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Scientists determine the origin of extra-solar object 'Oumuamua
In 2017, the first interstellar object from beyond our solar system was discovered via the Pan-STARRS astronomical observatory in Hawaii. It was named 'Oumuamua, meaning "scout" or "messenger" in Hawaiian. The object was like a comet, but with features that were just odd enough to defy classification.
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LATEST

US woman gives birth to first known baby with Covid antibodies, doctors say
The mother, a frontline healthcare worker, received her first Moderna dose in January, at 36 weeks pregnant A woman in south Florida who had received one dose of coronavirus vaccine while pregnant recently gave birth to the first known baby born with Covid-19 antibodies "after maternal vaccination", two pediatricians claimed. The doctors presented their finding in a preprint article , meaning thi
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Dead Sea scroll fragments and 'world's oldest basket' found in desert cave
Six-millennia-old skeleton of child also unearthed during dig in Judean Desert by Israeli archeologists Israeli archaeologists have unearthed two dozen Dead Sea scroll fragments from a remote cave in the Judean Desert, the first discovery of such Jewish religious texts in more than half a century. "For the first time in approximately 60 years, archaeological excavations have uncovered fragments o
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NASA's Juno reveals dark origins of one of Jupiter's grand light shows
New results from the Ultraviolet Spectrograph instrument on NASA's Juno mission reveal for the first time the birth of auroral dawn storms—the early morning brightening unique to Jupiter's spectacular aurorae. These immense, transient displays of light occur at both Jovian poles and had previously been observed only by ground-based and Earth-orbiting observatories, notably NASA's Hubble Space Tele
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A School Bought Solar Panels and Saved Enough to Give All Its Teachers Raises
Boosting Pay A rural school district in Batesville, Arkansas generated enough solar energy to give every teacher a raise, CBS News reports . Salaries were only averaging around $45,000 at the Batesville School District, with many teachers leaving as a result. It was also proving difficult to attract new teachers to the town of just 10,000 people. But then the school district, which included a hig
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Cosmic lens reveals faint radio galaxy
Radio telescopes are the world's most sensitive radio receivers, capable of finding extremely faint wisps of radio emission coming from objects at the farthest reaches of the universe. Recently, a team of astronomers used the National Science Foundation's Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) to take advantage of a helping hand from nature to detect a distant galaxy that likely is the faintest rad
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Ultrasound has potential to damage coronaviruses, study finds
The coronavirus' structure is an all-too-familiar image, with its densely packed surface receptors resembling a thorny crown. These spike-like proteins latch onto healthy cells and trigger the invasion of viral RNA. While the virus' geometry and infection strategy is generally understood, little is known about its physical integrity.
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Doctors: Woman Passed COVID Vaccine Immunity to Her Newborn Baby
Here's a dose of promising news. Scientists have found that a woman in south Florida who was recently vaccinated with one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine while pregnant passed on her COVID antibodies to her newborn baby, The Guardian reports . According to the team's findings, as detailed in a yet-to-be-peer-reviewed preprint , the mother, who is a frontline healthcare worker, received her first sho
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Pioneers Linking Math and Computer Science Win the Abel Prize
When Avi Wigderson and László Lovász began their careers in the 1970s, theoretical computer science and pure mathematics were almost entirely separate disciplines. Today, they've grown so close it's hard to find the line between them. For their many fundamental contributions to both fields, and for their work drawing them together, today Lovász and Wigderson were awarded the Abel Prize , an honor
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Catnip and grapefruit are ushering in a new era of insect repellants
Mosquitoes are a huge pain, but new insect repellants could help you stave them off without covering you in gross chemicals. (Pexels/) If you've been out in the woods in your life, you've probably eaten, drank, or breathed in DEET, and then been filled with regret. But it might not be forever. Over the past year, decades of research into essential-oil-based insect repellents have begun to bear fr
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Researchers derive urban scaling laws from the 3D geometry of a city
When complex systems double in size, many of their parts do not. Characteristically, some aspects will grow by only about 80 percent, others by about 120 percent. The astonishing uniformity of these two growth rates is known as "scaling laws." Scaling laws are observed everywhere in the world, from biology to physical systems. They also apply to cities. Yet, while a multitude of examples show thei
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Discovery identifies non-DNA mechanism involved in transmitting paternal experience to offspring
It has long been understood that a parent's DNA is the principal determinant of health and disease in offspring. Yet inheritance via DNA is only part of the story; a father's lifestyle such as diet, being overweight and stress levels have been linked to health consequences for his offspring. This occurs through the epigenome—heritable biochemical marks associated with the DNA and proteins that bin
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New measurement technique unravels what gives hummingbird wings their characteristic sound
The hummingbird is named after the humming sound it makes when it hovers in front of flowers to feed. But only now has it become clear how the wing generates the hummingbird's namesake sound when it is beating rapidly at 40 beats per second. Researchers from Eindhoven University of Technology, Sorama, a TU/e spin-off company, and Stanford University meticulously observed hummingbirds using 12 high
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What is Going on With the AstraZeneca/Oxford Vaccine?
Everyone will have heard of the situation in Europe right now, with a whole list of countries suspending dosing of the AstraZeneca/Oxford vaccine. Sweden and Latvia joined that list today .But getting clarity on this is another thing entirely. I have not been the biggest fan of the vaccine, because its initial rollout was (frankly) botched. It was difficult to figure out how efficacious it was, a
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New study investigates how life on land recovered after 'The Great Dying'
Over the course of Earth's history, several mass extinction events have destroyed ecosystems, including one that famously wiped out the dinosaurs. But none were as devastating as "The Great Dying," which took place 252 million years ago during the end of the Permian period. A new study, published today in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, shows in detail how life recovered in comparison to two s
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A multimillion-year-old record of Greenland vegetation and glacial history preserved in sediment beneath 1.4 km of ice at Camp Century [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Understanding the history of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) is critical for determining its sensitivity to warming and contribution to sea level; however, that history is poorly known before the last interglacial. Most knowledge comes from interpretation of marine sediment, an indirect record of past ice-sheet extent and behavior. Subglacial…
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Consumption of added sugar doubles fat production
Too much sugar is unhealthy – that we know, but it's not just down to the many calories. Even moderate amounts of added fructose and sucrose double the body's own fat production in the liver, researchers have shown. In the long term, this contributes to the development of diabetes or a fatty liver.
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Magnetism meets topology on a superconductor's surface
Electrons in a solid occupy distinct energy bands separated by gaps. Energy band gaps are an electronic "no man's land," an energy range where no electrons are allowed. Now, scientists studying a compound containing iron, tellurium, and selenium have found that an energy band gap opens at a point where two allowed energy bands intersect on the material's surface. They observed this unexpected elec
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Artificial light affects plant pollination even during the daytime
Streetlights alter the number of flower visits by insects not just at night, but also during the daytime. Artificial light at night thus indirectly affects the entire plant-pollinator community, with unknown consequences for functioning of the ecosystem, as researchers from the University of Zurich and Agroscope have proven for the first time.
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Picking up a book for fun positively affects verbal abilities
A new study shows that the more people read any kind of fiction the better their language skills are likely to be. Researchers found that people who enjoyed reading fiction for leisure and who identified as a reader scored higher on language tests, whereas those who read to access specific information scored more poorly on the same tests.
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A co-opted steroid synthesis gene, maintained in sorghum but not maize, is associated with a divergence in leaf wax chemistry [Plant Biology]
Virtually all land plants are coated in a cuticle, a waxy polyester that prevents nonstomatal water loss and is important for heat and drought tolerance. Here, we describe a likely genetic basis for a divergence in cuticular wax chemistry between Sorghum bicolor, a drought tolerant crop widely cultivated in hot…
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On the effects of the ocean on atmospheric CFC-11 lifetimes and emissions [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
The ocean is a reservoir for CFC-11, a major ozone-depleting chemical. Anthropogenic production of CFC-11 dramatically decreased in the 1990s under the Montreal Protocol, which stipulated a global phase out of production by 2010. However, studies raise questions about current overall emission levels and indicate unexpected increases of CFC-11 emissions…
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Flood risk behaviors of United States riverine metropolitan areas are driven by local hydrology and shaped by race [Sustainability Science]
Flooding risk results from complex interactions between hydrological hazards (e.g., riverine inundation during periods of heavy rainfall), exposure, vulnerability (e.g., the potential for structural damage or loss of life), and resilience (how well we recover, learn from, and adapt to past floods). Building on recent coupled conceptualizations of these complex…
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94% of older adults prescribed drugs that raise risk of falling
The study found that the percentage of adults 65 and older who were prescribed a fall- risk-increasing drug climbed to 94% in 2017, a significant leap from 57% in 1999. The research also revealed that the rate of death caused by falls in older adults more than doubled during the same time period.
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Scientists Find New Invasive Mosquito Species In Florida
Aedes scapularis mosquitoes are from the tropics and can carry yellow fever. Entomologist Lawrence Reeves recently identified them among mosquitoes he collected near Everglades National Park in 2019. (Image credit: Lawrence Reeves, UF/IFAS)
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A Bunch of US States Are Now Using Weather Modification Technology
As huge swathes of the West Coast are facing some of the most serious droughts the region has ever seen — almost certainly as a result of climate change — atmospheric scientists are trying to come up with solutions. Eight US states are now using a technique called "cloud seeding" to encourage clouds to form and provide drought-stricken regions with some much needed water, Scientific American repo
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Coronavirus live news: keep using AstraZeneca/Oxford vaccine, says WHO
Health body says it hasn't found association between blood clots and jab … Germany, Italy, France, Spain, Portugal, Slovenia, Indonesia pause AstraZeneca injections Benefits of Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine outweigh any risk, says EMA Europe's caution over Oxford vaccine about more than the science Which European states have paused AstraZeneca jabs? Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronav
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Mars' Oceans May Have Drained Into Its Interior
There may be far more water trapped inside Mars than we initially thought. According to a new paper published by researchers at Caltech in the journal Science today, Mars may still hold anywhere between 30 and 99 percent of the ancient water from its lakes and oceans within its crust, with less water escaping through the planet's atmosphere than previously thought. It's an exciting prospect, sugg
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Scientists unlock secret of why hummingbirds hum
Researchers use 3D sound mapping to show aerodynamic forces during flight explain eponymous sound Hummingbirds might be instantly recognisable from their eponymous sound, but the cause of the characteristic has long been a mystery. Now researchers say they have cracked the conundrum, finally taking the "hmm?" out of hummingbirds. Continue reading…
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What Conspiracy Theorists Don't Believe
Some people believe the most extraordinary things. Earth is flat, and airplane GPS is rigged to fool pilots into thinking otherwise. COVID-19 vaccines are a pretext to inject thought-controlling microchips into us all. The true president of the United States is Donald Trump; his inauguration will happen on January 20, make that March 4, make that a date to be arranged very soon. The question "How
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SpaceX Reportedly Wants to Fly First Starship to Orbit as Soon as July
Ambitious Targets According to information obtained by NASASpaceFlight , SpaceX may attempt to send a Starship prototype all the way to space as soon as July. The information, which has yet to be verified, claims that SpaceX is hoping to send booster "Super Heavy BN3 and Starship SN20" to space, "with a goal to get to orbit by July 1." Going Orbital The news comes after the company's latest proto
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Man Loses Half a Million Dollars in Elon Musk Reply "Crypto Giveaway" Scam
Dojo 4 Doge Obviously people occasionally fell for those Elon Musk imposter crypto scams — otherwise scammers wouldn't keep posting them. But this one is a bit of a doozy: a man referred to by the BBC as "Sebastian" lost over half a million dollars after getting duped by one of the scams. "There was a link to a new event below, so I clicked on it and saw that he was giving away Bitcoin!" Sebastia
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Biden Has a Border Problem
The Biden administration has gotten off to a fast start. President Joe Biden has signed a gigantic coronavirus-relief bill into law. Cabinet nominations are being approved by the Senate rapidly, many by lopsided margins. The United States has already returned to the Paris Agreement; green-energy ideas are being drafted into law. But there is a hole in the hull, and the boat is taking on water. Bi
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Tinder Is Adding an Option to Run Background Checks on Potential Dates
Yikes Dating app Tinder will soon allow its users to run background checks on possible dates, The Verge reports . Tinder's parent company, Match Group, made an investment of an undisclosed amount in Garbo, a nonprofit that facilitates these background checks based on just a first name and phone number — a partnership that could change the nature of intimacy, online relationships and privacy. Crim
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Dominic Cummings calls for 'very hard look' at handling of Covid crisis
Boris Johnson's former top aide says health department was 'smoking ruin' when pandemic struck Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Boris Johnson's former chief adviser, Dominic Cummings, has called for an investigation into the government's handling of coronavirus and described the Department of Health and Social Care as a "smoking ruin" when the crisis struck. Cummings
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UK politics live: Cummings says health department was 'total disaster' and had to be sidelined for vaccine procurement
Former chief adviser to PM tells MPs Department of Health in spring of 2020 was a 'smoking ruin' after PPE procurement problems Minister says UK public inquiry into Covid now would be 'premature' Public support for Covid inquiry more than twice as high as opposition UK foreign policy review will focus on China's growing power Global coronavirus updates – live 11.26am GMT In an interview on the To
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The world's richest countries are hoarding vaccines. This is morally indefensible | Fatima Bhutto
Why does South Africa pay twice as much for vaccines as European countries? Why has Africa – home to 1.3bn people – been allocated just 300m doses? Last year, European and North American countries managed to ignore warnings of a highly contagious pandemic – dragging their feet in setting protocols in place, delaying mandatory mask-wearing, and giving mostly miserly handouts to the millions strugg
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Scientists plan to drop the 14-day embryo rule, a key limit on stem cell research
In 2016, Magdalena Zernicka-Goetz grew human embryos in a lab dish for longer than anyone had before. Bathing the tiny spheres in a special broth inside an incubator , her team at the University of Cambridge watched the embryos develop, day after day, breaking all prior records . The embryos even attached to the dish as if it were a uterus, sprouting a few placental cells. But on day 13, Zernicka
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Woman Faces Years in Prison For Coughing on Uber Driver
Arna Kimiai, the woman who went viral earlier this month for assaulting and coughing on her Uber driver after he asked her to put on a mask, is now in police custody. Kimiai turned herself in to San Francisco Police last Thursday, Vice News reports . Now that she's there, she faces up to 20 years in prison for a variety of charges including battery of a transit employee, first-degree robbery, con
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The Identity Hoaxers
T he confession , when it came, did not hold back. "For the better part of my adult life, every move I've made, every relationship I've formed, has been rooted in the napalm toxic soil of lies," read the Medium post . It was published in September under the name of Jessica A. Krug, a George Washington University professor specializing in Black history. Krug had, she said, variously assumed the id
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A New Twist Reveals Superconductivity's Secrets
For the last three years, electrons have been toying with physicists. The game started in 2018 when the lab of Pablo Jarillo-Herrero announced the find of the decade : When the researchers stacked one flat sheet of carbon atoms on top of another, applied a "magic" 1.1-degree twist between them, then cooled the atomic wafers to nearly absolute zero, the sample became a perfect conduit of electrons
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Don't believe hydrogen and nuclear hype – they can't get us to net zero carbon by 2050 | Jonathon Porritt
Big industry players pushing techno-fixes are ignoring the only realistic solution to the climate crisis: renewables Now that the whole world seems to be aligned behind the goal of net zero carbon emissions by 2050, the nuclear industry is straining every sinew to present itself as an invaluable ally in the ambitious aim. Energy experts remain starkly divided on whether or not we can reach this g
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Satellites Are Stranded on the ISS Because of a Military Coup
Group Project An unusual geopolitical situation is brewing aboard the International Space Station. Prior to the military coup in Myanmar earlier this year, Japan's space agency JAXA had been collaborating with the country to build microsatellites that it planned to deploy in partnership with Myanmar's government. Now, JAXA has no idea what to do with the pair of 50-kilogram satellites, according
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NASA's Perseverance Rover Just Spotted a Tiny Twister on Mars
Dust Devil NASA just celebrated a big "first" for its Perseverance Mars rover. On Tuesday, the space agency released the first footage captured by the rover of a dust devil, which is a small cyclone that can travel across the Martian terrain like the Tasmanian Devil's signature whirlwind . The video is grainy and doesn't have the best framerate, but the fact that Perseverance spotted one of the l
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Biden brands Putin a 'killer' and says he will pay for Russian interference in US election – live
Biden's comments come after declassified report bolstered allegations Putin was behind interference Activists call on Coca-Cola, Delta to fight Georgia anti-voting bills Biden: Cuomo should resign if inquiry confirms claims 21 states threaten legal challenge to Biden's $1.9tn rescue plan Sign up to receive First Thing – our daily briefing by email 2.06pm GMT Biden tells migrants 'don't come over'
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China to only allow foreign visitors who have had Chinese-made vaccine
Move raises questions as China's vaccines not approved in many countries to which it is opening travel Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage China is resuming visa processing for foreigners from dozens of countries, but only if they have been inoculated against Covid-19 with a Chinese-made vaccine. The move has raised questions about the motivations behind the demand, give
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Drawing A Line In The Mud: Scientists Debate When 'Age Of Humans' Began
Scientists on five continents are hunting for geological evidence to pinpoint exactly when humans became a major force shaping life on Earth. But settling on the date could unleash a larger debate. (Image credit: M. Justin Wilkinson, Texas State U., Jacobs Contract at NASA-JSC/NASA)
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Minister says UK public inquiry into Covid now would be 'premature'
Reopening the economy is main priority for government, says the business secretary, Kwasi Kwarteng Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage A senior minister has rejected calls for a public inquiry into the UK government's handling of the coronavirus pandemic, which has resulted in the worst death toll per capita of any of the world's large economies. Appearing on Sky News, t
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Covid outbreak has reached my hospital in Papua New Guinea. People could soon be dying in the parking lot | Glen Mola
Port Moresby General Hospital is one of the few safe places for women to give birth, but 30% of our workforce has Covid-19 and we may have to shut our doors At Port Moresby General Hospital, about 20% of women presenting in labour have symptoms of Covid-19. Of these, about one-third (four to five women a day) test positive. We get the test results back about two to three hours after we take the s
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Pharma Execs Scheming About How to Make More Money Off COVID Vaccine
Pfizer says it's now exploring ways to drive up the cost of its vaccine. Speaking at a conference last week, Pfizer CFO Frank D'Amelio and investor relations senior VP Chuck Triano discussed how there's a "significant opportunity" to increase how much the company charges for vaccines, according to Business Insider . "If you look at how current demand and current pricing is being driven, it's clea
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Grow fresh, nutrient-rich sprouts at home—no garden required
These sprouted mung beans are more nutritious than they where when they were unsprouted. (Matt Taylor-Gross/) This story was originally featured on Saveur . Seeds of all sorts are at their most nutritious when they're sprouting. Before they reach this phase, a growth inhibitor called phytic acid keeps vitamins, fiber, and other crucial nutrients locked within their shells, preventing us from abso
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Your Walking Speed Might Predict Whether COVID Kills You
A new study uncovered a baffling new risk factor for severe or fatal coronavirus cases: how briskly people typically walk. Looking at data from more than 400,000 middle-aged and older coronavirus patients, scientists from Leicester General Hospital in the UK identified several risk factors for more severe cases of COVID-19 and a heightened risk of dying from the disease. Some were unsurprising, b
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Why an Infrastructure Deal Everyone Wants May Fail
"When you ask individual senators whether they want to see expanded infrastructure, the answer is nearly always yes." — Senator Elizabeth Warren "This is an area that is ripe with opportunity for bipartisan compromise." — Senator Ted Cruz "There's an opportunity to do something really good for the American public here." — James Williams, general vice president, International Union of Painters and
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Starship's Heat Shield Looks Like High Tech Armor
Hex Tiles Shots by Texas-based photographer and SpaceX enthusiast Austin Barnard show the space company's latest Starship prototype from close enough to see its new suit of armor. The spacecraft's eventual heatshield will be composed of many "hex tiles," hexagonally shaped bits of ceramic shielding designed to dissipate the enormous amounts of heat generated during reentry into the Earth's atmosp
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Inexpensive tin packs a big punch for the future of supercapacitors
A sustainable, powerful micro-supercapacitor may be on the horizon, thanks to an international collaboration of researchers from Penn State and the University of Electronic Science and Technology of China. Until now, the high-capacity, fast-charging energy storage devices have been limited by the composition of their electrodes—the connections responsible for managing the flow of electrons during
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Homeroom: My Daughter Is an Overachiever, and It's Hurting Her
Editor's Note: Every Tuesday, Abby Freireich and Brian Platzer take questions from readers about their kids' education. Have one? Email them at homeroom@theatlantic.com. Dear Abby and Brian, My daughter, whom I'll call Laura, is in seventh grade and has always been a perfectionist, especially when it comes to her schoolwork. But everything has been far worse this past year, while she's been in "h
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An ancient Maya ambassador's bones show a life of privilege and hardship
An important Maya man buried nearly 1,300 years ago led a privileged yet difficult life. The man, a diplomat named Ajpach' Waal, suffered malnutrition or illness as a child, but as an adult he helped negotiate an alliance between two powerful dynasties that ultimately failed. The ensuing political instability left him in reduced economic circumstances, and he probably died in relative obscurity.
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Elon Musk Says He's Selling a Techno Song About NFTs as an NFT
Computers Never Sleep Not even a day after claiming the title "Technoking," Tesla CEO Elon Musk uploaded a techno track about non-fungible tokens, better known as NFTs, to his Twitter account. I'm selling this song about NFTs as an NFT pic.twitter.com/B4EZLlesPx — Elon Musk (@elonmusk) March 15, 2021 And yes, you guessed it. "I'm selling this song about NFTs as an NFT," Musk wrote in the caption.
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Hackers Are Already Stealing NFTs
Non-Fungible Theft It's not a good look for a technology that touts itself as the future of fine art collecting. Hackers have already started stealing non-fungible tokens (NFTs), the blockchain-based art credentials that give a buyer original ownership over a digital piece of art, Motherboard reports . "Someone stole my NFTs today on @niftygateway and purchased $10K++ worth of today's drop withou
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Scientists plumb the depths of the world's tallest geyser
When Steamboat Geyser, the world's tallest, started erupting again in 2018 in Yellowstone National Park after decades of relative silence, it raised a few tantalizing scientific questions. Why is it so tall? Why is it erupting again now? And what can we learn about it before it goes quiet again?
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What Sarah Everard's Murder Illuminates—And Might Obscure
On the evening of March 3, Sarah Everard did everything right: She went home at a reasonable hour and traveled the long way, along well-lit London streets. As she walked, she checked in with her boyfriend on the phone. Then the call abruptly cut out. Everard never made it home that night . Her remains were recently discovered in the Kent woodlands, some 50 miles from where she was last seen alive
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The Biden Agenda Doesn't Run Through Washington
P resident Joe Biden can't expect a lot of cooperation from Texas. That much has been made clear by state Republicans' behavior in just the past three months. Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton led a far-fetched federal lawsuit to overturn Biden's victory. After that failed, he brought a suit against the new administration's plan to pause immigration deportations only two days into Biden's preside
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COVID-19 'vaccine passports' could set a troubling precedent
Vaccinations could help the tourism industry get back off the ground. But asking people for documents could lead to inequities, too. (Fran Boloni/Unsplash /) Yara M. Asi is a post-doctoral scholar in Health Management and Informatics, University of Central Florida. This story originally featured on The Conversation . After a year of canceled concerts , closed-door sporting events , and restricted
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AstraZeneca jab: EU regulator 'firmly convinced' benefits outweigh risks
Agency says there are 'no indications' the vaccine causes blood clots, but the risk may be higher for some groups Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The EU's medicines regulator has said it remains "firmly convinced" the benefits of the Oxford/AstraZeneca Covid vaccine outweigh the risks, but isolated cases of blood clots "are a serious concern and need serious and deta
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Decisions based on 'passion' likely to miss talent
Imagine you're hiring for a job or admitting students to a college: One applicant expresses great passion for the work, while another points to family encouragement to attend that institution or pursue that field. Which applicant is more likely to succeed?
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Magnetar SGR J1935+2154 investigated in detail
Using various ground-based facilities worldwide, an international team of astronomers has carried out long-term multi-frequency radio observations of a galactic magnetar known as SGR J1935+2154. Results of the observational campaign, published March 10 on arXiv.org, shed more light on the properties of radio emission from this source.
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Fish detectives: the sleuths using 'e-DNA' to fight seafood fraud
A Canadian supplier known for wild salmon has teamed up with geneticists to prove what really ends up on the plate Revealed: seafood fraud happening on a vast global scale The first notable thing about the wild salmon fillet Dane Chauvel shows me is its colour – a rich red that, even over FaceTime, makes my mouth water. The second notable thing is that it's definitely salmon. This might not seem
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The Pandemic Mistake America Can't Repeat
T he coronavirus pandemic may be in its final stage in the U.S. But it will not be the last pandemic of the 21st century. Since the turn of the century, SARS-CoV-2 is already the second virus to create a pandemic (the first was the H1N1 influenza in 2009) and the third coronavirus outbreak, following the first SARS crisis in 2003 and the emergence of Middle Eastern Respiratory Syndrome, also know
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New efficient quantum algorithm surpasses the Quantum Phase Estimation norm
Quantum computers have seen a lot attention recently as they are expected to solve certain problems that are outside the capabilities of normal computers. Primary to these problems is determining the electronic states of atoms and molecules so they can be used more effectively in a variety of industries—from lithium-ion battery designs to in silico technologies in drug development. A common way sc
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Scientists reveal responses of different biocrusts to warming and increased drought
In arid desert regions, a large proportion of the ground surface is covered by specialized organisms such as mosses and lichens that form biocrusts, which are important for the cycling of key nutrients in desert ecosystems. However, the long-term effects of warming and drought on these key biotic components of desert ecosystems remain poorly understood. Therefore, it is necessary to explore the re
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Technology to detect chemicals in fruit and vegetables
An ITMO Ph.D. student with her colleagues from Russia, Spain and Singapore has developed flexible sensing films based on silver nanoparticles that can be used to identify the presence of pesticide residue on the surface of agricultural produce in minutes. The research results were published in Nanoscale.
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To save giant sequoia trees, maybe it's time to plant backups
Last month, unusually high winds knocked down 15 giant sequoias in Yosemite. If you haven't had a chance to see them in person, giant sequoias are big—like, warp-your-sense-of-scale and melt-your-brain big. Then, once you've taken in their size, they do the same thing with your sense of time, because an individual tree can survive thousands of years. Wars, plagues, fashion trends: Sequoias have li
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Digital diplomati gynnar kvinnor
Digitala förhandlingar inom fredsdiplomatin ökar tillgängligheten, möjliggör en högre frekvens av möten, kan sätta säkerheten i fara och ibland bidra till störningar i interaktionen. Men också i vissa fall göra mötena mer jämställda. Detta skriver Isabel Bramsen, universitetslektor vid Lunds universitet och Anine Hagemann, forskare vid Köpenhamns universitet i artikeln The Missing Sense of Peace.
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Death enables complexity in chemical evolution
Simple systems can reproduce faster than complex ones. So, how can the complexity of life have arisen from simple chemical beginnings? Starting with a simple system of self-replicating fibers, chemists at the University of Groningen have discovered that upon introducing a molecule that attacks the replicators, the more complex structures have an advantage. This system shows the way forward in eluc
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Crystal structure prediction of multi-elements random alloy
Alchemy, which attempted to turn cheap metals such as lead and copper into gold, has not yet succeeded. However, with the development of alloys in which two or three auxiliary elements are mixed with the best elements of the times, modern alchemy can produce high-tech metal materials with high strength, such as high entropy alloys. Now, together with artificial intelligence, the era of predicting
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New proteins may lead to the reversal of antibiotic resistance in certain bacteria
Connections are crucial. Bacteria may be most dangerous when they connect—banding together to build fortress-like structures known as biofilms that afford them resistance to antibiotics. But a biomolecular scientist in Israel and a microbiologist in California have forged their own connections that could lead to new protocols for laying siege to biofilm-protected colonies. Their research was publi
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Ten years of safer skies with Europe's other satnav system
With 26 satellites in orbit and more than two billion receivers in use, Europe's Galileo satellite navigation system has made a massive impact. But our continent has another satnav system that has been providing safety-of-life services for ten years now—chances are that you've benefited from it without noticing.
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Researchers develop first self-cooling laser made with a silica fiber
Researchers have toiled for years, unsuccessfully, in pursuit of a silica optical fiber that would cool itself when excited with infrared laser light. Such a fiber would make it possible to use the most ubiquitous type of laser fiber—silica—without having to cool it externally and, theoretically, produce laser-based devices with exceptionally pure and stable frequencies.
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Research uncovers missing physics in explosive hotspots
Research conducted on Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) supercomputer Quartz highlights findings made by scientists that reveal a missing aspect of the physics of hotspots in TATB (1,3,5-trimamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene) and other explosives.
3h
Trackable and guided 'nanomissiles' deliver cancer-fighting drug straight to the tumor
Researchers from Skoltech and their colleagues from Hadassah Medical Center have developed hybrid nanostructured particles that can be magnetically guided to the tumor, tracked by their fluorescence and pushed to release the drug on demand by ultrasound. This technology can help make cancer chemotherapy more targeted. The paper was published in the journal Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces.
3h
The valuable contribution of stress to the thermal stability of nanograined polycrystalline alloys
Nanograined metals and alloys, whose grain size is less than 100 nm, exhibit extremely high strength and high ductility, possessing excellent mechanical properties. Nanograined materials, however, have a large number of grain boundaries and hence high total grain boundary energy. At a temperature higher than a critical temperature, grains in nanograined materials will grow spontaneously to reduce
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Researchers unlock the micro-molecular physiochemical mechanism of dental plaque formation
An inter-disciplinary team of researchers led by Prof. Qian Peiyuan, Chair Professor at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST)'s Department of Ocean Science and Division of Life Science has unraveled how a novel microbial small molecule released by Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans)—a bacterium commonly found in the human oral cavity—is connected to dental caries development usin
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Incredible fossil shows dinosaur sitting on preserved nest of eggs
A new fossil from southern China shows a dinosaur incubating its eggs at the time of its death. The find sheds light on oviraptor eating and egg-tending behavior. The find will be the focus of further study for some time. Despite how many of them you can find at a museum, fossils are comparatively rare . They can only form when a plant or animal dies under certain conditions, and without them the
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Missing baryons found in far-out reaches of galactic halos
Researchers have channeled the universe's earliest light – a relic of the universe's formation known as the cosmic microwave background – to solve a missing-matter mystery and learn new things about galaxy formation. Their work could also help us to better understand dark energy and test Einstein's theory of general relativity by providing new details about the rate at which galaxies are moving to
3min
A new view on plate tectonics
Along submarine mountain ranges, the mid-ocean ridges, forces from the Earth's interior push tectonic plates apart, forming new ocean floor and thus moving continents about. However, many features of the processes summarised under the term plate tectonics are still unclear. Researchers today have published a study in the international journal Nature that assigns transform faults which offset mid-o
3min
Recreational cannabis use among adults in the home is on the rise, but what about the children?
Among adults with children living in the home, cannabis use was more common in states with legalized cannabis use, according to a new study. Legalization for recreational and medical use were both linked with significantly higher prevalence of past-month and daily cannabis use. Until now, most harm reduction efforts protecting youth from exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke focused on parental cig
3min
Study finds transform faults play active role in shaping ocean floors
Forces acting inside the Earth have been constantly reshaping the continents and ocean basins over millions of years. What Alfred Wegener published as an idea in 1915 has been accepted since the 1960s, providing a unifying view about our planet. The fact that the theory of plate tectonics took so long to gain acceptance had two simple reasons. First, the geological formations that are most importa
4min
Double-duty catalyst generates hydrogen fuel while cleaning up wastewater
Hydrogen is a pollution-free energy source when it's extracted from water using sunlight instead of fossil fuels. But current strategies for 'splitting' or breaking apart water molecules with catalysts and light require the introduction of chemical additives to expedite the process. Now, researchers reporting in ACS ES&T Engineering have developed a catalyst that destroys medications and other com
4min
Virtual Event: COVID-19, One Year and Counting
It was unimaginable. A respiratory virus turned global pandemic disrupted every facet of our world. This was something public-health officials had been planning for. Yet most leaders seemed totally unprepared for its onslaught. A year later, half a million Americans have died. Where do we go from here? The Atlantic will explore the year that was, the power of the vaccines to stop the spread of th
15min
Your liver does more than you give it credit for
The liver is a powerhouse when it comes to metabolizing alcohol. (Patrick Fore/Unsplash/) Marie-Pierre Hasne is a PhD and Pharm.D. lecturer at the College of Medicine-Tucson, University of Arizona. This story originally featured on The Conversation . St. Patrick's Day is here, and even though most big celebrations have been canceled because of coronavirus, we still have something to cheer over—ou
15min
Protecting the ocean delivers a comprehensive solution for climate, fishing and biodiversity
A new study published in the prestigious peer-reviewed scientific journal Nature today offers a combined solution to several of humanity's most pressing challenges. It is the most comprehensive assessment to date of where strict ocean protection can contribute to a more abundant supply of healthy seafood and provide a cheap, natural solution to address climate change—in addition to protecting emba
22min
Advanced mouse embryos grown outside the uterus
To observe how a tiny ball of identical cells on its way to becoming a mammalian embryo first attaches to an awaiting uterine wall and then develops into nervous system, heart, stomach and limbs: This has been a highly-sought grail in the field of embryonic development for nearly 100 years. Prof. Jacob Hanna of the Weizmann Institute of Science and his group have now accomplished this feat. The me
22min
'We marry disorder with order': The effects of geometrical disorder on fluids and solids in mesoporous materials
We've all come across them before: those little bags of small balls that come packed together with new shoes or electrical goods. The balls are there to absorb moisture so as to protect the items from damage. "These materials act like a sponge," explains physicist Professor Rustem Valiullin from Leipzig University. He and his research group have found a way to more precisely determine the properti
27min
Icy ocean worlds seismometer passes further testing in Greenland
The NASA-funded Seismometer to Investigate Ice and Ocean Structure (SIIOS) performed well in seismic experiments conducted in snowy summer Greenland, according to a new study by the SIIOS team led by the University of Arizona published this week in Seismological Research Letters.
27min
Origin of Life: Lightning Strikes May Have Provided Missing Ingredient for Earth's First Organisms
The origin of life on Earth is one of the most complex puzzles facing scientists. It involves not only identifying the numerous chemical reactions that must take place to create a replicating organism, but also finding realistic sources for the ingredients needed for each of the reactions. One particular problem that has long faced scientists who study the origin of life is the source of the elus
29min
Google's new Nest Hub can track your sleep without a wearable or camera
The new Nest Hub looks similar to the older smart screen, but there's no camera. (Google /) You won't find a camera built into Google's new Nest Hub . But, even without an optical imaging device, the company's new smart screen can observe your sleep and tell you how well you're slumbering. Google calls the enabling technology Soli. It relies on radar to determine how you spend your time while you
40min
Identifying cells to better understand healthy and diseased behavior
Georgia Tech neuroscientists, using existing tools such as graphical models, can better identify cells in the brain. The algorithm has major implications for developmental diseases like Alzheimer's since once scientists can understand the mechanism of a disease, they can find interventions. The algorithm greatly accelerates the speed of analyzing whole-brain data and supports crowdsourcing where t
41min
Copy invitation
A sustainable, powerful micro-supercapacitor may be on the horizon, thanks to an international collaboration of researchers from Penn State and the University of Electronic Science and Technology of China. Until now, the high-capacity, fast-charging energy storage devices have been limited by the composition of their electrodes — the connections responsible for managing the flow of electrons duri
41min
Immune receptor protein could hold key to treatment of autoimmune diseases
TARM1 is a receptor protein whose role in the functioning of the immune system is unknown. In a new study, scientists from Japan have explored the potential role of TARM1 in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis by analyzing mouse models. They found that TARM1 activated dendritic cells, and development of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) was notably suppressed in TARM1-deficient mice and by tre
41min
Researchers identify barriers to use of surface electromyography in neurorehabilitation
Kessler researchers propose actions to facilitate the use of sEMG by rehabilitation professions. First, including hands-on sEMG experience in educational and professional training programs, Second, developing simpler technology interfaces, to make it easier to use sEMG. Third, codifying a means to regularly transfer research-based knowledge about sEMG and its relevance to SCI rehabilitation from r
41min
Nurse work environment influences stroke outcomes
Stroke remains a leading cause of death worldwide and one of the most common reasons for disability. While a wide variety of factors influence stroke outcomes, data show that avoiding readmissions and long lengths of stay among ischemic stroke patients has benefits for patients and health care systems alike. Although reduced readmission rates among various medical patients have been associated wit
41min
Cybersecurity pioneers win mathematics Abel Prize
The Abel Prize, which honours achievements in mathematics, was awarded Wednesday to Hungarian Laszlo Lovasz and Israeli Avi Wigderson for their contributions to computer security, the Norwegian Academy of Science said.
47min
Solar cells: Losses made visible on the nanoscale
Solar cells made of crystalline silicon achieve peak efficiencies, especially in combination with selective contacts made of amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). However, their efficiency is limited by losses in these contact layers. Now, for the first time, a team at Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) and the University of Utah, USA, has experimentally shown how such contact layers generate loss currents on t
53min
New aluminum and samarium hexaboride-based composite material with near-zero expansion
Precision or invar alloys have been developed by scientists for many centuries. These iron and nickel-based alloys are capable of keeping their size unchanged within a given range of temperatures. Because of this, they are used in the manufacture of precision gages, standards of length, details for mechanical dial plates, and similar devices. However, invar alloys lack many other useful physical c
53min
'We marry disorder with order'
We've all come across them before: Those little bags of small balls that come packed together with new shoes or electrical goods. The balls are there to absorb moisture so as to protect the items from damage. 'These materials act like a sponge,' explains physicist Professor Rustem Valiullin from Leipzig University.
1h
Common antibiotic can safely be given to most surgery patients despite penicillin allergy
The avoidance of cefazolin is based on dated research that reported a high cross-reactivity rate between penicillins and cephalosporins like cefazolin. The frequency of dual allergies to penicillin and cefazolin is so small that surgeons should feel confident giving cefazolin to patients with a history of penicillin allergy. Even in patients with confirmed penicillin allergy, the risk of cefazolin
1h
AI method can detect precursors to cervical cancer
Using artificial intelligence and mobile digital microscopy, researchers hope to create screening tools that can detect precursors to cervical cancer in women in resource-limited settings. A study led by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden now shows that AI screenings of pap smears carried out with portable scanners were comparable to analyses done by pathologists. The results are publi
1h
Not just for numbers: Anchoring biases decisions involving sight, sound, and touch
Numeric anchoring is a long-established technique of marketing communication. Once a price is mentioned, that number serves as the basis for—or "anchors"—all future discussions and decisions. But new research shows that this phenomenon is not limited to decisions that involve numbers, the use and understanding of which require high-level cognitive thinking. Anchoring also biases judgments at relat
1h
New technique detects minute particles of plastics in snow, rain and even soil
The snow may be melting, but it is leaving pollution behind in the form of micro- and nano-plastics according to a McGill study that was recently published in Environmental Pollution. The pollution is largely due to the relatively soluble plastics found in antifreeze products (polyethylene glycols) that can become airborne and picked up by the snow.
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What brings olfactory receptors to the cell surface: 'Zip codes' for odor sensors identified
A team of scientists led by Dietmar Krautwurst from the Leibniz Institute for Food Systems Biology at the Technical University of Munich has now identified address codes in odorant receptor proteins for the first time. Similar to zip codes, the codes ensure that the sensor proteins are targeted from inside the cell to the cell surface, where they begin their work as odorant detectors. The new find
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The Atlantic Daily: It's Okay to Feel Burned Out
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . The pandemic has made our lives strange, small, and stressful. No wonder so many of us feel like we have "spent the past year being pushed through a pasta extruder," as my colleague Ellen Cushing
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It's snowing plastic
McGill researchesr have developed a new technique that is orders of magnitude more sensitive than any of the other current methods used for tracing plastic in the environment. It allows scientists to detect ultra-trace quantities of many of the most common soluble and insoluble plastics in snow, water, rainfall, and even in soil samples once they have been separated – down to the level of a picogr
1h
FAU researchers break bonds in molecular nitrogen with calcium
A research team at FAU has demonstrated that calcium, a metal commonly found in nature is able to break the highly-stable nitrogen bond and can do so at minus 60°C which is a significant discovery in terms of the bond-breaking capabilities of calcium, which had been largely disregarded in the past. But their findings could also form the basis for developing industrial processes in the future.
1h
What brings olfactory receptors to the cell surface
A team of scientists from the Leibniz Institute for Food Systems Biology at the Technical University of Munich has now identified address codes in odorant receptor proteins for the first time. Similar to zip codes, the codes ensure that the sensor proteins are targeted from inside the cell to the cell surface. The new findings could contribute to the development of novel test systems with which th
1h
Best wireless keyboard: Your next typing companion
Comfortable and portable wireless keyboards that won't miss a stroke. (Soumil Kumar via Pexels /) Whether you've spent the last year gaming into the night, working from home, or a little bit of both, your keyboard has been there through it all. The best wireless keyboard can be a convenient switch that eases movement and alleviates wrist strain. A wireless keyboard also minimizes desk clutter—a p
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Elusive protein complex could hold the key to treating chromosomal disorders
One of the most vital functions performed by the cells in our body is DNA repair, a task so crucial to our well-being that failing to execute it can lead to consequences as dreadful as cancer. The process of DNA repair involves a complex interplay between several gene pathways and proteins. One such pathway is the "Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway," whose genes participate in DNA repair. FANCM, a compo
1h
Conspiracy theories influence our behavior—even if we do not believe in them
Not least because of the COVID-19 pandemic, conspiracy theories are more topical than ever. They are reported and discussed in almost all media and communication channels. But what influence do they have on our behavior? Scientists led by behavioral economist Loukas Balafoutas investigated this question in a recently published study. The result: We don't need to believe in conspiracy theories for
1h
Polarstern expedition investigates massive calved iceberg
Roughly two weeks ago, a massive iceberg calved from the Antarctic Ice Sheet. As the only research vessel nearby, the Polarstern took the opportunity to enter the area between the iceberg and the Brunt Ice Shelf. The first images from the seafloor reveal an amazing level of biodiversity in a region that was covered by thick ice for decades. The sediment samples gathered are expected to provide mor
1h
How to have constructive conversations | Julia Dhar
"We need to figure out how we go into conversations not looking for the victory, but the progress," says world debate champion Julia Dhar. In this practical talk, she shares three essential features of productive disagreements grounded in curiosity and purpose. The end result? Constructive conversations that sharpen your argument — not your relationships.
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HepaTx, Namocell, and Takara Bio USA complete second phase of collaboration on single cell analysis for cell therapy to treat late-stage liver diseases
HepaTx Corporation, Namocell Inc., and Takara Bio USA, Inc. (TBUSA) announced successful completion of the second phase of their collaboration on single cell analysis of hepatocyte-like cells (iHeps) differentiated from adipose tissue-derived stromal cells (ASCs) using Namocell's Single Cell Dispensers and Takara Bio's SMART-seq® kits to characterize HepaTx's novel cell therapies for liver disease
1h
Debat: Forbehold efterlyses
Succesmeldinger er i særlig høj kurs under pandemien. Desværre kan de også komme til at stå i kontrast til troværdighed, skriver Per Betzonich-Wilken, dr.phil., og censor på lægeuddannelsen.
1h
Nature-based Solutions (NbS) won't save the planet
Natural ecosystems, such as forests, grasslands and oceans, do a pretty good job of storing carbon and supporting biodiversity. It's therefore no surprise that Nature-based Solutions (NbS) – actions to protect, sustainably manage and restore natural or modified ecosystems, for the benefit of people and nature – are being widely discussed by NGOs , multi-stakeholder platforms and coalitions of cou
1h
Stimulating the immune system to fight cancer
Cancer cells have evolved mechanisms to escape the body's immune defense. Agents that prevent immune escape are attractive targets for the development of new cancer therapies. Scientists led by Prof. Herbert Waldmann and Dr. Slava Ziegler at the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Physiology in Dortmund have now developed a new cell-based test system to identify immunoregulatory modulators. Screenin
1h
The health of older women is determined by the characteristics of their partner
The health of women aged 65 and over appears to be related, in addition to their own socioeconomic characteristics, with that of their partners, as a result of traditional gender norms. This is one of the main conclusions of research led by Jordi Gumà, a researcher at UPF, conducted in conjunction with Jeroen Spijker, a Ramon y Cajal I3 researcher at Autonomous University of Barcelona, focusing on
1h
Hepatitis B: What people can learn from donkeys
The discovery of a previously unknown hepatitis B virus in donkeys and zebras opens up new opportunities for understanding the course of the disease. A global research consortium was able to show that the course of the infection with this virus is similar to that of chronic hepatitis B in humans. The study was led by DZIF scientists at the Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin and the Justus Liebig
1h
Partnerships in progress
Nature, Published online: 17 March 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00668-x Research alliances in Asia Pacific are shifting towards China.
1h
A guide to the Nature Index
Nature, Published online: 17 March 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00671-2 A description of the terminology and methodology used in this supplement, and a guide to the functionality available free online at natureindex.com.
1h
"Långt efteråt ser och känner jag branden, den har förändrat mitt liv"
Sommaren 2014 utbröt den största svenska skogsbranden i modern tid. Forskare har undersökt hur de boende i området upplevde katastrofen – och upptäckt överraskande skillnader. Forskare har undersökt hur 601 människor som bodde i närheten av området för den stora skogsbranden i Västmanland 2014, den största branden i modern tid i Sverige, upplevde katastrofen. Resultaten överraskade och visar på e
1h
PPE supplied to the NHS during COVID-19 pandemic poses challenge to the environment
According to a new study published in the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine, the carbon footprint of personal protective equipment (PPE) provided to health and social care staff in England during the first six months of the COVID-19 pandemic was equivalent to flying from London to New York 244 times every day. The good news is that adopting a range of strategies including increased UK manuf
1h
Conspiracy theories influence our behavior — even if we do not believe in them
Not least because of the COVID-19 pandemic, conspiracy theories are more topical than ever. They are reported and discussed in almost all media and communication channels. But what influence do they have on our behavior? Scientists led by behavioral economist Loukas Balafoutas investigated this question in a recently published study. The result: We don't need to believe in conspiracy theories for
2h
Looking for new explanations of TC genesis from the vertical coupling of Durian's embryo
In the tropical large scale disturbance systems, why do some convective cloud clusters eventually develop into tropical cyclones (TCs), while others fail to develop into TCs? Now Dr. Zhang Wenlong and his collaborators in Beijing have written a new story about the genesis of TC Durian, looking for new explanations from the vertical coupling characteristics of TC embryo and the role of the vertical
2h
Health promotion, prevention, and psychosocial health
The promotion of psychosocial health among individuals, groups, and society is an increasingly important subject in the field of public health. Psychosocial health is a complex interaction between the psyche of an individual and the social environment in which that individual lives. Promoting psychosocial health is often challenging and complex for health care professionals.
2h
The first COVID-19 lockdowns improved air quality. Where are we a year later?
One of the few uplifting developments in the early weeks of the COVID-19 pandemic was the remarkable boost in air quality around the world. As restrictions stilled cars, planes and boats, the change was so dramatic that a viral hoax claiming Italy's newly pristine Venetian canals had attracted dolphins seemed no less plausible than a true story that Los Angeles, at least for a day, had the cleanes
2h
Carbon dioxide electrotransformation into value-added chemicals in ionic liquid-based electrolytes
The use of fossil fuels as energy carriers and raw materials promotes the rapid development of society. However, the excessive exploitation of fossil fuels has given rise to an energy crisis and undesirable environmental changes. In particular, a continuous increase of CO2 concentration in the atmosphere, which is > 400 ppm today and is estimated to triple by 2040, might result in a series of envi
2h
What's behind vaccine hesitancy in the US?
About 31% of 5,009 surveyed Americans say they don't plan on getting the vaccine for the pandemic that's caused the deaths of more than half a million Americans in the last year, according to a new study. Experts say between 70 to 90% of the population needs to be vaccinated in order for herd immunity to end the pandemic. But even as the rollout picks up speed, with President Joe Biden announcing
2h
Solving the ancient problem of nucleic acid synthesis gives clues for the design of new antiviral drugs
An international team of scientists from the University of Turku, Finland and PennState University, U.S. have solved a long-standing mystery of how living organisms distinguish RNA and DNA building blocks during gene expression paving the way for the design of new antiviral drugs. The new insights were published in the journal Nature Communications.
2h
New bioink brings 3D-printing of human organs closer to reality
Researchers at Lund University have designed a new bioink which allows small human-sized airways to be 3D-bioprinted with the help of patient cells for the first time. The 3D-printed constructs are biocompatible and support new blood vessel growth into the transplanted material. This is an important first step towards 3D-printing organs. The new study has been published in Advanced Materials.
2h
What would volcanoes look like on metallic planets?
What would a volcano—and its lava flows—look like on a planetary body made primarily of metal? A pilot study offers insights into ferrovolcanism that could help scientists interpret landscape features on other worlds. Volcanoes form when magma , which consists of the partially molten solids beneath a planet's surface, erupts. On Earth, that magma is mostly molten rock, composed largely of silica.
2h
Åldersdiskriminering vanligt i teknikbranschen
För den som vill göra karriär inom teknikbranschen spelar ålder en avgörande roll. Äldre medarbetare antas nämligen vara mindre uppdaterade om den senaste tekniken och ha svårare för att bearbeta information och lära sig nya saker. Teknikbranschen har gjort sig känd för sin framåtanda och stora tilltro till vad tekniken kan uppnå – värden som ofta förknippas med ungdomlighet. Nu har forskare unde
2h
Evolved to stop bacteria, designed for stability
Connections are crucial. Bacteria may be most dangerous when they connect — banding together to build fortress-like structures known as biofilms that afford them resistance to antibiotics. But a biomolecular scientist in Israel and a microbiologist in California have forged their own connections that could lead to new protocols for laying siege to biofilm-protected colonies.
2h
CO2 electrotransformation into value-added chemicals in ionic liquid-based electrolytes
Electrochemical transformation of CO2 is an attractive way to recycle CO2 into value-added products and make it possible to store electrical energy in chemical form. Different innovative attempts have been investigated to improve these electrochemical processes. The application of ionic liquids as electrolyte has received growing attention in recent years. Scientists based in China summarize the l
2h
How can we mitigate the impacts of dust storms?
Over the last month, parts of Europe were hit by intense dust storms. First, a massive dust plume that originated in northeast Algeria caused reddish skies in large parts of Europe. Then, dust deposits tinted the snow-covered Pyrenees and the Alps brown. In late February, a Saharan dust outbreak severely affected the Canary Islands before heading toward continental Europe, reaching as far north as
2h
COVID Experts: We're Putting Out Campfires but the Forest Fire Rages – Facts So Romantic
"There is light at the end of the tunnel," Wayne Koff, President and CEO of the Human Vaccines Project, an organization that promotes vaccine development, said. "It is just that the tunnel is far longer than we assumed." Illustration by pumpyvector / Shutterstock After I got my second dose of a COVID-19 vaccine, a wave of euphoria infused me along with the modified messenger RNA. Many friends des
2h
Using game-based learning to teach economics during times of disruption
The educational disruption caused by the COVID-19 outbreak represents a significant challenge for teachers all over the world. The situation requires adapting the organization of lectures and the learning style to a fully online distance-learning context. Distance-learning is very different from face-to-face learning, notably in terms of the interaction between teacher and students and among stude
2h
Cu-based small-pore zeolites for deNOx
Zeolites, as efficient and stable catalysts, are widely used in the environmental catalysis field. Typically, Cu-based small-pore zeolites, as represented by Cu-SSZ-13, show excellent catalytic activity for selective catalytic reduction of NOx with ammonia (NH3-SCR) as well as high hydrothermal stability and poison resistance. Scientists based in China summarize the major advances in Cu-based smal
2h
Glass crystallization making red phosphor for high-power warm white lighting
This work reports the discovery of an unprecedented red-emitting Mg2Al4Si5O18:Eu2+ composite phosphor via crystallization of MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 aluminosilicate glass. Doped Eu2+ ions were thermally driven into the six-fold coordinated vacant channel of Mg2Al4Si5O18, responsible for the fascinating red emission. The maximum luminous flux and luminous efficiency of laser driven red-emitting device reach
2h
New quantum algorithm surpasses the QPE norm
Researchers improve their newly established quantum algorithm, bringing it to one-tenth the computational cost of Quantum Phase Estimation, and use it to directly calculate the vertical ionization energies of light atoms and molecules such as CO, O2, CN, F2, H2O, NH3 within 0.1 electron volts of precision.
2h
NUS researchers harness AI to identify cancer cells by their acidity
Healthy and cancer cells can look similar under a microscope. One way of differentiating them is by examining the level of acidity, or pH level, inside the cells.Tapping on this distinguishing characteristic, a research team from the National University of Singapore (NUS) has developed a technique that uses artificial intelligence (AI) to determine whether a single cell is healthy or cancerous by
2h
Semiconductor nanogrooves enhanced broad spectral band mmW and THz detection
A new type of millimetre and terahertz wave detector which contains a plasmonic nanogroove array fabricated in the epitaxially grown InSb on GaAs is reported. The detector can perform broad spectral band detection from 0.9 mm to 9.4 mm. A noise equivalent power of 2.2×10-14 W·Hz-1/2 is achieved at 1.75 mm. Such high-performance detectors are useful for wide applications including high-capacity com
2h
Under-desk treadmills that keep you active all day long
Put the "work" in "workout." (Goplus/) Many of us try to stay active, but after a long day at the office, there isn't always time to workout or go for a run. Under-desk treadmills provide a great solution that brings the benefits of an active lifestyle right into your office. They're designed to operate at slower speeds, and are quieter, too, so you're less likely to disturb co-workers. Some even
2h
Should companies let employees choose their tasks?
Letting employees select their own tasks is a popular means of increasing work satisfaction. However, managers should also consider the nature of the task and the employees' specialization before letting them select their own, suggests a new study led by UC Riverside and published in Organization Science.
2h
Can narcissistic managers fake that they care?
Relationships at work matter greatly to our well-being, and perhaps no work relationship affects us more strongly than the one we have with our manager. In fact, people who leave their job frequently report that their manager is their most important reason for doing so.
2h
COVID-19 and the unexplored role of neighborhood deprivation
Widely cited on the topic of contact tracing during the nationwide lockdown last year, Associate Professor Malcolm Campbell has collaborated with colleagues from UC's GeoHealth Laboratory, School of Health Sciences, Denmark's BERTHA Big Data Centre at Aarhus University and the New Zealand Ministry of Health to determine how a simple message designed to apply to everyone equally – 'stay home' – act
2h
Chlorophyllis
Nature, Published online: 17 March 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00713-9 A lesson learnt.
3h
Researchers provide complete clinical landscape for gene linked to epilepsy and autism
Researchers have compiled a complete genetic and clinical analysis of more than 400 individuals with SCN2A-related disorder, which has been linked to a variety of neurodevelopmental disorders, including epilepsy and autism. By linking clinical features to genetic abnormalities in a standardized format, the researchers hope their findings lead to improved identification and clinical intervention.
3h
Northeast 'ghost forests' multiply as waters rise
New research indicates two factors behind the emergence of "ghost forests" filled with dead trees along the mid-Atlantic and southern New England coast. Higher groundwater levels linked to sea-level rise and increased flooding from storm surges and very high tides are likely the most important factors, according to a report on the impacts of climate change that suggests how to enhance land-use pl
3h
Did Einstein believe in God?
To celebrate Einstein's birthday this past Sunday, we examine his take on religion and spirituality. Einstein's disapproval of quantum physics revealed his discontent with a world without causal harmony at its deepest levels: The famous "God does not play dice." He embraced a "Spinozan God," a deity that was one with nature, within all that is, from cosmic dust to humans. Science, to Einstein, wa
3h
Best shoe rack: Behold these versatile shoe storage options
Make sure you've got a place for all your shoes. (Anastasia Shuraeva via Pexels/) The one thing sneakerheads, stiletto fanatics, and regular Joes and Joannes have in common is a surfeit of shoes. Because even if you aren't particularly obsessed with footwear, chances are just the number of pairs you need to cover all the seasons and occasions in your life—snow boots, rain boots, flip-flops, flats
3h
These Synbiotic Supplements Might Be the Future of Gut Health
Advancements in modern science have given us all sorts of new tools for maximizing our health and wellness, from AI-powered workout machines to improve your physical fitness, to online counseling platforms to improve your mental well-being. However, when it comes to supporting gut health , and realizing all the potential health benefits that go along with it, one of the most advanced tools availa
3h
New species of mint family found in northern Myanmar
Premna is a genus of the mint family (Lamiaceae) of flowering plants. Over the past 20 years, two new species of the genus (P. bhamoensis and P. grandipaniculata) have been reported or described from Kachin State of northern Myanmar, one of the richest plant diversity centers in Southeast Asia.
3h
Scientists shrink pancreatic tumors by starving their cellular 'neighbors'
Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute demonstrated for the first time that blocking "cell drinking," or macropinocytosis, in the thick tissue surrounding a pancreatic tumor slowed tumor growth–providing more evidence that macropinocytosis is a driver of pancreatic cancer growth and is an important therapeutic target. The study was published in Cancer Discovery, a journa
4h
Pressure sensors could ensure a proper helmet fit to help protect the brain
Many athletes, from football players to equestrians, rely on helmets to protect their heads from impacts or falls. However, a loose or improperly fitted helmet could leave them vulnerable to traumatic brain injuries (TBIs), a leading cause of death or disability in the U.S. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Sensors have developed a highly sensitive pressure sensor cap that, when worn under a helme
4h
7 tips and tricks to master your Roku
This advice will help you get the most out of your Roku. (Roku/) You know what you're getting with a Roku streaming device: quick and easy access to as much audio and video content as you can take, from all of the big names in the streaming business. You owe it to yourself to make sure you know everything your Roku stick or box can do—otherwise you might miss out on some of its best features. 1.
4h
'Microbreaks' keep you more engaged on tough work days
Research shows people are more likely to take "microbreaks" at work on days when they're tired—but that's not a bad thing. Microbreaks seem to help tired employees bounce back from their morning fatigue and engage with their work better over the course of the day, the researchers found. Microbreaks are short, voluntary, and impromptu respites in the work day. Microbreaks include discretionary act
4h
More than one in 10 patients with lung cancer do not know what type they have
More than one in 10 patients with lung cancer do not know what type of tumor they have, according to data from a 17-country study carried out by the Global Lung Cancer Coalition (GLCC) to be presented at the European Lung Cancer Conference (ELCC). Nearly one in five patients surveyed did not feel involved in decisions about their treatment and care, and a similar proportion felt that they had neve
5h
Save Over 30% On This Tabletop 3D Printer Perfect For Adults And Kids
3D printing has made it possible to print out a new house , a steak , a nuclear reactor, you name it. So, it stands to reason that this technology can create the intricate toys we could only dream of when we were children. Toybox is dedicated to getting kids in on the fun — while building an interest in STEM — with its tabletop 3D printer serving as an infinite toy chest while teaching kids about
5h
Long-distance electron transfer in a filamentous Gram-positive bacterium
Nature Communications, Published online: 17 March 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-21709-z Long-distance extracellular electron transfer has been observed in Gram-negative bacteria. Here, Yang et al. show that a filamentous, unicellular Gram-positive bacterium is capable of bidirectional extracellular electron transfer, and forms centimetre-range conductive networks consisting of 1mm-long cells and c
5h
Revealing 3D structure of gluten in wheat dough by optical clearing imaging
Nature Communications, Published online: 17 March 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22019-0 Gluten is a crucial quality determinant of wheat-based food products, however, its structure remains unknown due to the lack of imaging techniques. Here, the authors report the 3D structure of gluten in millimeter scale and at submicron resolution by combining an optical clearing reagent with two-photon microsc
5h
Isolation and characterization of a covalent CeIV-Aryl complex with an anomalous 13C chemical shift
Nature Communications, Published online: 17 March 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-21766-4 Ce(IV) organometallic compounds are rare due to Ce(IV) being a powerful oxidant. Herein, the authors explore the covalency of a pair of organocerium complexes bearing a Ce(IV)-C(aryl) bond and examine their structure by NMR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, and computational calculations.
5h
Imagining and constraining ferrovolcanic eruptions and landscapes through large-scale experiments
Nature Communications, Published online: 17 March 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-21582-w Ferrovolcanism is a hypothetical form of planetary volcanism in which the erupted lava is metallic in composition. Here we show that ferrovolcanic lava is denser and less viscous than silicate lava, resulting in fast-moving, thin, braided flows.
5h
Quasi-continuous melting of model polymer monolayers prompts reinterpretation of polymer melting
Nature Communications, Published online: 17 March 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-21799-9 Melting is considered a strictly first-order transition and therefore cannot proceed continuously. Here the authors challenge this concept for long-chain compounds by demonstrating continuous melting of thin layers on graphite where the barrier for such melting, the interface crowding, is removed.
5h
Mechanical stress determines the configuration of TGFβ activation in articular cartilage
Nature Communications, Published online: 17 March 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-21948-0 The functional relationship between subchondral bone and articular cartilage is unclear. Here, the authors show that transforming growth factor-beta propagates the mechanical impact of subchondral bone on articular cartilage through αV integrin–talin mechanical transduction system in chondrocytes.
5h
Acetylation of KLF5 maintains EMT and tumorigenicity to cause chemoresistant bone metastasis in prostate cancer
Nature Communications, Published online: 17 March 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-21976-w The therapies for bone metastatic prostate cancer are limited and the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Here, the authors show that bone derived TGF-β induces acetylation of KLF5 (Ac-KLF5), and Ac-KLF5 promotes prostate cancer bone metastasis and resistance to docetaxel by upregulating CXCR4.
5h
Irony alert: stolen voices, relative rip-off
We're always on the lookout for papers with that fillip of irony that lets us wonder if the Great Comedian in the Sky enjoys our little project. This week, we found two such articles. One involves a 2008 paper in the Journal of Psycholinguistic Research titled "Examining Linguistic Relativity Hypothesis as One of the Main … Continue reading
6h
The potential economic impact of volcano alerts
The Volcano Alert Level (VAL) system, standardized by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) in 2006, is meant to save lives and keep citizens living in the shadow of an active volcano informed of their current level of risk.
8h
Pandemic has increased pregnancy stress for US women
COVID-19 has created new problems for U.S. pregnant women–one of their biggest concerns is the baby contracting the disease. Some feared they would become infected in the hospital when they delivered, then be forced to isolate from their newborn. Other problems included financial worries, difficulty finding healthy food and missed prenatal appointments. Even greater levels of stress and lack of s
12h
Hormone therapy shown to reduce effects of nocturia in postmenopausal women
CLEVELAND, Ohio (March 17, 2021)–As women age, they are more likely to wake up in the middle of the night to pass urine. The loss of estrogen during the menopause transition accelerates this problem, which is known as nocturia. A new study evaluated the effectiveness of different hormone therapies in managing the frequency of nocturia. Study results are published online today in Menopause , the j
12h
The role of adult playfulness in romantic life
While play and playfulness have been studied well in children, their structure and consequences are understudied in adults. A new article published in Social and Personality Psychology Compass highlights available research on this topic and also examines why playfulness is important in romantic relationships.
12h
Predicting the likelihood of bone fractures in older men
Fractures in the vertebrae of the spine and calcification in a blood vessel called the abdominal aorta can both be visualized through the same spinal imaging test. A new study published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research that included 5,365 older men indicates that each of these measures are linked with a higher risk of developing hip and other fractures.
12h
Researchers reveal UK trends in inflammatory eye disease
Scleritis is a vision-threatening inflammatory condition of the white portion of the eye, or the sclera, that is thought to be the result of an over-reaction of the body's immune system. A new study published in Arthritis & Rheumatology provides estimates of the incidence and prevalence of scleritis between 1997 and 2018 in the U.K.
12h
With the current direction of AI, robots, space ventures, quantum and clean energy, what career paths will be highly in demand from 20-30 years from now? What will be the new innovations?
In this interview: https://youtu.be/f3lUEnMaiAU Elon Musk said engineers and careers dealing with human beings are a good direction to go for the future Jack Ma said something similar which is creative careers such as the arts will be in demand. So with this being said, what do you fellow futurists think about future career paths? I'm trying to think of a time where people don't really have job s
15h
"I now think there is a 50% chance that we will reach longevity escape velocity by 2036. After that point (the "Methuselarity"), those who regularly receive the latest rejuvenation therapies will never suffer from age-related ill-health at any age." – Aubrey de Grey on March 14th, 2021
Aubrey de Grey has reaffirmed his prediction on reaching longevity escape velocity… "I now think there is a 50% chance that we will reach longevity escape velocity by 2036. After that point (the "Methuselarity"), those who regularly receive the latest rejuvenation therapies will never suffer from age-related ill-health at any age." submitted by /u/Jaxon9182 [link] [comments]
15h
New study investigates how life on land recovered after "The Great Dying"
A new study, published today in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, shows in detail how life recovered from "The Great Dying" in comparison to two smaller extinction events. The international study team showed for the first time that this mass extinction was harsher than other events due to a major collapse in diversity. Ultimately, characterizing communities–especially those that recovered succe
16h
Has Science Finally Created the Perfect Cup of Coffee?
Everyday, 80-percent of Americans drink coffee in an attempt to boost alertness, energy, and feelings of well-being. Sure, coffee is great for its ability to help us power up when we're lagging. But like most drugs, too much caffeine can be a bad thing. According to the American Psychological Association , at least eight studies conducted on caffeine found that it aggravated symptoms of anxiety a
16h
The city formula
Many facets of city growth follow universal scaling laws. While this fact is well established, researchers are still searching for the why. Carlos Molinero and Stefan Thurner, researchers at the Complexity Science Hub Vienna, now offer a simple and elegant explanation: They derive urban scaling laws from 3D city geometry.
16h
Young adults in a 20-year-long study shed light on what matters for mental health of ethnic diverse youth
A study in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP), published by Elsevier, reports on the young adult assessment of the now 20-year longitudinal Boricua Youth Study (BYS), a large cohort that brings much needed insight about development and mental health of children from diverse ethnic background growing up in disadvantaged contexts.
19h
UK variant spread rapidly in care homes in England
The study, published as a letter in the New England Journal of Medicine, looked at positive PCR tests of care home staff and residents between October and December. It found that, among the samples it had access to, the proportion of infections caused by the new variant rose from 12% in the week beginning 23 November to 60% of positive cases just two weeks later, in the week beginning 7 December.
19h
Best spin scrubber: For floors so clean, they squeak
Make sure your floors are immaculate. (Jason Boyd via Pexels/) What if we told you you could feel less like Cinderella while cleaning the house, scrubbing the floors with a cloth and bucket of water, and instead feel more like Inspector Gadget, whipping out all sorts of high-tech tools to make the job not only quick, but actually fun? Cleaning your floors, bath tiles, and kitchen sinks can go so
19h
Best gifts for teenage girls
Reliable birthday gift ideas. (Karolina Grabowska via Pexels /) Being a teenage girl is hard enough without having to fake a smile opening up uncool gifts year after year. This is why we've created a guide for gifting age-appropriate presents that the teen in your life will love. A lot can change between thirteen and eighteen, which is why we've included options for any birthday celebration from
20h
Fred Pulls the Plug on the Season | Gold Rush
Stream Full Episodes of Gold Rush: discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/gold-rush Discovery ► https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GoldRush/ https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Gold_Rush https://twitter.com/Discovery We're on Instagram!
20h
Picking up a book for fun positively affects verbal abilities: Concordia study
a new study published in the journal Reading and Writing shows that the more people read any kind of fiction the better their language skills are likely to be. Professor of education Sandra Martin-Chang and PhD student Stephanie Kozak led the study. They found that people who enjoyed reading fiction for leisure and who identified as a reader scored higher on language tests, whereas those who read
20h
Three-dimensional disadvantage
The continuous improvement of imaging technology holds great promise in areas where visual detection is necessary, such as with cancer screening. Three-dimensional imaging in particular has become popular because it provides a more complete picture of the target object and its context.
20h
Ultrasound vibrations may kill coronavirus, MIT study shows
The researchers created computer models of the likely structure of the SARS-CoV-2 virus, and then subjected those models to various ultrasound frequencies in a simulation. The results showed that key parts of the virus ruptured at specific frequencies. More research is needed, but the authors noted that the frequencies that damaged the virus fell within a range that's known to be safe to humans.
20h
Curiosity Stream Is The Streaming Service For Science Lovers
Curiosity is often defined as "a strong desire to know or learn." However, as far as modern television is concerned, it appears that this strong desire is fading away. The golden era of basic cable offered channels like Discovery and The Learning Channel, which were committed to science and other educational programing. But over the last decade or so, that type of programing has been replaced by
21h
Study uncovers safety concerns with some air purifiers
The market for air purifiers is booming, but a new study has found that some air cleaning technologies marketed for COVID-19 may be ineffective and have unintended health consequences. The study, authored by researchers at Illinois Tech, Portland State University, and Colorado State University, found that cleaning up one harmful air pollutant can create a suite of others.
21h
New study points to novel drug target for treating COVID-19
Researchers from Cleveland Clinic's Florida Research and Innovation Center (FRIC) have identified a potential new target for anti-COVID-19 therapies. Their findings were published in Nature Microbiology. Led by FRIC scientific director Michaela Gack, Ph.D., the team discovered that a coronavirus enzyme called PLpro (papain-like protease) blocks the body's immune response to the infection. More res
21h
Research team shows importance of investors on uniqueness of company strategies
Corporate strategies should be as unique as possible, in fact highly specific to each individual company. This enables companies to compete successfully in the long term. However, the capital market and others, including analysts, often react negatively to the idea of unique strategies. The reason is that deviating from typical industry standards makes them more complex to evaluate. This regularly
21h
Easing the burden on transgender and nonbinary graduate students
It would surprise no one that pursuing a graduate degree can be a stressful endeavor, and for students who are transgender and nonbinary (TNB), the atmosphere can become toxic, according to University of Houston researcher Nathan Grant Smith. In a new paper published in Higher Education, Smith provides an analysis of current literature pertaining to TNB graduate student experiences and suggests in
21h
Stage-specific overcompensation, the hydra effect, and the failure to eradicate an invasive predator [Ecology]
As biological invasions continue to increase globally, eradication programs have been undertaken at significant cost, often without consideration of relevant ecological theory. Theoretical fisheries models have shown that harvest can actually increase the equilibrium size of a population, and uncontrolled studies and anecdotal reports have documented population increases in response…
21h
Monitoring tumor cell death in murine tumor models using deuterium magnetic resonance spectroscopy and spectroscopic imaging [Applied Biological Sciences]
2H magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging has been shown recently to be a viable technique for metabolic imaging in the clinic. We show here that 2H MR spectroscopy and spectroscopic imaging measurements of [2,3-2H2]malate production from [2,3-2H2]fumarate can be used to detect tumor cell death in vivo via the production of…
21h
Diverse innate stimuli activate basophils through pathways involving Syk and I{kappa}B kinases [Immunology and Inflammation]
Mature basophils play critical inflammatory roles during helminthic, autoimmune, and allergic diseases through their secretion of histamine and the type 2 cytokines interleukin 4 (IL-4) and IL-13. Basophils are activated typically by allergen-mediated IgE cross-linking but also by endogenous "innate" factors. The aim of this study was to identify the…
21h
Attention recruits frontal cortex in human infants [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
Young infants learn about the world by overtly shifting their attention to perceptually salient events. In adults, attention recruits several brain regions spanning the frontal and parietal lobes. However, it is unclear whether these regions are sufficiently mature in infancy to support attention and, more generally, how infant attention is…
21h
Experimental evidence of the importance of multitrophic structure for species persistence [Ecology]
Ecological theory predicts that species interactions embedded in multitrophic networks shape the opportunities for species to persist. However, the lack of experimental support of this prediction has limited our understanding of how species interactions occurring within and across trophic levels simultaneously regulate the maintenance of biodiversity. Here, we integrate a…
21h
Crystal structure of a far-red-sensing cyanobacteriochrome reveals an atypical bilin conformation and spectral tuning mechanism [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Cyanobacteriochromes (CBCRs) are small, linear tetrapyrrole (bilin)-binding photoreceptors in the phytochrome superfamily that regulate diverse light-mediated adaptive processes in cyanobacteria. More spectrally diverse than canonical red/far-red–sensing phytochromes, CBCRs were thought to be restricted to sensing visible and near UV light until recently when several subfamilies with far-red–sensi
21h
Minimally invasive treatment provides fast pain relief for cancer patients
A minimally invasive treatment for patients whose cancer has spread to their bones provides quick and sustained pain relief and improves quality of life, according to a new study to be presented at the Society of Interventional Radiology Annual Scientific Meeting. The palliative treatment known as radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is effective in providing relief in as little as three days, and the be
22h
Ancient bone artefact found
The discovery of a rare bone artefact near the Lower Murray River casts more light on the rich archaeological record on Ngarrindjeri country in southern Australia.Details of the Murrawong bone point, dated between c. 5,300-3,800 years old, has have been described by Flinders University, Griffith University and other experts in a new paper in Australian Archaeology.
22h
Heart-healthy lifestyles linked to lower risk of future cancers
Traditional risk factors for cardiovascular disease, including older age, male sex, and current or former smoking were all independently associated with increased risk of the development of cancer. Although participants who already had a history of heart disease before the study or experienced a cardiovascular event after joining the study were not at increased risk of developing cancers, those wh
22h
94% of older adults get prescriptions that boost fall risk
The percentage of US adults 65 and older who received a prescription for a drug that increased their risk of falling rose to 94% in 2017—a significant leap from 57% in 1999, researchers report. The research also shows that the rate of fall-caused deaths in older adults more than doubled during the same time period. Even minor falls may be dangerous for older adults. Falls that are not fatal can s
22h
1 in 5 Americans knew someone who died of COVID-19
Nearly one-fifth of Americans knew someone who has died of COVID-19, a new survey says. A year into the coronavirus pandemic, 19% of all Americans report having a close friend or relative that has died from the virus, according to the survey from the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research at the University of Chicago. The impact of COVID-19 has been especially severe among Black
22h
Years of good life is a well-being indicator designed to serve research on sustainability [Social Sciences]
Sustainable development (SD) as popularized by the Brundtland Commission and politically enshrined in the Sustainable Development Goals has been the explicit focus of sustainability science. While there is broad agreement that the trend of human well-being (W) over time should serve as a sustainability criterion, the literature so far has…
22h
HflX is a GTPase that controls hypoxia-induced replication arrest in slow-growing mycobacteria [Microbiology]
GTPase high frequency of lysogenization X (HflX) is highly conserved in prokaryotes and acts as a ribosome-splitting factor as part of the heat shock response in Escherichia coli. Here we report that HflX produced by slow-growing Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG) is a GTPase that plays a critical role in…
22h
Trait similarity in reef fish faunas across the world's oceans [Ecology]
Species' traits, rather than taxonomic identities, determine community assembly and ecosystem functioning, yet biogeographic patterns have been far less studied for traits. While both environmental conditions and evolutionary history shape trait biogeography, their relative contributions are largely unknown for most organisms. Here, we explore the global biogeography of reef fish…
22h
Immunoediting role for major vault protein in apoptotic signaling induced by bacterial N-acyl homoserine lactones [Chemistry]
The major vault protein (MVP) mediates diverse cellular responses, including cancer cell resistance to chemotherapy and protection against inflammatory responses to Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Here, we report the use of photoactive probes to identify MVP as a target of the N-(3-oxo-dodecanoyl) homoserine lactone (C12), a quorum sensing signal of certain proteobacteria…
22h
Computationally designed peptide macrocycle inhibitors of New Delhi metallo-{beta}-lactamase 1 [Biochemistry]
The rise of antibiotic resistance calls for new therapeutics targeting resistance factors such as the New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase 1 (NDM-1), a bacterial enzyme that degrades β-lactam antibiotics. We present structure-guided computational methods for designing peptide macrocycles built from mixtures of l- and d-amino acids that are able to bind to…
22h
Meis homeobox genes control progenitor competence in the retina [Neuroscience]
The vertebrate eye is derived from the neuroepithelium, surface ectoderm, and extracellular mesenchyme. The neuroepithelium forms an optic cup in which the spatial separation of three domains is established, namely, the region of multipotent retinal progenitor cells (RPCs), the ciliary margin zone (CMZ)—which possesses both a neurogenic and nonneurogenic potential—and…
22h
Toxoplasma gondii association with host mitochondria requires key mitochondrial protein import machinery [Microbiology]
Host mitochondrial association (HMA) is a well-known phenomenon during Toxoplasma gondii infection of the host cell. The T. gondii locus mitochondrial association factor 1 (MAF1) is required for HMA and MAF1 encodes distinct paralogs of secreted dense granule effector proteins, some of which mediate the HMA phenotype (MAF1b paralogs drive…
22h
Modulation of a protein-folding landscape revealed by AFM-based force spectroscopy notwithstanding instrumental limitations [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Single-molecule force spectroscopy is a powerful tool for studying protein folding. Over the last decade, a key question has emerged: how are changes in intrinsic biomolecular dynamics altered by attachment to μm-scale force probes via flexible linkers? Here, we studied the folding/unfolding of α3D using atomic force microscopy (AFM)–based force…
22h
A conformational switch driven by phosphorylation regulates the activity of the evolutionarily conserved SNARE Ykt6 [Cell Biology]
Ykt6 is a soluble N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor activating protein receptor (SNARE) critically involved in diverse vesicular fusion pathways. While most SNAREs rely on transmembrane domains for their activity, Ykt6 dynamically cycles between the cytosol and membrane-bound compartments where it is active. The mechanism that regulates these transitions and allows Ykt6…
22h
Estimating maximal microbial growth rates from cultures, metagenomes, and single cells via codon usage patterns [Microbiology]
Maximal growth rate is a basic parameter of microbial lifestyle that varies over several orders of magnitude, with doubling times ranging from a matter of minutes to multiple days. Growth rates are typically measured using laboratory culture experiments. Yet, we lack sufficient understanding of the physiology of most microbes to…
22h
Lineage-specific selection and the evolution of virulence in the Candida clade [Microbiology]
Candida albicans is the most common cause of systemic fungal infections in humans and is considerably more virulent than its closest known relative, Candida dubliniensis. To investigate this difference, we constructed interspecies hybrids and quantified mRNA levels produced from each genome in the hybrid. This approach systematically identified expression differences…
22h
Protein design-scapes generated by microfluidic DNA assembly elucidate domain coupling in the bacterial histidine kinase CpxA [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
The randomization and screening of combinatorial DNA libraries is a powerful technique for understanding sequence–function relationships and optimizing biosynthetic pathways. Although it can be difficult to predict a priori which sequence combinations encode functional units, it is often possible to omit undesired combinations that inflate library size and screening effort….
22h
Discovery of a caspase cleavage motif antibody reveals insights into noncanonical inflammasome function [Biochemistry]
Inflammasomes sense a number of pathogen and host damage signals to initiate a signaling cascade that triggers inflammatory cell death, termed pyroptosis. The inflammatory caspases (1/4/5/11) are the key effectors of this process through cleavage and activation of the pore-forming protein gasdermin D. Caspase-1 also activates proinflammatory interleukins, IL-1β and…
22h
Electrochromic shift supports the membrane destabilization model of Tat-mediated transport and shows ion leakage during Sec transport [Plant Biology]
The mechanism and pore architecture of the Tat complex during transport of folded substrates remain a mystery, partly due to rapid dissociation after translocation. In contrast, the proteinaceous SecY pore is a persistent structure that needs only to undergo conformational shifts between "closed" and "opened" states when translocating unfolded substrate…
22h
Neuronal circuits overcome imbalance in excitation and inhibition by adjusting connection numbers [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
The interplay between excitation and inhibition is crucial for neuronal circuitry in the brain. Inhibitory cell fractions in the neocortex and hippocampus are typically maintained at 15 to 30%, which is assumed to be important for stable dynamics. We have studied systematically the role of precisely controlled excitatory/inhibitory (E/I) cellular…
22h
Visualizing the double-gyroid twin [Physics]
Periodic gyroid network materials have many interesting properties (band gaps, topologically protected modes, superior charge and mass transport, and outstanding mechanical properties) due to the space-group symmetries and their multichannel triply continuous morphology. The three-dimensional structure of a twin boundary in a self-assembled polystyrene-b-polydimethylsiloxane (PS-PDMS) double-gyroi
22h
Type III secretion system effector proteins are mechanically labile [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Multiple gram-negative bacteria encode type III secretion systems (T3SS) that allow them to inject effector proteins directly into host cells to facilitate colonization. To be secreted, effector proteins must be at least partially unfolded to pass through the narrow needle-like channel (diameter <2nm) of the T3SS. Fusion of effector…
22h
Evolution and global charge conservation for polarization singularities emerging from non-Hermitian degeneracies [Physics]
Core concepts in singular optics, especially the polarization singularities, have rapidly penetrated the surging fields of topological and non-Hermitian photonics. For open photonic structures with non-Hermitian degeneracies in particular, polarization singularities would inevitably encounter another sweeping concept of Berry phase. Several investigations have discussed, in an inexplicit way, conn
22h
Sortase-assembled pili in Corynebacterium diphtheriae are built using a latch mechanism [Biochemistry]
Gram-positive bacteria assemble pili (fimbriae) on their surfaces to adhere to host tissues and to promote polymicrobial interactions. These hair-like structures, although very thin (1 to 5 nm), exhibit impressive tensile strengths because their protein components (pilins) are covalently crosslinked together via lysine–isopeptide bonds by pilus-specific sortase enzymes. While atomic…
22h
Yeast optimizes metal utilization based on metabolic network and enzyme kinetics [Systems Biology]
Metal ions are vital to metabolism, as they can act as cofactors on enzymes and thus modulate individual enzymatic reactions. Although many enzymes have been reported to interact with metal ions, the quantitative relationships between metal ions and metabolism are lacking. Here, we reconstructed a genome-scale metabolic model of the…
22h
Decoupling expression and editing preferences of ADAR1 p150 and p110 isoforms [Genetics]
Human adenosine deaminase acting on RNA 1 (ADAR1) catalyzes adenosine-to-inosine deamination reactions on double-stranded RNA molecules to regulate cellular responses to endogenous and exogenous RNA. Defective ADAR1 editing leads to disorders such as Aicardi-Goutières syndrome, an autoinflammatory disease that manifests in the brain and skin, and dyschromatosis symmetrica hereditaria, a…
22h
Extreme weather events and military conflict over seven centuries in ancient Korea [Economic Sciences]
We explore the causal connection between weather and war by constructing and analyzing a dataset featuring extreme weather events and military conflicts involving a set of stable political entities that existed side by side over several centuries, namely, the three ancient kingdoms of the Korean Peninsula between 18 Before the…
22h
Computationally designed pyocyanin demethylase acts synergistically with tobramycin to kill recalcitrant Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen that develops difficult-to-treat biofilms in immunocompromised individuals, cystic fibrosis patients, and in chronic wounds. P. aeruginosa has an arsenal of physiological attributes that enable it to evade standard antibiotic treatments, particularly in the context of biofilms where it grows slowly and becomes tolerant…
22h
Directed information exchange between cortical layers in macaque V1 and V4 and its modulation by selective attention [Neuroscience]
Achieving behavioral goals requires integration of sensory and cognitive information across cortical laminae and cortical regions. How this computation is performed remains unknown. Using local field potential recordings and spectrally resolved conditional Granger causality (cGC) analysis, we mapped visual information flow, and its attentional modulation, between cortical layers within and…
22h
Molecular assemblies of the catalytic domain of SOS with KRas and oncogenic mutants [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Ras is regulated by a specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor Son of Sevenless (SOS), which facilitates the exchange of inactive, GDP-bound Ras with GTP. The catalytic activity of SOS is also allosterically modulated by an active Ras (Ras–GTP). However, it remains poorly understood how oncogenic Ras mutants interact with SOS…
22h
The receptor-like kinases BAM1 and BAM2 are required for root xylem patterning [Plant Biology]
Xylem patterning in the root is established through the creation of opposing gradients of miRNAs and their targets, transcripts of the HD-ZIP III family of transcriptions factors, enabled by the cell-to-cell spread of the former. The miRNAs regulating xylem patterning, miR165/6, move through plasmodesmata, but how their trafficking is regulated…
22h
ATM controls the extent of DNA end resection by eliciting sequential posttranslational modifications of CtIP [Cell Biology]
DNA end resection is a critical step in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) via homologous recombination (HR). However, the mechanisms governing the extent of resection at DSB sites undergoing homology-directed repair remain unclear. Here, we show that, upon DSB induction, the key resection factor CtIP is modified by…
22h
Chemical pumps and flexible sheets spontaneously form self-regulating oscillators in solution [Applied Physical Sciences]
The synchronization of self-oscillating systems is vital to various biological functions, from the coordinated contraction of heart muscle to the self-organization of slime molds. Through modeling, we design bioinspired materials systems that spontaneously form shape-changing self-oscillators, which communicate to synchronize both their temporal and spatial behavior. Here, catalytic reactions at..
22h
Evidence supporting a time-limited hippocampal role in retrieving autobiographical memories [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
The necessity of the human hippocampus for remote autobiographical recall remains fiercely debated. The standard model of consolidation predicts a time-limited role for the hippocampus, but the competing multiple trace/trace transformation theories posit indefinite involvement. Lesion evidence remains inconclusive, and the inferences one can draw from functional MRI (fMRI) have…
22h
Structural basis for selective AMPylation of Rac-subfamily GTPases by Bartonella effector protein 1 (Bep1) [Microbiology]
Small GTPases of the Ras-homology (Rho) family are conserved molecular switches that control fundamental cellular activities in eukaryotic cells. As such, they are targeted by numerous bacterial toxins and effector proteins, which have been intensively investigated regarding their biochemical activities and discrete target spectra; however, the molecular mechanism of target…
22h
The cyanobacterial taxis protein HmpF regulates type IV pilus activity in response to light [Microbiology]
Motility is ubiquitous in prokaryotic organisms including the photosynthetic cyanobacteria where surface motility powered by type 4 pili (T4P) is common and facilitates phototaxis to seek out favorable light environments. In cyanobacteria, chemotaxis-like systems are known to regulate motility and phototaxis. The characterized phototaxis systems rely on methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins…
22h
Crtc modulates fasting programs associated with 1-C metabolism and inhibition of insulin signaling [Biochemistry]
Fasting in mammals promotes increases in circulating glucagon and decreases in circulating insulin that stimulate catabolic programs and facilitate a transition from glucose to lipid burning. The second messenger cAMP mediates effects of glucagon on fasting metabolism, in part by promoting the phosphorylation of CREB and the dephosphorylation of the…
22h
Mechanistic basis for ubiquitin modulation of a protein energy landscape [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Ubiquitin is a common posttranslational modification canonically associated with targeting proteins to the 26S proteasome for degradation and also plays a role in numerous other nondegradative cellular processes. Ubiquitination at certain sites destabilizes the substrate protein, with consequences for proteasomal processing, while ubiquitination at other sites has little energetic effect….
22h
Chromatin remodelers and lineage-specific factors interact to target enhancers to establish proneurosensory fate within otic ectoderm [Developmental Biology]
Specification of Sox2+ proneurosensory progenitors within otic ectoderm is a prerequisite for the production of sensory cells and neurons for hearing. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms driving this lineage specification remain unknown. Here, we show that the Brg1-based SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex interacts with the neurosensory-specific transcriptional regulators Eya1/Six1 to i
22h
Analysis of chronic inflammatory lesions of the colon for BMMF Rep antigen expression and CD68 macrophage interactions [Immunology and Inflammation]
Consumption of Eurasian bovine meat and milk has been associated with cancer development, in particular with colorectal cancer (CRC). In addition, zoonotic infectious agents from bovine products were proposed to cause colon cancer (zur Hausen et al., 2009). Bovine meat and milk factors (BMMF) are small episomal DNA molecules frequently…
22h
High-salt diet suppresses autoimmune demyelination by regulating the blood-brain barrier permeability [Immunology and Inflammation]
Sodium chloride, "salt," is an essential component of daily food and vitally contributes to the body's homeostasis. However, excessive salt intake has often been held responsible for numerous health risks associated with the cardiovascular system and kidney. Recent reports linked a high-salt diet (HSD) to the exacerbation of artificially induced…
22h
Exploring sexual orientation beyond genital arousal: Using large-scale online dating contact behavior to study male and female bisexuality [Social Sciences]
Jabbour et al. (1) examine the extent to which men who self-report bisexual orientation exhibit bisexual genital arousal, employing a larger sample than had been used in previous research (n = 588 who provided self-reported arousal data; n = 474 with genital responses). The results confirm that men who report…
22h
The aryl hydrocarbon receptor facilitates the human cytomegalovirus-mediated G1/S block to cell cycle progression [Cell Biology]
The tryptophan metabolite, kynurenine, is known to be produced at elevated levels within human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-infected fibroblasts. Kynurenine is an endogenous aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) ligand. Here we show that the AhR is activated following HCMV infection, and pharmacological inhibition of AhR or knockdown of AhR RNA reduced the accumulation…
22h
Oocyte age and preconceptual alcohol use are highly correlated with epigenetic imprinting of a noncoding RNA (nc886) [Population Biology]
Genomic imprinting occurs before fertilization, impacts every cell of the developing child, and may be sensitive to environmental perturbations. The noncoding RNA, nc886 (also called VTRNA2-1) is the only known example of the ∼100 human genes imprinted by DNA methylation, that shows polymorphic imprinting in the population. The nc886 gene…
22h
The intrinsic instability of the hydrolase domain of lipoprotein lipase facilitates its inactivation by ANGPTL4-catalyzed unfolding [Medical Sciences]
The complex between lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and its endothelial receptor (GPIHBP1) is responsible for the lipolytic processing of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRLs) along the capillary lumen, a physiologic process that releases lipid nutrients for vital organs such as heart and skeletal muscle. LPL activity is regulated in a tissue-specific manner by…
22h
Reply to Chan et al.: Better delineating female and male sexual orientation [Social Sciences]
Chan et al. (1) use survey data to examine the association between self-reported sexual orientations (Kinsey scores) and online dating activity in bisexual men and women. They show that Kinsey scores predict similar patterns of contact behavior for bisexual individuals of both sexes and consequently question our position that the…
22h
Plug-and-socket mechanisms in nutrient sensing by lysosomal amino acid transporters [Cell Biology]
Unicellular organisms and epithelial cells from animals and plants must adapt to abrupt changes in their environment. Similarly, cells bathed in the protective milieu intérieur of multicellular organisms must monitor their intracellular nutrient and energy levels to control and adapt key cellular processes such as growth, proliferation, autophagy, and transcriptional…
22h
Conditions and extent of volatile loss from the Moon during formation of the Procellarum basin [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Rocks from the lunar interior are depleted in moderately volatile elements (MVEs) compared to terrestrial rocks. Most MVEs are also enriched in their heavier isotopes compared to those in terrestrial rocks. Such elemental depletion and heavy isotope enrichments have been attributed to liquid–vapor exchange and vapor loss from the protolunar…
22h
Toward net-zero sustainable aviation fuel with wet waste-derived volatile fatty acids [Engineering]
With the increasing demand for net-zero sustainable aviation fuels (SAF), new conversion technologies are needed to process waste feedstocks and meet carbon reduction and cost targets. Wet waste is a low-cost, prevalent feedstock with the energy potential to displace over 20% of US jet fuel consumption; however, its complexity and…
22h
How mouse sperm 'remember' dad's diet
New research in mice identifies how non-DNA molecules in sperm transmit environmental information. It has long been understood that a parent's DNA is the principal determinant of health and disease in offspring. Yet inheritance via DNA is only part of the story; a father's lifestyle such as diet, body weight , and stress levels have been linked to health consequences for his offspring. This occur
22h
How sperm remember
A new study from McGill, published recently in Developmental Cell , has made a significant advance in the field of epigenetics by identifying how environmental information is transmitted by non-DNA molecules in the sperm. It is a discovery that advances scientific understanding of the heredity of paternal life experiences and potentially opens new avenues for studying disease transmission and prev
23h
Revamp of UK CRISPR regulation will require public trust
Nature, Published online: 16 March 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00672-1 The United Kingdom is considering innovative ways of regulating gene editing in food and farming. Robust processes and public confidence will be vital for success.
23h
Could birth control pills ease concussion symptoms in female athletes?
A new pilot study has shown when a female athlete has a concussion injury during the phase of her menstrual cycle when progesterone is highest, she feels less stress. Feeling stressed is one symptom of a concussion. Feeling less stressed is a marker of recovery. The study also revealed for the first time the physiological reason for the neural protection is increased blood flow to the brain as a r
23h
Standing out from the crowd
Corporate strategies should be as unique as possible to enable companies to compete successfully in the longterm. However, the capital market and others often react negatively to the idea of unique strategies. This discourages companies from focusing on unique strategies, even though they would be beneficial. This contradiction is known as the "uniqueness paradox". Researchers from Göttingen and G
23h
Team finds intact plant fossils under Greenland ice sheet
For the first time ever, researchers have found fossils under Greenland's ice sheet that are so large and well preserved that they can be seen with the naked eye. The fossils reveal several million years of details about climate and plant life in Greenland, the researchers report. Following a relocation to the Copenhagen suburb of Rødovre in 2017, researchers found unopened boxes of ice cores dat
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