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Scientists may have solved ancient mystery of 'first computer'
Researchers claim breakthrough in study of 2,000-year-old Antikythera mechanism, an astronomical calculator found in sea From the moment it was discovered more than a century ago, scholars have puzzled over the Antikythera mechanism, a remarkable and baffling astronomical calculator that survives from the ancient world. The hand-powered, 2,000-year-old device displayed the motion of the universe,
6h
Controlled by light alone, new smart materials twist, bend and move
Researchers at Tufts University School of Engineering have created light-activated composite devices able to execute precise, visible movements and form complex three-dimensional shapes without the need for wires or other actuating materials or energy sources. The design combines programmable photonic crystals with an elastomeric composite that can be engineered at the macro and nano scale to resp
6h
How long will we keep wearing masks?
It may not make sense to shed our new mask habit. (Unsplash, Anna Shvets/) Click here to see all of PopSci's COVID-19 coverage. What a difference a year makes. Prior to March of 2020, if you didn't work in a hospital setting or on a construction site, it's unlikely you had ever worn a face mask. Now, we own them by the dozens—a grab bag of KN95s and bandanas, surgical masks, and floral-printed fa
5h
The fight for the Galápagos: race to expand reserve as fishing fleets circle
Ecuador's president to decide on proposal to expand islands' marine reserve, seen as vital to protect world heritage site from fishing industry Strolling along a beach dotted with sea lion pups and their mothers barking at one another, utterly unconcerned by your presence, is a singularly magical experience. On the trail leading to the shore on tiny Seymour Island, noisily courting blue-footed bo
6h
No reason not to keep using AstraZeneca vaccine, says WHO
World Health Organization tells countries to continue using jab while it looks into blood clot reports Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage A World Health Organization expert advisory committee is looking at the Oxford/AstraZeneca Covid-19 vaccine after some countries paused its distribution, but there is no reason not to use it, a spokeswoman has said. Health authorities
2h
Who Would Kidnap a Space Telescope?
NASA's new space telescope has had a rough go. Name a problem, and this telescope—meant to be the most powerful of its kind, a worthy successor to the famous Hubble— has faced it : poor management, technical errors, budget overruns, schedule delays, and a pandemic. So, naturally, the people responsible for the telescope's safety are now thinking about pirates. Yes, pirates. The topic came up at a
3h
Hemiandrus jacinda: insect named after New Zealand prime minister
New species of wētā, a giant flightless cricket, is seen as 'reflecting traits' of Jacinda Ardern New Zealand's prime minister, Jacinda Ardern, has received what may be her greatest accolade yet: a large insect named in her honour. A new species of wētā – a giant flightless cricket that is endemic to New Zealand – has been named Hemiandrus jacinda for being Labour-party red in colour and "long-li
6h
Wales to ease Covid lockdown restrictions from Saturday
First minister announces 'stay local' replacing 'stay home' rule among other changes Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Some semblance of normal life will begin again in Wales from Saturday, after the country's first minister, Mark Drakeford, announced a change from the current "stay home" restrictions to more lenient "stay local" requirements. From Saturday, four peopl
7h
World's wurst burglar: half-eaten sausage helps German police solve nine-year-old burglary
Inquiry into 2012 burglary is revived after French police turn up a DNA match for unrelated crime German police say they have solved a nine-year-old burglary case after DNA found on a half-eaten piece of sausage matched that of a man detained in France over an unrelated crime. Police in the western town of Schwelm said on Thursday the sausage belonged to the victim, and the suspect – a 30-year-ol
12h
World at 'peak twin' as birth rates reach historic high, study finds
Access to IVF and fertility services and postponement of parenthood drive rise in global twinning rates Twins may be more common today than at any time in history, according to the first comprehensive survey of twin births around the world. Researchers analysed records from more than 100 countries and found a substantial rise in twin birthrates since the 1980s, with one in 42 people now born a tw
16h
These fossilized lamprey hatchlings disprove an age-old evolutionary theory
An illustration of the hatchling lamprey found in South Africa. (Kristen Tietjen/) You're not descended from a water vampire. It's probably not a possibility you'd considered until now, but for more than a hundred years, evolutionary biologists suspected that the lamprey, a jawless, eel-shaped, blood-sucking fish, was the closest living model of the very first vertebrates. Despite how that sounds
17h
Cancer-Hunting Nanotech Makes Tumors Light Up
New fluorescent nanotech seems to be able to hunt down and coat cancer inside the body, painting the tumors a brightly glowing hue that makes them easier to spot. Scientists at Imperial College London designed these nanoprobes, specifically called bioharmonophores, to target cancer cells and glow in a way that stood out from how regular tissue is illuminated by medical imaging tools, according to
17h
Thousands of Patients Are Swallowing Tiny Pill-Cameras to Look for Cancer
An unusual drug trial just kicked off in the UK. A group of 11,000 National Health Service patients across England who have experienced symptoms of bowel cancer are lining up to receive a special drug capsule that stores a tiny camera inside of it, which is designed to check for a variety of cancers. "As we come out of 'peak COVID' and the disruption of the pandemic, the NHS is now pushing ahead
18h
This Meteor Exploded So Violently That It Shook Entire Buildings Below
Dramatic Entrance On Sunday night, a meteor rocketed over Vermont before exploding in such a powerful blast that people could hear it from miles away as it shook cars and buildings below. The fireball, NASA Meteor Watch later announced on Facebook, was likely a chunk of a fragmented asteroid that flew over Mount Mansfield State Forest at 42,000 miles per hour before exploding. The explosion becam
19h
Vikings Once Called North America Home
Centuries before Columbus, a small band of Norse people explored the Canadian coast. For now, the only proof is a single settlement. Here's what's known about how the Vikings came to North America, where they landed and why they left.
19h
Only Your Boss Can Cure Your Burnout
I n the early 1970s, a psychoanalyst named Herbert J. Freudenberger opened a free clinic to treat poor patients in New York City. It was a bit of a passion project: Freudenberger would work 10 to 12 hours during the day in his private practice, then head over to the free clinic to work until midnight or later. He seemed to realize that he was overcommitting. "You start your second job when most p
3h
American Special Ops Forces Are Everywhere
Illustrations by Mike McQuade Image above, clockwise from top left: A U.S. Army Special Forces sniper, 1991; the aftermath of Operation Eagle Claw, the failed U.S. rescue operation in Iran, 1980; a marine during the invasion of Grenada, 1983; Captain Vernon Gillespie Jr. in Vietnam, 1964; soldiers on patrol at Camp Victory, in Somalia, 10 days after 18 Americans were killed during the Delta-led B
3h
Huge Assembly Line Machine Catches on Fire at Tesla Factory
Expect Delays Bad news for Tesla: the carmaker's massive metal stamping machine, perhaps the largest machine of its kind in the world according to Electrek , caught on fire yesterday at the company's factory in Fremont, California. The incident is almost certain to slow down production of the Model Y, a vehicle that features one massive piece, rather than 70 different ones, acting as a rear under
1h
WTF Is an NFT?
This week we talk about non-fungible tokens, digital art collectors, and what it's like to sell one of your tweets.
3h
Nano-gate: Researchers create voltage-controlled nanopores that can trap particles as they try to pass through
Scientists from the Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research at Osaka University fabricated nanopores in silicon dioxide, that were only 300 nm, in diameter surrounded by electrodes. These nanopores could prevent particles from entering just by applying a voltage, which may permit the development of sensors that can detect very small concentrations of target molecules, as well as next-gener
3h
Researchers design a new highly-selective tool to study 'undruggable' proteins through the sugars they depend on
Sugar has been called "evil," "toxic," and "poison." But the body needs sugars, too. Sugar molecules help cells recognize and fight viruses and bacteria, shuttle proteins from cell to cell, and make sure those proteins function. Too much or too little can contribute to a range of maladies, including neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's, inflammation, diabetes, and even cancer.
19h
A protocol to explore entanglement dynamics via spacetime duality
In recent years, there have been significant advancements in the development of digital quantum computers and simulators. These emerging physical systems are opening up unprecedented possibilities for controlling and measuring a variety of quantum dynamics. As a result, some fundamental questions in many-body physics that would have previously been considered speculative and outside the realm of e
1h
Your guide to kid-proofing a computer
Remote learning resulted in lots of kids getting their first laptop. (AHMED HINDAWI / Unsplash/) Once your kids are old enough for their own computers, it opens up a whole new world of enjoyment. But with that comes a whole new set of concerns, and you start wondering what else a new device might expose your youngsters to. Microsoft and Apple are wise to this sort of worry, and have built parenta
19h
Shivering in the Pleistocene: New analyses of prehistoric climate conditions map human adaptations to cold
Jesús Rodríguez and Ana Mateos, scientists at the Centro Nacional de Investigación sobre la Evolución Humana (CENIEH), working with the geographer Christian Willmes of the University of Cologne (Germany), have analyzed the climatic conditions humans experienced in western Europe during the Middle Pleistocene, evaluating their possible adaptations to the cold using a thermoregulation model that sim
3h
Where are we most likely to catch COVID-19?
We've learned that sanitizing surfaces is less important than keeping college students masked and far apart. (Unsplash, Element5 Digital/) Click here to see all of PopSci's COVID-19 coverage. One in four Americans had received at least one dose of a coronavirus vaccine as of March 10. After a year of living through the COVID-19 pandemic (and now that the end may finally be in sight) those who hav
5h
Fourth-generation wire micrometer that rivals best in the world
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have developed a dramatically improved laser-based instrument that measures the diameter of fine-gauge wires, fibers and other objects only about three times the thickness of a human hair. Known as a laser micrometer, the device's accuracy equals that of its state-of-the-art counterparts but is cheaper, simpler to operate and
3h
Accurate aging of wild animals thanks to first epigenetic clock for bats
A new study led by University of Maryland and UCLA researchers found that DNA from tissue samples can be used to accurately predict the age of bats in the wild. The study also showed age-related changes to the DNA of long-lived species are different from those in short-lived species, especially in regions of the genome near genes associated with cancer and immunity. This work provides new insight
6h
The Books Briefing: Meghan Markle's Story Is Devastating and Familiar
In an interview with Oprah on Sunday , Meghan Markle and Prince Harry described the experiences that led them to leave their official roles in the British Royal Family. Specifically, Markle said, a barrage of attacks from the British press, racist attitudes within the Royal Family, a lack of support, and other factors drove her to have suicidal thoughts. (The Palace has since released a statement
1h
What the first year of COVID tells us about the next
On March 11, 2020 the World Health Organization declared COVID-19 to be a global pandemic. (Deposit Photos, jennmiranda3855@yahoo.co.uk; Unsplash, Jonathan J. Castellon/) Click here to see all of PopSci's COVID-19 coverage. On March 11, 2020 the World Health Organization declared COVID-19, a disease caused by the newly-discovered coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, a pandemic. Two days later, then-president
5h
Blockchain Company Sets Priceless Banksy Painting on Fire to Create an NFT
An original by world famous street artist Banksy was lit on fire during a livestream — and promptly sold for $380,000 worth of Ethereum as a non-fungible token (NFT), the BBC reports . Ironically, the artwork, titled "Morons," is a critique of the fine art market itself. The black and white print shows an auctioneer at the auction house Christie's, the same auction that sold an NFT for $69 millio
42min
Can we ever hug again?
In a post-pandemic world, will COVID-19 still keep us from hugging and shaking hands? (Unsplash, Hian Oliveria/) Click here to see all of PopSci's COVID-19 coverage. Humans need touch, and with the twin arrivals of springtime and COVID-19 vaccines, skin hunger borne from a year of social distancing and sequestration is becoming harder to bear. As more and more people become vaccinated and feeling
5h
CEQA Is an Abomination
B y any reasonable metric , the empty lot on the corner of First and Lorena Street in the Boyle Heights neighborhood of Los Angeles is a natural place to build housing. With a bus stop next door and an Expo Line light-rail station less than a quarter mile away, residents would enjoy an easy 30-minute commute to one of the densest business districts in North America. They could walk to daily neces
3h
47 million year old fly found with a full belly
Scientists have found a previously unknown fossil fly species in old lake sediments of the Messel Pit, a UNESCO World Heritage Site in Germany. In the stomach of the fossil insect, pollen from various plants could be detected, which allows rare insights into the feeding behavior, the ecology and the role of the fly as a pollinator.
2h
Androgen Receptors for COVID-19
There's a report of an interesting small-molecule drug effort against the coronavirus that seems to have produced rather significant results. The idea goes back to effects that were noticed last year – for example, in this population-based study from Italy. It's been known since the early days of the pandemic that males were overall more susceptible to severe disease than females, and there have
13h
Bacterial communities vary on different parts of the eye surface
A pioneering study led by University of Saskatchewan (USask) veterinary ophthalmologist Dr. Marina Leis (DVM, DACVO) shows that bacterial communities vary on different parts of the eye surface—a finding that significantly alters understanding of the mechanisms of eye disease and can lead to developing new treatments.
3h
After the Blast
Beirut in the 1960s. Rebuilt after the civil war, the city's downtown, west of the port, suffered significant damage in the 2020 explosion. (Photo illustration by Rana Salam; images courtesy of the artist) This article was published online on March 12, 2021. I had never really thought about my windows, about the thickness of the panes or the type of glass. Like so many things that I'll never agai
4h
Remote control for quantum emitters
In order to exploit the properties of quantum physics technologically, quantum objects and their interaction must be precisely controlled. In many cases, this is done using light. Researchers at the University of Innsbruck and the Institute of Quantum Optics and Quantum Information (IQOQI) of the Austrian Academy of Sciences have now developed a method to individually address quantum emitters usin
58min
COVID-19 survivor's guilt is a growing problem as we confront our losses
People are eager to return to normal after a year of coronavirus, but is the U.S. there yet? Hardly . The ongoing psychological and spiritual damage caused by the pandemic is rising, too. Guilt and shame are two prevailing emotions surrounding COVID-19. This guilt stems in part from the fact that anyone could be a potential carrier of the virus – so anyone, then, could unwittingly pass it to anot
7h
The circumnuclear starburst ring in infrared ultraluminous galaxies
Ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs), powered by starburst activity and often with supermassive black holes accreting material at their nuclei, contain large reservoirs of molecular gas. This is to be expected: Molecular gas is the raw material for new stars and moreover the presence of the infrared luminous warm dust implies an abundance of molecular gas. Galaxy collisions often trigger star
1h
RNA detection method advances in situ transcriptomics with potential for a range of biomedical applications
Human cells typically transcribe half of their roughly 20,000 genes into RNA molecules at any given time. Just like with proteins, the function of those RNA species not only relies on their abundance but also their precise localization within the 3D space of each cell. Many RNA molecules convey gene information from the cell's nucleus to the protein-synthesizing machinery distributed throughout th
3h
The Army put fitness trackers on paratroopers in Alaska to fine-tune its training
The study includes around 900 paratroopers in the Spartan brigade. (Whoop/) The airborne Army brigade known as the Spartans is based in Anchorage, Alaska. "We jump out of pretty much anything that flies," says Phil Rank, chief warrant officer with the light infantry brigade. "If it can get in the air, we can get out of it." Being a paratrooper in the Army and jumping out of perfectly good airplan
3min
Tool spots deepfake photos via light in the eyes
Researchers have developed a tool that automatically identifies deepfake photos by analyzing light reflections in the eyes. The tool proved 94% effective with portrait-like photos in experiments described in a new paper on the tool. "The cornea is almost like a perfect semisphere and is very reflective," says lead author, Siwei Lyu, professor in the computer science and engineering department at
10min
New proteins 'out of nothing'
In a worldwide collaboration, researchers have analysed, at unprecedented breadth and depth, the evolutionary history of how a protein – which is essential for the fertility of male fruit flies and emerged from previously non-coding DNA became functional and took on a relatively stable structure.
28min
Shedding light on perovskite films
Perovskite semiconductors are considered promising materials for solar cells of the next generation. Suitability of a semiconductor for photovoltaics is reflected among others by the so-called photoluminescence quantum efficiency. Researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have now developed a model, by means of which photoluminescence quantum efficiency of perovskite films can be dete
28min
Confined magnetic colloidal system for controllable fluid transport
Collective dynamics of confined colloids is crucial in diverse scenarios. Yet, fine-tuning the dynamics of colloids in confined spaces remains a formidable task. Here, the collective dynamics of confined magnetic colloids is finely modulated by magnetic fields. In particular, the mechanical properties of the colloidal suspension can be probed in real-time and this strategy is utilized to tune micr
42min
As Vaccine Campaign Expands, A Racial Gap Persists
As of Friday morning, more than 64 million people in the United States have received at least one dose of a Covid-19 vaccine. But amid the expanding vaccination campaign, some scholars and analysts have raised questions about who has, and has not, been able to access Covid-19 vaccination.
42min
Kammen som kan upptäcka både exoplaneter och sjukdomar
En ny typ av mikrokam, en minimal optisk mätsticka, har utvecklats av forskare på Chalmers. Den skulle kunna användas i självkörande fordon, i appar med koll på människors hälsa och i rymdobservatorier. Minimala optiska mätstickor – mikrokammar – kan användas för att upptäcka exoplaneter, hålla koll på vår hälsa och göra internet mer energieffektivt. En mikrokam kan beskrivas som en optisk stämga
55min
Progress in fused-ring electron acceptors
From 1995-2015, fullerene derivatives had been the dominating electron acceptors in organic solar cells (OSCs) owing to their performance superiority to other acceptors. However, the drawbacks of fullerenes, such as weak visible absorption, limited tunability of electronic properties and morphological instability, restrict further development of OSCs toward higher efficiencies and practical applic
58min
Using AI to assess surgical performance
A research team at Inselspital, Bern University Hospital and Caresyntax has succeeded in proving that artificial intelligence can reliably assess surgeons' skills. A method involving a three-stage procedure has been presented that correctly designates good and mediocre performance with a high accuracy rate. This paves the way for further steps towards AI-supported expert systems.
1h
Extinction cascading through ecosystems could spell trouble for humans
Humans rely on nature extensively for everything from food production to coastal protection, but those contributions might be more threatened than previously thought, according to new findings from the University of Colorado Boulder. New research in has found that even if ecoservices themselves aren't directly threatened, they can become threatened when other species around them go extinct–often
1h
Researchers find surprising transition-metal-type bonds while building new calcium(I) complexes
A team of researchers from University Erlangen-Nürnberg, Nanjing Tech University and Philipps-Universität Marburg has found that it is possible to use calcium(I) with β-diketiminate as a ligand and potassium as a terminal reductant for dinitrogen reduction. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes how they tried to make a calcium(I) complex in their lab using bulky liga
1h
Building codes are probably going to get less energy efficient
Buildings being constructed now will determine how energy efficient our world is for decades. (Pixabay/) While big climate bills tend to capture the attention of policymakers and the public, a much less-conspicuous set of rules also plays a major role in decarbonizing cities: building codes. Building codes—in addition to their fundamental role in ensuring new construction meets basic health and s
1h
Gravity mission still unearthing hidden secrets
Despite ESA's GOCE mission ending over seven years ago, scientists continue to use this remarkable satellite's gravity data to delve deep and unearth secrets about our planet. Recent research shows how scientists have combined GOCE data with measurements taken at the surface to generate a new model of Earth's crust and upper mantle. This is the first time such a model has been created this way—and
1h
Hierarchical mechanical metamaterials offer multiple stable configurations
Multistable mechanical metamaterials are artificial materials whose microarchitecture offers more than two different stable configurations. Existing mechanical metamaterials rely on origami or kirigami-based designs with snap-through instability and microstructured soft mechanisms. Scalable structures that can be built from mechanical metamaterials with an extremely large number of programmable st
1h
Evaluating the rehabilitation of an old mine waste rock pile
After 12 years, woody vegetation now covers the upper part of the rehabilitated area, offering a green visual landscape to the inhabitants of the village. However, in the lower part of the pile the vegetation shows excessive levels of cadmium, leading the researchers to propose an alternative technique to rehabilitate waste piles by classifying and selectively managing the mine waste.
1h
With gene therapy, scientists develop opioid-free solution for chronic pain
A gene therapy for chronic pain could offer a safer, non-addictive alternative to opioids. Researchers have developed the new therapy, which works by temporarily repressing a gene involved in sensing pain. It increased pain tolerance in mice, lowered their sensitivity to pain and provided months of pain relief without causing numbness.
1h
Four 3D Printed Houses Are Going on the Market in Austin
In late January of this year, one of the first 3D printed homes in the US went up for sale on Long Island. Now it's being joined by four additional homes located in Austin, Texas. The Austin homes are a collaboration between 3D printing construction company ICON and a Kansas City-based developer called 3Strands . 3Strands isn't just any housing developer—they focus on cutting construction costs a
1h
New clinical method could lower risk of recurring heart attacks
Researchers at Lund University in Sweden can now show that a new examination method identifies high-risk plaques in the blood vessels surrounding the heart, that cannot be seen solely with traditional angiograms. This type of plaque, rich in fat, could potentially cause recurring heart attacks in patients with heart disease. The study is published in the The Lancet.
1h
Shaping radio signals using light
Shaping radio signals using photonics technologies seems like a detour. But the versatility of current programmable silicon photonic circuits can open new possibilities according to researchers of the University of Twente. They have presented their microwave photonic spectral shaper inAPL Photonics .
1h
Scientists build the smallest cable containing a spin switch
A study published in Nature Communications involving researchers from the Madrid Institute for Advanced Studies in Nanoscience (IMDEA) and the University of Sevilla has measured for the first time the electrical conductivity of a single carbon nanotube with spin-crosslinked molecules inside it.
1h
Cutting-edge scale-out technology from Toshiba will take Fintech and Logistics to new level
Toshiba announced a scale-out technology that minimizes hardware limitations, an evolution of its optimization computer, the Simulation Bifurcation Machine (SBM), that supports continued increases in computing speed and scale. Toshiba expects the new SBM to be a game changer for real-world problems that require large-scale, high-speed and low-latency, such as simultaneous financial transactions in
1h
Nobody is more irritating when you are ill than your own family | Zoe Williams
My family treated my positive Covid test as exciting news, like they had been watching EastEnders for 17 years and finally something had happened What I never noticed before I got Covid was the thriving black market in stories and speculation about the virus, the after-virus and the sheer unadulterated weirdness of the human body. The public sphere is, understandably, preoccupied with the disease
1h
Classic math conundrum solved: Superb algorithm for finding the shortest route
One of the most classic algorithmic problems deals with calculating the shortest path between two points. A more complicated variant of the problem is when the route traverses a changing network – whether this be a road network or the internet. For 40 years, an algorithm has been sought to provide an optimal solution to this problem. Now, computer scientist have come up with a recipe.
1h
Chip turns 'dumb' headphones into smart sensors
Engineers have invented a cheap and easy way of turning "dumb" headphones into smart ones. The method transforms headphones into sensors that can be plugged into smartphones, identify their users, monitor their heart rates, and perform other services. The researchers based their invention, called HeadFi , on a small plug-in adapter that turns a regular headphone into a sensing device. Unlike smar
1h
Resistance bands that will help you feel the burn
Let's get our workout on! (Pixabay/rob9040/) Whether you're really into lifting weights or you're a self-proclaimed cardio junkie, resistance bands can help any athlete or exercise fiend elevate their workout. They are great for targeted strength training, but they can also add some intensity to cardio exercises like squat jumps and opposition jacks. These bands are light, flexible, and compact,
2h
Sea-level rise drives wastewater leakage to coastal waters
A new study, published by University of Hawai'i at Mānoa earth scientists, is the first to provide direct evidence that tidally-driven groundwater inundation of wastewater infrastructure is occurring today in urban Honolulu, Hawai'i. The study shows that higher ocean water levels are leading to wastewater entering storm drains and the coastal ocean–creating negative impacts to coastal water quali
2h
What Your T-Shirt Says About You
This article was published online on March 12, 2021. L ast May , when Connor Hitchcock decided to start a fundraiser for some out-of-work friends, he had modest expectations. Hitchcock and his wife, Christa, run Homefield Apparel, which licenses old collegiate sports logos to make vintage-inspired T-shirts and sweatshirts. They wanted to help out a handful of writers who had recently been furloug
2h
Best Dyson vacuum: Cleaners that really suck (In all the best ways!)
Suck up the mess with a Dyson vacuum. (Dyson/) Look at any report or review of vacuum cleaners, whether it's the best upright vacuum , the best vacuum for pet hair, or the best stick vacuum and you'll likely as not find there's a Dyson product in there. So what's so special about Dysons? Why do so many people think they make the best vacuum cleaners ? The British brand was founded in 1978 by Jame
2h
Fire away: Removing imported red fire ant could boost burrow ecosystems
The aptly named gopher tortoise is a keystone species of the southeastern United States, digging burrows that can extend more than 30 feet and serve as a habitat for more than 350 other species. Unfortunately, one of them is the red imported fire ant, an invasive species from South America that likely arrived in the 1930s and is named for the fiery sensation that often follows its sting.
3h
Bring your WhatsApp stickers with you to Telegram
Save those precious reaction stickers. All of them. ( Charles Deluvio / Unsplash/) When the internet buzzed with news that WhatsApp plans to share more user data with its parent company, Facebook, many of you decided to switch to Telegram . You convinced everyone in your favorite group chat to come with you, and even downloaded the app for your less-than-tech-savvy mom and taught her how to use i
3h
Planet with Secondary Atmosphere
The discovery and exploration of exoplanets over the last three decades has been an exciting addition to astronomy. In 1990 we knew of no planets outside our solar system, and now there are more than 4,000 confirmed exoplanets, and thousands of more candidates awaiting confirmation. This is still just a tiny sample of the planets even in our small corner of the galaxy. One of the questions going
3h
Practice Your Golf Swing Anywhere You Go With The PhiGolf Simulator
Golf has entered the 21st century in ways large and small over the last twenty years, but reasons you can't make a tee time remain eternal. Too much to do at home, lousy weather, or being pulled away by family means you can't always make a game. Fortunately, PhiGolf makes it easy to get a round in, anywhere you are, and it's just $190 when you use the coupon code GOLF10 at checkout. Tee Time, Any
3h
Daily briefing: How to share surplus COVID-19 vaccines
Nature, Published online: 10 March 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00648-1 Some countries will soon have billions of spare doses of COVID-19 vaccines. Plus, Achilles' heel spotted for promising HIV-prevention drug and a mind-reading headband for horses.
3h
Deforestation favors an increase in the diversity of antibiotic-resistant soil bacteria
In Brazil, a study conducted by researchers affiliated with the University of São Paulo (USP) and collaborators revealed that deforestation in the Amazon causes an increase in the diversity of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The researchers have reported their findings in Soil Biology and Biochemistry. The study compares the microorganisms that live in the soil of native forest with those found in
3h
Goda bakterier hjälper prematura barn
För tidigt födda barn, så kallade prematurer, kan drabbas av en livshotande inflammation i tarmen. Genom att tillföra särskilda mjölksyrabakterier kan man öka mångfalden av tarmbakterier hos dessa barn, vilket ger dem en friskare och mer balanserad tarmflora. Ett mjölkpaket väger ett kilo. De flesta barn som föds extremt för tidigt väger mindre än så. Ett barn som hade behövt utvecklas och växa y
4h
Riskfaktorer för svår covid-19 kartlagda
Hög ålder, manligt kön och underliggande sjukdom. Det är de största riskfaktorerna för svår covid-19, visar en omfattande svensk studie. Men också att ha Downs syndrom – och ha hemtjänst. En studie baserad på samtliga svenska fall av konstaterad covid-19, totalt mer än 84 000 personer, pekar ut riskfaktorer för att drabbas av svår sjukdom. Hög ålder är den överlägset starkaste riskfaktorn för svå
4h
PODCAST: Pandemier ændrer vores byer og boliger
På samme måde som koleraepidemierne satte gang i Københavns udbygning uden for voldene, vil også coronaen blive et afsæt for byudvikling og nytænkning af vores bygninger. I ugens Transformator samler vi desuden op på en række spørgsmål om vaccinerne og deres bivirkninger.
5h
Blodgruppen kan säga hur sjuk du blir
De flesta går genom livet helt ovetande om vilken blodgrupp de tillhör. Några få får veta när de ger blod eller får en blodtransfusion. Måhända skulle fler vara intresserade om de visste att blodgruppen kan berätta om infektionsrisken för vissa sjukdomar. I samma sekund som den senaste viruspandemin var ett faktum började människor att leta efter förklaringar till att vissa drabbades allvarligare
5h
Webcast: Parenting in the pandemic
Nature, Published online: 12 March 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00654-3 How scientist parents have been managing their time and childcare responsibilities during the pandemic.
5h
Hyperbolic enhancement of photocurrent patterns in minimally twisted bilayer graphene
Nature Communications, Published online: 12 March 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-21792-2 Here, the authors use scanning probe photocurrent imaging to resolve nanoscale variations of the Seebeck coefficient occurring at domain walls separating micron-scale AB and BA stacking regions in twisted bilayer graphene, and observe hyperbolic enhancement of the photocurrent pattern.
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Ultrafast non-excitonic valley Hall effect in MoS2/WTe2 heterobilayers
Nature Communications, Published online: 12 March 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-21013-w The valley Hall effect in 2D materials is a promising approach for future valleytronic applications, but it is usually based on excitons with short lifetimes. Here, spin polarized electrons are injected from WTe2 into MoS2, leading to a unipolar valley Hall effect with enhanced lifetimes and mobility.
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Dual Ni/photoredox-catalyzed asymmetric cross-coupling to access chiral benzylic boronic esters
Nature Communications, Published online: 12 March 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-21947-1 Metallaphototoredox catalysis has been rarely applied to reductive cross-couplings, in contrast to typical redox-neutral methods. Here, the authors report a mild Ni/photoredox-catalyzed reductive cross-coupling of aryl iodides and α-chloroboranes, further enriching the metallaphotoredox chemistry.
5h
Ultrafast multi-cycle terahertz measurements of the electrical conductivity in strongly excited solids
Nature Communications, Published online: 12 March 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-21756-6 The electrical conductivity is critical to understand warm dense matter, but the accurate measurement is extremely challenging. Here the authors use multi-cycle THz pulses to measure the conductivity of gold foils strongly heated by free-electron laser, determining the individual contributions of electron-elect
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Nano-imaging photoresponse in a moiré unit cell of minimally twisted bilayer graphene
Nature Communications, Published online: 12 March 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-21862-5 Here, the authors use a nanoscale probe to study the photoresponse within a single moiré unit cell of minimally twisted bilayer graphene, and observe an intricate photo-thermoelectric response attributed to the Seebeck coefficient variation at AB-BA domain boundaries.
5h
Vulnerabilities of protected lands in the face of climate and human footprint changes
Nature Communications, Published online: 12 March 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-21914-w Proected areas (PA) expansion is a major conservation goal, but its effectiveness is debated. Here, the authors propose a multi-dimensional framework to assess PA vulnerability and select areas suitable for expansion, demonstrating it for 2572 PAs in China under a low-emission scenario.
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The amyloid structure of mouse RIPK3 (receptor interacting protein kinase 3) in cell necroptosis
Nature Communications, Published online: 12 March 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-21881-2 Receptor Interacting Protein Kinase 3 (RIPK3) has a key role in TNF-induced necroptosis. Here, the authors combine solid state NMR measurements, MD simulations and cell based assays to characterize mouse RIPK3 and they present the structure of the RIPK3 amyloid core.
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Iron control of erythroid microtubule cytoskeleton as a potential target in treatment of iron-restricted anemia
Nature Communications, Published online: 12 March 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-21938-2 Debilitating anemias in chronic diseases can result from deficient iron delivery to red cell precursors. Here, the authors show how this deficiency damages the cytoskeletal framework of progenitor cells and identify a targeted strategy for cytoskeletal repair, leading to anemia correction.
5h
Book Review: The Elusive Dream of Self-Driving Cars
In "Driven," Alex Davies chronicles the early days of autonomous vehicle technology and its evolution into a billion-dollar race to put them on the road. Though the technology has long been promised to the public — along with a reduction in deaths and urban congestion — they have yet to become a reality.
5h
Natural "brake" against malignant neuroblastoma
A factor that turns malignant tumors into benign ones? – That is exactly what scientists at St. Anna Children's Cancer Research Institute and colleagues have discovered. They studied tumors of the peripheral nervous system in children, namely neuroblastomas. The scientists discovered that the uncontrolled growth of benign neuroblastomas is stopped by a signal molecule produced by Schwann cells pre
6h
Shutting the nano-gate
Osaka University scientists used circular gate electrodes set around tiny nanopores to hold particles just outside the opening, or make them pass through very slowly. This work may lead to revolutionary advances in single-molecule detection and cost-effective DNA sequencing.
6h
Tilbageblik: Et år med COVID-19
11. marts 2020 blev landet lukket ned. Et år er gået med stigende smittetal, besøgsrestriktioner, genåbning og en kæmpe omstilling af sundhedsvæsenet. Dagens Medicin kigger tilbage på et helt usædvanligt år.
6h
Artificial Intelligence in Construction Safety
Hey guys, I'm thinking of considering AI as my thesis but I have been struggling to find an area to focus on. My broad topic is the impact of AI in c onstruction safety. Few ideas that I have are: 1. Scanning for proper workwear 2. Scanning for building stability If any of you have any suggestions that would be very useful. I have also been learning python for better data analysis. Oh btw, i'm a
14h
COVID, Quickly, Episode 2: Lessons From a Pandemic Year
Today we bring you the second episode in a new podcast series: COVID, Quickly. Every two weeks, Scientific American 's senior health editors Tanya Lewis and Josh Fischman catch you up on the essential developments in the pandemic: from vaccines to new variants and everything in between.
16h
Race Replay: Big Chief vs. Monza | Street Outlaws
Stream Full Episodes of Street Outlaws: https://discovery.com/tv-shows/street-outlaws/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.facebook.com/StreetOutlaws Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery https://twitter.com/StreetOutlaws We're on Instagram! ht
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Cognitive science Vs. Neuroscience
I have done some research on both these subjects as I would like to get into AI or data science after my degree. My question is which subject would you think is more suited for me to study if I want to get into these type of careers; because as I understand it the want for neuroscience graduate is quite low in data science and neuroscience. U.K. based. submitted by /u/bigmanting65 [link] [comment
18h
Prospective student
Hello everyone, I'm currently super interested in studying neuroscience and was looking into some jobs I can possibly get after I complete my studies. I plan on doing a masters. After doing some research I found that data science and AI would be two of the most interesting sectors I would like to work in. After doing some research I learnt that with a neuroscience degree it is very difficult to e
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A touch of silver
Researchers in Carnegie Mellon University's Soft Machines Lab have developed a new silver-hydrogel composite for bioelectronics that combines high electrical conductivity with soft, stretchable biocompatibility.
19h
Optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy innovation enables simultaneous multicontrast imaging
Optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM), a new hybrid imaging technique, allows us to listen to the sound of light and see the color of biological tissue itself. It can be used for live, multicontrast functional imaging, but the limited wavelength choice of most commercial lasers and the limitations of the existing scanning methods have meant that OR-PAM can obtain only one or two dif
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These Impeccably Designed Work Boots Are Disguised as Stylish Sneakers
Your feet are the foundation of your body. Just like the foundation of a house, they provide support and stability for everything up top. And if they fail, so does the rest of you. That's why it's absolutely essential to protect your feet, whether you work in the trades, or you're just a weekend warrior doing projects around the house. And the good news is that protecting your feet doesn't have t
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Best pool vacuum: Clean up your summer swimming spot now
A clean pool is a happy pool. (Raphaël Biscaldi via Unsplash/) There might be no scene that better encapsulates summer than this one: you're lounging poolside, drink in hand, sunscreen at the ready, BBQ heating up. If you have a pool, you probably spend an inordinate amount of time dreaming of this day all winter. But, along with the benefits (and there are so many benefits) of owning a pool, com
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