not to the drug itself. Understanding the neural mechanisms driving this placebo effect has been a longstanding question. A meta-analysis finds that placebo treatments to reduce pain, known as placebo analgesia, reduce pain-related activity in m
17h
Detection dogs help generate important data for research and conservation
It is often difficult to find out exactly where the individual species can be found and how their populations are developing. According to a new overview, specially trained detection dogs can be indispensable in such cases. With the help of these dogs, the species sought can usually be found faster and more effectively than with other methods.
23h
How 'green' are environmentally friendly fireworks?
Fireworks are used in celebrations around the world, including Independence Day in the U.S., the Lantern Festival in China and the Diwali Festival in India. However, the popular pyrotechnic displays emit large amounts of pollutants into the atmosphere, sometimes causing severe air pollution. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology have estimated that, although so-call
5h
Rocket Lab could be SpaceX's biggest rival
In the private space industry, it can seem that there's SpaceX and then there's everyone else. Only Blue Origin, backed by its own billionaire founder in the person of Jeff Bezos, seems able to command the same degree of attention. And Blue Origin hasn't even gone beyond suborbital space yet. Rocket Lab might soon have something to say about that duopoly. The company, founded in New Zealand and h
22h
Microsoft's new Mesh platform turns your remote coworkers into holograms
Soon after the COVID-19 pandemic hit, many offices quickly and unexpectedly moved to the cloud. Now, these "offices" only really exist in the abstract, relying on a patchwork of real-time messaging services like Slack, e-mail, and a suddenly endless stream of video conferences. The quick switch didn't allow time for the idea of a truly digital office to take shape and deliver on the lofty promise
2h
Raf promotes dimerization of the Ras G-domain with increased allosteric connections [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Ras dimerization is critical for Raf activation. Here we show that the Ras binding domain of Raf (Raf-RBD) induces robust Ras dimerization at low surface densities on supported lipid bilayers and, to a lesser extent, in solution as observed by size exclusion chromatography and confirmed by SAXS. Community network analysis…
22h
Heart disease is in the eye of the beholder
Researchers have identified a potential new marker that shows cardiovascular disease may be present in a patient using an optical coherence tomography (OCT) scan — a non-invasive diagnostic tool commonly used in ophthalmology and optometry clinics to create images of the retina. The finding suggests it may be possible to detect heart disease during an eye examination.
21h
Aging stars provide a new cosmological yardstick
Despite a century of measurements, astronomers can't agree on the rate at which the universe is expanding. A technique that relies on measuring distances to a specific type of aging star in other galaxies—called the J-region Asymptotic Giant Branch, or JAGB method—might be able to help.
5h
When does an idea die? Plato and string theory clash with data
How far should we defend an idea in the face of contrarian evidence? Who decides when it's time to abandon an idea and deem it wrong? Science carries within it its seeds from ancient Greece, including certain prejudices of how reality should or shouldn't be. From the perspective of the west, it all started in ancient Greece, around 600 BCE. This is during the Axial Age, a somewhat controversial t
4h
New long-term study affirms contact lens wear as healthy option for children
A newly-published work highlights the long-term ocular health of children wearing daily disposable soft contact lenses and reports minimal impact on physiology over six years. Its results affirm that such lenses are an option for children as young as eight years old. Across the entire study period, there were no contact lens-related serious adverse events, and the low incidence rate of corneal inf
13h
A new blindness gene uncovered in a canine study
A study has uncovered a mutation in the IFT122 gene in blind dogs. The gene defect now discovered results in the progressive destruction of photoreceptor cells and retinal dystrophy. IFT122 is a new candidate also for retinal dystrophy in humans. A gene test in support of breeding and diagnostics has been developed based on the finding.
22h
New generation of tiny, agile drones introduced
Researchers developed an insect-size drone with soft actuators — akin to muscles — that are agile and resilient to collisions. The advance could boost aerial robots' repertoire, allowing them to operate in cramped spaces and withstand collisions.
3h
Researchers publish roadmap to harness data science and artificial intelligence for electron microscopy
Since they came into use in 1938, electron microscopes have played a pivotal role in a host of scientific advances, including the discovery of new proteins and therapeutics and contributions made to the electronics revolution. But the field of electron microscopy must incorporate the latest advances in data science and artificial intelligence to realize its full potential in the years ahead, accor
5h
Nanoparticle-delivered COVID-19 vaccine candidate shows promise in preclinical studies
Researchers have developed a promising new COVID-19 vaccine candidate that utilizes nanotechnology and has shown strong efficacy in preclinical disease models. According to a new study, the vaccine produced potent neutralizing antibodies among preclinical models and also prevented infection and disease symptoms in the face of exposure to SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19).
22h
The Large Hadron Collider's official tally: 59 new hadrons and counting
How many new particles has the LHC discovered? The most widely known discovery is of course that of the Higgs boson. Less well known is the fact that, over the past 10 years, the LHC experiments have also found more than 50 new particles called hadrons. Coincidentally, the number 50 appears in the context of hadrons twice, as 2021 marks the 50th anniversary of hadron colliders: on 27 January 1971,
5h
Environmental impact of computation and the future of green computing
Every aspect of modern computing, from the smallest chip to the largest data center comes with a carbon price tag. The tech industry and the field of computation as a whole have focused on building smaller, faster, more powerful devices — but few have considered their overall environmental impact. Researchers are trying to change that by challenging the field to add carbon footprint to the list o
17h
Energy switching decisions could widen social inequalities
New energy tariffs designed for a low carbon future could leave people on bad deals even worse off. The tariffs could benefit all kinds of customers, but many people are unlikely to choose them. Those likely to adopt them first are younger, with higher incomes and higher education.
22h
Inhibition of neuroinflammatory nitric oxide signaling suppresses glycation and prevents neuronal dysfunction in mouse prion disease [Neuroscience]
Several neurodegenerative diseases associated with protein misfolding (Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease) exhibit oxidative and nitrergic stress following initiation of neuroinflammatory pathways. Associated nitric oxide (NO)-mediated posttranslational modifications impact upon protein functions that can exacerbate pathology. Nonenzymatic and irreversible glycation signaling has been implicated
22h
Indoor air quality study shows aircraft in flight may have lowest particulate levels
If you're looking for an indoor space with a low level of particulate air pollution, a commercial airliner flying at cruising altitude may be your best option. A newly reported study of air quality in indoor spaces such as stores, restaurants, offices, public transportation — and commercial jets — shows aircraft cabins with the lowest levels of tiny aerosol particles.
17h
Ultrasonic cleaning of salad could reduce instances of food poisoning
A new study has shown that gentle streams of water carrying sound and microscopic air bubbles can clean bacteria from salad leaves more effectively than current washing methods used by suppliers and consumers. As well as reducing food poisoning, the findings could reduce food waste and have implications for the growing threat of anti-microbial resistance.
19h
Nanoparticle-delivered COVID-19 vaccine candidate shows promise in preclinical studies
Researchers have developed a promising new COVID-19 vaccine candidate that utilizes nanotechnology and has shown strong efficacy in preclinical disease models. According to a new study, the vaccine produced potent neutralizing antibodies among preclinical models and also prevented infection and disease symptoms in the face of exposure to SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19).
22h
New research highlights impact of the digital divide
The coronavirus pandemic has drawn new attention to the digital divide, as the need for online schooling and working from home has disproportionately hurt those without computer equipment and skills. New research finds that people with basic Information Technology (IT) skills are more likely to be employed, even in jobs that aren't explicitly tied to those skills.
18h
Researchers discover SARS-CoV-2 inhibitors
A research team of pharmacists at the University of Bonn has discovered two families of active substances that can block the replication of the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus. The drug candidates are able to switch off the the key enzyme of the virus, the so-called main protease. The study is based on laboratory experiments. Extensive clinical trials are still required for their further development as the
3h
Mountain 'tsunamis' have been taking place for 10,000 years in Chilean Patagonia
Catastrophic floods due to the emptying or rupture of glacial lakes in Chilean Patagonia have taken place cyclically since the last glacial maximum 10,000 years ago. Nevertheless, the magnitude of these mountain 'tsunamis' has declined over time, according to a paper published in the journal Quaternary Science Reviews in which scientists from the Centro Nacional de Investigación de La Evolución Hu
5h
Vaccine shows signs of protection against dozen-plus flu strains
A vaccine candidate has demonstrated promising signs of protection against more than a dozen swine flu strains — and more than a leading, commercially available vaccine. Its success in experiments involving swine suggests that its design could also fast-track efforts to develop a vaccine that protects people against many common strains of influenza.
4h
Division of labor within regenerating liver maintains metabolism, mouse study finds
The liver has a rare superpower among body organs – the ability to regenerate. It also keeps up its metabolic and toxin-removing work while regenerating, thanks to a subset of cells that expand their workload while the rest focus on multiplication, a new study in mice found. Furthermore, the cells of the liver communicate with each other to coordinate regeneration activity, which progresses from t
22h
A mechanism by which cells build 'mini-muscles' underneath their nucleus identified
Research has uncovered how motor protein myosin, which is responsible for contraction of skeletal muscles, functions also in non-muscle cells to build contractile structures at the inner face of the cell membrane. This is the first time when such 'mini-muscles', also known as stress fibers, have been seen to emerge spontaneously through myosin-driven reorganization of the pre-existing actin filame
23h
New light shed on the early evolution of limb bone marrow
When and how bone marrow first originated in the limbs of early four-legged animals is disputed in evolutionary biology. With the help of powerful X-ray technology, an international research team, led by Uppsala University, has now discovered that this evolutionary adaptation most likely took place after the first tetrapods stepped ashore.
5h
Researchers discover SARS-CoV-2 inhibitors
A research team of pharmacists at the University of Bonn has discovered two families of active substances that can block the replication of the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus. The drug candidates are able to switch off the the key enzyme of the virus, the so-called main protease. The study is based on laboratory experiments. Extensive clinical trials are still required for their further development as the
3h
​These light-emitting "smart" tattoos could act as medical monitors
Researchers at UCL and IIT have created a temporary tattoo that contains the same OLED technology that is used in TVs and smartphones. This technology has already been successfully applied to various materials including glass, food items, plastic, and paper packaging. This advance in technology isn't just about aesthetics. "In healthcare, they could emit light when there is a change in a patient'
12h
Homeroom: I Can't Keep Prodding My Son to Do His Work
Editor's Note: Every Tuesday, Abby Freireich and Brian Platzer take questions from readers about their kids' education. Have one? Email them at homeroom@theatlantic.com. Dear Abby and Brian, My son, whom I'll refer to as "Sean," is heading off to college next fall (if, God willing, colleges are open), and I'm embarrassed to admit that I don't think he knows how to organize his work or complete as
3h
Key steps discovered in production of critical immune cell
Researchers have uncovered a process cells use to fight off infection and cancer that could pave the way for precision cancer immunotherapy treatment. Through gaining a better understanding of how this process works, researchers hope to be able to determine a way of tailoring immunotherapy to better fight cancer. This research lays the foundation for future studies into the body's response to envi
3h
Fluorescent nanodiamonds successfully injected into living cells
As odd as it sounds, many scientists have attempted to place extremely small diamonds inside living cells. Why? Because nanodiamonds are consistently bright and can give us unique knowledge about the inner life of cells over a long time. Now physics researchers at Lund University in Sweden have succeeded in injecting a large number of nanodiamonds directly to the cell interior.
4h
Dethroning electrocatalysts for hydrogen production with inexpensive alternative material
Today, we can say without a shadow of doubt that an alternative to fossil fuels is needed. Fossil fuels are not only non-renewable sources of energy but also among the leading causes of global warming and air pollution. Thus, many scientists worldwide have their hopes placed on what they regard as the fuel of tomorrow: hydrogen (H2). Although H2 is a clean fuel with incredibly high energy density,
22h
Hoinga: Debris of stellar explosion found in unexpected location
In the first all-sky survey by the eROSITA X-ray telescope onboard SRG, astronomers at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics have identified a previously unknown supernova remnant, dubbed "Hoinga." The finding was confirmed in archival radio data and marks the first discovery of a joint Australian-eROSITA partnership established to explore our Galaxy using multiple wavelengths, fro
4h
Heat-free optical switch would enable optical quantum computing chips
In a potential boost for quantum computing and communication, a European research collaboration reported a new method of controlling and manipulating single photons without generating heat. The solution makes it possible to integrate optical switches and single-photon detectors in a single chip.
4h
Your favorite brunch foods are thousands of years old
Should we split a side of goat bacon? (Pexels/) What's the weirdest thing you learned this week? Well, whatever it is, we promise you'll have an even weirder answer if you listen to PopSci' s hit podcast . The Weirdest Thing I Learned This Week hits Apple , Anchor , and everywhere else you listen to podcasts every-other Wednesday morning. It's your new favorite source for the strangest science-ad
7h
Unveiling the weaving fractal network of connecting neurons
High-resolution imaging and 3D computer modeling show that the dendrites of neurons weave through space in a way that balances their need to connect to other neurons with the costs of doing so. The discovery emerged as researchers sought to understand the fractal nature of neurons as part of a project to design fractal-shaped electrodes to connect with retinal neurons to address vision loss due to
19h
Dietary fats interact with grape tannins to influence wine taste
Wine lovers recognize that a perfectly paired wine can make a delicious meal taste even better, but the reverse is also true: Certain foods can influence the flavors of wines. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry have explored how lipids—fatty molecules abundant in cheese, meats, vegetable oils and other foods—interact with grape tannins, masking the undesi
3h
What Will We Want When We Can Travel Again?
Pity the travel influencer (or don't; it's easy not to). Before COVID-19, the art of stoking wanderlust was defined by selling a fantasy—the promise not only of a perfect vacation, but of a self somehow fortified and made special by going to the same bleached beaches and blue-domed Greek villages as everyone else. But now, almost a year into a pandemic that's grounded people like never before, pr
3h
How some animals sense the gritty texture of their food
There's more to taste than flavor. Let ice cream melt, and the next time you take it out of the freezer you'll find its texture icy instead of the smooth, creamy confection you're used to. Though its flavor hasn't changed, most people would agree the dessert is less appetizing.
21h
Fuel efficiency of one car may be cancelled by your next car purchase
Researchers find that consumers tend to buy something less fuel efficient for their second car after springing for an eco-friendly vehicle. The study reports a 57% reduction in the benefits of your fuel efficient car based on the purchase of your second vehicle. Findings have major implications for the design of carbon mitigation programs that aren't taking into account consumers with multiple veh
22h
Quick-learning cuttlefish pass 'the marshmallow test'
Cuttlefish can delay gratification – wait for a better meal rather than be tempted by the one at hand – and those that can wait longest also do better in a learning test, scientists have discovered. This intriguing report marks the first time a link between self-control and intelligence has been found in an animal other than humans and chimpanzees.
4h
Simulations to make insight into electrokinetic transport more reliable
Researcher Remco Hartkamp and Ph.D. student Max Döpke of the Process & Energy Department have taken an important step in making simulation results for electrokinetic transport more reliable by using molecular simulations. In electrokinetics, ions play an important role in the transport of a liquid through narrow pores or of solid particles through a liquid. These types of transport properties are
5h
Rice variety resists arsenic
The agricultural cultivation of the staple food of rice harbors the risk of possible contamination with arsenic that can reach the grains following uptake by the roots. A research team studied over 4,000 rice variants and discovered a plant that resists the toxin as well as contains a large amount of the trace element selenium.
22h
The top 10 cities for biking probably aren't where you think
Source: COYA 2019 Bicycle Cities Index (msjonesnyc/) Amsterdam was once just as car-clogged as any other major city. But in 1995, bikers began to outnumber drivers. Copenhagen reached that same milestone in 2016. Like other modern pedaling paradises, they invested hundreds of millions in making roads safe and convenient for two-wheelers. Introducing bike sharing has encouraged an influx of casual
3h
From Financial Transactions to Confidential Information Storage, Blockchain is the Future of Data Transfer
If you had the foresight way back when to invest in cryptocurrency , good on you! You know that values have skyrocketed, and while currencies such as Bitcoin certainly aren't mainstream yet, there are forces at work to strengthen the technology (that being Blockchain ) behind them. Not only does Blockchain ensure a more secure way of dealing with cryptocurrency transactions, but through Ethereum
7h
An instructor's guide to reducing college students' stress and anxiety
Even before the COVID-19 pandemic, college students were reporting record levels of stress and anxiety. According to the American College Health Association Fall 2018 National College Health Assessment, 63% of U.S. college students experienced overwhelming anxiety throughout the year. Plus, stress can impact students' academic performance, and students with higher stress levels are more at-risk of
23h
Meeting the meat needs of the future
Researchers have succeeded in culturing meat in the laboratory in the form of millimeter-scale slabs of contractile bovine muscle. This innovative tissue culture process, arrayed in stackable hydrogel modules, uses electrical pulses to align myotubules thus mimicking the texture, grain and bulk of real steak meat. Further advances may help meet the increasing worldwide demand for dietary meat whil
17h
What kids know—and don't know—about COVID-19
The pandemic will be a formative experience for many kids around the world. (Jairo/Unsplash/) Karen Ford is an adjunct associate professor at the School of Nursing, University of Tasmania. Andrea Middleton is a lecturer at the University of Tasmania. Steven Campbell is a professor of Clinical Redesign– Nursing, University of Tasmania. This story originally featured on The Conversation . During th
22h
When Sick Cows Can't Be Culled: India's Battle With Brucellosis
As with most zoonotic diseases, the key to brucellosis prevention lies in improving animal health. Countries that have the disease under control usually adopt a two-pronged approach: mass vaccination, followed by slaughtering cattle that still test positive afterward. But this doesn't work in India.
8h
New form of symbiosis discovered: Endosymbiont derives energy from respiration of nitrate
Researchers from Bremen, together with their colleagues from the Max Planck Genome Center in Cologne and the aquatic research institute Eawag from Switzerland, have discovered a unique bacterium that lives inside a unicellular eukaryote and provides it with energy. Unlike mitochondria, this so-called endosymbiont derives energy from the respiration of nitrate, not oxygen. "Such partnership is comp
2h
New form of symbiosis discovered: Endosymbiont derives energy from respiration of nitrate
Researchers from Bremen, together with their colleagues from the Max Planck Genome Center in Cologne and the aquatic research institute Eawag from Switzerland, have discovered a unique bacterium that lives inside a unicellular eukaryote and provides it with energy. Unlike mitochondria, this so-called endosymbiont derives energy from the respiration of nitrate, not oxygen. "Such partnership is comp
2h
U.S. needs to double its tree nursery production, according to new study
In order to realize the full potential of reforestation in the United States, the nation's tree nurseries need to increase seedling production by an additional 1.7 billion each year, a 2.4-fold increase over current nursery production. These numbers, taken from a new study, show the promise of increased nursery output as a way to fight climate change, create jobs, and recover from uncharacteristic
5h
Reconstructing historical typhoons from a 142-year record
In recent years, strong TCs have been making landfalls in Japan, such as Typhoon Jebi in 2018, which severely hit the Kinki region, and Typhoon Hagibis in 2019, which severely hit eastern Japan. While Japan has suffered from a number of TC impacts throughout its history, meteorological data for these events has been sparse.
5h
Legal researcher who claimed false affiliation up to 31 retractions
A law researcher who has falsely claimed to have been affiliated with several institutions has lost eight more publications, bringing his retraction total to 31 and earning him a spot in the top 20 of our leaderboard. The most recent retractions for Dimitris Liakopoulos include The Regulation of Transnational Mergers in International and European Law, … Continue reading
7h
Pericytes regulate vascular immune homeostasis in the CNS [Immunology and Inflammation]
Pericytes regulate the development of organ-specific characteristics of the brain vasculature such as the blood–brain barrier (BBB) and astrocytic end-feet. Whether pericytes are involved in the control of leukocyte trafficking in the adult central nervous system (CNS), a process tightly regulated by CNS vasculature, remains elusive. Using adult pericyte-deficient mice…
22h
Serious new COVID-related smoking threat discovered by Ben-Gurion University researchers
"The experiment proved that the filter is a crucial element in reducing the harm of smoking so therefore, new filters need to be developed to reduce toxicity," explains Prof. Robert Marks, head of the BGU Avram and Stella Goldstein-Goren Department of Biotechnology Engineering. Prof. Robert Marks is a leading expert in the study of genetically engineered bacteria. His work focuses on finding the s
5min
How to Administer RNA – And How to Do It Again
As the world knows, the mRNA vaccines for the coronavirus are proving to be very effective. That's welcome news for the obvious pandemic reasons, but it's also welcome validation for a technique that's been in the works for many years now. I'll take a moment to re-emphasize how fortunate we are that so much of this groundwork, all these false starts, re-workings, and dead ends had already been wo
6min
Accelerating gains in abdominal fat during menopause tied to heart disease risk
Women who experience an accelerated accumulation of abdominal fat during menopause are at greater risk of heart disease, even if their weight stays steady, according to a new analysis. The study–based on a quarter century of data collected on hundreds of women–indicates that measuring waist circumference during preventive health care appointments for midlife women could be a better early indicat
26min
Planetary science intern leads study of Martian crust
Ahmed AlHantoobi, an intern working with Northern Arizona University planetary scientists, assistant professor Christopher Edwards and postdoctoral scholar Jennifer Buz in NAU's Department of Astronomy and Planetary Science, led a study looking for answers to magnetic anomalies on Mars. The team explored the relationships between the strength of the magnetic field on the surface and the compositio
26min
How do you know where volcanic ash will end up?
Until the eruption of Eyjafjallajökull volcano, models from the VAACs were based on the tracking of the clouds in the atmosphere. In the wake of this economic disaster for airlines, ash concentration levels have been introduced to make decisions on flight restrictions. However, a team of UNIGE discovered that even the smallest volcanic ash did not behave as expected. Its results will help to refin
26min
Chemists boost boron's utility
MIT chemists created a boron-containing chemical group that is 10,000 times more stable than boron on its own. The advance could make it possible to incorporate boron into drugs and improve their ability to bind their targets.
26min
The Invisible Stars of Asian Movies
O nly when he began editing Minari did the writer-director Lee Isaac Chung see exactly how much his cast had done for the story. The film, about a Korean American family starting a farm in 1980s Arkansas, was inspired by his childhood, but Chung told his actors he didn't want them imitating anyone he knew. So instead, they brought their own interpretations to the characters and made Chung's tale
27min
The Game Has Changed: Why We Need New Rules for Space Exploration
The first human expedition to Mars could take place within five to ten years. The crew will be made up mainly of volunteers, with the goal of establishing a colony on the red planet and eventually making the trip to Mars available to anyone. Scientists are sketching simulations of optimal launch windows (that is, the most fuel-efficient orbital trajectory), running analyses on top candidate landi
39min
Reading the physics hiding in data
Information is encoded in data. This is true for most aspects of modern everyday life, but also in most branches of contemporary physics. An interdisciplinary team of scientists from ICTP and SISSA showed that such a massive collection of data can be combed through, bringing out fundamental physical properties of an unknown system. Their study, published in Physical Review X , introduces a new dat
41min
New search engine for single cell atlases
A new software tool allows researchers to quickly query datasets generated from single-cell sequencing. Users can identify which cell types any combination of genes are active in. Published in Nature Methods on 1st March, the open-access 'scfind' software enables swift analysis of multiple datasets containing millions of cells by a wide range of users, on a standard computer.
41min
Tackling tumors with two types of virus
An international research group led by the University of Basel has developed a promising strategy for therapeutic cancer vaccines. Using two different viruses as vehicles, they administered specific tumor components in experiments on mice with cancer in order to stimulate their immune system to attack the tumor. The approach is now being tested in clinical studies.
41min
New form of symbiosis discovered
Mitochondria are present in almost all eukaryotic cells and supply them with energy. Until now, it was assumed that only mitochondria can act as the cells' energy providers. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology have now discovered that symbiotic bacteria can fulfil this function too. Their findings shed a completely new light on the survival of simple eukaryotes in oxygen
41min
Study: Alcohol withdrawal rates among hospitalized patients rose 34% during COVID pandemic
During the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020, there was a 34% increase in alcohol withdrawal (AW) rates among hospitalized patients at ChristianaCare, according to a research letter published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association. The study is believed to be the first to quantify the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on alcohol withdrawal among hospitalized patients.
41min
Incentives can reduce alcohol use among American Indian and Alaska Native people
A low-cost, easy-to-administer intervention that uses small prizes and other incentives to reward abstinence can serve as an effective tool to reduce alcohol use among American Indian and Alaska Native communities, new research suggests. Findings from a multisite study in American Indian and Alaska Native adults diagnosed with alcohol dependence showed that participants who were given incentives t
41min
Neanderthals could produce and hear human speech, new study finds
Neanderthals are emerging as having been much more advanced than previously suspected. Analysis of ear structures indicated by fossilized remains suggests they had everything they needed for understanding the subtleties of speech. The study also concludes that Neanderthals could produce the consonants required for a rich spoken language. Neanderthals' image has undergone quite an upgrade in recen
47min
My mother's final wish — and the right to die with dignity | Elaine Fong
After a terminal cancer diagnosis upended 12 years of remission, all Elaine Fong's mother wanted was a peaceful end of life. What she received instead became a fight for the right to decide when. Fong shares the heart-rending journey to honor her mother's choice for a death with dignity — and reflects on the need to explore our relationship to dying so that we may redesign this final and most uni
2h
COVID, 2020 and a year of lost research
Nature, Published online: 03 March 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00570-6 The pandemic's unequal toll on the research community, and a newly discovered mitochondria-like symbiosis.
2h
Mitochondria are mixed during cell division
Nature, Published online: 03 March 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00511-3 Organelles called mitochondria have essential roles in the cell and must be inherited successfully as it divides. It turns out that three types of interaction with filaments of actin protein mix and partition mitochondria during cell division.
2h
Photonic chip brings optical quantum computers a step closer
Nature, Published online: 03 March 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00488-z A programmable photonic circuit has been developed that can execute various quantum algorithms and is potentially highly scalable. This device could pave the way for large-scale quantum computers based on photonic hardware.
2h
Ligand-engineered bandgap stability in mixed-halide perovskite LEDs
Nature, Published online: 03 March 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03217-8 The binding of multidentate ligands to the surface of lead halide perovskite nanocrystals suppresses the formation of surface defects that result in halide segregation, yielding materials with efficient and colour-stable red emission.
2h
A microbial marriage reminiscent of mitochondrial evolution
Nature, Published online: 03 March 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00500-6 Symbiotic interactions between organisms have aided major evolutionary transitions. The interaction between two microorganisms has parallels with the evolution of mitochondria — key organelles in eukaryotic cells.
2h
Soft robot reaches the deepest part of the ocean
Nature, Published online: 03 March 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00489-y A self-powered robot inspired by a fish can survive the extreme pressures at the bottom of the ocean's deepest trench, thanks to its soft body and distributed electronic system — and might enable exploration of the uncharted ocean.
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Human alteration of global surface water storage variability
Nature, Published online: 03 March 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03262-3 Data from the ICESat-2 satellite quantifying the variability of water levels in natural and human-managed water bodies show that a disproportionate majority of global water storage variability occurs in human-managed reservoirs.
2h
Self-powered soft robot in the Mariana Trench
Nature, Published online: 03 March 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03153-z A free-swimming soft robot inspired by deep-sea creatures, with artificial muscle, power and control electronics spread across a polymer matrix, successfully adapts to high pressure and operates in the deep ocean.
2h
A bird's migration decoded
Nature, Published online: 03 March 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00510-4 Technological advances offer new ways to investigate the contribution that changing climate and genes have made in shaping past migrations by peregrine falcons. Can this help to predict the fate of future migrations?
2h
Chemists develop a new technology to prevent lithium-ion batteries from catching fire
Scientists at St Petersburg University have developed a new technology to prevent lithium-ion batteries from catching fire. What scientists propose is to use a 'chemical fuse' to cover the main conductor cable of the battery. It is a special protective covering made from conducting polymer. In case of abnormal situation, it breaks circuits and prevents the battery from catching fire.
2h
Who Would Volunteer to Fact-Check Twitter?
I learned about the pilot test of Twitter's new crowdsourced misinformation-labeling program the same way I learn about most news events that are relevant to my life: A bunch of Harry Styles fans were talking about it on my timeline. Or rather, they were reacting to it, in quote-tweets, one after another , all saying essentially the same thing : "larries better hide," "larries are over," "it's ov
2h
Researchers discover SARS-CoV-2 inhibitors
A research team of pharmacists at the University of Bonn has discovered two families of active substances that can block the replication of the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus. The drug candidates are able to switch off the the key enzyme of the virus, the so-called main protease. The study is based on laboratory experiments. Extensive clinical trials are still required for their further development as the
3h
University students with special educational needs highlight the benefits of e-assessment
The Unviersity published a study in the ETHE open access journal, conducted in conjunction with researchers from Finland, Turkey and the United Kingdom to evaluate the needs of this faction of the student community. "The study was developed as a result of one of the advantages provided by the UOC's TeSLA system (an adaptive trust-based e-assessment learning authentication system), which facilitate
3h
80% of sexual abuse victims in Spain who seek public compensation receive nothing
European Union law rules that Member States must provide fair and appropriate compensation for victims of sexual offences. In some countries, few victims receive any financial compensation, or often the amount received is very low. According to figures from the Spanish Government's Ministry of Finance, obtained by professor of Criminal Law at the UOC, Josep M. Tamarit, between 1998 and 2018 in Spa
3h
Fluorescent nanodiamonds successfully injected into living cells
As odd as it sounds, many scientists have attempted to place extremely small diamonds inside living cells. Why? Because nanodiamonds are consistently bright and can give us unique knowledge about the inner life of cells over a long time. Now physics researchers at Lund University in Sweden have succeeded in injecting a large number of nanodiamonds directly to the cell interior.
3h
Periodontitis: Researchers search for a new active substance
Targeted, efficient and with few side effects: A new method for combating periodontitis could render the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics superfluous. It was developed and tested for the first time by a team from Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU), the Fraunhofer Institute for Cell Therapy and Immunology IZI and Periotrap Pharmaceuticals GmbH. The aim is to neutralize only bacteria t
3h
Filming a 3-D video of a virus with 'instantaneous light' and AI
It is millions of trillions of times brighter than sunlight and a whopping 1,000 trillionth of a second, appropriately called 'instantaneous light'—the X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL) light that opens a new scientific paradigm. Combining it with AI, an international research team has succeeded in filming and restoring the 3-D structure of nanoparticles that share structural similarities with viru
3h
Periodontitis: Researchers search for a new active substance
Targeted, efficient and with few side effects: A new method for combating periodontitis could render the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics superfluous. It was developed and tested for the first time by a team from Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU), the Fraunhofer Institute for Cell Therapy and Immunology IZI and Periotrap Pharmaceuticals GmbH. The aim is to neutralize only bacteria t
3h
Team finds best spot for armband that tracks heart's signals
Researchers have taken a step forward in developing a new armband that can track the heart's electrical activity without requiring bulky wiring or sticky gel on the skin. Specifically, they determined the ideal placement for three electrodes in the band design, and how tightly the band needs to be to best detect electrical signals from the heart. The findings are the latest advance in a multi-ins
3h
Power outage costs remain a mystery years later
Even years after natural disasters occur, the complete costs of major power outages remain unknown, according to a new report. The findings come as lawmakers grapple with the aftermath of a generational snow and ice storm that knocked out electricity, heat, and water to millions of Texans for the better part of a week. Researchers studied major outages that weather events in Texas and five other
3h
Common dolphin populations at risk
While consumers look out for the Dolphin Safe mark on seafood purchases, a major research stocktake of Australian-New Zealand waters gives new guidelines to managers of dolphin fisheries.The extensive new genomic study of almost 500 common dolphins (Delphinus delphis), spanning multiple spatial areas of more than 1500 sq km from the southern and east coast of Australia to Tasmania and New Zealand,
3h
'Target identified': teaching a machine how to identify imperfections in 2D materials
Just as James Cameron's Terminator-800 was able to discriminate between "clothes, boots, and a motorcycle", machine-learning could identify different areas of interest on 2D materials. The simple, automated optical identification of fundamentally-different physical areas on these materials could significantly accelerate their application in next-generation, energy-efficient computing, optoelectron
3h
Molybdenum disulfide ushers in era of post-silicon photonics
Researchers of the Center for Photonics and Two-Dimensional Materials at MIPT, together with their colleagues from Spain, Great Britain, Sweden, and Singapore, including co-creator of the world's first 2D material and Nobel laureate Konstantin Novoselov, have measured giant optical anisotropy in layered molybdenum disulfide crystals for the first time. The work is published in the journal Nature C
3h
Rovern Perseverance letar liv på Mars
Den sexhjuliga rovern Perseverance är inte den första av sitt slag på Mars. Tidigare farkoster som Opportunity och Spirit har hittat tydliga bevis för att flytande vatten länge funnits på ytan. Perseverance uppgift är nu att leta efter spår av eventuellt tidigare liv i kratern Jezero, där den har landat. − Perseverance främsta uppgift är att komma närmare svaret på en av de största frågorna vi ha
3h
Periodontitis: Researchers search for a new active substance
Targeted, efficient and with few side effects: A new method for combating periodontitis could render the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics superfluous. It was developed and tested for the first time by a team from Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU), the Fraunhofer Institute for Cell Therapy and Immunology IZI and Periotrap Pharmaceuticals GmbH. The aim is to neutralise only bacteria t
3h
How to choose low glycaemic index (GI) foods? A GI "glossary" of Asian foods released
Professor Christiani Jeyakumar Henry, Senior Advisor of Singapore Institute of Food and Biotechnology Innovation, A*STAR and his team developed a glycaemic index glossary of non-Western foods. Mixed meals in Asia are complex in relation to ingredients used and hence, the inclusion of the GI of mixed meals is a major advantage. This compendium aims to highlight ways to reduce the GI of carbohydrate
3h
Green tea supplements modulate facial development of children with Down syndrome
A new study led by Belgian and Spanish researchers adds evidence about the potential benefits of green tea extracts in Down syndrome. The researchers observed that the intake of those extracts can reduce facial dysmorphology in children with Down syndrome when taken during the first three years of life. Additional experimental research in mice confirmed the positive effects at low doses. However,
4h
Humans settled the Bahamas earlier than we thought
New research finds that people settled the Bahamas earlier than scientists thought. Humans were present in Florida by 14,000 years ago, and until recently, it was believed the Bahamas—located only a few miles away—were not colonized until about 1,000 years ago. The new findings, however, prove that the area was colonized earlier, and the new settlers dramatically changed the landscape. As reporte
4h
Graph theory helps biologists study homeostasis
Healthy human bodies are good at regulating: Our temperatures remain around 98.6 degrees Fahrenheit, no matter how hot or cold the temperature around us. The sugar levels in our blood remain fairly constant, even when we down a glass of juice. We keep the right amount of calcium in our bones and out of the rest of our bodies.
4h
Key steps discovered in production of critical immune cell
WEHI researchers have uncovered a process cells use to fight off infection and cancer that could pave the way for precision cancer immunotherapy treatment. Through gaining a better understanding of how this process works, researchers hope to be able to determine a way of tailoring immunotherapy to better fight cancer. This research lays the foundation for future studies into the body's response to
4h
Neglected species: The symbolic significance of saving snails
Later this year, virtually all the countries on Earth are due to meet in China under the Convention on Biological Diversity to agree global conservation targets for 2030. Virtually may be the operative word, if COVID-19 precludes member states from meeting face to face in Kunming. Whatever the format, conservationists fervently hope that global leaders will agree to set aside 30% of the world's la
4h
Scientists investigate 3-D-printed high-entropy alloys
Scientists from the Skoltech Center for Design, Manufacturing and Materials (CDMM) and the Institute for Metals Superplasticity Problems (IMSP RAS) have studied the fatigue behavior of additive-manufactured high-entropy alloys (HEA). The research was published in the Journal of Alloys and Compounds.
4h
Molybdenum disulfide ushers in era of post-silicon photonics
Researchers of the Center for Photonics and Two-Dimensional Materials at MIPT, together with their colleagues from Spain, Great Britain, Sweden, and Singapore, including co-creator of the world's first 2-D material and Nobel laureate Konstantin Novoselov, have measured giant optical anisotropy in layered molybdenum disulfide crystals for the first time. The scientists suggest that such transition
4h
Neglected species: The symbolic significance of saving snails
Later this year, virtually all the countries on Earth are due to meet in China under the Convention on Biological Diversity to agree global conservation targets for 2030. Virtually may be the operative word, if COVID-19 precludes member states from meeting face to face in Kunming. Whatever the format, conservationists fervently hope that global leaders will agree to set aside 30% of the world's la
4h
Vaccine shows signs of protection against dozen-plus flu strains
A vaccine candidate developed at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln has demonstrated promising signs of protection against more than a dozen swine flu strains — and more than a leading, commercially available vaccine. Its success in experiments involving swine suggests that its design could also fast-track efforts to develop a vaccine that protects people against many common strains of influenza.
4h
To better grow veggies, identify their microbe buddies?
New research identifies nearly 300 species of microorganisms that grow together with common Asian vegetables. For vegetables to grow well, it is not enough to just give them sunlight and water; They need a whole community of microorganisms to help them grow healthily. The finding is the first step towards helping high-tech urban farmers produce more crops with less chemical fertilizers. Currently
5h
Dietary fats interact with grape tannins to influence wine taste
Wine lovers recognize that a perfectly paired wine can make a delicious meal taste even better, but the reverse is also true: Certain foods can influence the flavors of wines. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry have explored how lipids — fatty molecules abundant in cheese, meats, vegetable oils and other foods — interact with grape tannins, masking the
5h
How 'green' are environmentally friendly fireworks?
Fireworks are used in celebrations around the world, including Independence Day in the U.S., the Lantern Festival in China and the Diwali Festival in India. However, the popular pyrotechnic displays emit large amounts of pollutants into the atmosphere, sometimes causing severe air pollution. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology have estimated that, although so-call
5h
Deep Nostalgia Animates Your Old Family Photos
The first "deepfake" tools appeared in 2018 , leveraging deep learning to create lifelike but completely artificial copies of someone's face. Naturally, people used it to make fake celebrity porn, but there's a more socially acceptable use now. Genealogy firm MyHeritage has launched an online tool called Deep Nostalgia that can animate your old family photos — or really, any photo with a face. It
5h
The Next Pandemic
COVID-19 may have been a dress-rehearsal for more serious pandemics to come. How do we prepare? The post first appeared on Science-Based Medicine .
5h
New approach to removing toxins from wastewater
The New York State Center for Clean Water Technology (CCWT) at Stony Brook University has made a series of critical discoveries regarding a new approach to protecting Long Island's drinking water, groundwater, and surface waters. Some of the discoveries involve the likely human carcinogen, 1,4-dioxane, which has been found at higher levels in Long Island drinking water than anywhere else in the U.
5h
Optimizing disinfection to prevent spread of antibiotic resistance in wastewater
For nearly a century, improvement in human healthcare has depended heavily on the efficiency with which we can treat bacterial diseases. But today, antibiotic resistance—the ability of certain mutant super-bacteria to block out antibiotics—poses a major threat to healthcare, food security and overall social development worldwide, threatening to upend much medical progress.
5h
Digital teknik hjälper elever förstå geometri
Geometri passar bra för digital teknik. Undervisningsformen kan stimulera eleverna att undersöka, testa och resonera om geometriska figurer och deras egenskaper, men också hjälpa elever som inte riktigt kan ta till sig geometrin genom den traditionella undervisningen. Geometri är grundläggande och har starka band med andra delar av matematiken, till exempel algebran med sina ekvationer. – Geometr
5h
If things don't change soon, then the only future the USA will see is a dystopian horror story
We've all heard the statistics that 99% of the wealth in the USA is owned by the top 1%. Well, as you can imagine a society continuously moving towards automation and job reduction means that more and more people are going to lose their jobs over the next 20 or 30 years…. we can't even provide a living wage for many Americans the USA is embroiled in a losing battle for minimum wage to rise to $
7h
Automated next generation sequencing platform can accurately screen thousands for COVID-19
A robotics platform designed by Toronto researchers to screen thousands of COVID-19 samples at once has the potential to revolutionize how labs track the spread of viruses and other pathogens, according to new findings.The study, out Wednesday in Nature Communications, found the next-generation, ultra-high-throughput sequencing platform, called C19-SPAR-Seq, designed by researchers from the Lunenf
8h
County where people live may predict some cardiovascular death by race, ethnicity
The association between race and ethnicity and county-level factors of some U.S. counties may have a significant impact on cardiovascular-related death rates.In a new study analyzing 2017 health data from U.S. counties, researchers found that Black Americans continue to experience the highest cardiovascular death rate nationally, and county factors explained some cardiovascular death rates across
8h
Stroke risk highest among American Indian people, with or without AFib
An analysis of data for nearly 17 million people treated at hospitals in California showed that American Indian adults had a 47% higher risk of having a non-bleeding stroke when compared with people from all other racial and ethnic groups.That increased risk was present among American Indian individuals regardless of whether they also had atrial fibrillation, which is known to raise stroke risk.
8h
Do marketers matter for entrepreneurs?
Researchers from the University of Texas, University of Chicago, University of Notre Dame, and London School of Economics published a new paper in the Journal of Marketing that examines whether entrepreneurs in emerging markets can benefit from marketers' help.
9h
A model for career counselors to address unemployment after the COVID-19 pandemic
The COVID-19 pandemic has caused unprecedented economic disruption and unemployment worldwide, and it may be challenging for career counselors to determine how best to provide effective career counseling to unemployed people in the post-COVID-19 world. In an article published in the Journal of Employment Counseling, experts suggest applying a holistic model of career counseling that addresses the
10h
Researchers offer new insights on bird migration
During their seasonal migration, birds typically travel between breeding and non-breeding grounds along migratory routes grouped into major flyways, such as the Indo-European flyway between Europe and the Indian subcontinent. In a new study published in the Journal of Biogeography, investigators used modelling and tracking techniques to identify potential migratory barriers and corridors within th
10h
New research unlocks mysteries of soupfin shark migration and reproduction
A seven-year study of California's soupfin sharks sheds light on their migration and reproductive cycles, laying the groundwork for potential management strategies amid conservation concerns. The findings were published March 3 in the Journal of Applied Ecology by researchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego and the University of San Diego (USD).
10h
Researchers offer new insights on bird migration
During their seasonal migration, birds typically travel between breeding and non-breeding grounds along migratory routes grouped into major flyways, such as the Indo-European flyway between Europe and the Indian subcontinent. In a new study published in the Journal of Biogeography, investigators used modelling and tracking techniques to identify potential migratory barriers and corridors within th
10h
New research unlocks mysteries of soupfin shark migration and reproduction
A seven-year study of California's soupfin sharks sheds light on their migration and reproductive cycles, laying the groundwork for potential management strategies amid conservation concerns. The findings were published March 3 in the Journal of Applied Ecology by researchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego and the University of San Diego (USD).
10h
A new effect of red ginseng: suppression of lung cancer metastasis
Red ginseng, which has long been used as an ingredient in traditional Korean medicine, has recently drawn increased attention as a functional material for its health-promoting effects. The composition and activities of red ginseng vary depending on the processing method, and this has become an active area of research. Recently, a research team in Korea has entered the spotlight as they discovered
13h
How are universities planning to tackle emissions associated with food and flying?
New research from The University of Manchester has identified various ways in which UK higher education institutions are beginning to tackle emissions associated with business travel and catering. These are two substantial contributors to emissions in this sector, and difficult to decarbonise. The findings suggest need for further sector-wide efforts to tackle the planet's most pressing issue.
13h
Sesaminol: Parkinson's disease's surprise medicine
Researchers find that the chemical sesaminol, naturally occurring in sesame seeds, protects against Parkinson's disease by preventing neuronal damage that decreases the production of dopamine. In vitro experiments show sesaminol handle oxidative stress in cells by regulating the production of reactive oxygen species and the movement of antioxidants. In vivo experiments reveal that a diet of sesami
13h
SARS-CoV-2 immunization passports: A ticket to normal life?
Proof of immunization against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) may soon be required in many parts of the globe. The authors discuss how immunization passports could work, what Canada needs to do, and potential barriers and limitations in a CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) commentary www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.210244.
13h
Primary ovarian insufficiency associated with increased risk of osteoporosis
CLEVELAND, Ohio (March 3, 2021)–The loss of estrogen after menopause is associated with rapid bone loss. A new study compared the bone health outcomes in women with primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) and early menopause with women who experienced menopause at the standard age to confirm the association between POI and osteoporosis. Study results are published online today in Menopause , the jour
13h
Women with type 1 diabetes experience a shorter reproductive period
CLEVELAND, Ohio (March 3, 2021)–The length of the female reproductive period (the time from the onset of menses to the final menstrual period) has important health implications. A new study compared the length of reproductive periods for women with type 1 diabetes with women without diabetes to confirm the effect diabetes has on the female reproductive system. Study results are published online t
13h
Opioid overdose reduced in patients taking buprenorphine
The drug buprenorphine is an effective treatment for opioid use disorder, but many who misuse opioids also take benzodiazepines — drugs that treat anxiety and similar conditions. Many treatment centers hesitate to treat patients addicted to opioids who also take benzodiazepines. Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis studied overdose risk in people taking buprenorphi
13h
A model for career counselors to address unemployment after the COVID-19 pandemic
The COVID-19 pandemic has caused unprecedented economic disruption and unemployment worldwide, and it may be challenging for career counselors to determine how best to provide effective career counseling to unemployed people in the post-COVID-19 world. In an article published in the Journal of Employment Counseling, experts suggest applying a holistic model of career counseling that addresses the
13h
When should patients with dementia receive palliative care?
Patients with dementia may benefit from being referred to specialist palliative care–a branch of medicine that focuses on optimizing quality of life and providing relief from symptoms–but who should be referred, and when? A recent analysis of published studies on the topic found a lack of consensus regarding referral criteria for palliative care in patients with dementia. The results are publish
13h
Study links kidney stones with bone problems
In an analysis of nationwide data from the Veterans Health Administration, approximately one-quarter of individuals with kidney stones had a diagnosis of osteoporosis or bone fracture around the time of their kidney stone diagnosis. The findings are published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research.
13h
These Super Advanced eBikes Will Change Your Cycling Life Forever
In case you haven't noticed, ebikes have been taking off in popularity. Not only are they an economically and ecologically smart alternative to other forms of transportation, they're also extremely fun to ride. If you've been thinking about getting yourself an electric bike and getting into the action, the Ecotric FAT20S900-MB 48V ebike is one of the very best ways to do so. Not only is the Ecotr
18h

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