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Scientists Confirm an Incredibly Powerful Antimatter Particle Crashed Into Antarctica
Crash Course Scientists have now confirmed that an unusually powerful particle of antimatter crashed down into Antarctica back in December 2016. The collision seems to have triggered a subatomic cascade effect called Glashow resonance, Live Science reports , which is a theoretical phenomenon that requires more energy to set off than even the most powerful particle accelerators can provide. Scient
23h
Scientists sketch aged star system using over a century of observations
Astronomers have painted their best picture yet of an RV Tauri variable, a rare type of stellar binary where two stars—one approaching the end of its life—orbit within a sprawling disk of dust. Their 130-year dataset spans the widest range of light yet collected for one of these systems, from radio to X-rays.
23h
Oil in the ocean photooxides within hours to days, new study finds
A new study lead by scientists at the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science demonstrates that under realistic environmental conditions oil drifting in the ocean after the DWH oil spill photooxidized into persistent compounds within hours to days, instead over long periods of time as was thought during the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill. This is the first mo
9h
Small-molecule mimicry hunting strategy in the imperial cone snail, Conus imperialis
Venomous animals hunt using bioactive peptides, but relatively little is known about venom small molecules and the resulting complex hunting behaviors. Here, we explored the specialized metabolites from the venom of the worm-hunting cone snail, Conus imperialis . Using the model polychaete worm Platynereis dumerilii , we demonstrate that C. imperialis venom contains small molecules that mimic nat
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The Pandemic Happiness Gap
New surveys show that in the last year, older adults tended to be more positive than younger ones, suggesting that the ability to cope improves with age.
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'The ketamine blew my mind': can psychedelics cure addiction and depression?
This week sees the opening of the first UK high-street clinic offering psychedelic-assisted therapy. Could popping psilocybin be the future of mental healthcare? In the summer of 1981, when he was 13, Grant crashed a trail motorbike into a wall at his parents' house in Cambridgeshire. He'd been hiding it in the shed, but "it was far too powerful for me, and on my very first time starting it in th
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Oculus Founder Suggests Video Games That Kill You in Real Life
Death Wish Palmer Luckey, the guy who founded the VR company Oculus and the military technology company Anduril, has a gruesome idea to make video games more exciting: physical repercussions for players who are injured or die in whatever game they're playing. "The concept of videogames with physical consequences as severe as death are a sci-fi staple, but seen as beyond the pale in real life," Lu
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Peer-Reviewed Paper Claims Faster-Than-Light Travel Is Possible
Warp Drive, Engage! A new study claims that "warp drive" technology — a mechanism popularized by " Star Trek " that would allow for faster-than-light (FTL) travel — might be more feasible than previously thought. Dr. Erik Lentz, an astrophysicist at Göttingen University in Germany, published a paper in the peer-reviewed journal Classical and Quantum Gravity asserting that FTL speed is possible us
3h
Cone Snails Are Liars and Murderers
The aptly named cone snail wears a house that resembles a Ben & Jerry's receptacle, filled not with ice cream but with a squishy mollusk that sports an extendable, trunklike proboscis. The snails are superficially docile creatures, and can be painfully shy; sometimes they go weeks in a lab without taking a single bite of food, cringing at the slightest change in temperature, lighting, or human su
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Scientists Create Cancer Drug Without Any Animal Tests
Thanks to technology that allows scientists to culture human tissue on tiny chips, a team of scientists think they've found a way to eliminate animal testing from the clinical trial process. Researchers from The Hebrew University of Jerusalem just submitted a new cancer drug to the FDA for review without running a single experiment on a lab animal, The Times of Israel reports . Instead, they test
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Long Covid more likely in working-age women than in men – study
Preliminary data presented to Sage shows women five times as likely to report new disability or increased fatigue Working-age women who are hospitalised with coronavirus are five times as likely to develop long Covid as men in the same age group, according to research presented to the government's Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (Sage). Preliminary data shared with scientific advisers s
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People in China Absolutely Love Elon Musk
Everybody's Hope People in China have a new obsession: Tesla and SpaceX CEO Elon Musk, The New York Times reports . From tech entrepreneurs to anybody riled up to fight the establishment, the billionaire has gained massive appeal. "He can fight the establishment and become the richest man on Earth — and avoid getting beaten down in the process," Jane Zhang, founder of a Shanghai-based blockchain
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Eastern coyotes are increasingly common—here are 5 facts to know about them
An Eastern coyote hunts for mice in a midwinter field. (David Mark/) This story originally featured on Outdoor Life . They go by many names: coydog, yodel dog, song dog, trickster, brush wolf, tweed wolf … Most people, including biologists, now generally refer to them as Eastern coyotes ( Canis latrans ), but sometimes even the scientists aren't exactly sure where this critter falls in the taxo
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New perovskite LED emits a circularly polarized glow
Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) have revolutionized the displays industry. LEDs use electric current to produce visible light without the excess heat found in traditional light bulbs, a glow called electroluminescence. This breakthrough led to the eye-popping, high-definition viewing experience we've come to expect from our screens. Now, a group of physicists and chemists have developed a new type of
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Sömnhormonet kan ge skydd mot covid-19
Ända sedan pandemins start har det i flera studier undersökts om sömnhormonet melatonin skulle kunna bromsa insjuknandet eller sjukdomsförloppet av covid-19. Forskarna är oense kring om det är själva sömnhormonet eller sömnen i sig som påverkar.
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I dag drar en storm från månen förbi jorden
Det blåser på månen – och en gång i månaden når den här blåsten jorden. Fenomenet går att se som en svagt lysande fläck på natthimlen under några dagar. Ny forskning visar nu att när antalet meteoritnedslag på månen ökar så lyser den här fläcken starkare. Spela klippet för att se hur det går till när vi träffas av en vind från månen.
15h
SARS-CoV-2 jumped from bats to humans without much change
How much did SARS-CoV-2 need to change in order to adapt to its new human host? In a research article published in the open access journal PLOS Biology Oscar MacLean, Spyros Lytras at the University of Glasgow, and colleagues, show that since December 2019 and for the first 11 months of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic there has been very little 'important' genetic change observed in the hundreds of thousa
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SpaceX is Hooking Up an Air Force Aircraft With Starlink Internet
Air Force Starlink SpaceX is preparing to test its Starlink broadband-beaming internet service on board a US Air Force "tactical aircraft," CNBC reports . According to a request filed with the Federal Communications Commission on Thursday, SpaceX is looking to "make minor modifications to its experimental authorization for additional test activities undertaken with the federal government." "The t
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Plastic pollution from face masks could devastate the environment
A new study suggests that the huge numbers of disposable masks we're using may end up polluting the environment. The materials used to make some of these masks may be especially disposed to break down into microplastic bits. Once those plastic bits get into the environment they end up everywhere, including inside people. The face mask might be the quintessential image of this pandemic. Required a
21h
Hackers Bring Beer Production To a Halt
Crossing a Line Beer giant Molson Coors announced yesterday that a cyberattack is preventing it from producing beer as normal, at an undisclosed number of its breweries. Even with the company's SEC filing open to the public, specific details on the hack are hard to come by, Gizmodo notes . While Gizmodo speculates that there's some sort of ransomware or extortion afoot, what we do know is that be
22h
Incredibly Rare Asteroid Fragments Land on Couple's Driveway
Close Impact A UK couple got the surprise of a lifetime when they discovered pieces of a meteorite had landed on their driveway early last week. The space rocks landed near the home of Rob and Cathryn Wilcock in Winchcombe, England on February 28 after a fireball was spotted hurling across the skies above the western UK region, according to The Smithsonian Magazine . The couple heard a rattling n
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Humans still similar to first animals without heads, arms or skeletons
A new study finds genetic links between early oceanic animals and humans. The animals studied had no heads, skeletons, legs or arms. The creatures were from the Ediacaran era, living about 555 million years ago. As complex as modern humans can get, they still retain some features of the earliest animals on Earth, found new research. We are not as different as we might think from strange prehistor
6h
The Relentless Philip Roth
Illustration by Oliver Munday; Bernard Gotfryd / Hulton Archive; Bettman; Bob Peterson / The Life Images Collection / Getty This article was published online on March 13, 2021. W as there ever a novelist who was more of a novelist than Philip Roth? More of a long-haul moralist, more of a titanic grump, more of a sex fiend, more of an industrial reality-processor, more of a deskbound hero, more of
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Defend the Public Defenders
Public defense might be one of the rare professions in which doing one's job too well can lead to being fired. The reasons for this are structural—public defenders are tasked with an obligation they cannot fulfill without upsetting those tasked with helping them fulfill it—and the system can be fixed structurally: by creating a state-level office whose job it is to defend public defenders. Consid
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The Coyote swarming drone can deploy for aerial warfare—or hurricanes
Before this drone was called Coyote, it was known as LOCUST, seen here in 2016. (John F. Williams / US Navy/) A drone emerges from a missile tube like a cicada rocketing out of a cocoon. Once in air, its wings spring into place, its tail rudders fold up, and it powers forward, like a missile impersonating a plane. This is the Coyote drone, and on February 26th, the US Navy announced a contract wo
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International Space Station images trace bird migrations
Those who see Earth from the International Space Station often say it provides a new appreciation of our planet. The Avian Migration Aerial Surface Space project, or AMASS, takes advantage of thousands of images captured by astronauts to give people an appreciation of the migrations many birds undertake across the planet.
23h
Algorithm Detects Deepfakes by Analyzing Reflections in Eyes
Fake Spotting Researchers have developed an algorithm that identifies deepfake portraits by looking at their eyes. Computer scientists at the University of Buffalo created the deepfake-spotting algorithm, according to a press release , that analyzes the reflections in the eyes of portraits to determine their authenticity . In a study accepted in the IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Spe
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Researchers' computational methods pave the way for next-generation membrane technology for water purification
Water is perhaps Earth's most critical natural resource. Given increasing demand and increasingly stretched water resources, scientists are pursuing more innovative ways to use and reuse existing water, as well as to design new materials to improve water purification methods. Synthetically created semi-permeable polymer membranes used for contaminant solute removal can provide a level of advanced
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A computational guide to lead cells down desired differentiation paths
There is a great need to generate various types of cells for use in new therapies to replace tissues that are lost due to disease or injuries, or for studies outside the human body to improve our understanding of how organs and tissues function in health and disease. Many of these efforts start with human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) that, in theory, have the capacity to differentiate in
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Tiny bubbles making large impact on medical ultrasound imaging
If you were given "ultrasound" in a word association game, "sound wave" might easily come to mind. But in recent years, a new term has surfaced: bubbles. Those ephemeral, globular shapes are proving useful in improving medical imaging, disease detection and targeted drug delivery. There's just one glitch: bubbles fizzle out soon after injection into the bloodstream.
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Bellingcat is transforming investigative journalism with open-sourced information
Bellingcat has used open sources, such as satellite maps and social media posts, to unmask Russian spies and solve mysterious plane crashes. The independent news collective blends the investigative methods of citizen journalism with the guidelines of a traditional news outlet. It hopes to make open-source investigative techniques mainstream, setting an example in our era of vast data and "counter
21h
Zealandia switch: New theory of regulation of ice age climates
Abrupt shifts of the Southern Hemisphere westerly winds, paced by subtle variations in Earth's orbit, lie at the heart of ice age cycles, according to an international research team. This 'Zealandia Switch' hypothesis differs from the long-held view that orbital influences on the extent of Northern Hemisphere continental ice sheets regulate ice age climates. Southern Hemisphere westerlies regulate
22h
John Mallard obituary
Medical physicist who pioneered body scanning as a way to diagnose disease From the earliest X-rays to the latest body scanners, the ability to visualise the inside of the living body has revolutionised medical diagnosis. With a profound understanding of physics, great technical ingenuity and a mission to put these skills to use in the service of medicine, John Mallard, who has died aged 94, was o
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Person of Korea
Editor's Note: Read an interview with Paul Yoon about his writing process. This story was published online on March 13, 2021. H e waits three weeks for his father to respond. During that time, whenever he checks the mail, the dog follows him. She eyes the birds on the telephone wires. Then the migrant workers in the fields. One day, the payphone near the mailboxes rings. He hurries to the booth.
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Best under-desk bike: Zoom through a Zoom meeting
Exercise at your desk. (Samuel Bourke via Unsplash/) If multitasking is your happy place, then this one's for you. The best under-desk bikes out there enable you to go about your day while stretching your muscles, getting your heartbeat up, and improving your circulation. They're especially good if you spend so much time at your desk that you can't get to the gym after work or hit the road for an
6h
The pandemic has given me extra time with my teenage sons
It's been a tough time to be 17 or 18, but there have been some upsides, too My sons are 18 and 17. It was the younger's birthday this week and I made an awful cake that definitely breached my minimum cake standards (I hesitate to criticise Nigella, but there is such a thing as too much peanut butter). He looked a bit overwhelmed when we sang happy birthday, and I worried all day about him and hi
4h
Glaciers and enigmatic stone stripes in the Ethiopian highlands
Although past temperature variations in the tropics are of great importance to understanding the global climate system, little is known about their extent and chronological course. Researchers have now been able to demonstrate strong local cooling in the tropics during the last glacial period on the basis of glacier fluctuations and large stone stripes in the Ethiopian Highlands.
20h
An unusual creature is coming out of winter's slumber: Here's why scientists are excited
Animals that hibernate in the wild rarely do so in zoos and sanctuaries, with their climate controls and year-round access to food. But now our closest hibernating relative has gone into true, deep hibernation in captivity for the first time at the Duke Lemur Center. Studying dwarf lemur torpor may help humans safely enter and emerge from suspended states, such as when cardiac surgeons cool patien
20h
Best ski helmets: Comfortable protection for hitting the slopes
Make sure you keep your head protected next time you hit the trails. (Alex Lange via Unsplash/) Skiing is a fun and rewarding cold-weather activity that stimulates the body and mind, but it's incredibly important to deck yourself out with proper protective equipment, including a ski helmet to protect your head and prevent dangerous injuries in the event of an accident. Whether you're a seasoned s
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How an Epic and Violent Family History Fuels Fiction
Editor's Note: Read Paul Yoon's new short story, "Person of Korea." "Person of Korea" is a new short story by Paul Yoon. To mark the story's publication in The Atlantic , Yoon and Oliver Munday, the design director of the magazine, discussed the story over email. Their conversation has been lightly edited for clarity. Oliver Munday: Your short story "Person of Korea" is set partially in a village
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How to get materialism under control in your life
Materialism is a personal focus on acquiring possessions that can steer your attention and behavior away from things that make you happy. There are several things you can do to tame materialism in your own life. Satisfaction ultimately can't be found in collecting the most stuff possible, but rather in achieving intrinsic values. The Oxford Dictionary defines materialism as "a tendency to conside
22h
A Bug's Life
Photographs by Tine Poppe This article was published online on March 13, 2021. W hen you are an ant, the stakes are always high. There are those who would eat you—birds, snakes, bigger bugs—and those who could trample you and your environment in a single sneakered step. These enormous beings may not mean you any harm, but it is impact, not intention, that matters most. To envision how an ant migh
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How protein essential for male fertility emerged
Researchers have analysed, at unprecedented breadth and depth, the evolutionary history of how a protein – which is essential for the fertility of male fruit flies and emerged from previously non-coding DNA became functional and took on a relatively stable structure.
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Become a Grandmaster With The Ultimate Chess Training Bundle
While none of us will ever beat a computer , the delight of going brain-to-brain against a fellow human in chess can't be overstated. Chess helps you think tactically, approach problems by looking at the long term, and it's also a lot of fun. Yet mastering it can be tough, especially on your own. Fortunately, the Ultimate Beginner to Grandmaster Chess Course Bundle is here to take you from amateu
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Do you all have any opinions on Giulio Tononi's Integrated Information Theory of consciousness?
I just finished reading Christof Koch's "The Feeling of Life Itself" which serves as a pretty soft intro to IIT, and it left me a bit puzzled about the theory itself. I like that it puts consciousness on a continuous scale, and that it doesn't take a substrate dependent approach to consciousness, but beyond that I'm skeptical that it's the right approach (and a but confused on how it works) submi
14h
Wider horizons for highly ordered nanohole arrays
Tokyo, Japan – Scientists from Tokyo Metropolitan University have developed a new method for making ordered arrays of nanoholes in metallic oxide thin films using a range of transition metals. The team used a template to pre-pattern metallic surfaces with an ordered array of dimples before applying electrochemistry to selectively grow an oxide layer with holes. The process makes a wider selection
14h
This Robot Arm Can Print a Bottle Opener and Then Pour You the Beer
Are you currently on the market for a new hobby that is both incredibly entertaining and intellectually stimulating? Do you love computers and technology? Have you always wanted to have your own personal robot arm that can 3D print a bottle opener and then use it to pour you a beer? If the answer to any or all of these questions is yes , then you really need to take a look at the Rotrics DexArm .
19h
Meteorite older than Earth likely came from a "protoplanet"
Erg Chech 002 is a meteor not like any other ever found. It's older than the Earth, and its composition raises interesting possibilities. The meteor likely comes from an early baby planet in our solar system. Scientists are discovering all sorts of amazing told by the meteorites found scattered across the Earth's surface. Now a team led by Jean-Alix Barrat, a geochemist from the University of Wes
22h
Study finds cancer cells may evade chemotherapy by going dormant
Cancer cells can dodge chemotherapy by entering a state that bears similarity to certain kinds of senescence, a type of "active hibernation" that enables them to weather the stress induced by aggressive treatments aimed at destroying them, according to a new study by scientists at Weill Cornell Medicine. These findings have implications for developing new drug combinations that could block senesce
22h
YouTuber Uses Exoskeleton to Wield Gigantic Anime Sword
Giant Anime Sword Only a YouTube inventor would buy an exoskeleton purely to lift a massive 50-pound sword modeled after one found in the hit video game "Final Fantasy VII." And that's exactly what Allen Pan, from the YouTube channel Sufficiently Advanced, did for his his video. Extra Lift Pan constructed a massive steel sword with a puny 12 inch handle, modeled after the one used by Cloud, a cha
22h
Best shop vac: More powerful than your regular vacuum cleaner
Make sure you can clean up any mess you make. (La Miko va Pexels/) More powerful than the average Hoover, more versatile than the typical Dyson, and tougher than your pet Roomba, a shop vacuum is a must-have for any household. These cleaning tools can suck up almost anything. Once equipped with the best shop vac, you can attack any mess that's thrown at you, whether it's sawdust in the workshop,
23h
New ultralightweight, crush-resistant tensegrity metamaterials
Engineers describe the creation of a new class of mechanical metamaterials that delocalize deformations to prevent failure. They did so by turning to tensegrity, a century-old design principle in which isolated rigid bars are integrated into a flexible mesh of tethers to produce very lightweight, self-tensioning truss structures.
23h
Problems in 1 gene lead to congenital heart disease
Researchers have identified an important cause of congenital heart disease. They discovered that certain loss of functions in the PLD1 (Phospholipase D1) gene causes congenital right-sided cardiac valve defects and neonatal cardiomyopathy. Their findings appear in the Journal of Clinical Investigation . Congenital heart disease is the most common type of birth defect , accounting for one-third of
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Passion matters but not equally everywhere: Predicting achievement from interest, enjoyment, and efficacy in 59 societies [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
How to identify the students and employees most likely to achieve is a challenge in every field. American academic and lay theories alike highlight the importance of passion for strong achievement. Based on a Western independent model of motivation, passionate individuals—those who have a strong interest, demonstrate deep enjoyment, and…
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Identification of earth-abundant materials for selective dehydrogenation of light alkanes to olefins [Chemistry]
Selective ethane dehydrogenation (EDH) is an attractive on-purpose strategy for industrial ethylene production. Design of an effective, stable, and earth-abundant catalyst to replace noble metal Pt is the main obstacle for its large-scale application. Herein, we report an experimentally validated theoretical framework to discover promising catalysts for EDH, which combines…
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Comparative structural analysis of human Nav1.1 and Nav1.5 reveals mutational hotspots for sodium channelopathies [Biochemistry]
Among the nine subtypes of human voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels, the brain and cardiac isoforms, Nav1.1 and Nav1.5, each carry more than 400 missense mutations respectively associated with epilepsy and cardiac disorders. High-resolution structures are required for structure–function relationship dissection of the disease variants. We report the cryo-EM structures of…
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Structure of human Nav1.5 reveals the fast inactivation-related segments as a mutational hotspot for the long QT syndrome [Biochemistry]
Nav1.5 is the primary voltage-gated Na+ (Nav) channel in the heart. Mutations of Nav1.5 are associated with various cardiac disorders exemplified by the type 3 long QT syndrome (LQT3) and Brugada syndrome (BrS). E1784K is a common mutation that has been found in both LQT3 and BrS patients. Here we…
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School closures 'sideline' working mothers
Decades of feminist gains in the workforce have been undermined by the COVID-19 pandemic, which has upended public education across the United States, a critical infrastructure of care that parents—especially mothers—depend on to work, according to new research from Washington University in St. Louis.
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Metabolic derangements caused by a high-fat diet may be possible to eliminate
Intake of a high-fat diet leads to an increased risk for obesity, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and fatty liver. A study in mice from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden shows that it is possible to eliminate the deleterious effects of a high-fat diet by lowering the levels of apolipoprotein CIII (apoCIII), a key regulator of lipid metabolism. The study is published in the journal Science A
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LSD1 enzyme inhibitor TAK-418 unlocks aberrant epigenetic machinery and improves autism symptoms in neurodevelopmental disorder models
Persistent epigenetic dysregulation may underlie the pathophysiology of neurodevelopmental disorders, such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Here, we show that the inhibition of lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1) enzyme activity normalizes aberrant epigenetic control of gene expression in neurodevelopmental disorders. Maternal exposure to valproate or poly I:C caused sustained dysregulation of
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M-CSF, IL-6, and TGF-{beta} promote generation of a new subset of tissue repair macrophage for traumatic brain injury recovery
Traumatic brain injury (TBI) leads to high mortality rate. We aimed to identify the key cytokines favoring TBI repair and found that patients with TBI with a better outcome robustly increased concentrations of macrophage colony-stimulating factor, interleukin-6, and transforming growth factor–β (termed M6T) in cerebrospinal fluid or plasma. Using TBI mice, we identified that M2-like macrophage, m
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Nonuniform Late Pleistocene glacier fluctuations in tropical Eastern Africa
Today's ice caps and glaciers in Africa are restricted to the highest peaks, but during the Pleistocene, several mountains on the continent were extensively glaciated. However, little is known about regional differences in the timing and extent of past glaciations and the impact of paleoclimatic changes on the afro-alpine environment and settlement history. Here, we present a glacial chronology f
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Lowering apolipoprotein CIII protects against high-fat diet-induced metabolic derangements
Increased levels of apolipoprotein CIII (apoCIII), a key regulator of lipid metabolism, result in obesity-related metabolic derangements. We investigated mechanistically whether lowering or preventing high-fat diet (HFD)–induced increase in apoCIII protects against the detrimental metabolic consequences. Mice, first fed HFD for 10 weeks and thereafter also given an antisense (ASO) to lower apoCII
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Iron isotopes trace primordial magma ocean cumulates melting in Earths upper mantle
The differentiation of Earth ~4.5 billion years (Ga) ago is believed to have culminated in magma ocean crystallization, crystal-liquid separation, and the formation of mineralogically distinct mantle reservoirs. However, the magma ocean model remains difficult to validate because of the scarcity of geochemical tracers of lower mantle mineralogy. The Fe isotope compositions ( 57 Fe) of ancient maf
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Injury-mediated stiffening persistently activates muscle stem cells through YAP and TAZ mechanotransduction
The skeletal muscle microenvironment transiently remodels and stiffens after exercise and injury, as muscle ages, and in myopathic muscle; however, how these changes in stiffness affect resident muscle stem cells (MuSCs) remains understudied. Following muscle injury, muscle stiffness remained elevated after morphological regeneration was complete, accompanied by activated and proliferative MuSCs.
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Atoh7-independent specification of retinal ganglion cell identity
Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) relay visual information from the eye to the brain. RGCs are the first cell type generated during retinal neurogenesis. Loss of function of the transcription factor Atoh7 , expressed in multipotent early neurogenic retinal progenitors leads to a selective and essentially complete loss of RGCs. Therefore, Atoh7 is considered essential for conferring competence on prog
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Interplay between Pds5 and Rec8 in regulating chromosome axis length and crossover frequency
Meiotic chromosomes have a loop/axis architecture, with axis length determining crossover frequency. Meiosis-specific Pds5 depletion mutants have shorter chromosome axes and lower homologous chromosome pairing and recombination frequency. However, it is poorly understood how Pds5 coordinately regulates these processes. In this study, we show that only ~20% of wild-type level of Pds5 is required f
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Surface-directed engineering of tissue anisotropy in microphysiological models of musculoskeletal tissue
Here, we present an approach to model and adapt the mechanical regulation of morphogenesis that uses contractile cells as sculptors of engineered tissue anisotropy in vitro. Our method uses heterobifunctional cross-linkers to create mechanical boundary constraints that guide surface-directed sculpting of cell-laden extracellular matrix hydrogel constructs. Using this approach, we engineered linea
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Synergistically enhance confined diffusion by continuum intersecting channels in zeolites
In separation and catalysis applications, adsorption and diffusion are normally considered mutually exclusive. That is, rapid diffusion is generally accompanied by weak adsorption and vice versa. In this work, we analyze the anomalous loading-dependent mechanism of p -xylene diffusion in a newly developed zeolite called SCM-15. The obtained results demonstrate that the unique system of "continuum
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Highly anisotropic and flexible piezoceramic kirigami for preventing joint disorders
The prevention of work-related upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs; e.g., neck pain and shoulder fatigue) requires frequent exercises of neck and shoulder that primarily rely on the assistance of joint motion monitoring devices. However, most available wearable healthcare sensors are rigid, bulky, and incapable of recognizing the full range of human motions. Here, we propose a kirigam
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GIP mediates the incretin effect and glucose tolerance by dual actions on {alpha} cells and {beta} cells
Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) communicates nutrient intake from the gut to islets, enabling optimal levels of insulin secretion via the GIP receptor (GIPR) on β cells. The GIPR is also expressed in α cells, and GIP stimulates glucagon secretion; however, the role of this action in the postprandial state is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that GIP potentiates amino acid–stimulat
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People use both heterogeneity and minority representation to evaluate diversity
The term "diversity," although widely used, can mean different things. Diversity can refer to heterogeneity, i.e., the distribution of people across groups, or to the representation of specific minority groups. We use a conjoint experiment with a race-balanced, national sample to uncover which properties, heterogeneity or minority representation, Americans use to evaluate the extent of racial div
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Probing the photointermediates of light-driven sodium ion pump KR2 by DNP-enhanced solid-state NMR
The functional mechanism of the light-driven sodium pump Krokinobacter eikastus rhodopsin 2 (KR2) raises fundamental questions since the transfer of cations must differ from the better-known principles of rhodopsin-based proton pumps. Addressing these questions must involve a better understanding of its photointermediates. Here, dynamic nuclear polarization–enhanced solid-state nuclear magnetic r
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Interfacial superstructures and chemical bonding transitions at metal-ceramic interfaces
Metal-ceramic interfaces are scientifically interesting and technologically important. However, the transition of chemical bonding character from a metal to a nonoxide ceramic is not well understood. The effects of solute segregation and interfacial structural transitions are even more elusive. In this study, aberration-corrected electron microscopy is combined with atomic-resolution energy-dispe
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Air pollution: The silent killer called PM 2.5
Millions of people die prematurely every year from diseases and cancer caused by air pollution. The first line of defence against this carnage is ambient air quality standards. Yet, according to new research, over half of the world's population lives without the protection of adequate air quality standards.
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Way more people choose green energy when it's the default
Consumers are more likely to get sustainably produced electricity if that's their provider's default offer, according to new research. People often choose the standard option. Standard or default settings influence decisions such as choosing to be an organ donor or printing on both sides of the page. In fact, economists and sociologists call this the default effect. The same holds true for electr
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Twisty robots reveal how plant roots wind through soil
New research sheds light on the molecular and mechanical strategies that plant roots have for navigating through heterogenous, often rocky soil. Though he's a mechanical engineer, Elliot Hawkes, a roboticist at the University of California, Santa Barbara, is a big fan of biological systems. So much so that he developed a soft robot that mimics plant roots—a pliant, vine-like machine that unfurls
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New machine learning model could remove bias from social network connections
Did you ever wonder how social networking applications like Facebook and LinkedIn make recommendations on the people you should friend or pages you should follow? Recognizing that the majority of users are reluctant to publicize their sensitive attributes, researchers at the Penn State College of Information Sciences and Technology have developed a novel framework which estimates sensitive attribu
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How to spot deepfakes? Look at light reflection in the eyes
University at Buffalo computer scientists have developed a tool that automatically identifies deepfake photos by analyzing light reflections in the eyes. The tool proved 94% effective in experiments described in a paper accepted at the IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing to be held in June in Toronto, Canada.
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New AJTMH supplement offers guidance on severe COVID-19 management in resource-limited settings
A new supplement offering guidance on severe COVID-19 management in resource-limited settings is now available on the American Journal of Tropical Medicine (AJTMH) website. Pragmatic Recommendations for the Management of Hospitalized COVID-19 Patients in Low- and Middle-Income Countries was coordinated by a COVID-LMIC Task Force headed by Alfred Papali, MD, of Atrium Health, Charlotte, NC, and Mar
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Unmarried people given less intensive treatment for mantle cell lymphoma
Mantle cell lymphoma is a malignant disease in which intensive treatment can prolong life. In a new study, scientists from Uppsala University and other Swedish universities show that people with mantle cell lymphoma who were unmarried, and those who had low educational attainment, were less often treated with a stem-cell transplantation, which may result in poorer survival. The findings have been
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Model may shield Chincoteague ponies from 'swamp cancer'
A new model identifies potential hot spots for the pathogen Pythium insidiosum in the Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge, home to the wild Chincoteague ponies. P. insidiosum, an aquatic, fungus-like pathogen, thrives in standing water and is commonly found in tropical or subtropical environments. In horses it causes pythiosis, or swamp cancer, a fatal infection which often affects the skin or
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Philly to dim lights to make it safer for birds in flight
The lights of Philadelphia might not shine as bright in the coming weeks as a coalition in the City of Brotherly Love tries to prevent millions of migrating birds that pass through twice a year from slamming into skyscrapers and crashing to the sidewalk.
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