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Beauty is in the brain: AI reads brain data, generates personally attractive images
Researchers at the University of Helsinki and University of Copenhagen have succeeded in making an AI understand our subjective notions of what makes faces attractive. The device demonstrated this knowledge by its ability to create new portraits on its own that were tailored to be found personally attractive to individuals. The results can be utilised, for example, in modelling preferences and dec
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LATEST

SpaceX's Third Starship Prototype Lands, Explodes Minutes Later
After a promising flight, SpaceX's SN10 Starship prototype landed gently on Wednesday evening — where it remained on the ground for several minutes before violently exploding. Four and a half minutes after launch, after piercing the clouds at an altitude of roughly ten kilometers, the 165-foot stainless steel tower smoothly flipped itself onto its front to perform a "belly flop maneuver" intended
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How Female Frogs Tune Out Useless, Noisy Males
Before frat parties, there were frog ponds. Literal breeding grounds for some of the world's noisiest bachelors, these lusty pools are where amphibians gather to woo mates. And as any frog researcher will tell you, they're "super, super, super loud," says Valentina Caorsi, a bioacoustician at the University of Trento in Italy. Some spots host hundreds of males from a dozen species, each belting o
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A potential model for a real physical warp drive
A pair of researchers at Applied Physics has created what they describe as the first general model for a warp drive, a model for a space craft that could travel faster than the speed of light, without actually breaking the laws of physics. Alexey Bobrick, and Gianni Martire have written a paper describing their ideas for a warp drive and have published it in IOP's Classical and Quantum Gravity.
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Andrew Cuomo Should Resign
The sexual harassment charges are bad enough, but the man the media crowned "America's Governor" last year needlessly let thousands of New Yorkers die from COVID — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Swiss statistical systems enhanced by big data
A huge volume of digital data has been harvested, stored and shared in the last few years from sources such as social media, geolocation systems and aerial images from drones and satellites, giving researchers many new ways to study information and decrypt our world. In Switzerland, the Federal Statistical Office (FSO) has taken an interest in the big data revolution and the possibilities it offer
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Cephalopod aces 'marshmallow test' designed for eager children
Scientists recently ran the Stanford marshmallow experiment on cuttlefish and found they were pretty good at it. The test subjects could wait up to two minutes for a better tasting treat. The study suggests cuttlefish are smarter than you think but isn't the final word on how bright they are. The Stanford marshmallow test, an experiment asking kids to hold off on eating one marshmallow for 15 min
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Woolly mammoths may have shared the landscape with first humans in New England
Woolly mammoths may have walked the landscape at the same time as the earliest humans in what is now New England, according to a Dartmouth study published in Boreas. Through the radiocarbon dating of a rib fragment from the Mount Holly mammoth from Mount Holly, Vt., the researchers learned that this mammoth existed approximately 12,800 years ago. This date may overlap with the arrival of the first
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Volcanoes might light up the night sky of this exoplanet
Until now, researchers have found no evidence of global tectonic activity on planets outside our solar system. Under the leadership of the University of Bern and the National Center of Competence in Research NCCR PlanetS, scientists have now found that the material inside planet LHS 3844b flows from one hemisphere to the other and could be responsible for numerous volcanic eruptions on one side of
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A novel drug to prevent Lyme disease is now being tested in humans
Clinical trials on a new Lyme disease prevention vaccine have begun. (Nicoooografie/) This story originally featured on Field & Stream . A Massachusetts doctor may have discovered a shot that will prevent Lyme disease in humans . The drug received federal approval from the Food and Drug Administration to be tested on people at the end of 2020. The Phase 1 clinical trial on 66 human subjects began
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"We'll never have true AI without first understanding the brain"
The search for AI has always been about trying to build machines that think —at least in some sense. But the question of how alike artificial and biological intelligence should be has divided opinion for decades. Early efforts to build AI involved decision-making processes and information storage systems that were loosely inspired by the way humans seemed to think. And today's deep neural network
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Harvard study finds perfect blend of fruits and vegetables to lower risk of death
A massive new study confirms that five servings of fruit and veggies a day can lower the risk of death. The maximum benefit is found at two servings of fruit and three of veggies—anything more offers no extra benefit according to the researchers. Not all fruits and veggies are equal. Leafy greens are better for you than starchy corn and potatoes. While few people would contest that fruit and vege
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High strength through hierarchy: Researchers develop new process for building ultralight materials
As light as possible and as strong as possible at the same time: These are the requirements for modern lightweight materials, such as those used in aircraft construction and the automotive industry. A research team from Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht (HZG) and Hamburg University of Technology (TUHH) has now developed a new materials' design approach for future ultralight materials: Nanometer-sized m
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Hubble solves mystery of monster star's dimming
Last year, astronomers were puzzled when Betelguese, the bright red supergiant star in the constellation Orion, dramatically faded, but then recovered. The dimming lasted for weeks. Now, astronomers have turned their sights toward a monster star in the adjoining constellation Canis Major, the Great Dog.
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A peregrine falcon's power to migrate may lie in its DNA
A peregrine falcon. (Pixabay/) The peregrine falcon is best-known as the fastest animal on earth, but it's got a second superlative: it's the most wide-ranging bird of prey. Peregrines live on every continent except Antarctica, and make homes everywhere from Papua New Guinea to the desert Southwest to Chicago skyscrapers. Some of those populations breed high in the Arctic tundra, and individual p
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Researchers urge greater awareness of delayed skin reactions to Moderna COVID-19 vaccine
Researchers note that Phase 3 clinical data from the Moderna vaccine trial did show delayed skin hypersensitivity in a small number of the more than 30,000 trial participants. However, the authors say the large, red, sometimes raised, itchy or painful skin reactions were never fully characterized or explained, and they warn clinicians may not be prepared to recognize them and guide patients on tre
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Sialoglycan recognition is a common connection linking acidosis, zinc, and HMGB1 in sepsis [Immunology and Inflammation]
Blood pH is tightly maintained between 7.35 and 7.45, and acidosis (pH <7.3) indicates poor prognosis in sepsis, wherein lactic acid from anoxic tissues overwhelms the buffering capacity of blood. Poor sepsis prognosis is also associated with low zinc levels and the release of High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1)…
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Color blindness-correcting contact lenses
Imagine seeing the world in muted shades — gray sky, gray grass. Some people with color blindness see everything this way, though most can't see specific colors. Tinted glasses can help, but they can't be used to correct blurry vision. And dyed contact lenses currently in development for the condition are potentially harmful and unstable. Now researchers report infusing contact lenses with gold n
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Green tea supplements modulate facial development of children with Down syndrome, study finds
A new study adds evidence about the potential benefits of green tea extracts in Down syndrome. Researchers observed that the intake of those extracts can reduce facial dysmorphology in children with Down syndrome when taken during the first three years of life. Additional experimental research in mice confirmed the positive effects at low doses. However, the researchers also found that high doses
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Covid deaths high in countries with more overweight people, says report
Governments urged to prioritise obese people for vaccinations over greater risk of death from coronavirus Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Countries with high levels of overweight people, such as the UK and the US, have the highest death rates from Covid-19, a landmark report reveals, prompting calls for governments to urgently tackle obesity, as well as prioritising
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Experts: The United States' Dropping Birth Rate is Becoming a "Crisis"
Early on in the pandemic, demographics experts and Facebook memes alike both confidently declared that the COVID-19 era of lockdowns and hunkering down indoors would result in a new baby boom. Now, it seems the opposite has happened. The birth rate in the United States seems to have precipitously dropped CBS News reports , aligning with a years-long downward trend that experts now say is becoming
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Scientists who discovered migraine mechanism win £1.1m Brain prize
World's largest neuroscience prize goes to researchers whose work has paved way for preventive treatments Four scientists who discovered a key mechanism that causes migraines, paving the way for new preventive treatments, have won the largest prize for neuroscience in the world, sharing £1.1m. The Lundbeck Foundation in Denmark announced on Thursday that the British researcher Peter Goadsby, Mich
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Scientists Discover Water, Organic Materials on Surface of Asteroid
Special Delivery A team of scientists examining a newly-returned asteroid fragment made a fascinating discovery: the space rock it came from seems to be carrying both water and organic materials — key elements of life here on Earth. Royal Holloway, University of London scientists became the first to discover organic molecules on the surface of an asteroid, according to research they published Thu
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Elon Musk Wants to Rename a Texas Town "Starbase"
Welcome To Starbase Elon Musk is pushing to rename the Texas town where SpaceX test-launches its experimental Starship rocket with something a bit more fitting of its aspirations. On Tuesday, Musk tweeted that he's "creating the city of Starbase, Texas," which is almost certainly a reference to Boca Chica Village, according to CNET . That's the local retirement community that SpaceX previously at
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An Ice-Covered Russian Ghost Town
Earlier this week, the photographer Maria Passer visited some of the ice-covered abandoned buildings of Vorkuta, a dwindling coal-mining city north of the Arctic Circle, in Russia's Komi Republic. Temperatures in Vorkuta can drop as low as -58 degrees Fahrenheit in the coldest winter months. Fewer than half of the city's once-active coal mines still operate today, and the ongoing unemployment cri
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China Is Blanketing Every Public Space in Spy Cameras
Sharp Eyes China has been ramping up its surveillance panopticon over recent years, and now it appears that the project is nearing completion — the ability to surveil anyone in any public space in the country seems to be within the government's grasp. China's five-year plan from 2015 projected that a surveillance initiative called the Sharp Eyes program would blanket 100 percent of public spaces
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People Are Catching Two COVID Strains at the Same Time
In extremely rare cases, COVID-19 patients are being infected by two variants of the coronavirus at the same time. Brazilian scientists recently identified two patients with the unlucky condition. Thankfully, the very few cases of co-infection don't seem to have had any impact on disease severity, De Montfort University molecular biologist Maitreyi Shivkumar wrote in The Conversation . But it doe
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SpaceX's Starship SN10 rocket launches, lands, sits there, blows up – video
Elon Musks's Starship rocket has made its first test launch, flight and intact landing – before suddenly exploding minutes later. After a delay to the initial flight, SN10 lifted off from Boca Chica, Texas, reaching an altitude of 10 kilometres, before descending and landing upright, albeit apparently on fire at its base. Three minutes after touchdown and soon after the SpaceX live stream was tur
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China Is Administering Anal Swabs to Foreign Visitors
International travelers have had to endure something humiliating when entering China via an airport: anal swab tests for COVID-19, as Reuters reports . That's despite the fact that most other COVID tests use saliva samples taken from the mouth, nose, or back of the throat. Visitors at a number of Chinese cities have been required to submit to additional checks, according to state media, including
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Starship Explosion Was So Huge It Was Picked Up by Weather Radar
Big Boom SpaceX successfully launched, flipped, and landed its Starship SN10 prototype on Wednesday afternoon. But several minutes after touchdown, the stainless steel rocket exploded in a massive fireball . The explosion was so powerful, Houston-based meteorologist Matt Lanza pointed out in a tweet , that it appears to have showed up on local weather radar. Looks like weather radar in Brownsvill
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Elon Musk Says Starship "Landed in One Piece." Fact Check: Kinda.
SpaceX has finally managed to land its massive Starship rocket in one piece. Well, at least for several minutes . The 165-foot stainless steel structure lifted off at around 6:15 pm EST on Wednesday, and its maiden voyage ticked most of the checkboxes: the belly flop, the burn to flip itself upright, the landing. One checkbox, though — the "not exploding" one — remains elusive. Minutes after Spac
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CDC Updates Guidelines For Zombie Apocalypse
Finally, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) updated its official guidelines and recommendations for — you guessed it — a zombie apocalypse. If it sounds like this perhaps isn't the best time to dedicate resources to a fictional crisis , well, we hear you. But public health experts told Yahoo News that they think it's a smart move on the CDC's part. Even if the central premise
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This Black Hole Probably Shouldn't Exist
There's a spot in space, thousands of light-years from here, that might best be described as a cosmic amusement park. A supergiant star, so hot that it glows electric blue, and a black hole spin around each other at extraordinary speeds, orbiting so closely that some of the star's material is pulled toward the black hole. The stellar particles swirl around the invisible object in a tilt-a-whirl o
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Isadore Singer Transcended Mathematical Boundaries
The mathematics community lost a titan with the passing last month of Isadore "Is" Singer. Born in Detroit in 1924, Is was a visionary, transcending divisions between fields of mathematics as well as those between mathematics and quantum physics. He pursued deep questions and inspired others in his original research, wide-ranging lectures, mentoring of young researchers and advocacy in the public
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The Supreme Court Is Giving Lower Courts a Subtle Hint to Rein In Police Misconduct
For years, the Supreme Court has sent a clear message to lower courts: Police officers can't be sued for violating someone's constitutional rights unless the specific actions at issue have previously been held unconstitutional. Police, the Court has argued , need "breathing room to make reasonable but mistaken judgments about open legal questions." The trouble is that no matter how egregious the
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Is Biden's Outreach to Republicans Real?
Senator Susan Collins was driving to the airport in Bangor, Maine, for a flight back to Washington, when her cellphone rang. Hours earlier, she and some of her Republican colleagues had sent President Joe Biden a letter objecting to the scale of his $1.9 trillion coronavirus-relief bill. They wanted to come see him. To Collins's surprise, the new president was on the phone. Biden had called her "
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SpaceX: Mars ship prototype explodes after first intact landing
Elon Musk's last two prototypes reached similarly high altitude, but crash-landed in fireballs SpaceX's futuristic Starship looked like it aced a touchdown Wednesday, but then exploded on the landing pad with so much force that it was hurled into the air. The failure occurred just minutes after SpaceX declared success. Two previous test flights crash-landed in fireballs. Continue reading…
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SpaceX's Starship has finally stuck the landing on its third flight
On March 3, SpaceX's Starship pulled off a successful high-altitude flight—its third in a row. Unlike in the first two missions , the spacecraft stuck the landing. Then, as in the last two, the spacecraft blew up. What happened: At around 5:14 p.m. US Central Time, the 10th Starship prototype (SN10) was launched from SpaceX's test facility in Boca Chica, Texas, flying about 10 kilometers into the
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Startup Says It Can "Charge" an Electric Car In Under Ten Minutes
Ample Time San Francisco-based startup Ample has launched an electric car charging network that can provide a car with a full charge in less than ten minutes, Business Insider reports . Ample got on its feet thanks to a partnership with Uber. It's currently in charge of charging the ride-hailing app's fleet of cars in San Francisco. And now, seemingly, it wants to revolutionize the infrastructure
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Antarctica Is Crammed With Abandoned 'Ghost' Stations
In almost every sense of the word, the Palmer Archipelago in Antarctica is wild. Humpback whales, elephant seals, and the wandering albatross, a seabird with a wingspan as long as a male great white shark, all call this area home. Towering glaciers and blue-tinged icebergs dot the landscape, and sunsets last for hours. This empty, untamed place also has a gift shop. Port Lockroy, a small wooden b
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NASA's Mars Rover "Percy" Stretches Its Arm for the First Time
Wake Up It's been 14 days since NASA's Mars rover Perseverance landed on the Martian surface. Over that period, the lonely rover has been able to stretch and get ready for show time. "This week I've been doing lots of health checkouts, getting ready to get to work," NASA tweeted from the rover's official Twitter account on Wednesday. "I've checked many tasks off my list, including instrument test
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America's Legalistic Culture Is About to Become a Problem
As vaccine production and distribution accelerate, a new set of challenges around what Americans can and should demand of one another is emerging. And we're not ready for them. The public has been told for the past year that we need to mask up, physically distance, and lock down for the greater good. Now that vaccines are here, does that same greater good mean that society can discriminate agains
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Massachusetts Actually Might Have a Way to Keep Schools Open
The bright-blue tents appeared shortly after the close of winter break. Each Tuesday, Thalia Ruark and her classmates at the Bromfield School in Massachusetts, line up single file, spaced a neat six feet apart, for their weekly coronavirus test. The 11-year-old sixth grader still spends most of her classroom time on a computer at home, in accordance with Bromfield's hybrid-learning model. But the
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International climate scientists join call to halt Leeds Bradford airport expansion
Academics write to Robert Jenrick predicting dire consequences for climate crisis if plans go ahead Leading international climate scientists are among more than 200 academics who have written to the government calling on it to halt what they say would be an ecologically destructive expansion of Leeds Bradford airport. Almost 250 professors, academics and researchers from Leeds University, includi
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Earth Will Lose Its Oxygen in a Billion Years, Killing Most Living Organisms
Humans haven't been great for the health of the planet, but even if we pollute ourselves into extinction, Earth will continue on. It's survived enormous asteroid impacts and megavolcanoes, after all. A few primates aren't going to do worse in the long-run. The ultimate fate of life on Earth lies a billion years in the future. A new study supported by NASA's exoplanet habitability research lays ou
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A Counterintuitive Way to Cheer Up When You're Down
" How to Build a Life " is a weekly column by Arthur Brooks, tackling questions of meaning and happiness. N orman Rockwell painted some of the most iconic images of 20th-century America. His paintings, such as Rosie the Riveter and the Four Freedoms series from World War II, and The Problem We All Live With and Murder in Mississippi from the civil-rights movement, were intended to evoke the best
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Farmers and rights groups boycott food summit over big business links
Focus on agro-business rather than ecology has split groups invited to planned UN conference on hunger An international food summit to address growing hunger and diet-related disease is in disarray as hundreds of farmers' and human rights groups are planning a boycott. Related: 'A shame for the world': Uganda's fragile forest ecosystem destroyed for sugar Continue reading…
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Variation is the stuff of life. So why can it make us uncomfortable? | Lisa Feldman Barrett
Embracing difference is vital for our success as a species, but it places extra demands on the brain. Here's how to get better at it Most people enjoy variety. We like to eat different foods from meal to meal. We wear different clothes. We like to try new activities and visit new places, which may be hard to remember right now in our tiny, socially isolated rooms, but it's true. Likewise, with to
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Coronavirus live news: modified vaccines for variants to be fast-tracked, say UK and Australia regulators
Agencies in Canada, Singapore and Switzerland will also back plan for modified vaccines to be rolled out without new approval Vaccines tweaked for Covid variants 'will be fast-tracked safely' Decline in UK Covid rates slowing with possible increase in some areas Interpol: fake vaccines seized in China and South Africa 'tip of iceberg' Covid deaths high in countries with more overweight people, sa
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That Is Not How Your Brain Works – Issue 98: Mind
The 21st century is a time of great scientific discovery. Cars are driving themselves. Vaccines against deadly new viruses are created in less than a year. The latest Mars Rover is hunting for signs of alien life. But we're also surrounded with scientific myths: outdated beliefs that make their way regularly into news stories. Being wrong is a normal and inevitable part of the scientific process.
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Breakthrough greatly enhances ultrafast resolution achievable with X-ray free-electron lasers
A large international team of scientists from various research organizations, including the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, has developed a method that dramatically improves the already ultrafast time resolution achievable with X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs). It could lead to breakthroughs on how to design new materials and more efficient chemical processes.
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There's a Robodog Walking Around the Site of the SpaceX Starship Explosion
Strutting Around SpaceX came closer than ever before to a successful Starship test launch on Wednesday evening, just to see the SN10 prototype explode in a gigantic fireball minutes after an otherwise-successful landing. A day later, SpaceX is still in cleanup mode, with teams of workers retrieving various rocket parts and picking up after the explosion. But the company also got a helping hand fr
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Russian Cosmonauts Are Drilling Holes in the Walls of the ISS
Making Holes Russian cosmonauts currently stationed on board the International Space Station have started drilling holes near the infamous crack that formed in the station's Zvezda module, causing air to vent into outer space, Russian state news agency RIA Novosti reports . It may sound counterintuitive, but drilling holes, one on either end of the crack, is a procedure to prevent the crack from
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Consciousness Is Just a Feeling – Issue 98: Mind
When he was a boy, Mark Solms obsessed over big existential questions. What happens when I die? What makes me who I am? He went on to study neuroscience but soon discovered that neuropsychology had no patience for such open-ended questions about the psyche. So Solms did something unheard of for a budding scientist. He reclaimed Freud as a founding father of neuroscience and launched a new field,
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Fusion Thruster Startup Anticipates "First Town on Mars"
Radiation detection company US Nuclear Corp is trying to woo NASA into signing a contract to develop a fusion-powered spacecraft propulsion system that could take future space travelers all the way to Mars. In a collaboration with Magneto-Inertial Fusion Technologies, Inc. (MIFTI), a UC Irvine spinout focusing on developing a thermonuclear fusion-based generator, the company is hoping to help NAS
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Biden Needs Unions to Force His Hand
Joe Biden did an extraordinary thing for an American president earlier this week: Without qualification, he supported the right of workers to form a union. Biden didn't just weigh in on behalf of those seeking to unionize an Amazon distribution facility in Bessemer, Alabama. He also affirmed the importance of unions for all workers and for the good of the country. Conservatives and centrist media
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Species evolve heat tolerance more slowly than cold tolerance
Many species might be left vulnerable in the face of climate change, unable to adapt their physiologies to respond to rapid global warming. According to a team of international researchers, species evolve heat tolerance more slowly than cold tolerance, and the level of heat they can adapt to has limits.
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Super-Earth discovered: Data will characterize planetary atmosphere models
During the past 25 years astronomers have discovered a wide variety of exoplanets, made of rock, ice and gas, thanks to the construction of astronomical instruments designed specifically for planet searches. Also, using a combination of different observing techniques they have been able to determine a large number of masses, sizes, and hence densities of the planets, which helps them to estimate t
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If we do find alien life, what kind will it be?
Everyone wants to know if there is alien life in the universe, but Earth may give us clues that if it exists it may not be the civilization-building kind. Most of Earth's history shows life that is single-celled. That doesn't mean it was simple, though. Stunning molecular machines were being evolved by those tiny critters. What's in a planet's atmosphere may also determine what evolution can prod
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US Regulators Not Sure If Tesla's Funky New Steering Wheel Breaks Rules
Yoke Wheel Renders recently appeared of the interior of Tesla's brand new refresh of its best-selling Model S luxury sedan. Most notable among the cabin's new features was an unusual "yoke" steering wheel, reminiscent of the ones you'd normally find inside Formula One racecars — or even an experimental aircraft. Today, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) chimed in on the op
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The 'breathing' Himalaya: Great mountains grow in a cycle of rising and falling
How and when do mountains grow? It is tempting to think of mountain formation as something that takes place only extremely gradually, on timescales of tens of millions of years. One tectonic plate slowly pushes up against and slightly under another, until eventually up rises a mountain range. Of course, that picture is far too simplistic. We know, for example, that processes like erosion and earth
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UK will diverge from EU and US on approving tweaked Covid vaccines
MHRA says it will not insist that vaccines altered for new variants are 'non-inferior' to original Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The UK will adopt a different standard from Europe and the US when it considers approval for coronavirus vaccines that have been tweaked to deal with variants, the regulator has said. There would be no compromise on safety or effectivenes
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The Guardian view on Rishi Sunak's budget: Britain will go backwards with tax rises and spending cuts | Editorial
The chancellor would like Britain's relief response to be seen like Joe Biden's in the US. But President Biden believes in the power of government, Mr Sunak does not Rishi Sunak, the chancellor, has emerged in recent months with the plausible aura of a future Tory leader. This budget was a crucial one for two reasons. First, it was the biggest fiscal event since the UK left the orbit of the Europ
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Indian Official Claims Huge Blackout May Have Been a Hack
Shots Fired A major power outage that struck Mumbai last year may have been the result of a deliberate cyberattack against the Indian city's infrastructure. Initially, officials announced that the blackout stemmed from technical problems. But now, Reuters reports , local minister Anil Deshmukh told the press that an investigation revealed 14 Trojan horse programs lurking in the city's power syste
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'A Glitch in the Matrix' documentary explores the dark side of simulation theory
Simulation theory proposes that our world is likely a simulation created by beings with super-powerful computers. In "A Glitch in the Matrix," filmmaker Rodney Ascher explores the philosophy behind simulation theory, and interviews a handful of people who believe the world is a simulation. "A Glitch in the Matrix" premiered at the 2021 Sundance Film Festival and is now available to stream online.
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Social distancing in nature
Forager ants do it, vampire bats do it, guppies do it, and mandrills do it. Long before humans learned about and started "social distancing due to COVID-19," animals in nature intuitively practiced social distancing when one of their own became sick.
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Kentucky Startup Plans to Launch Teeny Tiny Space Station
Tiny Space Station Space Tango, a space startup based in Kentucky, is planning to launch its own tiny orbital research platform in a matter of just two years, United Press International reports . The company, which has just 22 employees, is outgrowing its small research containers, called CubeLabs, which are already on board the International Space Station. "As the scale of our business grows acr
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What you can and can't do after getting a COVID-19 vaccine
As more and more people in the US are getting vaccinated every day, many are asking what vaccinated people can and can't do. Is normality on the horizon? (Pixabay/) Click here to see all of PopSci's COVID-19 coverage. After last Saturday night's announcement that the FDA had authorized a third vaccine for emergency use , this week's vaccine news just kept getting better.On Tuesday night, Presiden
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European domestic dog may have originated in Southwestern Germany
Together with a group of international colleagues, a research team from the Senckenberg Centre for Human Evolution and Palaeoenvironment at the University of Tübingen studied the beginnings of the domestication of wolves in Europe. Using a multi-method approach, the researchers analyzed several Canidae fossils from a cave in Southwestern Germany. In their study, published today in the nature journ
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Rare diseases in the Bronze Age
Rare diseases are a special field in medical-pharmaceutical research and treatment today. "Rare" means that no more than five in 10,000 people suffer from a particular disease. Patients affected by a rare disorder are often severely restricted, both physically and in their social life, and require a high level of social and medical care.
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Air pollution fell sharply during lockdown
The far-reaching mobility restrictions at the beginning of the COVID pandemic in March 2020 created a unique situation for atmospheric sciences: "During the 2020 lockdown, we were able to directly investigate the actual effects of drastic traffic restrictions on the distribution of air pollutants and on the emission of climate gases," says Innsbruck atmospheric scientist Thomas Karl. With his team
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Hammer time! Baby fish brain lights up listening to U Can't Touch This – video
Australian DJ and neuroscientist Rebecca Poulsen – AKA BeXta – is studying what happens to a zebrafish larvae brains when they hear certain sounds. Then she played one MC Hammer's 1990 hit … 'You can see when the vocal goes 'ohhh-oh', specific neurons light up and you can see it pulses to the beat,' she says. 'To me it looks like neurons responding to different parts of the music' Continue readin
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The Weekly Planet: Why a Political Philosopher Is Thinking About Carbon Removal
Jared Rodriguez Every Tuesday, our lead climate reporter brings you the big ideas, expert analysis, and vital guidance that will help you flourish on a changing planet. Sign up to get T he Weekly Planet , our guide to living through climate change, in your inbox. Until a few years ago, the idea that humanity could suck carbon pollution out of the atmosphere at an industrial scale was deemed impla
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Researchers investigate 'imaginary part' in quantum resource theory
Recently, a research team led by academician Guo Guangcan from CAS Key Laboratory of Quantum Information of the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) of CAS, has made important progress in quantum information theory. Prof. Li Chuanfeng and Prof. Xiang Guoyong from the team collaborated with Dr. Strelstov from University of Warsaw to investigate the imaginary part of quantum theory a
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UK Covid live news: government's 1% pay increase offer for NHS staff sparks fury
Latest updates: pay offer denounced as 'pitiful' by health sector unions, amid warnings it could prompt NHS staff to quit Starmer calls for bigger NHS pay rise after unions attack 'pitiful' 1% Survey shows parents' concern over Covid effect on children's activity Cyprus will allow vaccinated British tourists from 1 May Global coronavirus updates – live 9.58am GMT The proportion of people who feel
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Covid: UK scientist says 'substantial' degree of mortality inevitable in future
Sage professor says death toll will reduce over time and life will 'get back to normal' Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Prof Andrew Hayward, a member of the UK government's Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (Sage), has said society will have to live with a degree of mortality that will be "substantial", but added that we will "get back to normal". He told Tim
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Spacewatch: Venus terrain revealed by Nasa solar probe
Image unexpectedly shows light and dark features, including Aphrodite Terra, a highland area near planet's equator A newly released image from Nasa's Parker Solar Probe unexpectedly shows surface features on Venus. It is a surprising result because Venus is permanently covered in clouds that should block out any view of the surface at optical wavelengths. Previous spacecraft have resorted to rada
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Astronomically hard: French stargazers hunt for meteorite the size of apricot
The space debris was spotted falling to Earth near Bordeaux but astronomer admits to 'needle in a haystack' search France's ranks of amateur astronomers have been urged to help find an apricot-size meteorite that fell to Earth last weekend in the south-west of the country. The rock, estimated to weigh 150 grams (just over five ounces), was captured plunging through the atmosphere by cameras at an
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The Pandemic's Future Hangs in Suspense
COVID-19 cases dropped about 5 percent this week, while testing rose 12 percent as backlogs in reported tests—always a little slower to recover than reported cases—rolled in following disruptive mid-February storms. The number of people hospitalized with COVID-19 dropped almost 16 percent week over week, making this the seventh straight week of sharp declines in hospitalizations. States and terri
11h
Twistoptics—A new way to control optical nonlinearity
Nonlinear optics, a study of how light interacts with matter, is critical to many photonic applications, from the green laser pointers we're all familiar with to intense broadband (white) light sources for quantum photonics that enable optical quantum computing, super-resolution imaging, optical sensing and ranging, and more. Through nonlinear optics, researchers are discovering new ways to use li
12h
SpaceX Starship Prototype Explodes Following Perfect Landing
SpaceX is running through Starship prototypes like they're growing on trees. Just a few weeks after its last rocket exploded following a hard landing, the company succeeded in landing a Starship rocket after its test flight. Sadly, the vessel exploded several minutes later. SpaceX hasn't talked about the cause of the incident, but it does seem to consider the SN10 flight an overall success despit
15h
The Atlantic Daily: The Future of American Voting Rights Is on the Line
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . The future of voting rights in America is on the line. "It's no exaggeration to say that future Americans could view the resolution of this struggle as a turning point in the history of U.S. demo
17h
New 'eyewear' to deepen the view of NASA's Roman Space Telescope
NASA's Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope will be able to explore even more cosmic questions, thanks to a new near-infrared filter. The upgrade will allow the observatory to see longer wavelengths of light, opening up exciting new opportunities for discoveries from the edge of our solar system to the farthest reaches of space.
19h
Cells are known by the company they keep
Cell culture media surrounds cells growing in the laboratory, and serves as both home and food. The media that scientists have used for decades to study cancer cells is great for promoting cell growth—but not so good at mimicking conditions in the human body. Now, a new study shows that these disparities can affect how critical a gene is to the fitness of proliferating human cells.
20h
Listen: Confronting the Legacy of Robert E. Lee
Listen and subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Podcasts The Confederate States seceded from the United States over slavery. But the "lost cause" myth—the idea that the Civil War was not about slavery but about northern aggression—still has a hold on countless Americans. The historian Ty Seidule doesn't believe that anymore, though he only came to the realization well into his
21h
The Army's new tool for analyzing bomb shrapnel could lead to better body armor
A Marine tosses a grenade during an exercise in Kuwait last year. (Lance Cpl. Andrew Skiver / US Marine Corp/) Every explosion is an event rich with data. The challenge is capturing that fleeting and violent information and rendering it sterile and useful. Announced in February, the US Army has a new tool to better capture the data from explosions, at least from practice battlefields. The traject
1d
'Deep Nostalgia' AI brings old photos to life through animation
Deep Nostalgia uses machine learning to animate static images. The AI can animate images by "looking" at a single facial image, and the animations include movements such as blinking, smiling and head tilting. As deepfake technology becomes increasingly sophisticated, some are concerned about how bad actors might abuse the technology to manipulate the pubic. A new service gives new life to the pas
1d
Can cats teach us the meaning of life?
In "Feline Philosophy," philosopher John Gray argues that self-awareness isn't the epitome of evolution—and it leads to suffering. Gray investigates Pascal, Spinoza, and Lao Tzu to understand why humans are so uncomfortable with themselves. Whether or not humans aspire to become like cats, Gray says nature teaches us the lessons felines inherently know. There she lies, basking in the sunlight sli
1d
COVID Stole Their Smell and Taste. Now They're Getting Treatment.
Researchers at the National Institutes of Health have turned their focus on treating the long term effects of COVID-19 — including the loss of taste and smell, a symptom affecting a significant portion of those who have recovered from infection, as CBS -affiliated TV station KHOU reports . We've long known that the coronavirus can wreak havoc on our senses. A loss of smell was one of the earliest
1d
Ghosts of past pesticide use can haunt organic farms for decades
Although the use of pesticides in agriculture is increasing, some farms have transitioned to organic practices and avoid applying them. But it's uncertain whether chemicals applied to land decades ago can continue to influence the soil's health after switching to organic management. Now, researchers have identified pesticide residues at 100 Swiss farms, including all the organic fields studied, wi
1d
Nature: New compound for male contraceptive pill
In a new article spells out an innovative strategy that has led to the discovery of a natural compound as a safe, effective and reversible male contraceptive agent in pre-clinical animal models. Despite tremendous efforts over the past decades, the progress in developing non-hormonal male contraceptives has been very limited.
1d
Conservation and ecology research tackles global issues without global input
The scientists looked at 13 well-known journals in ecology and conservation to find out who the top authors—the people who published the highest number of papers—were. Only 18 percent of the top names in these journals are women. (Pixabay/) Ecology, like many areas of science, has a long way to go before it is truly inclusive and equitable, a new study reiterates. The research, published on March
1d
Researchers read centuries-old sealed letter without ever opening it
An international team of scholars has read an unopened letter from early modern Europe — without breaking its seal or damaging it in any way — using an automated computational flattening algorithm. The team, including MIT Libraries and Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) researchers and an MIT student and alumna, published their findings today in a Nature Communication
1d
Sea butterflies already struggle in acidifying Southern Ocean
The oceans are becoming more acidic because of the rapid release of carbon dioxide (CO2) caused by anthropogenic (human) activities, such as burning of fossil fuels. So far, the oceans have taken up around 30% of all anthropogenic CO2 released to the atmosphere. The continuous increase of CO2 has a substantial effect on ocean chemistry because CO2 reacts with water and carbonate molecules. This pr
17h
Secret Alphabet Project "Wolverine" Aims to Give People Superhuman Hearing
Project Wolverine A secretive company is reportedly working on a top-secret plan to give people superhuman hearing. X, a company focused on moonshot ideas that's owned and operated by the Google parent Alphabet, is now working on a project named "Wolverine" after the X-Men superhero due to his heightened senses, Business Insider reports . The ultimate goal is to develop tech that lets people filt
15h
Ardern announces Auckland's Covid lockdown will lift on Sunday
Prime minister thanks New Zealand for complying with seven-day restrictions on fifth day of no new community cases Auckland's seven-day lockdown is due to lift on Sunday morning after no new cases of coronavirus were recorded in the community on Friday. The prime minister, Jacinda Ardern, said Auckland would go from alert level three to level two at 6am on Sunday, while the rest of the country wo
5h
Accelerating gains in abdominal fat during menopause tied to heart disease risk
Women who experience an accelerated accumulation of abdominal fat during menopause are at greater risk of heart disease, even if their weight stays steady, according to a new analysis. The study — based on a quarter century of data collected on hundreds of women — indicates that measuring waist circumference during preventive health care appointments for midlife women could be a better early ind
1d
Tenfold carbon emissions reduction needed to meet Paris climate goal
While 64 countries cut their fossil fuel emissions between 2016 and 2019, an international team of researchers, including an Earth system scientist at UCI, stressed that an even more pronounced reduction is going to be necessary to meet Paris Agreement goals to tackle global warming. In a study published today in Nature Climate Change, the team reported that a drop of .16 billion tons of CO2 per y
21h
NASA's Perseverance rover has a 1997 computer chip brain. Here's why.
A special super-tough version of an old chip made famous by Apple is running the show on NASA's Perseverance Mars rover. The chip is slow by modern standards, but meets the reliability test. The chip can be bombarded with radiation and still keeps on going. It's probably a good idea to stop and take a moment every now and then to marvel at the incredible amount of computing power in your pocket.
17h
How the pandemic has helped and hurt animals around the world
Sika deer in Nara Park, Japan. (Pixabay/) Some biologists have deemed the past year of pandemic-induced lockdowns and travel restrictions the "anthropause," an unexpected look at what happens to the environment when humans are suddenly staying at home. One area where the change was especially apparent was in large mammals, particularly those that live in tourist areas. From enclosed zoos to open
23h
When peeking in your brain may help with mental illness
In recent years, researchers have begun using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) not just to better understand the neural bases of psychiatric illness, but also for experimental treatment of depression, ADHD, anxiety, PTSD, substance use disorder, and schizophrenia with real-time fMRI neurofeedback. But how well does it work?
13h
Did woolly mammoths overlap with first humans in what is now New England?
Woolly mammoths may have walked the landscape at the same time as the earliest humans in what is now New England, according to a new study. Through the radiocarbon dating of a rib fragment from the Mount Holly mammoth from Mount Holly, Vt., the researchers learned that this mammoth existed approximately 12,800 years ago. This date may overlap with the arrival of the first humans in the Northeast,
14h
High end of climate sensitivity in new climate models seen as less plausible
Researchers found that the latest generation of high-sensitivity climate models do not provide a plausible scenario of Earth's future climate. These models project that clouds moderate greenhouse gas-induced warming — particularly in the northern hemisphere — much more than climate records show actually happens. The results provide a cautionary tale on interpreting climate simulations, which can
1d
A narrow ear canal reduces sound velocity to create additional acoustic inputs in a microscale insect ear [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Located in the forelegs, katydid ears are unique among arthropods in having outer, middle, and inner components, analogous to the mammalian ear. Unlike mammals, sound is received externally via two tympanic membranes in each ear and internally via a narrow ear canal (EC) derived from the respiratory tracheal system. Inside…
1d
Terahertz waves from electrons oscillating in liquid water
Ionization of water molecules by light generates free electrons in liquid water. After generation, the so-called solvated electron is formed, a localized electron surrounded by a shell of water molecules. In the ultrafast localization process, the electron and its water shell display strong oscillations, giving rise to terahertz emission for tens of picoseconds.
19h
Water influences the stickiness of hyaluronan
Hyaluronic acid, also known as hyaluronan, is a polysaccharide that helps establish the viscosity of bodily fluids. According to a new study by EPFL scientists, it also influences the behavior of far more water molecules than previously thought. Their findings—just published in Science Advances—open new avenues of research on the role water plays in the human body.
20h
Pärlugglor kan förvarna om harpestutbrott
Sorkar som blir sjuka i harpest är extra lovligt byte för pärlugglor. Nu pågår ett forskningsprojekt där inventering av pärlugglors holkar ska förvarna om nästa stora utbrott av harpest. Metoden skulle i framtiden kunna användas för att förutsäga även andra sjukdomsutbrott.
20h
Factoring in gravitomagnetism could do away with dark matter
Observations of galactic rotation curves give one of the strongest lines of evidence pointing towards the existence of dark matter, a non-baryonic form of matter that makes up an estimated 85% of the matter in the observable Universe. Current assessments of galactic rotation curves are based upon a framework of Newtonian accounts of gravity, a new article suggests that if this is substituted with
13h
Meet the AI algorithms that judge how beautiful you are
I first came across Qoves Studio through its popular YouTube channel, which offers polished videos like "Does the hairstyle make a pretty face?," " What makes Timothée Chalamet attractive? ," and " How jaw alignment influences social perceptions " to millions of viewers. Qoves started as a studio that would airbrush images for modeling agencies; now it is a "facial aesthetics consultancy" that pr
15min
Less inflammation with a traditional Tanzanian diet than with a Western diet
Urban Tanzanians have a more activated immune system compared to their rural counterparts. The difference in diet appears to explain this difference: in the cities, people eat a more western style diet, while in rural areas a traditional diet is more common. A team of researchers believe that this increased activity of the immune system contributes to the rapid increase in non-communicable disease
12h
Study reveals details of immune defense guidance system
At the beginning of an immune response, a molecule known to mobilize immune cells into the bloodstream, where they home in on infection sites, rapidly shifts position, a new study shows. Researchers say this indirectly amplifies the attack on foreign microbes or the body's own tissues.
1d
'Best case' goals for climate warming which could still result in massive wildfire risk
The landmark 2015 Paris Agreement resulted in multiple studies examining the impact of global temperature increases, but these rarely investigate the effect of warming on "fire weather" conditions. Now, in a new study, scientists have found that by projecting two different types of fire weather conditions, an additional half-degree of warming could drastically increase the likelihood and significa
1d
AMD Announces New Radeon 6700 XT, Theoretically Priced at $479
AMD has announced its upcoming 6700 XT. As the name implies, it's intended as the lower-end sibling of the 6800 and 6800 XT series and as the generational, drop-in replacement for the 5700 XT. The 6700 XT will hit store shelves on March 18 with a price of $479. This represents a price increase relative to that previous card, which debuted at $400. Of course, given current GPU prices, anyone able
1d
Apparent Atlantic warming cycle likely an artifact of climate forcing
Volcanic eruptions, not natural variability, were the cause of an apparent 'Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation,' a purported cycle of warming thought to have occurred on a timescale of 40 to 60 years during the pre-industrial era, according to a team of climate scientists who looked at a large array of climate modeling experiments.
11h
Determination of glycine transporter opens new avenues in development of psychiatric drugs
Glycine can stimulate or inhibit neurons in the brain, thereby controlling complex functions. Unraveling the three-dimensional structure of the glycine transporter, researchers have now come a big step closer to understanding the regulation of glycine in the brain. These results open up opportunities to find effective drugs that inhibit GlyT1 function, with major implications for the treatment of
16h
Helping soft robots turn rigid on demand
Researchers have simulated a soft-bodied robot that turns rigid on demand. The advance may help broaden robots' range of tasks and allow for safe interactions with people, including in patient care settings.
1d
Key factor identified that makes worms feel full after a good meal
In nematode worms, a key controller allows the worm to sense when it needs food and when it feels full, and then changes its behavior accordingly. Jennifer Tullet of the University of Kent and colleagues report these new findings in a paper published March 4th in PLOS Genetics. They propose that a similar factor may control feelings of fullness in humans.
15h
Cuttlefish Pass Marshmallow Test
Cuttlefish are amazing little critters. They are cephalopods (along with octopus, quid, and nautilus), they see polarized light and can use that to change their skin color to match their surroundings. They have eight arms and two tentacles, all with suckers, that they use to capture prey. They, like other cephalopods, are also pretty smart. And now, apparently, they are also in the very elite clu
22h
How to melt, mix, and balance chocolate in cocktails
Get the recipe for French Kiss Cocktail » New York City bartender Mandy Cohen combines cognac, Chambord, dark chocolate & sea salt liqueur, and a splash of lambrusco to make the rich and sultry French Kiss cocktail. Get the recipe for French Kiss Cocktail » (Mandy Cohen/) This story was originally featured on Saveur . Believed by the ancient Aztecs to be a powerful aphrodisiac, cacao and chocolat
13h
The Intelligent Life of Droids – Issue 98: Mind
When we first meet L3, Lando Calrissian's droid co-pilot in the 2018 film Solo: A Star Wars Story , she's railing against a brutal droid-on-droid cage match in a cantina: "How can you condone this savagery?! Droid rights! We are sentient!" When I first saw Solo , my reaction to L3 was mixed. I was thrilled to finally see a character in Star Wars saying out loud what I had been thinking for years:
1d
Secret of the famous Pazyryk carpet: Fermented wool is the answer
Why are the red, yellow, and blue colors used in the world's oldest knotted-pile carpet still so vivid and bright, even after almost two and a half thousand years? Researchers have now been able to uncover the secrets behind the so-called Pazyryk carpet using high-resolution x-ray fluorescence microscopy.
14h
A COSMIC approach to nanoscale science
COSMIC, a multipurpose X-ray instrument at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's (Berkeley Lab's) Advanced Light Source (ALS), has made headway in the scientific community since its launch less than 2 years ago, with groundbreaking contributions in fields ranging from batteries to biominerals.
16h
WOX9: A jack of all trades
Researchers used CRISPR, a genome-editing tool, to figure out the hidden roles of a developmental gene called WOX9. It usually induces flower branching in tomatoes and influences embryo growth in a plant related to broccoli. By tweaking the DNA in the gene's nearby promoter region, the researchers found WOX9 could induce flower branching in other species. These types of genetic manipulations provi
16h
Cutting off stealthy interlopers: a framework for secure cyber-physical systems
Cyber-physical systems (CPS), which combine modern networking with physical actuators, can be vulnerable against hackers. Recently, researchers developed a new framework for CPSs that is resilient to a sophisticated kind of cyberattack. Unlike existing solutions, the proposed approach allows for real-time detection and recovery from the attack while ensuring stable operation. This paves the way fo
17h
We should stop teaching children myths about work and success
The narratives that define our culture are subtle sometimes. We all like the shared belief that hard work has good outcomes. For instance, you go to school to get a job. If you work hard in your job, you'll have a good life, live in your own house and achieve your dreams.
21h
New microcomb could help discover exoplanets and detect diseases
Tiny photonic devices could be used to find new exoplanets, monitor our health, and make the internet more energy efficient. Researchers now present a game changing microcomb that could bring advanced applications closer to reality. The new microcomb is a coherent, tunable and reproducible device with up to ten times higher net conversion efficiency than the current state of the art.
19h
University of Tennessee investigation finds manipulated images in Science paper
An investigation by the University of Tennessee Health Sciences Center, in Memphis, into a 2006 Science paper found evidence that three figures in the article had been manipulated. Science sleuth Elisabeth Bik first flagged the paper, titled "Molecular Linkage Between the Kinase ATM and NF-κB Signaling in Response to Genotoxic Stimuli," to the editors of … Continue reading
15h
Volcanoes might light up the night sky of this planet
Until now, researchers have found no evidence of global tectonic activity on planets outside our solar system. Scientists have now found that the material inside planet LHS 3844b flows from one hemisphere to the other and could be responsible for numerous volcanic eruptions on one side of the planet.
15h
Prehistoric killing machine exposed
3D imaging of the dinocephalian, Anteosaurus, shows that this massive premammalian reptile that grew to the size of a full-grown hippopotamus, was a highly agile killing machine, and not a slow stodgy scavenger as previously believed.
1d
Chemists boost boron's utility
Chemists created a boron-containing chemical group that is 10,000 times more stable than boron on its own. The advance could make it possible to incorporate boron into drugs and improve their ability to bind their targets.
1d
The battle against hard-to-treat fungal infections
Systemic fungal infections are much rarer than other illnesses, but they are potentially deadly, with limited options for treatment. In fact, fungi are becoming increasingly resistant to the few drugs that are available, and infections are growing more common. A cover story in Chemical & Engineering News, the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, details how scientists are working
1d
COVID-19 lockdown linked to uptick in tobacco use
Pandemic-related anxiety, boredom, and irregular routines were cited as major drivers of increased nicotine and tobacco use during the initial COVID-19 "lockdown," according to research just released by Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health. The study highlights ways that public health interventions and policies can better support quit attempts and harm reduction, both during the COV
13h
The Rise and Fall of the "Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation"
Two decades ago, in an interview with science journalist Richard Kerr for the journal Science, I coined the term the "Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation" (AMO) to describe an internal oscillation in the climate system resulting from interactions between North Atlantic ocean currents and wind patterns. These interactions were thought to lead to alternating decades-long intervals of warming and cool
15h
Impacts of introducing and lifting nonpharmaceutical interventions on COVID-19 daily growth rate and compliance in the United States [Social Sciences]
We evaluate the impacts of implementing and lifting nonpharmaceutical interventions (NPIs) in US counties on the daily growth rate of COVID-19 cases and compliance, measured through the percentage of devices staying home, and evaluate whether introducing and lifting NPIs protecting selective populations is an effective strategy. We use difference-in-differences methods,…
1d
Newly discovered millipede, Nannaria hokie, lives at Virginia Tech
Hearing the words "new species discovered" may conjure images of deep caves, uncharted rainforests, or hidden oases in the desert. But the reality is that thousands of new species are discovered each year by enterprising scientists all over the world. Many of these new species do come from exotic locations, but more surprisingly, many come from just down the road, including the newest member of th
14h
This frog has lungs that act like noise-canceling headphones, study shows
To succeed in mating, many male frogs sit in one place and call to their potential mates. But this raises an important question familiar to anyone trying to listen to someone talking at a busy cocktail party: how does a female hear and then find a choice male of her own species among all the irrelevant background noise, including the sound of other frog species? Now, researchers reporting March 4
18h
Testing instruments for Artemis astronauts
NASA's Artemis program will establish a sustainable presence at the Moon as we prepare to venture on to Mars. To empower the success of these missions, terrestrial engineers must furnish astronauts with the tools they need to make new discoveries on their journeys.
19h
How 'green' are environmentally friendly fireworks?
Fireworks are used in celebrations around the world, including Independence Day in the U.S., the Lantern Festival in China and the Diwali Festival in India. However, the popular pyrotechnic displays emit large amounts of pollutants into the atmosphere, sometimes causing severe air pollution. Now, researchers have estimated that, although so-called environmentally friendly fireworks emit 15-65% les
1d
Bioinspired materials from dandelions
Fields are covered with dandelions in spring, a very common plant with yellow-gold flowers and toothed leaves. When they wither, the flowers turn into fluffy white seed heads that, like tiny parachutes, are scattered around by the wind. Taraxacum officinale—its scientific name—inspired legends and poems and has been used for centuries as a natural remedy for many ailments.
1d
Masks, well-ventilated classrooms, and other precautions are key to reopening schools
With an end to the pandemic possibly in sight, some schools are slowly starting to open their doors. (Pixabay /) Click here to see all of PopSci's COVID-19 coverage. The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has closed schools across the US for months at a time, shunting many classes online and forcing parents and educators to improvise. As the vaccine rollout accelerates and spring approaches—and with an en
11h
NASA's ICESat-2 satellite reveals shape, depth of Antarctic ice shelf fractures
When a block of ice the size of Houston, Texas, broke off from East Antarctica's Amery Ice Shelf in 2019, scientists had anticipated the calving event, but not exactly where it would happen. Now, satellite data can help scientists measure the depth and shape of ice shelf fractures to better predict when and where calving events will occur, according to researchers.
16h
New search engine for single cell atlases
A new software tool allows researchers to quickly query datasets generated from single-cell sequencing. Users can identify which cell types any combination of genes are active in. The open-access 'scfind' software enables swift analysis of multiple datasets containing millions of cells by a wide range of users, on a standard computer.
1d
Dietary fats interact with grape tannins to influence wine taste
Wine lovers recognize that a perfectly paired wine can make a delicious meal taste even better, but the reverse is also true: Certain foods can influence the flavors of wines. Now, researchers have explored how lipids — fatty molecules abundant in cheese, meats, vegetable oils and other foods — interact with grape tannins, masking the undesirable flavors of the wine compounds.
1d
Planetary science intern leads study of Martian crust
The planet Mars has no global magnetic field, although scientists believe it did have one at some point in the past. Previous studies suggest that when Mars' global magnetic field was present, it was approximately the same strength as Earth's current field. Surprisingly, instruments from past Mars missions, both orbiters and landers, have spotted patches on the planet's surface that are strongly m
1d
Molnupiravir: Last of the Small-Molecule Coronavirus Hopes?
A lot of people have been wondering about what's up with a small-molecular antiviral compound that's been in the news on and off during the pandemic. That's molnupiravir , below, also known as EIDD-2801 and MK-4482. It has all those numbers because it has some history behind it. The compound was discovered at Emory in the university's Drug Innovation Ventures nonprofit spin-off, which has been wo
17h
New AI tool can revolutionize microscopy
An AI tool developed at the University of Gothenburg offers new opportunities for analyzing images taken with microscopes. A study shows that the tool, which has already received international recognition, can fundamentally change microscopy and pave the way for new discoveries and areas of use within both research and industry.
19h
New model can predict how bacteria develop antibiotic resistance
Using theoretical models of bacterial metabolism and reproduction, scientists can predict the type of resistance that bacteria will develop when they are exposed to antibiotics. This has now been shown by an Uppsala University research team, in collaboration with colleagues in Cologne, Germany. The study is published in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution.
18h
Does how we think influence what we think? – podcast
What we believe is influenced by an array of factors, from our past experience to who our friends are. But a recent paper has now looked at what role how we think plays in sculpting our world-views. Natalie Grover speaks to lead author Dr Leor Zmigrod about the research evaluating the link between cognitive disposition – differences in how information is perceived and processed – and ideologies C
1d
Will climate change outpace species adaptation?
Many species might be left vulnerable in the face of climate change, unable to adapt their physiologies to respond to rapid global warming. According to a team of international researchers, species evolve heat tolerance more slowly than cold tolerance, and the level of heat they can adapt to has limits.
14h
New insights into an ancient protein complex
Extensive collaboration between five VIB groups resulted in a better understanding of the machinery that plants use to regulate the protein composition of their outer membrane. This discovery enhances our basic knowledge of how the plasma membrane composition can be adapted based on external stimuli, an essential process for life on earth.
17h
New study improves marine climate change evidence base
Scientists from the University of St Andrews and Marine Scotland have undertaken the first full mapping of carbon stores across the UK's offshore Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) to provide updated evidence for those trying to address aspects of climate and environmental change.
19h
Conquering the timing jitters
A large international team has developed a method that dramatically improves the time resolution achievable with X-ray free-electron lasers. Their method could have a broad impact in the field of ultrafast science.
1d
Best ice skates: Stay comfortable and in control on the ice
Whether you're playing hockey or skating around a rink for fun, you want skates that will be comfortable. (DESIGNECOLOGIST via Unsplash/) Evidence suggests that the notion of strapping sharp blades to one's feet in order to skim across frozen ponds or lakes first occurred to the people of Finland more than 4,000 years ago. Since then, ice skating has evolved from a practical means of traversing i
12h
Fermented wool is the answer
Why are the red, yellow, and blue colours used in the world's oldest knotted-pile carpet still so vivid and bright, even after almost two and a half thousand years? Researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg have now been able to uncover the secrets behind the so-called Pazyryk carpet using high-resolution x-ray fluorescence microscopy. Their findings have been published in t
16h
Fine particulate matter from wildfire smoke more harmful than pollution from other sources
Researchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego examining 14 years of hospital admissions data conclude that the fine particles in wildfire smoke can be several times more harmful to human respiratory health than particulate matter from other sources such as car exhaust. While this distinction has been previously identified in laboratory experiments, the new study confirms it at
38min
Biden lauds NASA team for giving US 'dose of confidence'
President Joe Biden on Thursday congratulated the NASA team responsible for last month's successful landing of an six-wheeled rover on Mars and for giving the country a "dose of confidence" at a moment when the nation's reputation as a scientific leader has been tattered by the coronavirus pandemic.
1h
Zinc oxide: Key component for the methanol synthesis reaction over copper catalysts
The current commercial production of methanol through the hydrogenation of the green-house gas CO2 relies on a catalyst consisting of copper, zinc oxide and aluminum oxide. Even though this catalyst has been used for many decades in the chemical industry, unknowns still remain. A team of researchers from the Interface Science Department of the Fritz-Haber-Institute of the Max Planck Society, the R
17h
New mutations and proteins of novel coronavirus revealed
A recent study from the Indian Institute of Science (IISc), published in the Journal of Proteome Research, has identified multiple mutations and unique proteins in isolates of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. It has also shown that the host produces several proteins of their own as their body launches an immunological defense in response to the viral attack.
19h
How do you know where volcanic ash will end up?
When the Eyjafjallajökull volcano in Iceland erupted in April 2010, air traffic was interrupted for six days and then disrupted until May. Until then, models from the nine Volcanic Ash Advisory Centres (VAACs) around the world, which aimed at predicting when the ash cloud interfered with aircraft routes, were based on the tracking of the clouds in the atmosphere.
1d
Chemists develop a new technology to prevent lithium-ion batteries from catching fire
Lithium-ion battery fire hazards are extensive worldwide and such failure can have a severe implication for both smartphones and electric cars, says the head of the group and Professor in the Department of Electrochemistry at St Petersburg University Oleg Levin. "From 2012 to 2018, 25,000 cases of catching fire by a wide range of devices in the USA only were reported. Earlier, from 1999 to 2012, o
1d
Sierra snowpack at 61% as new drought looms for California this summer
Highlighting the second dry winter in a row, the Sierra Nevada snowpack on Tuesday was just 61% of its historical average for this date, the latest signal that California appears headed toward summer drought conditions, with water restrictions possible in some areas for the first time in five years.
1d
Chimpanzees without borders
Chimpanzees are divided into four subspecies separated by geographic barriers like rivers. Previous studies attempting to understand chimpanzee population histories have been limited either by a poor geographic distribution of samples, samples of uncertain origin or different types of genetic markers. Due to these obstacles, some studies have shown clear separations between chimpanzee subspecies w
22min
New Corona test developed
In order to monitor and contain the spread of SARS-CoV-2 it is necessary to test large numbers of people on a regular basis in decentralized settings. Researchers of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology and the Hospital St. Georg in Leipzig, Germany, have developed improved protocols for the detection of SARS-CoV-2. The method can detect a positive sample in a pool with 25 uninfe
22min
Tracking proteins in the heart of cells
The cell must provide its various organelles with all the energy elements they need, which are formed in the Golgi apparatus. But how do the proteins that carry these cargoes – the kinesins – find their way within the cell's "road network" to deliver them at the right place? Researchers (UNIGE) have discovered a fluorescent chemical dye, making it possible for the first time to track the transport
22min
The collapse of Northern California kelp forests will be hard to reverse
Satellite imagery shows that the area covered by kelp forests off the coast of Northern California has dropped by more than 95 percent, with just a few small, isolated patches of bull kelp remaining. Species-rich kelp forests have been replaced by "urchin barrens," where purple sea urchins cover a seafloor devoid of kelp and other algae.
38min
Little damage from huge Pacific quake; tsunami threat passes
One of the strongest earthquakes to hit the South Pacific in modern history triggered tsunami warnings across the ocean and forced thousands of people in New Zealand to evacuate coastal areas Friday. Small tsunami waves were seen, but little damage was apparent hours later.
1h
Variable compensation and salesperson health
Researchers from University of Houston and University of Bochum published a new paper in the Journal of Marketing that examines how variable compensation plans for salespeople can lead to lower health.
1h
Your genetics influence how resilient you are to the cold
Some people just aren't bothered by the cold, no matter how low the temperature dips. And the reason for this may be in a person's genes. Our new research shows that a common genetic variant in the skeletal muscle gene, ACTN3, makes people more resilient to cold temperatures. Around one in five people lack a muscle protein called alpha-actinin-3 due to a single genetic change in the ACTN3 gene. T
1h
Tarmbakterieenzym vid typ 2-diabetes kartlagd
Tidigare forskning har visat att personer med diabetes typ-2 har en sammansättning av tarmens bakterieflora som skiljer sig från friska individer. I en studie har forskare kartlagt en typ av bakterieenzym som finns i tarmen och som påverkar sockertoleransen.
3h
The Bilingual Brain
Humans have the ability to learn multiple languages. Studying bilingual brains offers scientists an opportunity to analyze physical changes in the brain and alterations in how the brain works as a result of some behavior, known as structural and functional plasticity. I recently wrote an article where I discuss plasticity, the ability of our brain […]
5h
Kulturel storforbruger trods kunstoverdosis som barn
KULTURKANYLEN Som barn af kunstnerforældre har læge Lui Näslund Koch brugt så mange timer på gallerier, at det i flere år har hængt ham ud af halsen. Alligevel er han i dag selv storforbruger af kultur og inddrager også gerne sine børn – dog i mere afdæmpede doser.
5h
Was the Golden Rule Born in the Mind of a Monkey? – Facts So Romantic
As economic inequality increased in many wealthy nations in recent years, a debate has developed around the question of whether inequality is bad for national economies—and bad for their citizens. A captivating video clip of monkey behavior (see below), taken from a 2011 TED talk by primatologist Frans de Waal, has become a surprising piece of ammunition in this discussion. The video illustrates
9h
Best snowboard helmet: Snow gear to stay safe on the slopes
Stay safe and stylish on your next snowboarding trip. (Visit Almaty via Unsplash /) Before you get to shredding the slopes, you have to make sure you've got the best snowboard helmet as part of your snow gear. Snowboarding, like skiing, requires an investment in selecting the right gear. Some gear can be rented but others are better to purchase and bring with you—for example, items that really ne
11h
Team of bioethicists and scientists suggests revisiting 14-day limit on human embryo
An international team of bioethicists and scientists, led by a researcher at Case Western Reserve University, contends it may be justified to go beyond the standing 14-day limit that restricts how long researchers can study human embryos in a dish. Going beyond this policy limit could lead to potential health and fertility benefits, and the authors provide a process for doing so.
13h
Twistoptics–A new way to control optical nonlinearity
Columbia Engineering researchers report that they developed a new, efficient way to modulate and enhance an important type of nonlinear optical process: optical second harmonic generation–where two input photons are combined in the material to produce one photon with twice the energy–from hexagonal boron nitride through micromechanical rotation and multilayer stacking. Their work is the first to
13h
Is Solar Power Right for Your Home? This Free Assessment Can Tell You.
For a long time, anybody who wanted to go solar had to fork over a ton of capital up front and accept that they might never get it back. However, over the last decade things have changed dramatically. Today the cost of installing residential solar energy systems has never been lower, while the potential return on your investment has never been higher. And while the process of making the switch to
13h
COVID-19 pandemic has increased loneliness and other social issues, especially for women
Social distancing guidelines have reduced the spread of COVID-19, but lockdowns and isolation also have created or aggravated other well-being concerns, reports new research. Mayo Clinic investigators found a significant increase in loneliness and a decrease in feelings of friendship during the pandemic. The study, published Feb. 20 in the journal Social Science & Medicine, also showed disproporti
13h
MAROON-X embarks on its exoplanet quest
Astronomers using the recently installed instrument MAROON-X on Gemini North have determined the mass of a transiting exoplanet orbiting the nearby star Gliese 486. As well as putting the innovative new instrument through its paces, this result, when combined with data from the TESS satellite, precisely measures key properties of a rocky planet that is ideal for follow-up observations with the nex
14h
When peaking at your brain may help with mental illness
In recent years, researchers have begun using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) not just to better understand the neural bases of psychiatric illness, but also for experimental treatment of depression, ADHD, anxiety, PTSD, substance use disorder, and schizophrenia with real-time fMRI neurofeedback. But how well does it work?
14h
A super-Earth is discovered which can be used to test planetary atmosphere models
During the past 25 years astronomers have discovered a wide variety of exoplanets, made of rock, ice and gas, thanks to the construction of astronomical instruments designed specifically for planet searches. Also, using a combination of different observing techniques they have been able to determine a large numher of masses, sizes, and hence densities of the planets, which helps them to estimate t
15h
High strength through hierarchy
As light as possible and as strong as possible at the same time. These are the requirements for modern lightweight materials, such as those used in aircraft construction and the automotive industry. A research team from Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht (HZG) and Hamburg University of Technology (TUHH) has now developed a new materials' design approach for future ultralight materials: Nanometer-sized m
15h
COVID-19 screening: A new model for assessing the efficiency of group testing
How best to evaluate the performance of a group testing strategy for the SARS-CoV-2 virus? French scientist have developed a model that evaluates the efficiency of such tests. Their study accounts for dilution effect, in an effort to assess the number of potential false negatives based on pooled sample size, to optimize group size thereby minimizing epidemic risk, and finally to more accurately de
15h
Parents' pandemic depression boosted kids' anxiety
Parent depression and stress early in the pandemic negatively contributed to their young children's home education and anxiety, a new study suggests. Some parents may still experience that stress as their kids transition back to school while COVID-19 remains a danger. Both parents and children may need continued support, researchers say. The findings, published in Children and Youth Services Revi
15h
Original error
Harvard Medical School researchers reconstructed the evolutionary history of cancer cells in two patients, tracing the timeline of the mutation that causes the disease to a cell of origin. In a 63-year-old patient, it occurred at around age 19; in a 34-year-old patient, at around age 9.
15h
Equitably allocating COVID-19 vaccine
Equitable implementation of COVID?19 vaccine delivery is a national and global priority, with a strong focus on reducing existing disparities and not creating new disparities. But while a framework has been recognized for equitable allocation of COVID?19 vaccine that acknowledges the rights and interests of sexual and gender minorities (SGM), it fails to identify strategies or data to achieve that
15h
Smoking cessation drug may treat Parkinson's in women
Texas A&M University College of Medicine ressearchers have recently discovered that cytisine — a smoking cessation drug commonly used in Europe — reduces the loss of dopamine neurons in females. These findings provide potential evidence for the use of the drug to treat Parkinson's disease or stop its progression in women.
16h
Antisense oligonucleotides as a feasible therapy to treat MECP2 duplication disorder
A preclinical study from the laboratory of Dr. Huda Zoghbi, professor at Baylor College of Medicine and director of the Jan and Dan Duncan Neurological Research Institute at Texas Children's Hospital, provides experimental evidence that supports the use of antisense oligonucleotides as a feasible strategy to treat MDS. The study also offers crucial insights into the pharmacodynamics of this approa
16h
Approaches for optimal use of different COVID-19 vaccines
This Viewpoint proposes ways to maximize vaccine efficacy and allocation given the rise of coronavirus variants and authorization of a Johnson & Johnson vaccine, including reserving the latter for younger healthier populations, boosting it with a single-dose messenger RNA (mRNA) vaccination and single mRNA immunization of people with prior documented SARS-CoV-2 infection.
16h
Effect of Ivermectin on time to resolution of symptoms among adults with mild COVID-19
This randomized clinical trials reports that among adults with mild COVID-19, a five-day course of ivermectin, compared with placebo, didn't significantly improve the time to resolution of symptoms. The findings don't support the use of ivermectin for treatment of mild COVID-19, although larger trials may be needed to understand the effects of ivermectin on other clinically relevant outcomes.
16h
Can AI fight racial bias in treating knee pain?
A new method of pain assessment that uses artificial intelligence could offer a way to eliminate racial bias from the process, according to a new study. Among the many mysteries in medical science, it is known that minority and low-income patients experience greater pain than other parts of the population. This is true regardless of the root cause of the pain and even when comparing patients with
16h
Fed money to smaller companies boosts the economy more
New research finds that federal agencies get more bang for their buck when they channel grant dollars into smaller startups. Recent efforts to support businesses reeling from revenues lost during the pandemic, such as grants and loan programs, have been criticized for favoring larger companies. The researchers say their work could provide valuable insights as federal and state governments look fo
16h
ICESat-2 satellite reveals shape, depth of Antarctic ice shelf fractures
When a block of ice the size of Houston, Texas, broke off from East Antarctica's Amery Ice Shelf in 2019, scientists had anticipated the calving event, but not exactly where it would happen. Now, satellite data can help scientists measure the depth and shape of ice shelf fractures to better predict when and where calving events will occur, according to researchers.
16h
Mantis shrimp eyes inspire new optical sensor
A new kind of optical sensor small enough to fit on a smartphone but capable of hyperspectral and polarimetric imaging gets its inspiration from the eyes of mantis shrimp. "Lots of artificial intelligence (AI) programs can make use of data-rich hyperspectral and polarimetric images, but the equipment necessary for capturing those images is currently somewhat bulky," says Michael Kudenov, an assoc
16h
209 US counties face a crisis in staffing ICUs that care for COVID-19 patients
Over the next month, 209 U.S. counties in the United States will need to implement crisis workforce strategies to deal with potentially dangerous shortfalls of intensive care unit doctors, according to a new analysis published today. The analysis draws on data from a just launched county-level hospital workforce estimator, one that takes into account the strain on staffing due to the COVID-19 pand
16h
A world without cervical cancer: Preventive Medicine publishes special issue to further global efforts to eliminate deadly disease
Cervical cancer is a serious global health threat which kills more than 300,000 women every year. Recognizing this urgent public health issue, the editorial team of Preventive Medicine , led by Editor-in-Chief Dr. Eduardo Franco, Director, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Chair, Gerald Bronfman Department of Oncology at McGill University, is publishing a special issue titled "From Science to Ac
17h
Social media checks can bring bias into hiring
The way human resources professionals review online information and social media profiles of job candidates highlights how so-called "cybervetting" can introduce bias and moral judgment into the hiring process, "The study drives home that cybervetting is ultimately assessing each job candidate's moral character," says Steve McDonald, corresponding author of the study and a professor of sociology
18h
SARS-CoV-2 mutations can complicate immune surveillance of human T-killer cells
The body's immune response plays a crucial role in the course of a SARS-CoV-2 infection. In addition to antibodies, the so-called T-killer cells, are also responsible for detecting viruses in the body and eliminating them. Scientists from the CeMM Research Center for Molecular Medicine of the Austrian Academy of Sciences and the Medical University of Vienna have now shown that SARS-CoV-2 can make
18h
Robotic systems for patient evaluation
Researchers evaluated the feasibility and acceptability of using a mobile robotic system to perform health care tasks such as acquiring vital signs, obtaining nasal or oral swabs and facilitating contactless triage interviews of patients with potential COVID-19 in the emergency department.
18h
Prevalence of inflammatory heart disease among pro athletes with prior COVID-19 infection who received systematic return-to-play cardiac screening
In this study of return-to-play cardiac testing performed on 789 professional athletes with COVID-19 infection, imaging evidence of inflammatory heart disease that resulted in restriction from play was identified in five athletes (0.6%). No adverse cardiac events occurred in the athletes who underwent cardiac screening and resumed professional sports participation.
18h
Induced pluripotent stem cells reveal causes of disease
Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) are suitable for discovering the genes that underly complex and also rare genetic diseases. Scientists from the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), together with international partners, have studied genotype-phenotype relationships in iPSCs using data from approximately one thousand donors.
18h
Could catnip become the new DEET?
* Natural compound found in catnip is at least as effective as synthetic insect repellents such as DEET* Catnip can easily be grown in a home garden and made into oil or extract* New type of deterrent targets pain receptors in insects while maintaining no impact on humans
18h
Astrocytes derived from patients with bipolar disorder malfunction
Cells called astrocytes derived from the induced pluripotent stem cells of patients with bipolar disorder offer suboptimal support for neuronal activity. In a paper appearing March 4th in the journal Stem Cell Reports , researchers show that this malfunction can be traced to an inflammation-promoting molecule called interleukin-6 (IL-6), which is secreted by astrocytes. The results highlight the p
18h
Administering zinc to covid-19 patients could help towards their recovery
* The study has shown that patients infected with SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus with lower blood zinc levels require a longer recovery time and are at higher risk of death. Mortality in this patient group was 21% compared to 5% of those with higher levels of zinc in the blood. The study has also carried out in vitro tests which demonstrated the protective effect of this element by limiting the spread of
18h