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How Facebook got addicted to spreading misinformation
Joaquin Quiñonero Candela, a director of AI at Facebook, was apologizing to his audience. It was March 23, 2018, just days after the revelation that Cambridge Analytica, a consultancy that worked on Donald Trump's 2016 presidential election campaign, had surreptitiously siphoned the personal data of tens of millions of Americans from their Facebook accounts in an attempt to influence how they vot
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Playing games with quantum interference
As Richard Feynman famously put it, "the double slit experiment is absolutely impossible to explain in any classical way and has in it the heart of quantum mechanics. In reality, it contains the only mystery."
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Oil and gas companies are making old pipelines the landowner's problem
A new gas pipeline undergoes construction in Pennsylvania. (Max Phillips (Jeremy Buckingham MLC)/) Kate Wheeling writes for Nexus Media. You can follow her @KateWheeling . This article originally featured on Nexus Media , a nonprofit climate change news service. Some years ago, David Howell got a call from a landowner in Central Texas who had 300 feet of an old oil pipeline buried under his prope
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Perseverance rover's SuperCam science instrument delivers first results
The first readings from the SuperCam instrument aboard NASA's Perseverance rover have arrived on Earth. SuperCam was developed jointly by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in New Mexico and a consortium of French research laboratories under the auspices of the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). The instrument delivered data to the French Space Agency's operations center in Toulouse
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The best way to prevent arm pain from using your phone too much
Scrolling social media in bed can take a toll on your body. (Jonathan Borba/Unsplash/) If your nighttime ritual involves holding your phone to your face and scrolling through Twitter or watching a couple (dozen) YouTube videos, you may notice your arm hurts the next day. That pain has a name: "cell phone elbow," medically known as ulnar nerve entrapment or cubital tunnel syndrome. Simply put, kee
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{alpha}-Synuclein-induced Kv4 channelopathy in mouse vagal motoneurons drives nonmotor parkinsonian symptoms
No disease-modifying therapy is currently available for Parkinson's disease (PD), the second most common neurodegenerative disease. The long nonmotor prodromal phase of PD is a window of opportunity for early detection and intervention. However, we lack the pathophysiological understanding to develop selective biomarkers and interventions. By using a mutant α-synuclein selective-overexpression mo
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Virtual pollination trade uncovers global dependence on biodiversity of developing countries
Nations' food consumption patterns are increasingly globalized and trade dependent. Natural resources used for agriculture (e.g., water, pollinators) are hence being virtually exchanged across countries. Inspired by the virtual water concept, we, herein, propose the concept of virtual biotic pollination flow as an indicator of countries' mutual dependence on biodiversity-based ecosystem services
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Singapore scientists develop novel gene editor to correct disease-causing mutations
The Genome Institute of Singapore (GIS) has developed a CRISPR-based gene editor to correct mutations that cause genetic disorders. The C-to-G Base Editor (CGBE) by GIS advances the widely adopted CRISPR-Cas9 technology to enable molecular surgery on the human genome. This invention opens up treatment options for approximately 40 per cent of single-base substitutions associated with human diseases
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The Second-Class Treatment of U.S. Territories Is Un-American
Last month, I served as a House impeachment manager in the trial of President Donald Trump. My presence on the floor of the U.S. Senate carried a great deal of meaning for me. It also said a lot about America. A Black girl who split her childhood between housing projects in Brooklyn and St. Croix could grow up to become a member of Congress who holds a former president to account. But I was the o
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Private Schools Have Become Truly Obscene
Photo illustrations by Oliver Munday and Arsh Raziuddin; renderings by Justin Metz This article was published online on March 11, 2021. Dalton is one of the most selective private schools in Manhattan, in part because it knows the answer to an important question: What do hedge-funders want? They want what no one else has. At Dalton, that means an "archaeologist in residence," a teaching kitchen,
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10 Years Since the Great East Japan Earthquake
Ten years ago, on March 11, 2011, a magnitude-9.0 earthquake struck off Japan's northeastern shore—the most powerful earthquake ever recorded to have hit the country—generating enormous tsunami waves that spread across miles of shoreline, climbing as high as 130 feet. The fierce inundation of seawater tore apart coastal towns and villages, carrying ships inland as thousands of homes were flattene
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Bowel cancer screening capsules the latest in at-home care trend
Innovation in NHS self-care will see patients in England swallow tiny cameras instead of having standard endoscopy People will be able to check if they have bowel cancer by swallowing a tiny capsule containing miniature cameras, in an extension of patient self-care. In what experts described as a trend towards more NHS at-home care, hastened by the Covid-19 pandemic, thousands of people in Englan
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A Huge "Magnetic Anomaly" Struck One Geographic Spot, Hundreds of Years Ago
Magnetic Anomaly An international team of researchers dug through hundreds of years worth of data about the Earth's magnetic field — and found something strange. The team found a "magnetic field anomaly" in Southeast Asia roughly 800 years ago, a discovery that could help scientists better understand the future behavior of our planet's magnetic field. In fact, there is a non-zero chance that we a
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NASA's New Rover Just Shot a Rock With Its Laser
NASA's Perseverance Mars rover just shot its laser at a rock on Mars. In a clip uploaded to SoundCloud , we get to listen in on the scientific instrument doing its work. "You're listening to the first audio recordings of laser strikes on Mars," a tweet by the rover's official account reads. "These rhythmic tapping sounds heard by the microphone on my SuperCam instrument have different intensities
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An NFT Painting Just Sold For $69 Million
A work by digital artist Mike Winkelmann, better known as "Beeple," has sold for an astonishing $69 million at world-renowned auction house Christie's. The work, titled "The First 5000 Days" was, according to Christie's, the "first purely digital work of art ever offered by a major auction house." "The First 5000 Days" is a non-fungible token, or NFT for short. That means it's a unique, purely di
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Elon Musk: Cybertruck Will Be Able to Power Off-Grid Tiny Homes
Cyber Camper Tesla's Cybertruck is shaping up to be the ultimate off-road warrior — and it might be just as good as providing off-the-grid power as well. CEO Elon Musk took to Twitter to confirm that the Cybertruck will be able to power a camper or even a tiny home with its battery. When asked whether a user would be able to "plug my tiny house into the Cybertruck to power it," Musk answered with
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Quantum Mischief Rewrites the Laws of Cause and Effect
Alice and Bob, the stars of so many thought experiments, are cooking dinner when mishaps ensue. Alice accidentally drops a plate; the sound startles Bob, who burns himself on the stove and cries out. In another version of events, Bob burns himself and cries out, causing Alice to drop a plate. Over the last decade, quantum physicists have been exploring the implications of a strange realization: I
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Renting Is Terrible. Owning Is Worse.
A merica conceives of itself as an " ownership society ." Nearly two-thirds of U.S. households own their home, and the idea of renting is inseparable from ownership in the U.S. context. Renting is given meaning by its relationship to ownership—it's how you live if you can't afford, or aren't yet ready, to own. America treats renting as it has treated the minimum wage for the past several decades:
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No, Really, Are We Rome?
Illustration by Nicolás Ortega; Joseph-Noël Sylvestre, The Sack of Rome in 410 by the Vandals (1890). Fine Art Images / Getty. This article was published online on March 11, 2021. T he scenes at the Capitol on January 6 were remarkable for all sorts of reasons, but a distinctive fall-of-Rome flavor was one of them, and it was hard to miss. Photographs of the Capitol's debris-strewn marble portico
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People Are Keeping Their Vaccines Secret
In the past three months, Americans have become collectively obsessed with shots of shots. Photos featuring the humble deltoid—that meaty muscle that swaddles the upper arm, newly famous as the injection site for all three currently cleared COVID-19 vaccines—have been flooding Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, and even Tinder . After a year of misery and chaos, they're digital proof of the relief and
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How scientists helped Alaska's "Rat Island" shake off its namesake rodents
In 2008, a team of scientists from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Nature Conservancy, and the nonprofit Island Conservation set out to eradicate the rats on Hawadax Island. (Rory Stansbury/) In the late 18th century, a ship wrecked off the coast of Hawadax Island, a small, unforested, bracingly cinematic landscape in the Aleutian Island chain, which stretches from the coast of Alaska tow
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COVID Hospitalizations Are Plummeting With Vaccine Rollout
COVID-19 hospitalization rates in the United States continue to plummet downward as the vaccine rollout continues — a clear sign that the campaign is working. Things have steadily improved across all age groups since a massive spike in new coronavirus cases, hospitalizations, and deaths that began in November and persisted through much of January, according to the CDC's tracker . And while the pa
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The Weekly Planet: Biden's Stimulus Is a Big Deal for Public Transit
Every week, our lead climate reporter brings you the big ideas, expert analysis, and vital guidance that will help you flourish on a changing planet. Sign up to get T he Weekly Planet , our guide to living through climate change, in your inbox. Over the weekend, the Senate passed the American Rescue Plan Act, a $1.9 trillion economic stimulus package. The House of Representatives is poised to pas
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First-Person Vid Shows Perseverance Hurtling Toward Mars Surface
Landing on Mars NASA has released an incredible video, stitched together from shots its Perseverance rover took right before landing on Mars on February 18th. "You're looking at the real deal images I used to make my pinpoint landing," a tweet by the rover's official Twitter account reads. The video kicks off with the heat shield being blown off, revealing the camera below. The rover then plummet
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Changing Your Mind Can Make You Less Anxious
" How to Build a Life " is a weekly column by Arthur Brooks, tackling questions of meaning and happiness. I n the late 1950s and early 1960s, the psychologist Henry Murray asked a sample of college sophomores to participate in a seemingly innocuous experiment in which they would write their "personal philosophy of life," including their core values and guiding principles, and then engage in a civ
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DARPA wants designs for robotic warships that won't need a crew
The Sea Hunter in 2018. (US Navy/) The ocean is vast and hostile to human life. DARPA, the US military's blue skies projects wing, anticipates a future where robot ships patrol the surface of the sea, freed from the constraint of sustaining human life on board. On March 2, defense company L3Harris announced that DARPA had selected it to design a new ship—one that needs no humans on board. Dubbed
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The Guardian view on test and trace: count the true cost of failure
Before the vaccine, Britain's pandemic defences were in a scandalous state. The government must still be held to account for its failures Contact tracing was once advertised as the centrepiece of the government's strategy for managing the pandemic . The coronavirus would be held at bay and other nations would be in awe at Britain's "world-beating" system. Neither goal was achieved. A report , pub
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Elite women may have ruled El Argar 4,000 years ago
Women of the ruling class may have played an important role in the governance of El Argar, a society which flourished in the southeast of the Iberian Peninsula between 2200 and 1550 BCE, and which in the last two centuries of its existence, developed into the first state organization of the western Mediterranean.
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Scientists Say a Gene Hack Could Make You Feel Less Pain
A team of researchers at the University of California, San Diego have come up with a possible way to reduce chronic pain by temporarily altering a gene using CRISPR therapy, Gizmodo reports . The researchers came across a paper that suggests that mutations in the gene called SCN9A could leave people with the inability to register and feel pain. When the gene was had increased expression, it left
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A year of pandemic life, as told by the things we Googled
The pandemic has changed life in many ways, the least of which is mask-wearing. (Pixabay/) Click here to see all of PopSci's COVID-19 coverage. It's been a bumper year for jargon. Curves to be flattened, social distance to be maintained, and triple-layer masks to be donned. There was a lot to learn. So one way of viewing this pandemic twelve months in might be: what info have we been looking for?
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The Code Breaker by Walter Isaacson review – a science page-turner
Designer babies and ethical quicksand … The biographer of Steve Jobs tells the story of Jennifer Doudna and the development of gene-editing One of the most striking passages in Walter Isaacson's new book comes towards the end. It is 2019 and a scientific meeting is under way at the famous Cold Spring Harbour Laboratory in New York State, but James Watson, the co-discoverer of the structure of D
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Long-term COVID-19 symptoms are even more common than we thought
The impacts of COVID-19 are going to be felt for a long time. (Pixabay/) As the one-year anniversary of the pandemic hits us this week, we still have lots of questions about how we vaccinate against the novel disease, treat patients who are already infected, and what the future symptoms of infection could look like. After a year of research and observation, we know more than we ever have, but the
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Perseverance Is Now Officially Searching for Life on Mars
Setting Off After successfully landing on Mars last month, NASA's Perseverance rover has started its hunt for signs of ancient extraterrestrial life. Perseverance has already scooped up its first samples of Martian rocks and soil, according to Agence France-Presse . When it sends them back home to Earth, around 2031 , NASA scientists will finally be able to determine whether Mars once hosted micr
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Is This Startup Working on an Actual Warp Drive?
THE CLOSEST NEIGHBORING STAR TO OUR SUN , a small red dwarf called Proxima Centauri, is about 4.24 light-years from Earth. That might not sound like much — but even for one of the fastest spacecraft ever built by mankind, NASA's interplanetary traveler New Horizons, it'd take more than 78,000 Earth years to travel there at top speed. If we ever want a chance of traveling to other parts of our gal
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A Man Accidentally Got Two COVID Vaccines on the Same Day and It Was Not Good
Victor Smith, a 91-year-old man from Ohio, accidentally got two shots of the COVID vaccine in a single day. The results weren't great, according to local NBC-affiliated news station WLWT5. "His blood pressure at [one] point was 86 over 47 and so they could not administer Lasix which would help the fluid around the lungs because his blood pressure was too low," daughter Dawn Smith Theodore told WL
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Earth-sized exoplanet may have lost its original atmosphere, but gained a second one through volcanism
Orbiting a red dwarf star 41 light-years away is an Earth-sized, rocky exoplanet called GJ 1132 b. In some ways, GJ 1132 b has intriguing parallels to Earth, but in other ways it is very different. One of the differences is that its smoggy, hazy atmosphere contains a toxic mix of hydrogen, methane and hydrogen cyanide. Scientists using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope have found evidence this is not
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Observing the birth of a quasiparticle
Over the past decades, physicists worldwide have been trying to gain a better understanding of non-equilibrium dynamics in quantum many-body systems. Some studies investigated what are known as quasiparticles, disturbances or entities in physical systems that exhibit behavior similar to that of particles.
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Massive stars in the early universe may have been progenitors of super-massive black holes
Recent observations have shown that there is a supermassive black hole at the center of each galaxy. However, what is the origin of these supermassive black holes? It is still a mystery today. An international research team led by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan and Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics (ASIAA) in Taiwan has predicted an extreme supernova from a su
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The Link Between Bioelectricity and Consciousness – Facts So Romantic
"It's really hard to define what's special about neurons," says Tufts molecular biologist Michael Levin. "Almost all cells do the things neurons do, just more slowly." Illustration by jijomathaidesigners / Shutterstock Life seems to be tied to bioelectricity at every level. The late electrophysiologist and surgeon Robert Becker spent decades researching the role of the body's electric fields in d
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Genetic analysis of ancient massacre reveals instance of indiscriminate killing
Genetic analysis provides clarity and also prompts further questions around an ancient massacre in Potočani, Croatia, in a study published March 10, 2021 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Mario Novak from the Institute for Anthropological Research, Croatia, Ron Pinhasi from the University of Vienna, Austria, David Reich from Harvard Medical School and Harvard University, U.S., and colleagues.
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Cotton masks outperform synthetic fibers in humidity test
In a new study, filtration efficiency increased by 33 percent with cotton fabrics. Nine different types of cotton flannel were tested, with efficacy rates ranging from 12-45 percent better than synthetic fibers. Nylon, rayon, and polyester all performed much worse than the cotton counterparts. A year into the pandemic and we've never gained clarity around masks. Of course, we know wearing one is
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Homeless and rough sleepers in England prioritised for vaccine
Matt Hancock acts on official advice concerning segment of society more likely to be in poor health Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The government has taken up official advice that homeless people and those sleeping rough should be prioritised for coronavirus vaccines, given they are more likely to have undiagnosed conditions and have less regular access to healthcar
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Restoring Pell Grants—And Possibilities—for Prisoners
D uring the winter months , the small classroom smelled of wood and heat. Three rows of desks faced the door, and before class began I would rearrange some of them into a circle. Different shades of forest green hugged the walls, the remnants of years of paint jobs done with varying levels of proficiency and care. On bright mornings, the sun sliced through two large windows and bathed the classro
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Long Covid and graded exercise therapy | Letter
No trials of graded exercise have shown to harm patients, say Dr Alastair Miller, Prof Paul Garner and Prof Peter White, so those with post-Covid fatigue syndrome should not be discouraged from trying it Dr Joanna Herman is right to call out the lack of care being offered to sufferers of long Covid ( People with long Covid urgently need help. Why can't we access it? , 10 March). The willingness o
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The Biggest Thing Kamala Harris Could Do This Year
The battle to protect voting rights needs a field general. Vice President Kamala Harris needs a cause to define her tenure. The second problem suggests the answer to the first: President Joe Biden could designate Harris as the administration's point person in combatting the onslaught against voter access now advancing in Republican-controlled states. Both Biden and Harris are speaking more explic
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Scientists develop novel gene editor to correct disease-causing mutations
A team of researchers from the Agency for Science, Technology and Research's (A*STAR) Genome Institute of Singapore (GIS) have developed a CRISPR-based gene editor, C-to-G Base Editor (CGBE), to correct mutations that cause genetic disorders. Their research was published in Nature Communications on 2 March 2021.
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Japanese Mayor's House Firebombed to Protest Nuclear Power
Public Feedback In October of last year, a resident of the Japanese town of Suttsu threw a Molotov cocktail through the window of mayor Haruo Kataoka's house. The mayor's crime? Tentatively volunteering to participate in a government initiative exploring possible areas to safely store nuclear waste, The New York Times reports . The firebomb didn't do much damage (and the perp apologized) but the
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Single Pfizer dose leaves cancer patients at risk, researchers warn
Covid vaccination policy review urged after study finds 12-week gap leaves patients vulnerable Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Delaying the second dose of the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine must be urgently reviewed for cancer patients after a single shot was found to offer inadequate protection, researchers have said. A study from King's College London and the Francis Cric
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How "WandaVision" goes beyond peak superhero stories
I'm a comic book fan 50 years in the making but, over the last few years, even I have found myself with superhero fatigue. Then came "WandaVision". The writers have found a way to blunt our expectations about what should happen in this kind of genre. Formula fatigue isn't just a problem for the superhero genre. Creators of sci-fi, detective, romance, and buddy-comedies can recapture exhausted aud
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A Year at Home Showed People New Sides of Their Loved Ones
Over the past year of the coronavirus pandemic, millions and millions of Americans have spent much more time than usual with the people they live with. This near-constant proximity has occasionally been torturous , but it has also afforded people views into corners of their loved ones' lives that were previously obscured. For many Americans, a year at home has revealed new dimensions and quirks o
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10 years after Fukushima, outdated nuclear power plants are still the norm
An International Atomic Energy Agency investigator examines Reactor Unit 3 at the damaged Fukushima Daiichi plant on May 27, 2011. (Greg Webb, IAEA/Flickr/) Kiyoshi Kurokawa is a professor emeritus at the University of Tokyo. Najmedin Meshkati is a professor of Engineering and International Relations at the University of Southern California. This story originally featured on The Conversation . Te
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Making better decisions with big data personas
A persona is an imaginary figure representing a segment of real people, and it is a communicative design technique aimed at enhanced user understanding. Through several decades of use, personas were data structures, static frameworks user attributes with no interactivity. A persona was a means to organize data about the imaginary person and to present information to the decision-makers. This wasn
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Setback for Majorana fermion as Microsoft team retracts research paper
A team of researchers at a Microsoft laboratory in the Netherlands, who published a 2018 paper in the journal Nature, has now retracted that paper, citing a lack of evidence to support their previous conclusions. The study involved trying to prove the existence of the fermion—a theorized particle that could possibly be both matter and antimatter. The retraction came after Sergey Frolov, a research
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Can planting more trees keep cities from heating up?
Turning a sweaty city into a green urban paradise is no simple task. (Silver Ringvee on Unsplash/) Major cities across the country, from Washington D.C. to Los Angeles, are heating up. Local governments have turned to green infrastructure, specifically the tried and true method of planting trees to help mitigate rising temperatures in urban areas filled with dark pavement and concrete that soak u
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Fossilized feeding frenzy: 47-million-year-old fly found with a full belly
An international team of scientists with Fridgeir Grímsson from the University of Vienna has found a previously unknown fossil fly species in old lake sediments of the Messel Pit, a UNESCO World Heritage Site in Germany. In the stomach of the fossil insect, pollen from various plants could be detected, which allows rare insights into the feeding behavior, the ecology and the role of the fly as a p
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Plant immunity requires two-step detection of invaders
Plants perceive pathogens and activate immunity using two very different types of receptors. Receptors at the cell surface detect pathogen-derived molecules that accumulate outside plant cells, activating pattern-triggered immunity (PTI). PTI is suppressed by pathogen-derived effector proteins, that are injected into host cells to enable pathogen growth, but these effectors can be detected by intr
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Robots learn faster with quantum technology
Artificial intelligence is part of our modern life by enabling machines to learn useful processes such as speech recognition and digital personal assistants. A crucial question for practical applications is how fast such intelligent machines can learn. An experiment at the University of Vienna has answered this question, showing that quantum technology enables a speed-up in the learning process. T
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Listen: Latinos Are a Huge, Diverse Group. Why Are They Lumped Together?
Listen and subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Podcasts Do Puerto Ricans, Mexicans, and Cubans share an identity? The answer wasn't necessarily clear before 1980. That's when the Census Bureau introduced a pair of new terms, Hispanic and Latino , to its decennial count. The addition was the result of years of advocacy and negotiation: Being counted on the census meant the pote
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Road Salt Is Imperiling Aquatic Ecosystems. It Doesn't Have To.
The rock salt that keeps wintry roads safe also racks up high hidden costs to freshwater ecosystems — and could spell disaster, according to a 2017 study. In a lakeside region in upstate New York, however, towns are finding ways to balance the need for safe roads with the duty to protect the environment.
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Is the Asteroid Belt What's Left of an Obliterated Planet?
Coming or Going? The unknown origin story of the asteroid belt, a gigantic minefield of space rocks orbiting the Sun beyond Mars, has long fascinated and puzzled scientists. Two leading theories — that the asteroids are either the remains of a planet that was blown apart or the raw materials of a new world that's yet to form — seem increasingly unlikely, Astronomy Magazine reports . Not because t
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Deciphering the impacts of small RNA interactions in individual bacterial cells
Bacteria employ many different strategies to regulate gene expression in response to fluctuating, often stressful, conditions in their environments. One type of regulation involves non-coding RNA molecules called small RNAs (sRNAs), which are found in all domains of life. A new study led by researchers at the University of Illinois describes, for the first time, the impacts of sRNA interactions in
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Paralyzed Soccer Player Walks Again Using Exoskeleton Suit
An Australian soccer player who now has quadriplegia after an injury on the field is walking again thanks to a robotic exoskeleton that's helping with his rehabilitation. Australian Football League player Shaun Greentree collided with another player and fractured three of his vertebrae in October, Australia's 9News reports , leaving him paralyzed and unable to walk. Now, he's one of the first peo
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Placenta is a dumping ground for genetic defects
The first study of the genomic architecture of the human placenta confirms that the normal structure of the placenta is different to any other human organ and resembles that of a tumor, harboring many of the same genetic mutations found in childhood cancers.
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The solar wind, explained
The solar wind is a flow of particles that comes off the sun at about one million miles per hour and travels throughout the entire solar system. First proposed in the 1950s by University of Chicago physicist Eugene Parker, the solar wind is visible in the halo around the sun during an eclipse and sometimes when the particles hit the Earth's atmosphere—as the aurora borealis, or northern lights.
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Genome-wide association study in almost 195,000 individuals identifies 50 previously unidentified genetic loci for eye color
Human eye color is highly heritable, but its genetic architecture is not yet fully understood. We report the results of the largest genome-wide association study for eye color to date, involving up to 192,986 European participants from 10 populations. We identify 124 independent associations arising from 61 discrete genomic regions, including 50 previously unidentified. We find evidence for genes
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First he held a superspreader event. Then he recommended fake cures.
In late January, tech impresario Peter Diamandis hosted an exclusive, indoor conference for a group of ultra-wealthy patrons in Los Angeles. As MIT Technology Review reported last month , the get-together, where no masks were required, became a covid-19 superspreader event. Four days later, as staff, speakers, and attendees began testing positive for the virus, an email went out to those who had
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The Left's Answer to Trump Is 6 Foot 8 and Wears Shorts in February
Updated at 2:30 p.m. ET on March 11, 2020. BRADDOCK, Pa.—John Fetterman didn't grow up with anyone who had a biker-bar bouncer's chin beard or who wore work shirts and shorts in February. He didn't grow up committed to LGBTQ rights and legalizing marijuana and a living wage. The Pennsylvania lieutenant governor and Democratic candidate for the U.S. Senate didn't grow up dreaming of being a senato
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'Lost' ocean nanoplastic might be getting trapped on coasts
As plastic debris weathers in aquatic environments, it can shed tiny nanoplastics. Although scientists have a good understanding of how these particles form, they still don't have a good grasp of where all the fragments end up. Now, researchers have shown experimentally that most nanoplastics in estuarine waters can clump, forming larger clusters that either settle or stick to solid objects, inste
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Building a better data economy
It's "time to wake up and do a better job," says publisher Tim O'Reilly—from getting serious about climate change to building a better data economy. And the way a better data economy is built is through data commons—or data as a common resource—not as the giant tech companies are acting now, which is not just keeping data to themselves but profiting from our data and causing us harm in the proces
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Facebook Shows Off Neural "Wristbands" to Control AR Glasses
In September, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg revealed that the company was planning on releasing augmented reality glasses as soon as 2021. Now, the social media company wants to take the concept a step further. According to a new blog post by Facebook Reality Labs (FRL), the company is hoping to hook up the AR glasses to a "soft wristband" designed to read signals from the spinal cord, that can co
3h
High School Wasn't Supposed to Be Like This
COVID-19 has destroyed the sanctuary of my multigenerational household. At 3 a.m., on a Thursday in December, my grandmother died in a New Orleans hospice from the coronavirus, six days after she had tested positive. I am only 14, and this is my first time experiencing loss. Every day, I struggle with her death. Sometimes I pretend I can see her, with her dyed red hair that was graying at the roo
6h
Mapping the best places to plant trees
Reforestation could help to combat climate change, but whether and where to plant trees is a complex choice with many conflicting factors. To combat this problem, researchers reporting in the journal One Earth on December 18 have created the Reforestation Hub, an interactive map of reforestation opportunity in the United States. The tool will help foresters, legislators, and natural resource agenc
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How to make all headphones intelligent
How do you turn 'dumb' headphones into smart ones? Engineers have invented a cheap and easy way by transforming headphones into sensors that can be plugged into smartphones, identify their users, monitor their heart rates and perform other services. Their invention, called HeadFi, is based on a small plug-in headphone adapter that turns a regular headphone into a sensing device.
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In first, scientists trace fastest solar particles to their roots on the Sun
Zipping through space at close to the speed of light, Solar Energetic Particles, or SEPs, are one of the main challenges for the future of human spaceflight. Clouds of these tiny solar projectiles can make it to Earth—a 93 million mile journey—in under an hour. They can fry sensitive spacecraft electronics and pose serious risks to human astronauts. But their onset is extraordinarily hard to predi
23h
Was there ever life on Mars? Perseverance's SHERLOC laser sniffs for microscopic clues
NASA named the ultraviolet laser SHERLOC, which stands for "Scanning Habitable Environments with Raman and Luminescence for Organics & Chemicals." (NASA/JPL-Caltech/) The chassis of NASA's Perseverance rover bristles with more than a dozen cameras (and, for the first time, a microphone), but the Martian explorer's business end is a block of sensors engineers lovingly refer to as "The Turret." Usi
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Researchers develop guidelines for reporting polygenic risk scores
Scientists and healthcare providers are beginning to use polygenic risk scores for assessing a person's inherited risk for common complex diseases. But researchers have observed inconsistencies in how such scores are calculated and reported. To address this concern, researchers have published a framework that identifies the minimal polygenic risk score-related information that scientists should in
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How the pandemic could finally democratize commutes
What responsibilities do employers have in terms of supporting their workforce's commute to work? There are great examples of efforts from employers to facilitate commutes to work, but the same mobility perks are much harder to offer for small business employers, non-traditional employers, contract workers and the self-employed. For those groups who don't enjoy employee commute perks, transportat
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IceCube detection of high-energy particle proves 60-year-old physics theory
On December 6, 2016, a high-energy particle hurtled to Earth from outer space at close to the speed of light. It triggered the sensors of the IceCube Neutrino Observatory, a massive telescope buried in the Antarctic glacier. IceCube had seen a Glashow resonance event, a phenomenon predicted by Nobel laureate physicist Sheldon Glashow in 1960.
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Graphene nanoparticles and their influence on neurons
Effective, specific, with a reversible and non-harmful action: the identikit of the perfect biomaterial seems to correspond to graphene flakes, the subject of a new study carried out by SISSA—International School for Advanced Studies of Trieste, Catalan Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (ICN2) of Barcelona, and the National Graphene Institute of the University of Manchester, as part of t
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Long-accepted theory of vertebrate origin upended by fossilized lamprey larvae
A study of fossilized lampreys dating from more than 300 million years ago is challenging a long-held theory about the evolutionary origin of vertebrates. These ancient, jawless, eel-like fishes arose around half a billion years ago and they have long provided insights into vertebrate evolution. The analysis of the fossils counters the established view that the blind, filter-feeding larvae of mode
1d
Not so fast, supernova: Highest-energy cosmic rays detected in star clusters
The highest-energy cosmic rays come from subatomic interactions within star clusters, not supernovae, say physicists. For decades, researchers assumed cosmic rays are flung into space from supernova. But new research suggests even supernovae are not strong enough to push particles to petaelectronvolts (PeVs). Instead, the researchers posit that star clusters like the Cygnus Cocoon serve as PeVatro
1h
Aspirin use for cardiovascular disease may reduce likelihood of COVID-19 infection, study finds
In a recent study, aspirin use to avoid the development of cardiovascular diseases in healthy individuals was associated with a 29 percent lower likelihood of COVID-19 infection, as compared to aspirin non-users. The proportion of patients treated with aspirin was significantly lower among the COVID-19-positive individuals, as compared to the COVID-19-negative ones. And those subjects who had been
2h
How to Quiet Your Mind Chatter – Issue 98: Mind
We've all been there. Stuck in our own heads, fixated on a two-minute conversation from three days ago. We replay it over and over. I shouldn't have snapped at Dad. He was always so patient when I was growing up. We get stuck. The voice in our heads goes from an ally to a vicious nag, just looping uselessly over the same things, again and again and again. Ethan Kross, an experimental psychologist
18h
Vaccine Distribution Site Accidentally Gave Out Empty Shots
In an extremely unlucky twist, some people who went in to get their coronavirus vaccines got an armful of nothing instead. A Kroger clinic in Virginia messed up several people's vaccinations — the company says fewer than ten — by forgetting to actually put the vaccine inside the syringe first, local channel CBS 6 reports . All of the people affected have since been contacted and vaccinated, for r
38min
Technosignatures
Recently experts gathered online for a digital conference in which they discussed possibilities for detecting signs of alien technological civilizations – so called "technosignatures". Being an enthusiast, I have heard of many of these before, but there were a lot of new ideas coming out of that meeting as well. Here is the preprint , with all the technical information. I think collectively this
8h
Revealing the way a critical enzyme works in the cell
S-acylation is the process of chemically linking a lipid to protein via a thioester bond. It is an important process of the cell that regulates the localization and function of numerous proteins. It promotes lipid membrane association of the protein, for instance to the plasma membrane, Golgi apparatus, or inner nuclear membrane.
4h
The secrets of the best rainbows on Earth
An atmospheric scientist makes an impassioned case for Hawaii being the best place on Earth to experience the wonder of rainbows. He begins by highlighting the Hawaiian cultural significance of rainbows, he reviews the science of rainbows and the special combination of circumstances that makes Hawai'i a haven for rainbows.
1h
Making green energy the default choice can help tackle climate change, study finds
Researchers studying the Swiss energy market have found that making green energy the default option for consumers leads to an enduring shift to renewables and thus has the potential to cut CO2 emissions by millions of tons. The study investigated the effect of changes in the Swiss energy market that presented energy from renewable sources as the standard option for consumers – the 'green default.'
2h
Modulation of photocarrier relaxation dynamics in two-dimensional semiconductors
Two-dimensional (2D) semiconductors can host a rich set of excitonic species because of the greatly enhanced Coulomb interactions. The excitonic states can exhibit large oscillator strengths and strong light-matter interactions, and dominate the optical properties of 2D semiconductors. In addition, because of the low dimensionality, excitonic dynamics of 2D semiconductors can be more susceptible t
3h
Misinformation tactics protect rare birds from problem predators
Efficient decision-making integrates previous experience with new information. Tactical use of misinformation can alter choice in humans. Whether misinformation affects decision-making in other free-living species, including problem species, is unknown. Here, we show that sensory misinformation tactics can reduce the impacts of predators on vulnerable bird populations as effectively as lethal con
1d
Making decisions based on how we feel about memories, not accuracy
Memory involves both recall of specific details (who, where, when) and feelings of remembering and reliving past events. New research shows that these objective and subjective memories function independently, involve different parts of the brain, and that we make decisions based on subjective memory.
2h
Female snowy plovers are no bad mothers
In snowy plovers, females have overcome traditional family stereotypes. They often abandon the family to begin a clutch with a new partner whereas the males continue to care for their young until they are independent. An international team led by scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology in Seewiesen, Germany, has now investigated the decision-making process that determines the dura
2h
Uncovering exotic molecules of potential astrochemical interest
Looking at the night sky, one's thoughts might be drawn to astrochemistry. What molecules are found in the vast spaces between the stars? Would we see the same molecules that surround us here on Earth? Or would some of them be more exotic—something rarely observed or even unknown?
3h
Elite women might have ruled El Argar 4,000 years ago
Research on the individuals and valuable grave goods found in a princely tomb of La Almoloya, in which a silver diadem stands out, offers a new perspective on the power of the El Argar society during the Bronze Age and the role some women may have had.
3h
Extracting information from ancient teeth
There's a surprising amount of information stored in the hardened plaque, or calculus, between teeth. And if that calculus belongs to the remains of a person who lived in ancient times, the information could reveal new insights about the past. But the tiny samples can be difficult to work with. Now, scientists apply a new method to this analysis, finding more proteins than traditional approaches.
1d
Aspirin use for cardiovascular disease may reduce likelihood of COVID-19 infection
Aspirin use to avoid the development of cardiovascular diseases in healthy individuals was associated with a 29% lower likelihood of COVID-19 infection, as compared to aspirin non-users. The proportion of patients treated with aspirin was significantly lower among the COVID-19-positive individuals, as compared to the COVID-19-negative ones. And those subjects who had been treated with aspirin were
1d
New study links protein causing Alzheimer's disease with common sight loss
Newly published research has revealed a close link between proteins associated with Alzheimer's disease and age-related sight loss. The findings could open the way to new treatments for patients with deteriorating vision and through this study, the scientists believe they could reduce the need for using animals in future research into blinding conditions.
3h
Climate change may not expand drylands
Does a warmer climate mean more dry land? For years, researchers projected that drylands—including deserts, savannas and shrublands—will expand as the planet warms, but new research from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) challenges those prevailing views.
33min
How to Live With Uncertainty
T he deadliest virus in history was variola. For thousands of years, it stalked humanity, causing smallpox, a horrific fate. An infected person's skin would suddenly erupt in blisters, papules, and vesicles. These would sometimes cover the eyes, and could grow together until the skin fell off, or fill with blood, or turn gray as the person bled internally. In the 20th century alone, the disease k
1h
Air pollutant reductions could enhance global warming without greenhouse gas cuts
New modeling experiment of the long-term effects of reductions in air pollutants known as sulfate aerosols predicts further increases in surface air temperature at current and increased carbon dioxide levels because of loss of an overall cooling effect caused by the light-scattering particles. Such modeling accounting for slow climate responses to changes in the atmosphere indicates the need to re
3h
Researchers set new resolution record for imaging the human eye
Researchers have developed a noninvasive technique that can capture images of rod and cone photoreceptors with unprecedented detail. The advance could lead to new treatments and earlier detection for retinal diseases such as macular degeneration, a leading cause of vision loss.
5h
3 Medical Innovations Fueled by Covid-19 That Will Outlast the Pandemic
A number of technologies and tools got a chance to prove themselves for the first time in the context of Covid-19. Three researchers working in gene-based vaccines, wearable diagnostics, and drug discovery explain how their work rose to the challenge of the pandemic, and their hopes that each technology is now poised to continue making big changes in medicine. Genetic Vaccines Deborah Fuller, Pro
5h
How do you make a convincing deepfake video? – podcast
Last week videos of what appeared to be Tom Cruise at home and playing golf appeared on TikTok. It later emerged the clips were actually AI-generated by a creator of 'deepfake' videos. Deepfake videos depict situations that have never happened in the real world, and are becoming increasingly convincing. Alex Hern goes behind the scenes to find out exactly how such videos were made, and how far th
10h
Eksperter dumper Screms II-garanti fra AWS: »Juridisk set ubrugelig«
Schrems II-dommen har gjort det svært at overføre persondata fra EU til USA på lovlig vis, og det giver grå hår i hovederne på både cloud-kunder og ditto leverandører. AWS har udsendt en garanti om, at man kan gigantens tjenester og stadig være compliant – men den giver juridiske eksperter ikke m…
18h
Scientists propose novel self-modulation scheme in seeded free-electron lasers
Seeded free-electron lasers (FELs), which use frequency up-conversion of an external seed laser to improve temporal coherence, are considered ideal for supplying stable, fully coherent, soft X-ray pulses. However, the requirement for an external seed laser with sufficient peak power to modulate the electron beam can hardly be met by the present state-of-the-art laser systems, it remains challengin
7h
Dog's body size and shape could indicate a greater bone tumour risk
New research led by the University of Bristol Vet School has now confirmed that larger breeds, such as Rottweiler, Great Dane and Rhodesian Ridgeback, have a greater risk of osteosarcoma than smaller breeds, as well as showing that breeds with shorter skulls and legs have lower osteosarcoma risk. The findings could inform future breed health reforms as well as studies into the way tumours develop
20h
The narwhal's tusk reveals its past living conditions
Every year, a new growth layer is added to the narwhal's spiraled tusk. The individual layers act as an archive of data that reveals what and where the animal has eaten, providing a glimpse of how the ice and environmental conditions have changed over its long life span (up to 50 years).
4h
Yarns coated with enzymes can act as filters
North Carolina State University researchers showed in a new study they could coat cotton yarns with enzymes, which are nature's tool for speeding chemical reactions, in order to change hydrogen peroxide into oxygen and water. The proof-of-concept study is a step toward the creation of a new generation of chemical filters.
5h
Firefly tourism takes flight, sparking wonder and concern
Firefly beetles rank among the world's most charismatic creatures, with luminous courtship displays that have now turned them into a popular attraction for wildlife tourists. In the first comprehensive review of firefly tourism, published in the journal Conservation Science and Practice, an international team of biologists led by a Tufts University researcher, reveal that an estimated 1 million pe
12h
Scientists have synthesized a new high-temperature superconductor
An international team led by Artem R. Oganov, a Professor at Skoltech and MISIS, and Dr. Ivan Troyan from the Institute of Crystallography of RAS performed theoretical and experimental research on a new high-temperature superconductor, yttrium hydride (YH6). Their findings were published in the journal Advanced Materials.
1d
'One step closer to unlocking mysteries of the bio/nano interface'
An interdisciplinary research team has unraveled how functional biomaterials rely upon an interfacial protein layer to transmit signals to living cells concerning their adhesion, proliferation and overall development. According to a recent article the nanoscale features and properties of an underlying substrate do not impact the biological response of cells directly. However, these properties indi
2h
Optimal design for acoustic unobservability in water
Until now, it was only possible to optimize an acoustic cloaking structure for the air environment. However, with this latest research, "Acoustic cloak designed by topology optimization for acoustic-elastic coupled systems," published in the latest Applied Physics Letters, it is possible to design an acoustic cloak for underwater environments.
3h
Researchers find ribosome assembly essential for stem cell regeneration
Researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have identified genes responsible for hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) regeneration via the assembly of the ribosome, the protein factories in cells that translate mRNA sequences into amino acid sequences. The findings, which were published in Cell Stem Cell, highlight the importance of proper ribosome assembly in stem cell regeneration and id
4h
Robust information routing by dorsal subiculum neurons
The dorsal hippocampus conveys various information associated with spatial navigation; however, how the information is distributed to multiple downstream areas remains unknown. We investigated this by identifying axonal projections using optogenetics during large-scale recordings from the rat subiculum, the major hippocampal output structure. Subicular neurons demonstrated a noise-resistant repre
1d
New tool to dissect the "undruggable"
Researchers from Harvard University have developed a new tool to study "undruggable" proteins through the sugars they depend on. Almost 85 percent of proteins, including those associated with Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, inflammation, and certain cancers, are beyond the reach of current drugs. Now, with a new pencil/eraser tool, researchers can start to study how sugar molecules affect these proteins
2min
'Hunker down' stress genes boosted in women who live in violent neighborhoods
The chronic stress of living in neighborhoods with high rates of violence and poverty alters gene activity in immune cells, according to a new study of low-income single Black mothers on the South Side of Chicago. The changes in stress-related gene expression reflect the body's "hunker down" response to long-term threat. This has implications for health outcomes in communities of color and other m
2min
With 'big one' coming, quake alert system launches in Oregon
People in Oregon will be better prepared for earthquakes—particularly important in the Pacific Northwest because experts say "the big one" is coming—as an early warning system launched Thursday, the 10th anniversary of a devastating quake and tsunami in Japan.
9min
Tracking cosmic ghosts
The idea was so far-fetched it seemed like science fiction: create an observatory out of a one cubic kilometer block of ice in Antarctica to track ghostly particles called neutrinos that pass through the Earth. But speaking to Benedickt Riedel, global computing manager at the IceCube Neutrino Observatory, it makes perfect sense.
15min
Climate change influences river flow
Climate change is affecting the water balance of our planet: depending on the region and the time of year, this can influence the amount of water in rivers potentially resulting in more flooding or drought. River flow is an important indicator of water resources available to humans and the environment. The amount of available water also depends on further factors, such as direct interventions in t
15min
Black and Hispanic workers overrepresented in occupations with higher risk for COVID-19 exposure
A new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, published by Elsevier, identifies specific job categories that put workers at risk because they require working in close contact with others. Some of these jobs have a disproportionately high number of Black or Hispanic workers. The findings should be used to inform workplace interventions to reduce the risk for these particularly vulnera
16min
Simultaneous multicontrast OR-PAM from single laser source
Optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) can be used for live, multicontrast functional imaging, but the limited wavelength choice of most commercial lasers and the limitations of the existing scanning methods have meant that OR-PAM can obtain only one or two different types of contrast in a single scan. Lidai Wang and his research team at City University of Hong Kong recently develope
16min
Laser-driven experiments provide insights into the formation of the universe
Researchers conducted experiments that captured for the first time in a laboratory setting the time history of the growth of magnetic fields by the turbulent dynamo, a physical mechanism thought to be responsible for generating and sustaining astrophysical magnetic fields. The research is essential to studying how large structures in the universe were formed and how energy is divided throughout th
16min
New insight into how cancer spreads
The transformation Ford and her team are studying happens when cells called epithelial cells, which are more adherent to one another and less likely to spread to other parts of the body, start to take on the characteristics of mesenchymal cells, which are more migratory and more likely to invade other parts of the body. This transformation is referred to as the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition
16min
Superconducting coils for contactless power transmission in the kilowatt range
A team led by Christoph Utschick and Prof. Rudolf Gross, physicists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), has developed a coil with superconducting wires capable of transmitting power in the range of more than five kilowatts contactless and with only small losses. The wide field of conceivable applications include autonomous industrial robots, medical equipment, vehicles and even aircraft.
21min
Hyperpolarized proton MRI used to observe metabolic processes in real time
Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is already widely used in medicine for diagnostic purposes. Hyperpolarized MRI is a more recent development and its research and application potential has yet to be fully explored. Researchers at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) and the Helmholtz Institute Mainz (HIM) have now unveiled a new technique for observing metabolic processes in the body. Their si
27min
Cheaper carbon capture is on the way
As part of a marathon research effort to lower the cost of carbon capture, chemists have now demonstrated a method to seize carbon dioxide (CO2) that reduces costs by 19 percent compared to current commercial technology. The new technology requires 17 percent less energy to accomplish the same task as its commercial counterparts, surpassing barriers that have kept other forms of carbon capture fro
27min
Higher incomes tied to better emotional states — but there's a catch
A review of data from 1.6 million people shows that higher incomes relate to more positive feelings about the self. Feelings towards others were not affected by higher incomes. The findings have implications for those hoping to improve society by raising incomes alone. It has often said that money cannot buy happiness, though it is also thought that the wealthy enjoy their miseries in relative co
28min
Scientists discover cellular stress enzyme that might play key role in neurodegenerative diseases such as ALS
An enzyme called MARK2 has been identified as a key stress-response switch in cells in a study by researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Overactivation of this type of stress response is a possible cause of injury to brain cells in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis. The discovery will make MARK2 a focus of invest
29min
Microscope helps with dinosaur puzzle
Fossil sites sometimes resemble a living room table on which half a dozen different jigsaw puzzles have been dumped: It is often difficult to say which bone belongs to which animal. Together with colleagues from Switzerland, researchers from the University of Bonn have now presented a method that allows a more certain answer to this question. Their results are published in the journal Palaeontolog
33min
Air pollution: The silent killer called PM2.5
Millions of people die prematurely every year from diseases and cancer caused by air pollution. The first line of defense against this carnage is ambient air quality standards. Yet, according to researchers from McGill University, over half of the world's population lives without the protection of adequate air quality standards.
33min
Pandemic emphasizes need for digital literacy education
Parents would never give their children the keys to the car without supervised training and driver's education. An Iowa State University researcher says parents and educators need to take a similar approach before handing children a keyboard to access the digital world.
33min
Geologists discover powerful 'river of rocks' below Caribbean
Geologists have long thought tectonic plates move because they are pulled by the weight of their sinking portions and that an underlying, hot, softer layer called asthenosphere serves as a passive lubricant. But a team of geologists at the University of Houston has found that layer is actually flowing vigorously, moving fast enough to drive plate motions.
33min
A new model predicts snakebites to save human lives
About 1.8 million envenoming snakebites occur around the world annually, killing about 94,000 people. In tropical areas, especially in Southeast Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa, snakebites are considered a major cause of death, especially among farmers who encounter snakes in their fields. In response, the World Health Organization has launched a strategic plan to reduce snakebites by 50% by 2030. An
35min
The Future of the Neuroscience of Dreaming
What is the purpose of dreaming? What do the contents of your dreams mean? What is your brain doing during dreams to produce the sometimes surreal experiences that leave you confused upon waking? Why do we remember some parts of our dreams, but struggle to recall the events in others? The unsatisfying answer to these Continue reading ""
58min
Assembly of NFL and desmin intermediate filaments: Headed in the right direction [Biochemistry]
Intermediate filaments (IFs), together with actin filaments and microtubules, form the cytoskeleton—a critical structural component of all cells. Humans express 73 unique IF proteins that associate as obligate homo- or heterodimers. IF dimers assemble into tetramers, which are the building blocks of the higher-order cytoskeletal and nucleoskeletal structures visualized in…
1h
Progesterone receptor isoform B regulates the Oxtr-Plcl2-Trpc3 pathway to suppress uterine contractility [Physiology]
Uterine contractile dysfunction leads to pregnancy complications such as preterm birth and labor dystocia. In humans, it is hypothesized that progesterone receptor isoform PGR-B promotes a relaxed state of the myometrium, and PGR-A facilitates uterine contraction. This hypothesis was tested in vivo using transgenic mouse models that overexpress PGR-A or…
1h
Noninvasive neuromagnetic single-trial analysis of human neocortical population spikes [Neuroscience]
Neuronal spiking is commonly recorded by invasive sharp microelectrodes, whereas standard noninvasive macroapproaches (e.g., electroencephalography [EEG] and magnetoencephalography [MEG]) predominantly represent mass postsynaptic potentials. A notable exception are low-amplitude high-frequency (∼600 Hz) somatosensory EEG/MEG responses that can represent population spikes when averaged over hundred
1h
Limitation of phosphate assimilation maintains cytoplasmic magnesium homeostasis [Microbiology]
Phosphorus (P) is an essential component of core biological molecules. In bacteria, P is acquired mainly as inorganic orthophosphate (Pi) and assimilated into adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in the cytoplasm. Although P is essential, excess cytosolic Pi hinders growth. We now report that bacteria limit Pi uptake to avoid disruption of…
1h
Visualizing active viral infection reveals diverse cell fates in synchronized algal bloom demise [Microbiology]
Marine viruses are the most abundant biological entity in the ocean and are considered as major evolutionary drivers of microbial life [C. A. Suttle, Nat. Rev. Microbiol. 5, 801–812 (2007)]. Yet, we lack quantitative approaches to assess their impact on the marine ecosystem. Here, we provide quantification of active viral…
1h
Super-resolution mapping of cellular double-strand break resection complexes during homologous recombination [Cell Biology]
Homologous recombination (HR) is a major pathway for repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The initial step that drives the HR process is resection of DNA at the DSB, during which a multitude of nucleases, mediators, and signaling proteins accumulates at the damage foci in a manner that remains elusive….
1h
The cyanobacterium Prochlorococcus has divergent light-harvesting antennae and may have evolved in a low-oxygen ocean [Environmental Sciences]
Marine picocyanobacteria of the genus Prochlorococcus are the most abundant photosynthetic organisms in the modern ocean, where they exert a profound influence on elemental cycling and energy flow. The use of transmembrane chlorophyll complexes instead of phycobilisomes as light-harvesting antennae is considered a defining attribute of Prochlorococcus. Its ecology and…
1h
Role of intramolecular hydrogen bonds in promoting electron flow through amino acid and oligopeptide conjugates [Chemistry]
Elucidating the factors that control charge transfer rates in relatively flexible conjugates is of importance for understanding energy flows in biology as well as assisting the design and construction of electronic devices. Here, we report ultrafast electron transfer (ET) and hole transfer (HT) between a corrole (Cor) donor linked to…
1h
There Is No One Pandemic Anniversary
It can begin almost imperceptibly, with the turning of the leaves or the first heat of summer, an ambient anxiety with no clear cause . Other times the feeling comes on suddenly , when a news story about the disaster's anniversary stirs memories of trauma. Some people have nightmares or flashbacks. After 9/11, PTSD rates crested at the one-year mark. Disaster psychologists call this phenomenon th
1h
A little nature can boost teens' pandemic well-being
Outdoor play and nature-based activities can help buffer some of the negative mental health impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic for adolescents, according to a new study. Researchers say the findings point to outdoor play and nature-based activities as a tool to help teenagers cope with major stressors like the pandemic, as well as future natural disasters and other global stressors. They also under
1h
Paleontology: Microscope helps with dinosaur puzzle
Fossil sites sometimes resemble a living room table on which half a dozen different jigsaw puzzles have been dumped: It is often difficult to say which bone belongs to which animal. Together with colleagues from Switzerland, researchers from the University of Bonn have now presented a method that allows a more certain answer to this question. Their results are published in the journal Palaeontolog
1h
Skoltech team shows how Turing-like patterns fool neural networks
Skoltech researchers were able to show that patterns that can cause neural networks to make mistakes in recognizing images are, in effect, akin to Turing patterns found all over the natural world. This work makes a step towards explaining the fascinating properties of perturbations by Turing patterns, which have a solid theory behind them. In the future, this result can be used to design defenses
1h
UCI-led team creates new ultralightweight, crush-resistant tensegrity metamaterials
In a study published this week in Advanced Materials , engineers at the University of California, Irvine and the Georgia Institute of Technology describe the creation of a new class of mechanical metamaterials that delocalize deformations to prevent failure. They did so by turning to tensegrity, a century-old design principle in which isolated rigid bars are integrated into a flexible mesh of teth
1h
Contactless high performance power transmission
A team led by Christoph Utschick and Prof. Rudolf Gross, physicists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), has developed a coil with superconducting wires capable of transmitting power in the range of more than five kilowatts contactless and with only small losses. The wide field of conceivable applications include autonomous industrial robots, medical equipment, vehicles and even aircraft.
1h
Foodborne fungus impairs intestinal wound healing in Crohn's disease
A foodborne fungus that is harmless to most people exacerbates gastrointestinal symptoms in people with Crohn's disease by preventing intestinal ulcers from healing, according to a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the Cleveland Clinic. The findings suggest that antifungal medications or dietary interventions may help alleviate the symptoms of Crohn's.
1h
Model warns of new mosquito invasion in Florida
Now that the disease-transmitting mosquito Aedes scapularis has invaded the Florida peninsula, researchers have come up with a method to predict where conditions may be most suitable for its spread. When a new mosquito species capable of transmitting disease arrives and shows signs it can survive across multiple urban and rural habitats it brings the potential for public health risk. Aedes scapul
1h
The skeleton of the malaria parasite reveals its secrets
Plasmodium is the parasite causing malaria, one of the deadliest parasitic diseases. The parasite requires two hosts —the Anopheles mosquito and the human— to complete its life cycle and goes through different forms at each stage of its life cycle. Transitioning from one form to the next involves a massive reorganization of the cytoskeleton. Two teams from the University of Geneva (UNIGE) have she
1h
Messenger RNA COVID-19 vaccines greatly reduce risk of asymptomatic COVID-19 infection, spread to ot
Ten days after receiving a second dose of a messenger RNA, or mRNA, vaccine for COVID-19, patients without COVID-19 symptoms are far less likely to test positive and unknowingly spread COVID-19, compared to patients who have not been vaccinated for COVID-19. The Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna messenger RNA vaccines for COVID-19 are authorized for emergency use in the U.S.
1h
Canoo's upcoming electric pickup truck will offer modular storage and adorable aesthetics
Look at all that visibility. (Canoo/) Right now, the electric pickup truck landscape includes a lot of lofty promises. Last year, Ford foreshadowed an electric truck that will be more powerful than its ultra-popular F-150. Bollinger claims it will start building its long-awaited 4×4 by the end of this year. Rivian says its flexible vehicles will start shipping in the summer. And Elon Musk has sho
2h
Lipid presentation by the protein C receptor links coagulation with autoimmunity
Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPLs) cause severe autoimmune disease characterized by vascular pathologies and pregnancy complications. Here, we identify endosomal lysobisphosphatidic acid (LBPA) presented by the CD1d-like endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) as a pathogenic cell surface antigen recognized by aPLs for induction of thrombosis and endosomal inflammatory signaling. The engagement of
2h
Dinitrogen complexation and reduction at low-valent calcium
Here we report that attempted preparation of low-valent Ca I complexes in the form of LCa-CaL (where L is a bulky β-diketiminate ligand) under dinitrogen (N 2 ) atmosphere led to isolation of LCa(N 2 )CaL, which was characterized crystallographically. The N 2 2 anion in this complex reacted in most cases as a very potent two-electron donor. Therefore, LCa(N 2 )CaL acts as a synthon for the low-va
2h
Chiral-induced spin selectivity enables a room-temperature spin light-emitting diode
In traditional optoelectronic approaches, control over spin, charge, and light requires the use of both electrical and magnetic fields. In a spin-polarized light-emitting diode (spin-LED), charges are injected, and circularly polarized light is emitted from spin-polarized carrier pairs. Typically, the injection of carriers occurs with the application of an electric field, whereas spin polarizatio
2h
Electric field-tunable superconductivity in alternating-twist magic-angle trilayer graphene
Engineering moiré superlattices by twisting layers in van der Waals (vdW) heterostructures has uncovered a wide array of quantum phenomena. We constructed a vdW heterostructure that consists of three graphene layers stacked with alternating twist angles ±. At the average twist angle ~ 1.56°, a theoretically predicted "magic angle" for the formation of flat electron bands, we observed displacement
2h
Recurrent deletions in the SARS-CoV-2 spike glycoprotein drive antibody escape
Zoonotic pandemics, such as that caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), can follow the spillover of animal viruses into highly susceptible human populations. The descendants of these viruses have adapted to the human host and evolved to evade immune pressure. Coronaviruses acquire substitutions more slowly than other RNA viruses. In the spike glycoprotein, we foun
2h
Synthesis of borophane polymorphs through hydrogenation of borophene
Synthetic two-dimensional polymorphs of boron, or borophene, have attracted attention because of their anisotropic metallicity, correlated-electron phenomena, and diverse superlattice structures. Although borophene heterostructures have been realized, ordered chemical modification of borophene has not yet been reported. Here, we synthesize "borophane" polymorphs by hydrogenating borophene with at
2h
Temperature controls carbon cycling and biological evolution in the ocean twilight zone
Theory suggests that the ocean's biological carbon pump, the process by which organic matter is produced at the surface and transferred to the deep ocean, is sensitive to temperature because temperature controls photosynthesis and respiration rates. We applied a combined data-modeling approach to investigate carbon and nutrient recycling rates across the world ocean over the past 15 million years
2h
Neutralization of SARS-CoV-2 lineage B.1.1.7 pseudovirus by BNT162b2 vaccine-elicited human sera
Recently, a new severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) lineage called B.1.1.7 (variant of concern: VOC 202012/01), which is reported to spread more efficiently and faster than other strains, emerged in the United Kingdom. This variant has an unusually large number of mutations, with 10 amino acid changes in the spike (S) protein, raising concerns that its recognition by neut
2h
Debaryomyces is enriched in Crohns disease intestinal tissue and impairs healing in mice
Alterations of the mycobiota composition associated with Crohn's disease (CD) are challenging to link to defining elements of pathophysiology, such as poor injury repair. Using culture-dependent and -independent methods, we discovered that Debaryomyces hansenii preferentially localized to and was abundant within incompletely healed intestinal wounds of mice and inflamed mucosal tissues of CD huma
2h
Globally observed trends in mean and extreme river flow attributed to climate change
Anthropogenic climate change is expected to affect global river flow. Here, we analyze time series of low, mean, and high river flows from 7250 observatories around the world covering the years 1971 to 2010. We identify spatially complex trend patterns, where some regions are drying and others are wetting consistently across low, mean, and high flows. Trends computed from state-of-the-art model s
2h
Evidence of superfluidity in a dipolar supersolid from nonclassical rotational inertia
A key manifestation of superfluidity in liquids and gases is a reduction of the moment of inertia under slow rotations. Nonclassical rotational effects have also been considered in the context of the elusive supersolid phase of matter, in which superfluidity coexists with a lattice structure. Here, we show that the recently discovered supersolid phase in dipolar quantum gases features a reduced m
2h
T cell circuits that sense antigen density with an ultrasensitive threshold
Overexpressed tumor-associated antigens [for example, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)] are attractive targets for therapeutic T cells, but toxic "off-tumor" cross-reaction with normal tissues that express low levels of target antigen can occur with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)–T cells. Inspired by natural ultrasensitive response circu
2h
Investigating a tsunamigenic megathrust earthquake in the Japan Trench
The 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake occurred in the Japan Trench 10 years ago, where devastating earthquakes and tsunamis have repeatedly resulted from subduction of the Pacific plate. Densely instrumented seismic, geodetic, and tsunami observation networks precisely recorded the event, including seafloor observations. A large coseismic fault slip that unexpectedly extended to a shallow part of megath
2h
Noncanonical scaffolding of G{alpha}i and {beta}-arrestin by G protein-coupled receptors
Heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide–binding protein (G protein)–coupled receptors (GPCRs) are common drug targets and canonically couple to specific G α protein subtypes and β-arrestin adaptor proteins. G protein–mediated signaling and β-arrestin–mediated signaling have been considered separable. We show here that GPCRs promote a direct interaction between G αi protein subtype family members and β-
2h
Genomic, epigenomic, and biophysical cues controlling the emergence of the lung alveolus
The lung alveolus is the functional unit of the respiratory system required for gas exchange. During the transition to air breathing at birth, biophysical forces are thought to shape the emerging tissue niche. However, the intercellular signaling that drives these processes remains poorly understood. Applying a multimodal approach, we identified alveolar type 1 (AT1) epithelial cells as a distinc
2h
Type III secretion system effectors form robust and flexible intracellular virulence networks
Infections with many Gram-negative pathogens, including Escherichia coli , Salmonella , Shigella , and Yersinia , rely on type III secretion system (T3SS) effectors. We hypothesized that while hijacking processes within mammalian cells, the effectors operate as a robust network that can tolerate substantial contractions. This was tested in vivo using the mouse pathogen Citrobacter rodentium (enco
2h
Study of mosquito protein could lead to treatments against life-threatening viruses
The mosquito protein AEG12 strongly inhibits the family of viruses that cause yellow fever, dengue, West Nile, and Zika and weakly inhibits coronaviruses, according to scientists. The researchers found that AEG12 works by destabilizing the viral envelope, breaking its protective covering. The findings could lead to therapeutics against viruses that affect millions of people around the world.
2h
Producing highly efficient LEDs based on 2D perovskite films
Energy-efficient light-emitting diodes (LEDs) have been used in our everyday life for many decades. But the quest for better LEDs, offering both lower costs and brighter colors, has recently drawn scientists to a material called perovskite. A recent project has now developed a 2D perovskite material for the most efficient LEDs.
2h
Plans to reopen schools don't jive with teacher vaccinations
There's no correlation between states' school reopening status and the ability of teachers to get vaccinated against COVID-19, a new analysis finds. Even as President Joe Biden this week urged states to prioritize teachers for vaccinations , an analysis conducted with Johns Hopkins University's teacher vaccination tracker finds that no states are reporting the percentage of teachers and school st
2h
It's a Sin and the Ritual of AIDS Fiction
When Russell T. Davies created Queer as Folk , the groundbreaking 1999 U.K. drama series about gay men in London, he had one rule. The show would depict the vivacity of urban queer life without shying away from its darker side—but HIV/AIDS wouldn't be part of that picture. New medicines had made it so that the virus, which had massacred gay men since about 1980, "was beginning to not be a death s
2h
Read to succeed — in math; study shows how reading skill shapes more than just reading
These findings clearly demonstrate how the cooperative areas of the brain responsible for reading skill are also at work during apparently unrelated activities, such as multiplication, suggest that reading, writing and arithmetic, the foundational skills informally identified as the three Rs, might actually overlap in ways not previously imagined, let alone experimentally validated.
2h
Lithium chloride promotes recovery of radiation-induced oral mucositis and dysgeusia
Oral mucositis and taste dysfunction (dysgeusia) occurs in nearly all patients receiving head and neck radiotherapy and tremendously affects the quality of life and treatment outcome. The study "LiCl Promotes Recovery of Radiation-Induced Oral Mucositis and Dysgeusia" published in the Journal of Dental Research (JDR), investigated the hypothesis that lithium chloride (LiCl) can promote the restora
2h
A monumental particle accelerator in the Cygnus Cocoon
At the heart of Cygnus, one of the most beautiful constellations of the summer sky, beats a source of high-energy cosmic ray particles: the Cygnus Cocoon. An international group of scientists at the HAWC observatory has gathered evidence that this vast astronomical structure is the most powerful of our galaxy's natural particle accelerators known of up to now.
2h
Wing tags severely impair flight in African Cape Vultures
Conservationists who apply wing tags for identifying Cape Vultures—a species of African vulture that is vulnerable to extinction—are putting the birds' lives further at risk, a new movement ecology study has shown. Researchers from the Max Planck Institute of Animal Behavior in Germany and VulPro NPC in South Africa have demonstrated that Cape Vultures fitted with tags on their wings traveled shor
2h
Rare earths outside China: Researchers identify new deposits
Rare earth elements are the gold of the 21st century: rare and highly prized all over the world. Most known and economically viable sources of rare earths are located in China, where more than 80 percent of them are refined. This has resulted in a near monopoly situation, with China dominating international trade, particularly in heavy rare earths. Geologists and materials scientists at FAU have n
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Information transition mechanisms of spatiotemporal metasurfaces
Spatiotemporal metasurfaces are analyzed from an information perspective, in which two information transition mechanisms on group extension and independent control of multiple harmonics are revealed and characterized. The information transition efficiencies of these mechanisms are analyzed as well, which could be used to predict the channel capacity of the spatiotemporal metasurfaces for wireless
3h
Starting small to answer the big questions about photosynthesis
Despite being discovered almost 300 ago, photosynthesis still holds many unanswered questions for science, particularly the way that proteins organise themselves to convert sunlight into chemical energy and at the same time, protect plants from too much sunlight. Now a collaboration between researchers at the University of Leeds and Kobe University in Japan is developing a novel approach to the in
3h
Rare earths outside China: FAU researchers identify new deposits
Rare earth elements are the gold of the 21st century: rare and highly prized all over the world. Most known and economically viable sources of rare earths are located in China, where more than 80 percent of them are refined. This has resulted in a near monopoly situation, with China dominating international trade, particularly in heavy rare earths. Geologists and materials scientists at FAU have n
3h
Learning to help the adaptive immune system
Scientists studied the adaptive immune system as a kind of artificial intelligence that can be trained to produce the correct response to invasion by pathogens. This work may lead to more effective vaccines and immune boosting therapies.
3h
12 months of pandemic life in 12 photographs
Click here to see all of PopSci's COVID-19 coverage. There are certain sights that people have grown habituated—and even numb—to in the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic . We may have forgotten what it's like to read someone's facial expressions now that we're always masked up in public. And we've probably grown accustomed to sanitizer dispensers greeting us in every school, store, and office.
3h
Real-time observation of frequency Bloch oscillations with fibre loop modulation
Bloch oscillations (BOs) were initially predicted for electrons in a solid lattice as a static electric field is applied. Scientists in China created a synthetic frequency lattice in a fiber loop under detuned phase modulation and directly observed the frequency BOs in real time. The frequency spectrum in telecommunication band can be shifted as large as hundreds of GHz. The study may find applica
3h
Can restarting aging stem cells fight memory decline?
Researchers have discovered a mechanism linked to stem cell aging as well as how to reactivate the production of neurons. As people get older, their neural stem cells lose the ability to proliferate and produce new neurons, leading to a decline in memory function. The stem cells in our brain generate new neurons throughout life, for example in the hippocampus. This region of the brain plays a key
3h
Arbitrary polarization conversion dichroism metasurfaces for full Poincaré sphere polarizers
Polarization control is essential for tailoring light-matter interactions and is the foundation for many applications such as polarization imaging, nonlinear optics, data storage, and information multiplexing. A linear polarizer, which is a polarization optical element that filters a specific linear polarization from unpolarized light, plays an important role in both polarization generation and ma
3h
Best college graduation gifts: Tools to get them on their way
Great gifts for the recent grad in your life. (Charles DeLoye via Unsplash /) As college comes to a close, there's the ceremony with the chairs on the lawn and the polite clapping (more enthusiastically for that woman who got a double PhD—kudos). There's the champagne in plastic cups and the celebratory family meal at the local restaurant. Then it's time for the good stuff: graduation presents! S
3h
Probiotics increase gut bacteria diversity in extremely preterm infants
Extremely preterm infants can suffer from a life-threatening inflammation of the gut. A new clinical study has shown that supplements of a lactic acid bacterium may have positive effects by increasing the diversity of intestinal bacteria in these infants. The study has been led by researchers at Linköping University, Sweden, and published in the scientific journal Cell Reports Medicine.
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ADHD: Aggressive behavior is genetically coded
An international collaboration headed by researchers from iPSYCH has found genetic variants that increase the risk of aggression in children with ADHD. In the same study, the researchers also discovered that the genetics which increase aggression in some children with ADHD, are the same genetics that affect aggression in children without a diagnosis.
4h
Fossilized feeding frenzy
An international team of scientists with Fridgeir Grímsson from the University of Vienna has found a previously unknown fossil fly species in old lake sediments of the Messel Pit, a UNESCO World Heritage Site in Germany. In the stomach of the fossil insect, pollen from various plants could be detected, which allows rare insights into the feeding behavior, the ecology and the role of the fly as a p
4h
Loss induced nonreciprocity
Nonreciprocity is important in both optical information processing and topological photonics studies. Recently, scientists in China proposed a generic principle to realize nonreciprocity by using energy loss. As the phase lag induced by loss is independent of the energy propagation direction, by combining multi-lossy channels, different interference outcomes give rise to nonreciprocity and unidire
4h
AI holographic nanostructures on CMOS chips for energy-efficient security schemes
Scientist in China present a new nanoscale AI optical chip trained to perform unpowered all-optical inference at the speed of light for enhanced authentication solutions. By combining smart optical devices with imaging sensors, the scientists empower the sensors to perform complex functions as simply as putting glasses on them, achieving a neural density more than 10 times higher than human brain
4h
Children's dietary guidelines need to change, experts say
Dietary and infant feeding guidelines should be strengthened to include more practical advice on the best ways to support children to learn to like and eat vegetables. Flinders University researchers say more tailored practical advice is needed on how to offer vegetables to young children through repeated exposure and daily variety in order to increase their intake will increase consumption.
4h
Lithium niobate crystal film for integrated photonic applications
Lithium niobate film on insulator (LNOI) has become a promising photonic platform owning to its electro-optic and nonlinear optical properties. The ultralow-loss and high-confinement nanophotonic waveguides have been fabricated by the complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS)-compatible microstructure engineering of LNOI. Herein, we review the recent progress in CMOS-compatible microstructure
4h
Differences found in stroke severity and post-stroke care among Black and Hispanic women
An analysis of hospital data found that Black and Hispanic women, ages 65-74 years old hospitalized with stroke, had more severe strokes than white women of the same age. In addition, Black and Hispanic women ages 65-84 years old were more likely to be discharged to skilled nursing or rehabilitation facilities after stroke, compared to older, white stroke patients who were discharged home.
4h
Dana-Farber research leads to better understanding of the immune system in kidney cancer
In two new studies published today in Cancer Cell, researchers from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard used the emerging technology of single-cell RNA sequencing to draw a clearer picture of how kidney tumors' microenvironments change in response to immunotherapy. The researchers believe that this work points to potential targets for new drug therapies.
4h
CHOP researchers find ribosome assembly essential for stem cell regeneration
Researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have identified genes responsible for hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) regeneration via the assembly of the ribosome, the protein factories in cells that translate mRNA sequences into amino acid sequences. The findings, which were published in Cell Stem Cell, highlight the importance of proper ribosome assembly in stem cell regeneration and id
4h
First lab-grown mini-thyroids use patients' own tissue
To investigate potential alternative treatment strategies for patients with hypothyroidism, researchers have now for the first time succeeded in generating thyroid mini-organs in the lab. In a new study published in Stem Cell Reports, Robert Coppes and colleagues from the University of Groningen, The Netherlands, used healthy thyroid tissue from patients undergoing surgical removal of the thyroid
4h
Nintendo Switch controllers to enhance your gaming experience
Let's play! (Unsplash/Enrique Vidal Flores/) First released in 2017, the eighth generation Nintendo Switch is the a sought-after console for its portability, versatility, and downright awesome game selection. But a console is only as good (and usable) as its controller(s). Luckily there are many multifunctional, smart-design Switch controllers that allow for various setups including single or dou
4h
Danskerne lever længere trods COVID-19
Trods mere end 1.300 dødsfald tilskrevet COVID-19 steg den gennemsnitlige levealder i Danmark i 2020. Det viser en ny analyse foretaget af Statens Institut for Folkesundhed. En række andre europæiske lande oplever derimod nedgang i levealderen.
4h
Neck heating pads to help you work or relax in comfort
Look for a heating pad with a long cord and multiple heat settings. (Sunbeam/) If you're looking to add heat for your neck as part of a self-care routine, there are many products available that can help. Wraps which use the chemical reaction of iron oxidation to generate heat when exposed to oxygen can be convenient, but the cost — and waste — of these disposable items can add up quickly, and if
4h
Handy lights to help your indoor plants thrive
Give your indoor plants the light they need to thrive. (Unsplash/DESIGNECOLOGIST/) Whether you're in an office or a porch, keeping a plant alive doesn't always come down to your green thumb. Beyond other stimulants such as pruners and fertilizers, a plant light can help support anything from basil to citrus in a range of environments and conditions. Some common variations among lights include mod
4h
Adding triglyceride-lowering Omega-3 based medication to statins may lower stroke risk
Adding the triglyceride-lowering medication icosapent ethyl cut the risk of a first stroke by an additional 36% in patients already taking statin medications to treat high cholesterol.In previous research, icosapent ethyl reduced the risk of major cardiovascular events.The prescription medication is a highly purified form of an omega-3 fatty acid. The study's results do not apply to supplements av
4h
Nya sätt att hitta okända miljögifter hos djur
Mer än femtio år gamla vävnadsprover från lodjur och havsörn har hjälpt forskare att hitta okända miljöföroreningar som kan vara ett växande problem för det svenska djurlivet. Människan släpper ut en mängd olika kemikalier i miljön, varav somliga kan vara farliga för både oss och djurlivet. Därför finns idag miljöövervakningsprogram som följer trender i halter av kända skadliga kemikalier i miljö
5h
Boxing gloves to bring to the gym, ring, or at-home mat
The right pair of gloves for you will protect your hands and be comfortable to wear. (Unsplash/Anastase Maragos/) If you're looking to go for multiple rounds during a boxing match, gloves can make or break your experience. The weight, material, and structure of these products can influence how well you throw a punch — or defend yourself from a hook, jab or undercut. Whether you're boxing alone or
5h
Förändrat sätt att jobba även efter pandemin
Framtidens kontor kan – i spåret av pandemin – bli en plats för sociala möten och kreativa processer, samtidigt som behovet av stora ytor minskar. Allt pekar också på fortsatt färre tjänsteresor och pendlingsresor. Forskare har studerat på vilket sätt pandemin påverkat mötes- och resebeteenden hos anställda vid tio svenska organisationer (myndigheter, universitet och företag) och frågat personalc
5h
Biggest and smallest Caribbean mammals are most at risk of extinction
The largest and smallest mammals in the Caribbean have been the most vulnerable to extinction, a new study shows. The findings, published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B , help predict future extinction risk and inform the conservation strategies needed to prevent future biodiversity loss. Most past studies have found that larger mammals go extinct more often, so the new findings are un
5h
3D printing method turns goo into a hand in minutes
A new 3D printing method can create a life-size human hand in 19 minutes—instead of six hours using conventional 3D printing. It's a step toward creating 3D printed human organs and tissue, researchers report. It looks like science fiction: A machine dips into a shallow vat of translucent yellow goo and pulls out what becomes a life-sized hand. But it's real—and the biotechnology could eventually
5h
NIH-led team sets new bar in retinal imaging
A team led by scientists at the National Eye Institute (NEI) has noninvasively visualized the light-sensing cells in the back of the eye, known as photoreceptors, in greater detail than ever before. Published in Optica, the researchers report how they improved imaging resolution by a third by selectively blocking the light used to image the eye.
5h
Food bank use surged during the pandemic – but they can rarely provide all the help people need
Many families have faced a number of new economic challenges since the COVID-19 pandemic began. Although some incomes have been bolstered through a £20 weekly universal credit uplift or protected through the job retention scheme (furlough), it wasn't enough to prevent a further surge in the use of food banks. But research shows that while services such as food banks provide marginal help, they are
5h
World's first team to run post-mortem imaging routinely to determine causes of whale and dolphin deaths
Dead bodies of cetaceans, aquatic mammals like whales and dolphins, are occasionally found washed ashore. A research team from City University of Hong Kong (CityU) is the first team worldwide to routinely apply "virtopsy," a pioneer dead body examination technique, on stranded cetaceans to find out their causes of death, health conditions, as well as the anthropogenic impact on their well-being. T
5h
Noxious contracts and inequality: The hidden side of pandemic life
We hear all the time that the pandemic has "cast a sharp light" on American inequality. And indeed it has. But it's not only exposed long-standing inequalities in the American workforce, it's also created fundamentally new types of inequality, most notably a stark risk divide between workers in remote and face-to-face occupations, says Stanford sociologist David Grusky.
5h
New test makes detection of genetic material visible to the naked eye
Researchers at Delft University of Technology (TU Delft) have developed a test that allows them to detect specific pieces of genetic material, the results of which can be read with the naked eye. The test could be used to detect viruses, such as the coronavirus, and antibiotic-resistant bacteria quickly and cheaply. The results have been published in Biophysical Journal.
5h
New species of firefly discovered in Singapore
Researchers from the Lee Kong Chian Natural History Museum, National University of Singapore, have discovered a new species of firefly from the last remaining freshwater swamp forest in Singapore. This is the first time since 1909 that a new species of luminous firefly has been discovered in Singapore—highlighting the need for continued biodiversity research, even in small, well-studied, and highl
5h
The Atlantic Daily: First Came the Pandemic. Then Came New Parenthood.
Last summer, as the pandemic raged on, my colleague Sophie Gilbert became a parent. It was the hardest thing she's ever done. "Other than my husband, not a single person I love has really seen me being a mother," she writes in an extraordinary essay . "This new person I've become since I gave birth is a person virtually no one knows." With the birth of her twins, Sophie joined the millions of par
6h
Nano-micelle packaging CRISPR/Cas9 components enables brain genome editing
The search of safe and efficient delivery methods of CRISPR/Cas9 is still ongoing. We fabricated nano-micelle co-loading Cas9 mRNA and gRNA in the core, and proved for the first time that RNA-based delivery of CRISPR/Cas9 induces genome editing in mouse brain parenchyma. This was possible because: first, co-loading gRNA with Cas9 mRNA protected gRNA from degradation, and second, polyethylene glyco
6h
After COVID-19, work will never be 'normal' again
A year ago, just after Bay Area governments imposed a shelter-in-place order to check the spread of a mysterious new coronavirus, Cristina Banks worried about how she would work from home. She would miss her office at UC Berkeley's Haas School of Business. She would miss interacting with colleagues and students. She would miss her books and her papers.
6h
Researchers probe cell nucleus response with needle-tip technique
Kaitlin McCreery is the coauthor of a new paper published in Small that deals with diagnosing diseases such as osteoarthritis in soft tissue. McCreery is currently a Ph.D. student in the Neu Lab where she studies the biophysical relationship between cells and tissues to gain insights about tissue development and pathology. The work is one of two papers on nuclear mechanobiology that were published
6h
Fungi use ingenious strategies to forage underground
When you think of fungi, you'll probably picture a huddle of chubby brown mushrooms, or the large, red-capped toadstools you stumble across in the woods. In doing so, you're reducing fungi to their reproductive organs—tasty or striking as they may often be.
6h
Unhealthy weight gains, increased drinking reported by Americans coping with pandemic stress
As growing vaccine demand signals a potential turning point in the global COVID-19 pandemic, the nation's health crisis is far from over. One year after the World Health Organization declared COVID-19 a global pandemic, many adults report undesired changes to their weight, increased drinking and other negative behavior changes that may be related to an inability to cope with prolonged stress, acco
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Why tackling malnutrition is key to women's empowerment
Disruptions to food and health systems because of COVID-19 are causing rates of malnutrition to rise substantially. Experts predict that severe hunger around the worldwill more than double over the course of the pandemicand in many parts of the world malnutrition will kill more people than the COVID-19 virus itself.
6h
Lifestyle intervention is beneficial for most people with type 2 diabetes, but not all
For people who are overweight or obese and have type 2 diabetes, the first line of treatment is usually lifestyle intervention, including weight loss and increased physical activity. While this approach has cardiovascular benefit for many, it can be detrimental for people who have poor blood sugar control, according to a study conducted by researchers at Wake Forest School of Medicine.
6h
Sociologist looks at worker inequities as restaurants reopen from pandemic
The pandemic has been devastating to restaurants, as well as the rest of the hospitality industry. But as damaging as it's been, the ensuing shutdown has shown that restaurants have worked creatively to keep serving food to an eager audience and now have the opportunity to change up the employee dynamic to benefit both the workers and industry.
6h
Best outdoor TV: For rooftop gatherings and patio parties
Great options if you want to watch some tube from your deck or backyard. (Jordan Koons via Unsplash/) Whether you're looking to throw a socially-distanced outdoor Grammys watch party, or you just want to watch the latest episode of The Bachelor with a breeze on your face, outdoor TVs are a great way to entertain and get some fresh air at the same time. Most standard TVs aren't built to withstand
6h
Tracing and controlling high pathogenicity avian influenza
Since October 30, 2020, there have been over 30 recorded outbreaks of high pathogenicity avian influenza (HPAI) in domestic poultry and wild fowl in Japan. This outbreak was caused by the influenza A virus H5N8, a known High Pathogenicity Avian Influenza Virus (HPAIV). In such a scenario, identification of the source of the virus and its transmission route is important to control its spread.
7h
Fine structure revealed of potential alternative to lead compound used in sensors
The fine structure of barium titanite, a potential alternative to lead titanite, has been revealed by researchers employing a novel technique over the extremely short time period that the ferroelectric phenomena experienced by these materials occur. The investigation should assist further exploration of how to replace lead titanate with other materials, so that its widespread applicability may be
7h
Free-standing photocrosslinked protein polymer hydrogels for sustained drug release
Protein hydrogels, three-dimensional macromolecular structures that do not dissolve in water (in spite of being hydrophilic), can hold large quantities of aqueous solutions due to the network formed from chemical or physical crosslinking. Partly because of this they have many medical applications including tissue engineering, wound healing and drug delivery.
7h
New metrics could reduce gender gap in STEM fields
Hiring, promotion and tenure within universities are based on objective metrics of performance, something that is often evaluated using metrics that disproportionately favor men over women, such as citations and invited lectureships.
7h
Toward a more comprehensive understanding of aridity changes over global drylands
Global drylands are experiencing faster-than-average warming and are also among the most vulnerable regions to climate change. Meteorological metrics all point to an emerging trend of increased surface aridity, raising concerns of land desertification and degradation. However, recent satellite observations also show lusher drylands, in apparent contradiction to the image of drylands becoming drier
7h
Most fern species in Xishuangbanna are rare
A researcher from the Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden (XTBG) said in a floristic study that the majority of fern species in the forest habitat of Xishuangbanna of Yunnan province are locally rare. Two-thirds of terrestrial fern species and nearly all epiphytes are rare.
7h
Novel electrocatalysis system realizes ambient ammonia electrosynthesis
It's commonly known that the electrocatalytic nitrogen (N2) reduction reaction (NRR) can convert N2 and H2O into ammonia (NH3), one of the most essential chemicals in ecological system. With renewable electricity under mild conditions, it's envisaged as a promising strategy to replace the industrial Haber-Bosch process. However, this method is still far away from the practical application because
7h
Our bodies use less water than those of other primates
Among primates, humans evolved to be the low-flow model: Our bodies use 30% to 50% less water per day than those of our closest animal cousins, research finds. Our bodies are constantly losing water: when we sweat, go to the bathroom, even when we breathe. That water needs to be replenished to keep blood volume and other body fluids within normal ranges. An ancient shift in our body's ability to
7h
Scientists found new way to synthesize chiral tetraarylmethanes
A group of scientists at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) have achieved a catalytic asymmetric synthesis of tetraarylmethanes by chiral phosphoric catalysis. With this process, two libraries of structurally distinct CTAMs were efficiently synthesized with high enantioselectivity. Preliminary biological activity study indicated that these spherical molecules are highly pro
7h
Master the Full Adobe Creative Cloud With This Expert Led Training Package
As smartphones have proliferated — putting cameras, microphones, and more in our pockets — the creative world has become more accessible, albeit not without some odd results . As a result, more and more of us are turning to Adobe's Creative Cloud for both passion and career-related reasons, and the Complete All-in-One Adobe Creative Cloud Max Suite Certification Course Bundle, currently $33.99, 9
7h
Synkad el med uppkopplade hushåll
Med hjälp av AI kan det bli möjligt att optimera vår energianvändning genom att synka el från olika typer av producenter och sedan distribuera elen dit den behövs för stunden. Systemet kräver dock än mer uppkopplade hem och med det följer risken för integritetsintrång. Vårt energisystem blir alltmer distribuerat: från att nästan all el tidigare levererades från några få centralt placerade anläggn
8h
Elon Musk Explains Why Starship SN10 Exploded After Landing
SpaceX has been working on its new heavy-lift rocket for the past few years, and the company has been good enough to stream all of the tests live. Naturally, we've seen the Starship blow up a few times because space is hard. Most recently, the Starship SN10 prototype landed after its high-altitude test flight only to explode a few minutes later . Now we know a bit about why that happened and how
8h
Lifestyle research studies to reduce risk of Alzheimer's respond to COVID-19 challenges
The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on public health is staggering; more than one hundred million cases and two million deaths worldwide. In response, most countries and local governments have taken substantial measures — such as travel restrictions and physical distancing — to keep their citizens safe. Both the pandemic and related protective measures pose challenges for ongoing clinical resear
8h
Spillet om 5G: Nu starter afgørende frekvensauktion
I dag begynder auktionen over fem frekvensbånd til 5G-mobilnetværk. Især fordelingen af 3,5 GHz er ventet med spænding, da det er udpeget som det mest centrale 5G-frekvensbånd. Her er en guide til at forstå frekvensauktionen, og hvad der er på spil.
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The Atlantic's April Cover Story
A teaching kitchen. A rooftop greenhouse. College-level classes on multivariable calculus and linear algebra. And, in a global pandemic that has only exacerbated inequality, the luxury of attending class, largely undisrupted, in person. At the most elite private schools across the country, students have access to the best education that money can buy—creating an obscene gulf between how rich kids
9h
Joint profiling of DNA and proteins in single cells to dissect genotype-phenotype associations in leukemia
Nature Communications, Published online: 11 March 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-21810-3 It is currently difficult to map DNA variants and surface phenotypes in the same cells, preventing direct linkage of phenotype and genotype. Here the authors report DAb-seq for simultaneous capture of DNA genotype and cell surface phenotype from single cells at high throughput.
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DeepTCR is a deep learning framework for revealing sequence concepts within T-cell repertoires
Nature Communications, Published online: 11 March 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-21879-w The advent of high-throughput T-cell receptor sequencing has allowed for the rapid and thorough characterization of the adaptive immune response. Here the authors show how deep learning can reveal both descriptive and predictive sequence concepts within the immune repertoire.
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Hepatitis B virus cccDNA is formed through distinct repair processes of each strand
Nature Communications, Published online: 11 March 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-21850-9 HBV covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) enables and persists in chronic infection, but the molecular mechanism of its formation is unclear. Here, Wei and Ploss elucidate the detailed kinetics and biochemical steps by which the relaxed circular DNA is converted into cccDNA.
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mTORC1 couples cyst(e)ine availability with GPX4 protein synthesis and ferroptosis regulation
Nature Communications, Published online: 11 March 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-21841-w Glutathione peroxidase 4 (GPX4) inhibits ferroptosis, but protein synthesis is inefficient and costly. Here, the authors reveal that cystine uptake promotes GPX4 synthesis by activating mTORC1 and show that cancer cells are sensitized to ferroptosis by mTORC1 inhibition.
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Seeding the idea of encapsulating a representative synthetic metagenome in a single yeast cell
Nature Communications, Published online: 11 March 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-21877-y Synthetic metagenomics could potentially unravel the complexities of microbial ecosystems by revealing the simplicity of microbial communities captured in a single cell. Conceptionally, a yeast cell carrying a representative synthetic metagenome could uncover the complexity of multi-species interactions, illust
10h
Lehigh U. researchers: 'One step closer to unlocking mysteries of the bio/nano interface'
An interdisciplinary research team at Lehigh University has unraveled how functional biomaterials rely upon an interfacial protein layer to transmit signals to living cells concerning their adhesion, proliferation and overall development. According to an article published today in Scientific Reports , the nanoscale features and properties of an underlying substrate do not impact the biological res
10h
Updated guidance confirms crucial role of nurses for patients with acute ischemic stroke
Three scientific statements provide newer, evidence-based suggestions for practices and assessment tools that offer guidance for nurses to provide comprehensive care for patients with acute ischemic stroke.Timely diagnosis of ischemic stroke is vital to expedite treatment that can potentially prevent permanent damage to brain tissue, which can result in severe disabilities.Close monitoring of pati
10h
Pandemic crippling nature conservation efforts
The COVID-19 pandemic has not only had devastating effects on humans, it has also heavily impacted efforts to safeguard natural ecosystems and habitats around the globe, conservationists warned Thursday.
11h
Hawaii's rains, floods cited as examples of climate change
Heavy rains are part of the winter wet season in Hawaiian Islands. But the downpours triggering flooding that destroyed homes and bridges and set off mass evacuations on multiple islands this week are also an example of the more intense rainstorms officials and climate scientists say are occurring more frequently as the planet warms.
12h
Mothers in academia address workplace inequalities
As the coronavirus pandemic's grip on the United States stretched from weeks into months, with huge swaths of the American workforce bound to their homes, studies began trickling out revealing that the impact and burden of quarantine was not equally shared. Women—particularly mothers, and especially mothers of color—were bearing the brunt of the pandemic's toll, losing their jobs in greater number
12h
När tänderna vill gå tillbaka efter tandreglering
Efter tandreglering vill i många fall tänderna gå tillbaka till sitt ursprungliga läge. Övertandläkaren Sasan Naraghi har undersökt olika sätt att fixera tänderna i den nya positionen. Resultatet visar att alla undersökta metoder ger gott resultat, och att ibland stannar tänderna på plats utan åtgärd.