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Spørg fagmanden om varmepumper
Udbredelsen af varmepumper som klimavenlig teknologi risikerer at medføre markante støjgener for naboerne. Ingeniøren inviterer læserne til at indsende spørgsmål om varmepumper. Tirsdag er der webinar omkring 'den gode varmepumpeinstallation uden støjgener'.
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There's no proof the Oxford vaccine causes blood clots. So why are people worried? | David Spiegelhalter
MÅSKE TILFÆLDIGHED AT DER ER SET BLODPROPPER VED ASTRA-ZENECA VACCINE
It's human nature to spot patterns in data. But we should be careful about finding causal links where none may exist Stories about people getting blood clots soon after taking the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine have become a source of anxiety among European leaders. After a report on a death and three hospitalisations in Norway, which found serious blood clotting in adults who had received the vaccin
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Benefits of Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine outweigh any risk, says EMA
ASTRA-ZENECA VACCINEN HAR FLERE FORDELE END ULEMPER
European agency seeks to allay blood clot fears as Germany, France and Italy temporarily suspend use Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus cSoverage Europe's medicines regulator has moved to stifle spiralling concern about the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine, saying the shot's benefits outweigh the risks after four major EU countries announced they were suspending its use. Germany, Franc
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Whispers from the dark side: What can gravitational waves reveal about dark matter?
The NANOGrav Collaboration recently captured the first signs of very low-frequency gravitational waves. Prof. Pedro Schwaller and Wolfram Ratzinger analyzed the data and, in particular, considered the possibility of whether this may point towards new physics beyond the Standard Model. In an article published in the journal SciPost Physics, they report that the signal is consistent with both a phas
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Biden Chooses Prosperity Over Vengeance
Donald Trump was a punishment. Conservatives saw him that way, and Trump saw himself that way, too. After his upset victory over Hillary Clinton in the 2016 election, some conservatives started to respond to any perceived liberal excess with a simple phrase : "This is why Trump won." If that was a convenient deflection, a way to rationalize Trumpian malice as the left's responsibility, it was als
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The Misinformation Campaign Was Distinctly One-Sided
On the morning of September 21, 2020, three trays of United States mail were discovered in a ditch in Greenville, Wisconsin. The local sheriff's office reported that the mail dump included several absentee ballots. When a U.S. Postal Service spokesperson made a similar assertion two days later, a local Fox affiliate, WLUK, reported the statement on its website. And then a national network of cons
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Neanderthals helped create early human art, researcher says
Archaeologist says ability to think and create objects may not have been restricted to homo sapiens When Neanderthals, Denisovans and homo sapiens met one another 50,000 years ago, these archaic and modern humans not only interbred during the thousands of years in which they overlapped, but they exchanged ideas that led to a surge in creativity, according to a leading academic. Tom Higham, a prof
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Climate crisis: recent European droughts 'worst in 2,000 years'
Study of tree rings dating back to Roman empire concludes weather since 2014 has been extraordinary The series of severe droughts and heatwaves in Europe since 2014 is the most extreme for more than 2,000 years, research suggests. The study analysed tree rings dating as far back as the Roman empire to create the longest such record to date. The scientists said global heating was the most probable
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AstraZeneca Defends COVID Vaccine Against Blood Clot Concerns
COVID-19 vaccine manufacturer AstraZeneca was forced to go on the defensive amid a wave of countries halting the rollout of its shot over fears it may cause blood clots. The company released a statement on Sunday that according to "all available safety data of more than 17 million people vaccinated in the European Union (EU) and UK with COVID-19 Vaccine AstraZeneca has shown no evidence of an inc
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'The worst days of my life': how Covid-19 patients can recover from ICU delirium | Dorothy Wade
The trauma of intensive care often triggers long-term mental health problems, and counselling is crucial to rehabilitation Dr Dorothy Wade is principal psychologist for intensive care at University College Hospital and honorary associate professor at University College London "Last night the porters took me down to the basement in a supermarket trolley. I was met by hooded monks who stole my soul
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This Particular COVID Variant Has Vaccine Experts Concerned
As various mutated forms of the coronavirus emerged, experts — and the rest of us — were left wondering what it all meant for the push to get everyone vaccinated as soon as possible. We've known for months that spike protein mutations found in common new variants made the coronavirus more infectious and easier to spread, but it was less obvious whether they would still be blocked by the COVID-19
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NASA and Blue Origin Developing Artificial Gravity Trick
Spinning Out Blue Origin and NASA have teamed up to develop a new artificial gravity system within a spacecraft, stemming from a rapidly-spinning capsule that generates centrifugal force like a carnival ride. The plan, it seems, is to basically find a way to turn Blue Origin's New Shepard spacecraft into a flying Tilt-A-Whirl with about as much of a "gravitational" force as the Moon, according to
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Those Who Died Trying to Save Others
Medical workers are called heroes. But there hasn't been a national reckoning over the many thousands lost to Covid. Here are a few of the people who gave their lives while on the front lines of the pandemic.
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The most distant radio-loud quasar discovered
In a recent study, an international team of astronomers presents the discovery of PSO J172.3556+18.7734—a highly accreting radio-loud quasar at a redshift of approximately 6.82. This is the most distant radio-loud quasar known to date. The finding is detailed in a paper published March 4 on arXiv.org.
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The Lost Story of Lady Bird
In May 1964, just months after John F. Kennedy's assassination, President Lyndon Baines Johnson had to decide whether to run for reelection. With pressure picking up to escalate the Vietnam War, and civil-rights legislation stuck in Congress, he doubted he would be able to unify the country. He asked his most trusted political adviser to set out the pros and cons of seeking the presidency in his
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The Egg Industry Grapples With a Grim Practice: Chick Culling
The U.S. egg industry is investing in sophisticated technologies that may one day be used to eradicate culling of male chicks, a practice both cruel and wasteful. But cull-free eggs are already available in thousands of European supermarkets — raising the question of precisely when the U.S. will follow suit.
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What price a child's life? India's quest to make rare disease drugs affordable
Parents whose only hope was finding foreign sponsorship or a clinical trial are now looking for homegrown breakthroughs For three years, Vidya tried to find the cause of her son's recurrent fevers and low cognitive development. When she found out, she was devastated. Vineeth, 10, has an incurable illness – mucopolysaccharidosis type 2 – that affects his organs. Afflicting just one in a million, t
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Study sheds light on role of fingerprints in sense of touch
Scientists looking at why human fingertips are so sensitive have found the culprit hiding in our prints Whether it is feeling the coarse texture of a pair of jeans, the gnarled bark of a tree or the smooth skin of a lover, our sense of touch is a crucial aspect of how we interact with the world around us. Now scientists say they have shed new light on why human fingertips are so sensitive, reveal
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There might be many planets with water-rich atmospheres
An atmosphere is what makes life on Earth's surface possible, regulating our climate and sheltering us from damaging cosmic rays. But although telescopes have counted a growing number of rocky planets, scientists had thought most of their atmospheres long lost.
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Walrus Falls Asleep on Iceberg, Drifts Across Ocean
A hapless walrus had a rude awakening — it woke up on an iceberg floating off the northern shore of Ireland, where walruses do not typically live, after drifting all the way from the North Pole. At least, that's the prevailing theory explaining why the confused walrus was spotted by a young girl on her stroll, British newspaper The Independent reports . In other words, the walrus is all of us hav
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Oppo put a digital microscope in its new flagship smartphone
The macro camera has a ring light around it because the phone typically blocks ambient light on the subject when you get that close. (Oppo /) It's getting more difficult for smartphone manufacturers to differentiate the cameras on their devices. Super-wide cameras are old news now, and we're now firmly in the era of smartphone cams that have actual optical zoom lenses. Some companies have tried m
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The Family That Always Lives on Daylight Saving Time
The rest of America sprang forward yesterday, but Tali and Scott Richards have been here all along. Standard time has mired most of the U.S. in winter darkness for months. In November, Americans willed the sun, which otherwise would have set by 6 p.m. or so in the northern part of the U.S., to set earlier, at 5 or even 4. Those who still have analog clocks and watches cranked them back one hour;
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When memory qubits and photons get entangled
Encrypting data in a way that ensures secure communication is an ever-growing challenge because crucial components of today's encryption systems cannot withstand future quantum computers. Researchers around the world are therefore working on technologies for novel encryption methods that are also based on quantum effects. The phenomenon of so-called quantum entanglement plays a particularly import
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Could there be life on Jupiter's moons?
The search for life outside of Earth has taken many forms. Mars, our neighbouring world, looks like it was once habitable. Perhaps too Venus, despite its current hellish conditions. But in recent years, scientists' gazes have been drawn elsewhere. What about the moons of Jupiter?
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How to Write a Living Will
When my dad passed away without a will, my family had so many unanswered questions. These resources can help make it easier for those you leave behind.
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An Ode to Not Meditating
Tim Lahan This article was published online on March 15, 2021. I know, I know : It's good for you. It's good for us , damn it. Good for the nation. You're not going to open your blissfully de-focused eyes after 20 minutes of meditation, sigh, rise slowly to your feet, and then go charging off to sack the Capitol. Not immediately, anyway. And I also know that a serious meditation practice is … ser
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Model predicts urban development and greenhouses gasses will fuel urban floods
When rain began falling in northern Georgia on Sept. 15, 2009, little did Atlantans know that they would bear witness to epic flooding throughout the city. Neighborhoods, like Peachtree Hills, were submerged; Georgia's busiest expressway was underwater, as were roads and bridges; untreated sewage mingled with rising flood waters; cars and people were swept away. Then-Georgia-governor, Sonny Perdue
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Start planning now for a healthy crop of homegrown food
There's a growing interest in the old-fashioned heritage skills of gardening, foraging, and living "off the land" these days. (Tim MacWelch/) This story was originally featured on Outdoor Life . It takes a lot more than a pack of seeds and a shovel to enhance your food security with a backyard survival garden. You need a solid, practical plan. Maybe you've never planted a single seed before, or m
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Rare open-access quantum computer now operational
A new Department of Energy open-access quantum computing testbed is ready for the public. Scientists from Indiana University recently became the first team to begin using Sandia National Laboratories' Quantum Scientific Computing Open User Testbed, or QSCOUT.
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What happens in your brain when you 'lose yourself' in fiction
If you count yourself among those who lose themselves in the lives of fictional characters, scientists now have a better idea of how that happens. Researchers found that the more immersed people tend to get into 'becoming' a fictional character, the more they use the same part of the brain to think about the character as they do to think about themselves.
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Space station crew to relocate Soyuz to make room for new crewmates
Three residents of the International Space Station will take a spin around their orbital neighborhood in the Soyuz MS-17 on Friday, March 19, relocating the spacecraft to prepare for the arrival of the next set of crew members. Live coverage on NASA Television, the NASA app, and the agency's website will begin at 12:15 p.m. EDT.
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Researchers identify optimal human landing system architectures to land on the Moon
Researchers from Skoltech and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have analyzed several dozen options to pick the best one in terms of performance and costs for the 'last mile' of a future mission to the Moon—actually delivering astronauts to the lunar surface and back up to the safety of the orbiting lunar station. The paper was published in the journal Acta Astronautica.
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Lab studies of emotion and well-being may be missing real-world anxiety
Psychologists have been studying emotional health and well-being for decades, often having people engage in contrived laboratory experiments and respond to self-report questionnaires to understand their emotional experiences and the strategies they use to manage stress. But those hundreds of studies may have missed a pretty big complicating factor – baseline anxiety levels of the subjects — argue
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Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field Camera 3 restored
The Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) instrument on NASA's Hubble Space Telescope was brought back online on Saturday, March 13th at approximately 7:00 p.m. EST. The instrument was shut down as part of the normal observatory safe mode activities that occurred on Sunday, March 7, in response to a software error on the main flight computer. After starting its recovery on Thursday, March 11, WFC3 suspended
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Best kneeling chair: Home office furniture that promises comfort and better posture
Another way to sit. (Amazon/) Human beings were not meant to sit at a 90-degree angle for eight-plus hours a day, and we weren't meant to stand for that long either. Unfortunately for many of us, our jobs did not get that memo. The way to protect your body from undue stress and damage is to invest in the best kneeling chair you can. According to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (
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Get Dry Fast and Without Towels With the Viatek Body Dryer
Wherever we as a species go, we tend to figure out how to build a pool nearby, even when "nearby" means " 13 stories underground ." And that's got its positives, but it also means lots of towels to wash. So if you love swimming, or just would rather skip the towel after a shower, the Viatek Body Dryer can keep you clean. Dry Off, Touch-Free To ditch the towel, all you need to do is set up the bod
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About 7 interstellar objects pass through the inner solar system every year, study estimates
In October 19th, 2017, the first interstellar object ever detected flew past Earth on its way out of the solar system. Less than two years later, a second object was detected, an easily identified interstellar comet designated as 2I/Borisov. The appearance of these two objects verified earlier theoretical work that concluded that interstellar objects (ISOs) regularly enter our solar system.
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The Odd Pattern That Keeps Happening at the Grammys
One year into fussing with Zoom backgrounds, who can't relate to Megan Thee Stallion and Cardi B twerking in front of a digital wallpaper of purses, diamonds, big-rig trucks, and the rappers' own faces? At last night's Grammys, two of hip-hop's top talents put on a digital-meets-physical hallucination that turned out to be the best entertainment of the night. A stiletto heel doubled as a stripper
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Important forests and wetlands are disappearing in Belize
Using NASA satellite images and machine learning, researchers have mapped changes in the landscape of northwestern Belize over a span of four decades, finding significant losses of forest and wetlands, but also successful regrowth of forest in established conservation zones that protect surviving structures of the ancient Maya.
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Largest supernova remnant ever discovered with X-rays
In the first all-sky survey by the eROSITA X-ray telescope onboard SRG, astronomers have identified a previously unknown supernova remnant, dubbed "Hoinga". The finding was confirmed in archival radio data and marks the first discovery of a joint Australian-eROSITA partnership established to explore our Galaxy using multiple wavelengths, from low-frequency radio waves to energetic X-rays. The Hoin
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Reducing global warming matters for freshwater fish species
The habitats of freshwater fish species are threatened by global warming, mainly due to rising water temperatures. A 3.2-degree Celsius increase in global mean temperature would threaten more than half of the habitat for one third of all freshwater fish species. The number of species at risk is ten times smaller if warming is limited to 1.5 degrees.
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The Commons
The Most American Religion Mormons spent 200 years assimilating to a certain national ideal—only to find their country in an identity crisis, McKay Coppins wrote in the January/February issue. What will the third century of the faith look like? I'm a devout Episcopalian, but I spent many years dealing with an incomprehensible and not very subtle anti-Mormon bias. After I was named Mitt Romney's c
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Nanoclusters with a copper-hydrogen core provide new structure-activity insights
Copper nanomaterials with a cubic shape so perfect that they form neatly aligned stacks when brought together have been created by researchers at KAUST. The cuboid copper nanoclusters, developed by rational design, are a new member of an exotic nanomaterial family that has shown many promising properties but has remained very hard to make.
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Scenes From the 2021 Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race
Earlier this morning, Dallas Seavey and his team crossed the finish line near Willow, Alaska, to win the 2021 Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race, claiming his fifth title. Seavey is now tied with Rick Swenson, the only other musher to have won five titles. This year, due to the ongoing pandemic, the race took place on a modified 832-mile course called the Gold Trail Loop, staying in the wilderness, avo
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Economics of nature: Mapping Liberia's ecosystems to understand their value
Conservation scientist Trond Larsen and his team trekked through a remote forest in Liberia, recording the plants, animals, and insects that they saw. They noted whether the forest was intact or degraded. Far above their heads, NASA's Earth-observing satellites collected data about the terrain as the satellites continued their well-traveled orbits over Africa.
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Bacteria adapt syringe apparatus to changing conditions
Basic, acidic, basic again: for pathogenic bacteria such as Salmonella, the human digestive tract is a sea of change. So how do the bacteria manage to react to these changes? A team of researchers has now provided a possible explanation: pathogenic bacteria can change components of their injection apparatus on the fly – like changing the tires on a moving car – to enable a rapid response.
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New class of substances for redox reactions
An interdisciplinary team presents a new class of chemical compounds that can be reversibly oxidized and reduced. The compounds known as 'pyrazinacenes' are simple, stable compounds that consist of a series of connected nitrogen-containing carbon rings.
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Image: Lomonosov crater on Mars
At first glance this captivating scene peering through wispy clouds and down onto a dune field is reminiscent of a satellite view of one of Earth's deserts, but this is in fact a beautiful landscape on Mars.
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Image: Hubble views a galaxy with faint threads
This unusual lenticular galaxy, which is between a spiral and elliptical shape, has lost almost all the gas and dust from its signature spiral arms, which used to orbit around its center. Known as NGC 1947, this galaxy was discovered almost 200 years ago by James Dunlop, a Scottish-born astronomer who later studied the sky from Australia. NGC 1947 can only be seen from the southern hemisphere, in
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This Tiny Fish Can Withstand Almost Anything
Originating in the Great Dismal Swamp of Virginia, just south of the Chesapeake Bay, the Elizabeth River is turbid and brackish, its banks redolent with the nose-wrinkling stench of rotting vegetation. These muddy, pungent waters support an array of life—oak and maple trees, herons, otters, and oysters. But the Elizabeth empties into the massive Norfolk Harbor, making it ideal for shipping and sh
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Vädjan till naturen
Naturligt låter bra Att någonting är naturligt låter intuitivt mycket bättre än att något är konstgjort. De flesta av oss associerar naturliga saker med något positivt, med tillverkade saker är … Continued Inlägget dök först upp på Vetenskap och Folkbildning .
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NASA images reveal important forests and wetlands are disappearing in Belize
Using NASA satellite images and machine learning, researchers with The University of Texas at Austin have mapped changes in the landscape of northwestern Belize over a span of four decades, finding significant losses of forest and wetlands, but also successful regrowth of forest in established conservation zones that protect surviving structures of the ancient Maya.
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How do good metals go bad?
So-called 'bad metals' are materials right at the border between metal and insulator: tiny changes in chemical composition turn the metal into an insulator – or vice versa. Until now, it seemed that these 'bad metals' could not be explained with conventional theories. But in fact these metals are not that 'bad' after all. Upon closer inspection, their behavior fits in perfectly with what we alread
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Study of venom in imperial cone snails suggests they use fake pheromones to entice prey
An international team of researchers has found that imperial cone snails produce two compounds that mimic chemicals found in pheromones produced by Platynereis dumerilii—a type of worm preyed upon by imperial cone snails. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes their study of snail venom and what they learned about it.
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Measuring the temperatures of red giants is actually pretty tricky
Red giant stars are, well, red and giant. But astronomers have always had difficulty estimating their temperatures due to their complex and turbulent atmospheres. Without an accurate gauge of their temperatures, it's difficult to tell when they will end their lives in gigantic supernova explosions. Now, a team of astronomers has developed a more effective technique for taking the temperature of re
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Discovery of 'knock-on chemistry' opens new frontier in reaction dynamics
Research by a team of chemists at the University of Toronto, led by Nobel Prize-winning researcher John Polanyi, is shedding new light on the behavior of molecules as they collide and exchange atoms during chemical reaction. The discovery casts doubt on a 90-year old theoretical model of the behavior of the "transition state", intermediate between reagents and products in chemical reactions, openi
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America's Coronavirus Catastrophe Began With Data
A few minutes before midnight on March 4, 2020, the two of us emailed every U.S. state and the District of Columbia with a simple question: How many people have been tested in your state, total, for the coronavirus? By then, about 150 people had been diagnosed with COVID-19 in the United States, and 11 had died of the disease. Yet the CDC had stopped publicly reporting the number of Americans tes
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How novel pathogens may cause the development of colorectal cancer
Do BMMFs, the novel infectious agents found in dairy products and bovine sera, play a role in the development of colorectal cancer? Scientists led by Harald zur Hausen detected the pathogens in colorectal cancer patients in close proximity to tumors. The researchers show that the BMMFs trigger local chronic inflammation, which can cause mutations via activated oxygen molecules and thus promote can
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Race influences flood risk behaviors
If you live in a flood prone area, would you—or could you—take measures to mitigate flood risks? What about others in your community? We are running out of time to ask this question according to The World Resources Institute, because global flood risk is increasing and loss projections for rivers alone put the cost over 500 billion dollars by midcentury.
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Best robot mops: Shine your floors without lifting a finger
Leave no messes on the floor. (ECOVACS/) You've already known about robot vacuum cleaners —you might even have one running around in your carpeted living room right now. Well, the latest and greatest smart home appliance is the robot mop that—you guessed it—sops up spills and scrubs schmutz off of your hard flooring. If a mopping robot sounds right up your street, you might be excited to know tha
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Of mice and men and their different tolerance to pathogens
A collaborative team at Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and Harvard Medical School has harnessed the Wyss's microfluidic Organs-on-Chip technology to model the different anatomical sections of the mouse intestine and their symbiosis with a complex living microbiome in vitro. In a comparative analysis of mouse and human microbiomes, the researchers were able to confir
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An 'indiscriminate' massacre: Study examines why 41 people were killed 6,200 years ago
In 2007, a mass grave containing the ancient remains of 41 men, women, and children was discovered in Croatia. Initially, some researchers proposed the victims might have been killed due to xenophobia. However, a new genetic analysis suggests that the victims weren't newcomers to the area, leading researchers to note that climatic changes might have played a role in the killings. In 2007, a man i
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Racial disparities in heart disease, hypertension, and diabetes death rates have minimally improved over last two decades
In the last 20 years, Black adults living in rural areas of the United States experienced high mortality rates due to diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease and stroke compared to white adults. According to a research letter published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, racial disparities improved minimally in rural areas over the last two decades, with larger improvements
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Don Mason obituary
My friend and colleague Don Mason, who has died aged 86, will be remembered for his discoveries about cells of the body's immune system, notably the regulation of lymphocytes, and how fast and with what specificity their receptors recognise parts of foreign molecules. He began this work in 1973, joining the Medical Research Council's cellular immunology unit in the Dunn School of Pathology, Oxfor
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Online Counseling Makes Mental Healthcare More Accessible Than Ever
It's more important than ever that mental health care be made as affordable and accessible as possible. People shouldn't avoid getting the help they need because it's too expensive, or because psychiatrists and therapists in their area are all booked up. Or because dealing with the red tape of the traditional health care system is too stressful. Luckily, innovative online counseling platforms lik
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COVID-19 variants continue to threaten our ability to end the pandemic
Novavax, a bio-tech company based in Maryland, released results of its phase 3 COVID-19 vaccine trial last week. (Pixabay/) Click here to see all of PopSci's COVID-19 coverage. The number of COVID-19 shots given worldwide now stands at over 350 million. For all the global public health shortcomings around the pandemic, this is still the biggest single vaccine campaign in human history. The US now
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Generating electricity through flooring surfaces
Ingo Burgert and his team at Empa and ETH Zurich have proven it time and again: Wood is so much more than "just" a building material. Their research aims at extending the existing characteristics of wood in such a way that it is suitable for completely new ranges of application. For instance, they have already developed high-strength, water-repellent and magnetizable wood. Now, together with the E
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Study reveals new clues about the architecture of X chromosomes
Researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) have uncovered new clues that add to the growing understanding of how female mammals, including humans, 'silence' one X chromosome. Their new study, published in Molecular Cell, demonstrates how certain proteins alter the architecture of the X chromosome, which contributes to its inactivation. Better understanding of X chromosome inactivation cou
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Lemurs can sniff out hidden fruit from afar
Lemurs can use their sense of smell to locate fruit hidden more than 50 feet away in the forest—but only when the wind blows the fruit's aroma toward them, according to a study published in the American Journal of Physical Anthropology.
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Machine learning system predicts severe COVID-19
An advanced machine-learning system can accurately predict if a patient's bout with COVID-19 will become severe or fatal and relay its findings to clinicians. Clinicians often learn how to recognize patterns in COVID-19 cases after they treat many patients with it. Machine-learning systems promise to enhance that ability, recognizing more complex patterns in large numbers of people with COVID-19
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Men of color avoid public places out of fear of involvement with criminal justice agents
The U.S. criminal legal system has expanded at a rapid pace, even as crime rates have declined since the 1990s. As a result, individuals' interactions with and surveillance by law enforcement are now commonplace. But citizens experience different interactions, with people of color who live in impoverished urban communities having the most frequent encounters. A new study interviewed young Philadel
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Seattle's minimum wage increase did not change crime or employment rates
Between 2015 and 2017, Seattle, Washington, became the first U.S. city to increase its hourly minimum wage to $15, more than double the federal minimum wage and 60 percent higher than Seattle's previous minimum wage. A new study examined the impact of this change on public safety. The study was motivated by the idea that since crime is sometimes the result of material deprivation, changes in the m
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I Want to Look Damn Good When the World Sees Me Again
All pandemic long, I've been hunting for a way—please, literally any way —to bludgeon myself into exercising with some kind of regularity. The quarantine life has turned me into an Indian Gollum. My arms, never quite jacked but at least semi-toned, currently have about as much bulk as overcooked linguini. Whatever seedlings of abs I had last March are now buried deep beneath a permafrost of flab.
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Even rice bred for heat loses yields at high temps
Research on the relationship between temperature and yields of various rice varieties suggests that warming temperatures negatively affect rice yields. The study uses 50 years of weather and rice-yield data from farms in the Philippines. Recent varieties of rice, bred for environmental stresses like heat, showed better yields than both traditional rice varieties and modern varieties of rice not s
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Solving the puzzle of polymers binding to ice for Cryopreservation
When biological material is frozen, cryoprotectants are used to prevent the damage associated with the formation of ice during the freezing process. New polymeric cryoprotectants are emerging, alongside the established cryoprotectants, but how exactly they manage to control ice formation and growth is still largely unknown. This is especially true for PVA, a deceptively simple synthetic polymer th
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Story tips: Urban climate impacts, materials' dual approach and healing power
Researchers at ORNL have identified a statistical relationship between the growth of cities and the spread of paved surfaces like roads and sidewalks. // Scientists at ORNL successfully demonstrated a technique to heal dendrites that formed in a solid electrolyte, resolving an issue that can hamper the performance of high energy-density, solid-state batteries. // ORNL researchers combined additive
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Voltage from the parquet
Researchers at Empa and ETH Zurich have made wood compressible and turned it into a micro-generator. When it is loaded, an electrical voltage is generated. In this way, the wood can serve as a bio-sensor – or generate usable energy. The latest highlight: To ensure that the process does not require aggressive chemicals, naturally occurring wood-degrading fungi take over the task of modifying the wo
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Significant variation found in timing andselection of genetic tests for non–small-cell lung cancer
Biomarker testing surveys specific disease-associated molecules to predict treatment response and disease progression; however its use has complicated the diagnosis of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In a new study in The Journal of Molecular Diagnosis , published by Elsevier, investigators provide for the first time a complete overview of biomarker testing, spanning multiple treatment lines,
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Open door to treatment of renal fibrosis by showing that it is caused by telomere shortening
Ageing is a common factor in many diseases. So, what if it were possible to treat them by acting on the causes of ageing or, more specifically, by acting on the shortening of telomeres, the structures that protect chromosomes? This strategy is being pursued by CNIO researchers, which have already succeeded to cure pulmonary fibrosis and infarctions in mice by lengthening telomeres. Now they take a
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Saarbrücken based bioinformaticians trace down molecular signals of Parkinson's disease
Parkinson's disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disease in the world, yet little is known about its causes and progression. To diagnose it early, make prognoses and develop therapies, biomarkers that indicate the development and course of the disease are needed. Bioinformaticians at Saarland University have been searching for such biomarkers, focusing on ribonucleic acids (RNA).
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Is there an association between a pregnant mother's diet and her child's weight?
Results of a study published in AJCN suggest that a mother's diet during pregnancy may have a long-term impact on her child's weight. In particular, there are specific developmental periods from birth to adolescence when nutrition during pregnancy may influence offspring weight. For example, the study found that dietary intakes with higher inflammatory potential during pregnancy were associated wi
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Best air purifiers: Cleaner indoor air at the push of a button
Make sure you breathe easy with a great air purifier. (Mila/) Filters in home air purifiers suck in dust, smoke, allergens, and viruses, pummel them to death, then circulate clean, filtered air. Sounds simple enough, but not all purifiers are created equal, and not everyone is right for every person. Your particular environment is a huge factor in choosing the best air purifier for you—do you liv
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Gut microbes regroup to aid defence after infection
Nature, Published online: 15 March 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00642-7 Resident gut microbes can help to block infection, but the mechanisms involved are not fully understood. It has now been found that changes in the microbial community after infection boost the level of a molecule that combats harmful bacteria.
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Study: Seattle's minimum wage increase did not change crime or employment rates
A new study examined the impact of this change on public safety. The study was motivated by the idea that since crime is sometimes the result of material deprivation, changes in the minimum wage might have implications for criminal activity: Boosting the minimum wage could raise workers' salaries (which could be associated with reduced crime). But if higher minimum wages spur employers to substitu
3h
Masonic Medical Research Institute develops new technology for studying brown fat
Brown fat, also known as brown adipose tissue (BAT), is a special type of fat that helps maintain body temperature. Importantly, brown fat is a biological fuel linked to metabolic rate and fat storage. In a recent publication, Dr. Zhiqiang Lin, Assistant Professor at the Masonic Medical Research Institute (MMRI) and senior author of the manuscript, successfully developed a new way to enrich isolat
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Lilly's Alzheimer's Data
That's a post title that I could have used eight or ten times over the lifetime of this blog – Eli Lilly has been hammering away at Alzheimer's for a long time now. They have yet another anti-amyloid antibody study out this week , and (as has happened over and over in this area) it as preceded by talk of interesting, tantalizing possible efficacy. Maybe possibly we might finally perhaps see somet
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Framtidens klimatsmarta paketleverans
Hämta ditt paket på en parkeringsplats där du bor när som helst på dygnet. Det är modellen för konceptet smarta mobila postboxar som är tänkt att öka tillgängligheten för människor men också att minska trafikmängden som ökat i takt med en växande e-handel. Det är företaget Smarter Mobility (Dipp-r) som utvecklat konceptet för den sista delen i logistikkedjan ( "the last mile" ) kring transport av
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What if mental health workers responded to emergency calls? | Leslie Herod
When you report an emergency in the US, police, firefighters or paramedics answer the call. What if mental health professionals responded, too? Colorado State Representative Leslie Herod shares a straightforward and research-backed approach that brings heart and humanity to criminal justice rather than unnecessary fines and arrests — and keeps crises from escalating into traumatic, or even deadly
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Psychotropic drug prescribing among nursing home residents in Canada during COVID-19 pandemic
This population-based study of all nursing home residents in Ontario, Canada, found increased prescribing of psychotropic drugs at the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic that persisted through September 2020. Although absolute increases in prescribing were small, they were disproportionate to expected secular prescribing trends from April 2018 to February 2020, and they were distinct from observed pre
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Beta blockers not associated with risk of depression
Drugs such as beta-adrenergic antagonists (beta blockers) have been linked to a range of adverse effects, including depression. But how reliable are these data, and which psychiatric side effects might indeed be caused by these drugs? These questions have been addressed by a team of researchers from Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, whose comprehensive meta-analysis has been published in Hyper
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Fungus in food stymies Crohn's disease intestinal healing
Foods such as cheese and processed meats can infect sites of intestinal damage in mice and people with Crohn's disease and prevent healing, according to new research. The new study also shows that treating infected mice with antifungal medication eliminates the fungus and allows the wounds to heal. Eating is a dangerous business. Naturally occurring toxins in food and potentially harmful foodborn
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Scientists develop invisible anti-counterfeit labels
Researchers from ITMO University and St. Petersburg Academic University developed a new technology for marking authentic goods. Manufacturers will be able to label electronics, drugs, jewelry, and other products with invisible images that can only be seen with special equipment. These labels will help protect the goods from forgery. The research is published in Advanced Materials.
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Climate change is altering rivers around the world
A new study shows climate change—not water and land management—plays a crucial role in changes in rivers and streams at the global level. Climate change affects the water balance of our planet: depending on the region and the time of year, this can influence the amount of water in rivers potentially resulting in more flooding or drought. River flow is an important indicator of water resources ava
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New probe set unravels evolutionary history of second-most diverse group of land plants
In 2016, a collaborative group of research and education specialists received funding from the National Science Foundation for the project 'Building a Comprehensive Evolutionary History of Flagellate Plants'—also known as 'Genealogy of Flagellate Plants' (GoFlag). Members of the team have the ambitious goal of reconstructing the 470-million-year history of one of the most diverse groups of land pl
5h
Fear of COVID-19 :
An international team of researchers led by scientists from the University of Vienna has now identified psychological predictors of fear and health during the lockdowns. The result of the study, published in PLOS ONE : Individual psychological variables have a much better predictive power than environmental variables.
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How filter-feeding bivalves could be used to clean up microplastics
On a hot summer day in Connecticut, it's common to go to a beach-side restaurant, eat some fresh oysters and mussels, and enjoy the crashing of the waves against the sand. For a group of University of Connecticut faculty and a Florida Atlantic University professor, their plan is to skip the beach and the restaurant and use relatives of those delicious animals for another reason—filtering the harmf
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The importance of international standards for the graphene community
NPL, in collaboration with international partners, has developed an ISO/IEC standard, ISO/TS 21356-1:2021, for measuring the structural properties of graphene, typically sold as powders or in a liquid dispersion. The ISO/IEC standard allows the supply chain to answer the question 'what is my material?" and is based on methods developed with The University of Manchester in the NPL Good Practice Gui
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Nanophotonics Could Be the 'Dark Horse' of the Quantum Computing Race, New Paper Says
The race to build the first practical quantum computers looks like a two-horse contest between machines built from superconducting qubits and those that use trapped ions. But new research suggests a third contender— machines based on optical technology—could sneak up on the inside. The most advanced quantum computers today are the ones buil t by Google and IBM , which rely on superconducting circ
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Birds may avoid fast, flashy butterflies and their mimics
Birds can learn to recognize fast and flashy butterflies they've failed to catch in the past—as well as similar-looking species—research finds. The research provides some of the strongest evidence to date for the idea of evasive mimicry, a strategy in which animals protect themselves from predators by matching the colors or patterns of agile relatives. First proposed more than 60 years ago, the h
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Mixed Reality
I have been following the development of virtual and augmented reality (VR and AR), writing about it here occasionally . I have a VR headset and use it regularly (I am currently playing Myst VR – very nice). I don't use it exclusively not even for gaming, some games are better on a usual screen and some are better in VR. My only gaming experience with AR is Pokemon on my cellphone (probably like
6h
Bacteria use quantum mechanics for protection
Researchers have discovered that a species of bacteria called C. tepidum employs the laws of quantum mechanics to protect itself from oxygen damage. Photosynthetic organisms harvest light from the sun to produce the energy they need to survive. A new paper reveals their secret: exploiting quantum mechanics. "This is the first time we are seeing biology actively exploiting quantum effects." "Befor
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Stressed-out bacteria provide insights to antibiotic resistance
For a bacterium, the world can be a tough place to survive, a constant competition for food and space. Some bacteria, like Pseudomonas aeruginosa, secrete toxic molecules that act as a defense mechanism against nearby competitor bacteria. This natural antibiotic, pyocyanin, is also toxic to Pseudomonas itself, but Pseudomonas has evolved ways to live in its presence.
6h
The Semiconductor Shortage Comes for Qualcomm, Sweeps Phone Industry
The semiconductor shortage has hit Qualcomm and the smartphone SoC manufacturer is reportedly having real trouble meeting orders across the globe. Qualcomm is just the latest company to be hit by this problem; CPUs, GPUs, automotive hardware, and LCDs have all been variously impacted over the past few months. Qualcomm is getting hit right now for three reasons. First, globally elevated demand rel
6h
NASA and Blue Origin Will Simulate Lunar Gravity With Spinning Rockets
Blue Origin aims to launch space tourists soon, but maybe some Amazon satellites could make the trip, too. Jeff Bezos recently announced he would step down as Amazon's CEO, allowing him to devote more time to building rockets. That's what billionaires do these days — just ask Elon Musk. Bezos' Blue Origin rockets are still taking shape, but the company has announced a partnership with NASA to imp
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Researchers gain insight into how solvent molecules impact light-driven reactions
Light-absorbing molecules can transform photons into electricity or fuels by shuttling electrons from one atom to another. In many cases the molecules are surrounded by a solvent—water, in the case of photosynthesis—and studies have shown that the solvent plays an important role in electron transfer. But measuring the motions of solvent molecules to find out how they influence the process has been
6h
Mutation i könsceller kopplad till epilepsi och utvecklingsstörning
Mutationer i genen för neurochondrin kan bidra till att epilepsi, försenad språkutveckling och utvecklingsstörning uppstår. Mutationen innebär en genförändring som kraftigt försämrar kontakter och signalöverföring mellan nervcellerna i hjärnan. – Mutationen kan vara ytterligare en förklaring till varför människor drabbas av de här tillstånden och som kan göra det lättare att diagnosticera drabbad
6h
Reducing risk and avoiding disaster – creating grid 2.0
It's hard to imagine a world without electricity. It powers elevators that allow us to build up, rather than out. Electricity keeps our homes at the right temperature. It helps to purify the water that we drink, and sometimes the air that we breathe. We use electricity for our phones and computers. And given the continuing growth of the Internet of Things, electricity demand will grow for many yea
7h
Severe winter drought in Nepal precisely predicted by model
Nepal media reported on March 5, 2020 that the country experienced severe drought in the past winter. The total rainfall dropped by 75% as compared with the normal average for the season. Shortage of rain had a major impact on irrigation, ruining vast rice crops and leaving thousands of farmers with little food or income. The wildfire raging in the mid-west Nepal lasted for two months, destroying
7h
Efficiency in photocatalysis found to be site-sensitive
Prof. Huang Weixin and Zhang Qun from University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), together with domestic collaborators, probed into the photocatalytic oxidation of methanol on various anatase TiO2 nanocrystals. The results were published on Angewandte Chemie International Edition.
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Pandemic burnout is rampant in academia
Nature, Published online: 15 March 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00663-2 Remote working, research delays and childcare obligations are taking their toll on scientists, causing stress and anxiety.
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Degradable lignin-based polyurethane adsorbent for efficient crude oil cleanup
A research group led by Prof. Zhu Jin at the Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering (NIMTE) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), has synthesized a high-efficiency carbon nanotube (CNT) modified lignin-based polyurethane adsorbent for crude oil spill remediation, in cooperation with Prof. Chen Tao's group at NIMTE and Prof. Yan Ning's group at the University of Toronto (U of
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Broad spectral range few-cycle laser pulses characterization by using a FASI device
Researchers from the Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics (SIOM) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) have developed a simple device called frequency-resolved optical gating and self-referenced spectral interferometry (FASI), which combines the frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG) and self-referenced spectral interferometry (SRSI) in a single device based on the same third-order
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Kraftigt ökad risk för hjärnblödning vid drickande
Personer som dricker fyra glas alkohol eller mer per dygn har en kraftigt ökad risk att drabbas av hjärnblödning än de som dricker lite eller inget. Det visar en avhandling från Umeå universitet. Att hög alkoholkonsumtion är en riskfaktor för hjärnblödning är känt sedan tidigare. Däremot har det varit svårt att veta exakt hur stor riskökningen är. I tidigare studier har man oftast använt självska
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Threats of global warming to the world's freshwater fishes
Nature Communications, Published online: 15 March 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-21655-w Climate change is a threat to global biodiversity, but the potential effects on freshwater fishes have not been well studied. Here the authors model future flow and water temperature extremes and predict that increases in water temperature in particular will pose serious threats to freshwater fishes
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A pulsatile release platform based on photo-induced imine-crosslinking hydrogel promotes scarless wound healing
Nature Communications, Published online: 15 March 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-21964-0 Dysfunctional and disfiguring scars can result from aberrant wound repair. Here, the authors develop a wound dressing material based on an integrated photo-crosslinking strategy and a microcapsule platform with pulsatile release of TGF-β inhibitor to achieve spatiotemporal specificity for scarless wound repair.
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Voltage controlled Néel vector rotation in zero magnetic field
Nature Communications, Published online: 15 March 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-21872-3 Voltage control of magnetization is critical for the development of antiferromagnetic spintronics. Here, using magnetic force microscopy and Hall measurements, Mahmood et al. demonstrate controlled rotation of the Néel vector in a heterostructure composed of Pt and antiferromagnetic B:Cr2O3.
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Engineering motile aqueous phase-separated droplets via liposome stabilisation
Nature Communications, Published online: 15 March 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-21832-x Bio-mimetic motion has been hard to achieve due to a lack of biocompatible conditions. Here, the authors report the creation of a liposome-stabilised aqueous PEG/dextran Pickering-like emulsion system with motion induced by the Marangoni effect and characterised by negative chemotaxis.
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Branched-chain α-ketoacids are preferentially reaminated and activate protein synthesis in the heart
Nature Communications, Published online: 15 March 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-21962-2 Systemic modulation of branched-chain keto acid (BCKA) metabolism alters cardiac health. Here, the authors define the major fates of BCKA in the heart and demonstrate that acute exposure to BCKA levels found in obesity activates cardiac protein synthesis and markedly alters the heart phosphoproteome.
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Interactions between timing and transmissibility explain diverse flavivirus dynamics in Fiji
Nature Communications, Published online: 15 March 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-21788-y Dengue and Zika virus are closely related flaviviruses but can have contrasting transmission dynamics in the same populations. Here, the authors use a model combining serological, surveillance and viral sequence data to explain differences in transmission dynamics in Fiji.
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'Reducing global warming matters for freshwater fish species'
The habitats of freshwater fish species are threatened by global warming, mainly due to rising water temperatures. A 3.2-degree Celsius increase in global mean temperature would threaten more than half of the habitat for one third of all freshwater fish species. The number of species at risk is ten times smaller if warming is limited to 1.5 degrees.
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Will spaceX's starships make it easier to build huge space stations ?
I've been thinking that it would actually be possible, since we can get 100 Ton to orbit, and I've read that having a 100 starships that are completely reusable is possible by 2035 or so. I think this would be a huge step forward and would allow us to do more things efficiently in space. What do you think ? submitted by /u/Helasri [link] [comments]
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The Brownstein protocol is not a proven treatment for COVID-19
Dr. David Brownstein is a "holistic" physician who practices in Dr. Gorski's neck of the woods. Unfortunately, he just wrote a book promoting an unproven protocol involving vitamins, nebulized hydrogen peroxide and iodine, and intravenous ozone to treat COVID-19. There is no evidence that his protocol works, other than a very poor quality case series. The post first appeared on Science-Based Med
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Doctor communication key to pandemic vaccine adoption
People who talk with their doctors are more likely to get vaccinated during a pandemic, according to a study of evidence collected during the "swine flu," the last pandemic to hit the U.S. before COVID-19. Researchers surveyed patients about the vaccine for the H1N1 virus (swine flu). They found that doctor-patient communication helped build trust in physicians, leading to more positive attitudes
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