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Cern experiment hints at new force of nature
Experts reveal 'cautious excitement' over unstable particles that fail to decay as standard model suggests Scientists at the Large Hadron Collider near Geneva have spotted an unusual signal in their data that may be the first hint of a new kind of physics. The LHCb collaboration, one of four main teams at the LHC, analysed 10 years of data on how unstable particles called B mesons, created moment
15h
Scientists Find New Patterns In Mysterious Radio Pulses From Distant Galaxies
Microsecond Burst The strange signals known as "fast radio bursts" (FRBs) have long mystified the astronomy community. The sudden, strong radio pulses, often emanating from distant galaxies, appear at regularly timed intervals, from every few of milliseconds to weeks — and we still aren't entirely sure what they are or why they exist. Now, a new team of astronomers has taken an even closer look.
8h
AstraZeneca's COVID-19 vaccine completely prevents severe illness and death
AstraZeneca's COVID-19 vaccine could be in the US soon. (AstraZeneca/) Click here to see all of PopSci's COVID-19 coverage. A fourth drug manufacturer, AstraZeneca, has announced positive results in Phase III COVID vaccine trials in the United States. The vaccine, developed in partnership with Oxford University, and with some funding from Operation Warp Speed, is in widespread use outside the US
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Multiple migrations to the Philippines during the last 50,000 years [Anthropology]
Island Southeast Asia has recently produced several surprises regarding human history, but the region's complex demography remains poorly understood. Here, we report ∼2.3 million genotypes from 1,028 individuals representing 115 indigenous Philippine populations and genome-sequence data from two ∼8,000-y-old individuals from Liangdao in the Taiwan Strait. We show that the…
5h
Scientists Created an Artificial Early Embryo From Human Skin Cells
We all know how human reproduction works: sperm meets egg, fertilized egg kicks off its journey, transforms into a human embryo, then becomes a fetus and ultimately a baby. But what if boy meets girl isn't the only way? Last week, two studies in Nature torpedoed the classic narrative of the beginning of life. Two independent teams coaxed ordinary skin cells into a living cluster that resembled a
9h
Removing Space Debris
Right now there are about 3,000 active satellites in Earth orbit. About 1,000 of those satellites are part of the Starlink project to provide internet access everywhere on the planet, with a planned 42,000 total when complete. that is a massive increase in the number of active satellites. At the same time there another 3,000 defunct satellites that are no longer operational but remain in orbit. T
9h
Experimental competition induces immediate and lasting effects on the neurogenome in free-living female birds [Evolution]
Periods of social instability can elicit adaptive phenotypic plasticity to promote success in future competition. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms have primarily been studied in captive and laboratory-reared animals, leaving uncertainty as to how natural competition among free-living animals affects gene activity. Here, we experimentally generated social competition among wild,…
5h
Supercell tornadoes are much stronger and wider than damage-based ratings indicate [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Tornadoes cause damage, injury, and death when intense winds impact structures. Quantifying the strength and extent of such winds is critical to characterizing tornado hazards. Ratings of intensity and size are based nearly entirely on postevent damage surveys [R. Edwards et al., Bull. Am. Meteorol. Soc. 94, 641–653 (2013)]. It…
5h
Dexamethasone hailed as lifesaver for up to a million Covid patients worldwide
Results of Recovery drug trial also credited with successful treatment of 22,000 people in the UK, says NHS England Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Dexamethasone – the inexpensive steroid that quickly emerged as a highly effective Covid therapy thanks to a large drug testing programme pioneered by UK scientists – has so far saved the lives of an estimated million peo
23h
'What appointments did these dogs have to keep?': long lunches and brief liaisons in a radical new dogumentary
To mark National Puppy Day, Elizabeth Lo's acclaimed film Stray gives humans rare insight into the canine gaze, courtesy of homeless mutts in Istanbul From the moment Zeytin makes her first appearance in Elizabeth Lo 's feature Stray, there is no doubt you are in the presence of a unique spirit. As she surveys an Istanbul side street at dawn, her features are alert, her gaze is uncompromising and
13h
America Is Now in the Hands of the Vaccine-Hesitant
It's official: America's vaccine-supply crunch is over. The U.S. has ordered, optioned, or procured enough doses to immunize every single member of the population more than five times over , and all adults will be eligible for the shots by May 1. In other words, after months of careful rationing and distribution snafus , we've finally hit a new phase of the pandemic endgame: vaccines galore. Next
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Watch This Awesome Video of Clouds Drifting Across the Martian Sky
Martian Storm A stunning video that went viral over the weekend shows a fierce, dark cloud passing over a rocky landscape. But this isn't Arizona — it's the desolate surface of Mars. Clouds in the sky, gently passing overhead. On Mars, Friday, March 19, 2021. pic.twitter.com/jJpemPefIV — Prof. Paul Byrne (@ThePlanetaryGuy) March 20, 2021 The eight images were taken by NASA's Curiosity rover on Ma
7h
The Dehumanizing Logic of All the 'Happy Ending' Jokes
Almost a week has passed since the shootings at three massage parlors in the Atlanta area, which resulted in the death of eight people, six of them Asian or Asian American women. The Atlanta police have yet to say that the incidents were motivated by racism, seemingly in part because the shooting suspect told them that he suffers from a "sex addiction." FBI Director Chris Wray has said that, acco
11h
How the U.S. Tax Code Privileges White Families
Soon after I got my master's degree in tax law from NYU in 1984, I started preparing my parents' tax returns. They filed jointly, and what always stuck out to me was how comparable their incomes were. My mother worked as a nurse at an assisted-living facility, and my father was a plumber with the New York City Housing Authority. Some years, my father's overtime would put him on top by a few hundr
11h
Biden Just Showed Us What He Really Values
In September, one political observer cast a gimlet eye on then-candidate Joe Biden's theory about contemporary politics: He believes that once Trump is gone, Republicans on Capitol Hill will return to the low-key, courteous mien that Biden remembers (or thinks he remembers) from his long career in the Senate. Rather than relentlessly attacking these Republicans, Biden has chosen to reach out to t
12h
We Must Confront Anti–Asian American Hate Crimes
The pandemic has been challenging for all of us, but Americans of Asian descent have had to deal with an additional crisis that accompanied the arrival of COVID-19: an alarming increase of hate, vitriol, and harassment directed at them simply because of their ethnic backgrounds or national origin. This disturbing reality has only recently spilled out into public view, but it's nothing new for Ame
12h
The Curious Case of Florida's Pandemic Response
I started reporting this essay with a clear thesis: Florida is having a moment. To the extent that winning a pandemic is possible, Florida seemed to be winning the pandemic. Despite criticism from liberals for its laissez-faire approach to COVID-19, Florida has been "booming," according to CNN , and the state's success is "a vindication for their policies." Governor Ron DeSantis bragged that Flor
12h
The Show That Changed Television Forever
Adapted from Rock Me on the Water , HarperCollins Publishers, 2021. W hen CBS first placed All in the Family on the air, on January 12, 1971, it irrevocably transformed television. After a shaky first season in which it struggled to find an audience, the show prospered, rising to become No. 1 in the ratings for five consecutive years, a record unmatched at the time. All in the Family commanded na
12h
US agency questions AstraZeneca's Covid vaccine trial data
Drug firm may have provided incomplete view of efficacy data from US trial, says safety monitor Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine against Covid has been dealt another blow within hours of AstraZeneca posting excellent results from its long-awaited big trial in the US. Questions have been raised in the US by the independent Data and Safety
14h
Former US Director of National Intelligence Says He's Seriously Puzzled by UFOs
UFO Sighting In an eyebrow-raising segment on Fox News , former US Director of National Intelligence John Ratcliffe made some intriguing claims about the federal government's tracking of unidentified flying objects (UFOs.) "Frankly, there are a lot more sightings than have been made public," he told Fox personality Maria Bartiromo. "Some of those have been declassified. And when we talk about sig
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Just-Launched Spacecraft Will Use Grappling Hook to Destroy Space Junk
Drag and Drop A Japanese company called Astroscale is tackling the increasingly dangerous cloud of space junk orbiting our planet and the real threat it poses to satellites and other spacecraft. The company launched a new kind of satellite called the End of Life Services by Astroscale-demonstration (ELSA-d) on Monday, Quartz reports . Soon, ELSA-d will use a powerful magnet to latch onto a doomed
3h
NASA Chooses "Airfield" Location for Mars Helicopter
NASA has chosen the location where it will attempt a historic first: the first time a manmade object will try to take flight off the surface of another planet. As early as April , NASA's Ingenuity Mars helicopter will attempt to fly to roughly ten feet, according to acting NASA administrator Steve Jurczyk, who spoke during a Tuesday media briefing . The agency has officially chosen the "airfield"
4h
Plans Unveiled for Grand Mars City
Breaking Ground The architecture firm ABIBOO just released the plans for its — and perhaps the — first human city on Mars. Nüwa City, as it's called, would house 250,000 people and be built into the side of a giant Martian cliff, according to ABIBOO's press release , where residents would get the benefit of sunlight access while also being protected from the deadly onslaught of cosmic radiation.
8h
Covid-19 has shown humanity how close we are to the edge | Toby Ord
To prevent catastrophe, governments must transform our resilience to climate breakdown, AI and engineered pandemics It is profoundly difficult to grapple with risks whose stakes may include the global collapse of civilisation, or even the extinction of humanity. The pandemic has shattered our illusions of safety and reminded us that despite all the progress made in science and technology, we rema
11h
Sturgeon criticised by MSPs over Alex Salmond day after being cleared over ministerial code breach – live
Holyrood committee highly critical of Scottish first minister's accounts of meeting with former mentor Nicola Sturgeon accused of misleading parliament over Alex Salmond Nicola Sturgeon vows to focus on elections after being cleared by inquiry What did report that cleared Sturgeon of misleading parliament say? Timeline: major developments so far in the Sturgeon and Salmond affair Global coronavir
13h
Matrix Multiplication Inches Closer to Mythic Goal
For computer scientists and mathematicians, opinions about "exponent two" boil down to a sense of how the world should be. "It's hard to distinguish scientific thinking from wishful thinking," said Chris Umans of the California Institute of Technology. "I want the exponent to be two because it's beautiful." "Exponent two" refers to the ideal speed — in terms of number of steps required — of perfo
8h
Helgoland by Carlo Rovelli review – the mysteries of quantum mechanics
Having altered how we think about time, the physicist sets his sights on perhaps the most maddeningly difficult theory of all Carlo Rovelli, the Italian theoretical physicist, is one of the great scientific explicators of our time . His wafer-thin essay collection, Seven Brief Lessons on Physics , sold more than 1m copies in English translation in 2015 and remains the world's fastest-selling scie
16h
Scientists Detect Chemicals Inside Pregnant Women They Can't Even Identify
An alarming new study found dozens of "mystery chemicals" inside the bodies of pregnant women, leaving scientists both concerned and confused. Of the 109 unusual, human-made chemicals identified in the study, 55 had never been found inside the human body before, according to research published last week in the journal Environmental Science & Technology . Another 42 were complete mysteries — both
2h
Caltech Scientists Say They Can Read Human Brain With Ultrasound
A new trick uses precise ultrasound imaging — the same kind that lets parents-to-be see their kid before it's born — to read and even predict activity within the brain. Scientists at Caltech were able to use ultrasound to listen in as blood sloshed around in different parts of the brain, which they quickly realized was a proxy for which neural regions were active at any given moment, according to
6h
Covid vaccine used on apes at San Diego zoo trialled on mink
Experimental animal jabs could stop spillover back to humans, says firm behind vaccines for primates At the start of 2021, four orangutans and five bonobos became the first great apes at a US zoo to receive Covid-19 vaccinations. An outbreak in San Diego zoo's western lowland gorilla troop had caused panic among staff after the virus spread to the animals, probably from an asymptomatic zookeeper.
11h
'Netanyahu Is Playing With Fire With the Democrats'
Today, Israel will hold its fourth election in two years. This is a sign not of democracy on steroids, but instead of acute dysfunction, a semipermanent paralysis brought about, strangely, by the extreme stability of Israeli voting patterns: Neither the incumbent, Benjamin Netanyahu, nor his various opponents have been able to change enough minds to build a durable parliamentary majority. Netanya
18h
The Republican Electoral College Contradiction
A few months after losing the White House, Republicans across the country have had a revelation: The Electoral College could use some improvements. The problem is that they have contradictory proposals for how to fix it—and contradictory arguments for why those proposals would help Americans pick their president. In Wisconsin, Michigan, and New Hampshire, GOP lawmakers want to award Electoral Col
8h
Why There's a Partisan Split on Sexual Harassment
In 2017, in response to the Access Hollywood tape and the shock of Donald Trump's election, I embarked on a research project. I wanted to understand how so many people could support a leader who had bragged about being a sexual predator. And I wanted to know why I experienced such visceral disgust for Trump's character but so many others in the United States did not. I left my job working for New
12h
Cuts and budget delays are undermining UK science sector, warns Labour
No funding earmarked for research agency and Europe's Horizon scheme despite imminent start to financial year The government risks creating a serious funding gap for science, Labour has warned, saying that delays over budgets and cuts to research are undermining the sector and giving the lie to ministers' boasts about Britain's status as a science superpower. The party has highlighted a continued
1d
Another new chameleon from the Bale region of Ethiopia
The Bale Mountains in south-central Ethiopia are considered to be one of the most unique centers of endemism, with an extraordinary number of plants and animals that can only be found there. Numerous species are already known from this Afromontane high-elevation plateau, making it a biodiversity hotspot, but ongoing research continues to reveal the presence of so far unknown and undescribed organi
4h
I Just Want to Date Like Every Other 20-Something
Two months into the pandemic, I gave in and tried Zoom dating. After a few days of chatting on OKCupid, I found myself across the screen from a perfectly nice match. It was one hour in hell: Trapped in a two-way-hostage video, I was hyperaware of everything that was missing—the smell of her perfume, how she moved through space, seeing the way she ordered a drink. If I was going to date, it had to
6h
Cephalopods: Older than previously thought?
Possibly the oldest cephalopods in the Earth's history stem from the Avalon Peninsula in Newfoundland (Canada) discovered by scientists from Heidelberg University. The 522-million-year-old fossils could turn out to be the first known form of these highly evolved invertebrate organisms, whose living descendants today include species such as the cuttlefish, octopus and nautilus. The find would indic
9h
Vladimir Putin to have Russian-made Covid vaccine in private
Russian president won't have first dose in public after delaying jab for months Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Vladimir Putin is scheduled to receive his first dose of a Russian-made coronavirus vaccine later on Tuesday, after months of delaying his jab, in an apparent effort to boost Russia's fledgling vaccination drive. A Kremlin spokesman on Tuesday said that Put
10h
B2 1420+32 is a changing-look blazar, study finds
An international team of astronomers has performed multi-wavelength photometric and spectroscopic observations of a blazar known as B2 1420+32. The observational campaign found that the object exhibits a large scale spectral variability and is the so-called "changing-look" blazar. The findings are reported in a paper published March 15 on arXiv.org.
10h
Image: Mont Mercou on Mars
Here are a few stunning views of the Curiosity Rover's current location, Mont Mercou in Gale Crater on Mars. This towering outcrop provides a great look at layered sedimentary rock structures. On Earth, it's common to find layered rock like the ones within this cliff face, especially where there were once lakes. The pancake-like layers of sediment are compressed and cemented to form a rock record
10h
Keeping track of spacecraft as Earth's water alters its spin
Mass is constantly being redistributed around our planet, as Earth's atmosphere, oceans and other bodies of water on and under the surface melt, shift and stir. This mass redistribution alters Earth's center of gravity, which in turn speeds up and slows down the planet's spin—and so the length of the day—as well as changing the orientation of its spin axis. These changes to Earth's spin and orient
11h
What early-budding trees tell us about genetics, climate change
Late frosts have caused millions of dollars in losses for orchards over the years. Scientists are investigating the genes that tell trees when to bud out and blossom. A deep understanding of the genetics of bud-break enables scientists to modify or select crop varieties more resilient to late frost, warming winters, diseases and pests.
22h
Researchers develop ultra-sensitive flow microsensors
A team of scientists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst have developed the thinnest and most sensitive flow sensor, which could have significant implications for medical research and applications, according to new research published recently in Nature Communications.
1d
Haunting Photos Show Missiles Milliseconds Before Exploding
Fatal Frame If you're interested in seeing some images taken just moments before (intentional, well-planned) disaster, boy do we have a highlight reel for you. Live weapon tests are an important part of making sure that new bombs, missiles, and drones actually do what the military wants them to do upon impact, lest the armed forces accidentally fire a dud during actual combat. Now, The Drive put
4h
Fungal species causing candidiasis use distinct infection strategies
Candidiasis is a fungal infection caused by a yeast called Candida. It is a serious global health problem and it can be vaginal, oral or systemic. The latter is the most severe form of infection, as it can lead to death, but vaginal candidiasis infection is the most prevalent, affecting 80% of women at some point in their lives.
7h
Homeroom: My Son Spends Hours Studying. Then He Forgets Everything.
Editor's Note: Every Tuesday, Abby Freireich and Brian Platzer take questions from readers about their kids' education. Have one? Email them at homeroom@theatlantic.com. Dear Abby and Brian, I don't know if it has to do with remote learning or if this would have come up anyway, but my sixth grader, whom I'll call "Tom," immediately seems to forget everything he studies. He remembers non-school-re
11h
An exotic metal-insulator transition in a surface-doped transition metal dichalcogenide
Metal-insulator transition (MIT) driven by many-body interactions is an important phenomenon in condensed matter physics. Exotic phases always emerge around the metal-insulator transition points where quantum fluctuations arise from a competition among spin, charge, orbital, and lattice degrees of freedom. Two-dimensional (2D) materials are a large class of materials. Their simple structure, low d
7h
A synthesis of health benefits of natural sounds and their distribution in national parks [Environmental Sciences]
Parks are important places to listen to natural sounds and avoid human-related noise, an increasingly rare combination. We first explore whether and to what degree natural sounds influence health outcomes using a systematic literature review and meta-analysis. We identified 36 publications examining the health benefits of natural sound. Meta-analyses of…
5h
Elon Musk Has an Interesting Argument Against UFOs
The Strongest Argument Tesla and SpaceX CEO Elon Musk waded in to the world of UFO sightings this week, claiming his latest meme is the "strongest argument against aliens." Strongest argument against aliens pic.twitter.com/eF2FFZpJQE — Elon Musk (@elonmusk) March 23, 2021 The graph shows how the resolution of cameras has risen since the 19th century — even while images of UFO sightings have remai
2h
Evidence suggests that many tornados are bigger and stronger than reported
A small team of researchers with the Center for Severe Weather Research, in Boulder, Colorado, has found evidence that suggests many tornados in the U.S. are bigger and stronger than their classification would suggest. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes their study of tornadic activity in the U.S. and what they found.
9h
The CysLT2R receptor mediates leukotriene C4-driven acute and chronic itch [Neuroscience]
Acute and chronic itch are burdensome manifestations of skin pathologies including allergic skin diseases and atopic dermatitis, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are not well understood. Cysteinyl leukotrienes (CysLTs), comprising LTC4, LTD4, and LTE4, are produced by immune cells during type 2 inflammation. Here, we uncover a role for LTC4…
5h
Babies prefer baby talk, whether they're learning one language or two
A study finds babies prefer baby talk, whether they're learning one language or two. Scientists knew infants learning one language preferred the sing-song tones of parents' baby talk, and now scientists have found babies learning two languages are developmentally right on track. Bilingual babies showed the same interest in baby talk, at the same age, as monolingual babies.
7h
How human cells coordinate the start of DNA replication
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) President and CEO Bruce Stillman has been dissecting DNA replication, a critical step in cell division, since the 1980s. His lab studies how Origin Recognition Complexes—ORCs—coordinate DNA duplication. They discovered how our cells assemble and disassemble ORCs during the cell division cycle. One ORC protein is sequestered into small liquid droplets, keeping i
2h
New evidence in search for the mysterious Denisovans
An international group of researchers led by the University of Adelaide has conducted a comprehensive genetic analysis and found no evidence of interbreeding between modern humans and the ancient humans known from fossil records in Island Southeast Asia. They did find further DNA evidence of our mysterious ancient cousins, the Denisovans, which could mean there are major discoveries to come in the
9h
The producer benefits of implicit fossil fuel subsidies in the United States [Sustainability Science]
This paper estimates the financial benefits accruing to fossil fuel producers (i.e., the producer incidence) that arise because of implicit fossil fuel subsidies in the United States. The analysis takes account of coal, natural gas, gasoline, and diesel, along with the implicit subsidies due to externalized environmental damages, public health…
5h
Politics desperately needs hope, so why does it no longer inspire it?
In the late 2000s and early 2010s, the word 'hope' was ubiquitous in Western politics. While its use in the Barack Obama presidential campaign has become iconic, appeal to hope was not limited to the United States: the Leftist Greek Syriza party relied on the slogan 'hope is on the way', for example, and many other European parties embraced similar rallying cries. Since then, however, we rarely h
14h
Study identifies concerning delays in TB diagnoses in the United States
Most delays ranged between 10 and 45 days, with a median of 24 days, after a visit to a doctor, which exceeds current World Health Organization recommendations of diagnosing and treating TB within two to three weeks of symptom onset. Delays were linked to greater risk for disease complications, transmission of infection to household members Older individuals and those with compromised immunity wer
22h
A simple laser for quantum-like classical light
Tailoring light is much like tailoring cloth, cutting and snipping to turn a bland fabric into one with a desired pattern. In the case of light, the tailoring is usually done in the spatial degrees of freedom, such as its amplitude and phase (the 'pattern' of light), and its polarization, while the cutting and snipping might be controlled with spatial light modulators and the like. This burgeoning
7h
Ultra-sensitive flow microsensors
A team of scientists have developed the thinnest and most sensitive flow sensor, which could have significant implications for medical research and applications, according to new research.
22h
How long until uterus transplants for trans women?
Research trials evaluating human uterus transplant should include transgender women, not just women with XX chromosomes, say researchers. It's been nearly seven years since the world's first successful birth after a human uterus transplant. Since that medical milestone, the experimental procedure has seen such significant clinical advances that more than 60 uterus transplants have taken place acr
10h
New binocular Nova Cas 2021 flares in Cassiopeia
It began, as all modern astronomical alerts seem to, with one tweet, then two. Early on the morning of Friday, March 19, we started seeing word that a nova was spotted in the constellation of Cassiopeia the Queen, near its border with Cepheus. At the time, the nova was at magnitude +10 "with a bullet," and still brightening. A formal notice came that same night from the American Association of Var
10h
New strategy for fighting brain cancer
Most people relate cholesterol to heart health, but it is also a critical component in the growth and spread of brain cancer. Researchers recently discovered how cholesterol becomes dysregulated in brain cancer cells and showed that the gene responsible for it could be a target for future drugs.
5h
Link found between invasive species and commercial success in global pet trade
A pair of researchers at the University of Lausanne has found a link between invasive animal species and commercial success in the global pet trade. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Jérôme Gippet and Cleo Bertelsmeier describe their study of sales of invasive species and what they learned about them.
9h
Explosive origins of 'secondary' ice and snow
Scientists publish new direct evidence that shattering drizzle droplets drive explosive 'ice multiplication' events. The findings have implications for weather forecasts, climate modeling, water supplies — and even energy and transportation infrastructure.
22h
The same sea level for everyone
Maps generally indicate elevation in meters above sea level. But sea level is not the same everywhere. A group of experts has developed an International Height Reference System (IHRS) that will unify geodetic measurements worldwide.
3h
A divided visual field in hawkmoths
Hummingbird hawkmoths are small insects that hover in the air like hummingbirds when drinking nectar from flowers. Dr. Anna Stöckl from the Biocentre of the Julius-Maximilians-Universität (JMU) Würzburg in Bavaria, Germany, is studying the visual performance of these insects. Dr. Stöckl and her doctoral student Ronja Bigge now present their latest findings in the journal Current Biology.
5h
North American deserts are a biodiversity hotspot for butterflies
By comparing the genetic diversity of butterflies in North America, researchers reporting in the journal iScience on March 23 found that the array of different evolutionary distinct groups of butterflies is particularly high in the deserts of Mexico and the southwestern United States. This may be an outcome of actively changing conditions in the Desert Southwest and more generally in the western p
8h
Last Ice Age: Precipitation caused maximum advance of Alpine Glaciers
Geologists unexpectedly found mineral deposits in former ice caves in the Austrian Alps dating back to the peak of the last ice age. These special calcite crystals demonstrate that intensive snowfall during the second half of the year triggered a massive glacier advance leading to the climax of the last ice age.
4h
Rich false memories of autobiographical events can be reversed [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
False memories of autobiographical events can create enormous problems in forensic settings (e.g., false accusations). While multiple studies succeeded in inducing false memories in interview settings, we present research trying to reverse this effect (and thereby reduce the potential damage) by means of two ecologically valid strategies. We first successfully…
5h
Short-lived plant species are more climate-sensitive
Short-lived plant species are more sensitive to climate change than long-lived ones, researchers found out. The international team compiled comprehensive worldwide available data on how plant populations react to climate change and could show that plant characteristics such as generation time can predict how sensitive species are to changing climates.
8h
Algorithms inspired by social networks reveal lifecycle of substorms, a key element of space weather
Space weather often manifests as substorms, where a beautiful auroral display such as the Northern Lights is accompanied by an electrical current in space which has effects at earth that can interfere with and damage power distribution and electrical systems. Now, the lifecycle of these auroral substorms has been revealed using social media-inspired mathematical tools to analyze space weather obse
10h
Razer's flagship keyboard has clever tech under its caps
It will not float in front of pyramids, but it is a very good keyboard. (Razer /) Switching from a flimsy laptop keyboard to a big mechanical one feels amazing. The keys have a luxurious amount of travel and the sound is like a Tommy gun pumping out hot lead in an old-timey gangster movie as you compose your tweets. The new Razer Huntsman V2 Analog offers those same perks when it comes to feel, b
1d
Rare fossilized algae, discovered unexpectedly, fill in evolutionary gaps
When geobiology graduate student Katie Maloney trekked into the mountains of Canada's remote Yukon territory, she was hoping to find microscopic fossils of early life. Even with detailed field plans, the odds of finding just the right rocks were low. Far from leaving empty-handed, though, she hiked back out with some of the most significant fossils for the time period.
2h
A divided visual field
How do hawkmoths use visual patterns in different parts of their visual field? While researching this question, a research team experienced a surprise.
5h
Penguin hemoglobin evolved to meet oxygen demands of diving
Webbed feet, flipper-like wings and unique feathers all helped penguins adapt to life underwater. But by resurrecting two ancient versions of hemoglobin, a research team has shown that the evolution of diving is also in their blood, which optimized its capture and release of oxygen to ensure that penguins wouldn't waste their breath while holding it.
5h
Novel thermometer can accelerate quantum computer development
Researchers have developed a novel type of thermometer that can simply and quickly measure temperatures during quantum calculations with extremely high accuracy. The breakthrough provides a benchmarking tool for quantum computing of great value – and opens up for experiments in the exciting field of quantum thermodynamics.
10h
Landsat satellite data warns of harmful algal blooms
Come summer, Utahns will flock to the state's lakes and reservoirs to boat, swim and picnic along the shore. And every week, if not every day, scientists like Kate Fickas of Utah State University in Logan will use satellite images and other data to monitor recreation sites to check for rapid growth of algae into a bloom, and make sure the water is safe for people and pets.
11h
Nanobiomaterial boosts neuronal growth in mice with spinal cord injuries
Researchers from the Department of Orthopedics of Tongji Hospital at Tongji University in Shanghai have successfully used a nanobiomaterial called layered double hydroxide (LDH) to inhibit the inflammatory environment surrounding spinal cord injuries in mice, accelerating regeneration of neurons and reconstruction of the neural circuit in the spine. The researchers were also able to identify the u
11h
The lambs break their silence
A study of ancient bones shows that Early Neolithic sheep-breeders were faced with high levels of mortality among young animals in their herds. A statistical model allowed the age distribution of the bones to be precisely determined.
2h
Moiré effect: How to twist material properties
2D materials like graphene have revolutionized materials science. Now a new interesting option has been added to this field of research: Two thin material layers can be stacked and twisted by a certain angle. This leads to a Moiré-effect and changes the properties of the material.
4h
Cephalopods: Older than was thought?
Earth scientists have discovered possibly the oldest cephalopods in Earth's history. The 522 million-year-old fossils from Newfoundland (Canada) could turn out to be the first known form of these highly evolved invertebrate organisms. In that case, the find would indicate that the cephalopods evolved about 30 million years earlier than has been assumed.
5h
Enhanced ceramics could play pivotal role in advancing 5G technology
5G, or the fifth-generation technology standard for broadband cellular networks, is touted as having finally arrived for ultrafast download speeds, an end to dropped calls and buffering, and greater connectivity to advance autonomous vehicle development, remote surgery, and the Internet of Things.
8h
The future of America's drinking water
In 2020 wildfires ravaged more than 10 million acres of land across California, Oregon and Washington, making it the largest fire season in modern history. Across the country, hurricanes over Atlantic waters yielded a record-breaking number of storms.
9h
Net Zero pledges go global, now action needs to follow words, says Oxford-ECIU report
Net zero targets now cover two thirds of the global economy, according to a report today from Oxford Net Zero and the ECIU (Energy and Climate Intelligence Unit) – even though it was only a decade ago that Oxford climate scientists first showed the need to reach net zero emissions. However, despite the rapid progress, the study reveals, only 20% of these targets currently meet quality tests.
9h
Chemical status of European surface waters decreases while monitoring improves
The Water Framework Directive was enacted in 2000 with the goal of protecting and restoring aquatic ecosystems to a "good ecological status." Alongside this monumental water policy effort, large amounts of environmental monitoring data were gathered to track the occurrence of organic contaminants in Europe. For the first time, this large dataset comprising of more than 8 million measurements of 35
9h
Covid-19: what happens next? – podcast
On 23 March 2020, the UK prime minister, Boris Johnson, announced the first lockdown in response to the growing number of cases of Covid-19. At the same time, countries around the world began to close their schools, restaurants, and offices and ask citizens to physically distance from one another. In the 12 months since, more than 2 million people have died, viral variants have emerged, and we ha
18h
The Weekly Planet: Why Celebrities Are Agog Over This Tiny Climate Think Tank
Every week, our lead climate reporter brings you the big ideas, expert analysis, and vital guidance that will help you flourish on a changing planet. Sign up to get T he Weekly Planet , our guide to living through climate change, in your inbox. The think tank Carbon180 is, as far as I know, the only American nonprofit dedicated to studying the removal of carbon-dioxide pollution from the atmosphe
1h
Demonstration of unconventional transverse thermoelectric generation
A research team devised a new thermoelectric generation mechanism with a hybrid structure composed of thermoelectric and magnetic materials. The team then actually fabricated this structure and observed the record-high thermopower appearing in the direction perpendicular to a temperature gradient (i.e., transverse thermoelectric generation). These results may offer insights into new mechanisms and
5h
Taking microelectronics to a new dimension
Metallic microstructures are the key components in almost every current or emerging technology. For example, with the next wireless communication standard (6G) being established, the need for advanced components and especially antennas is unmet. The drive to yet higher frequencies and deeper integration goes hand in hand with miniaturization and fabrication technologies with on-chip capability. Vi
5h
Discovery of non-toxic semiconductors with a direct band gap in the near-infrared
Scientists have discovered a potentially promising infrared LED and infrared detector component. This compound — composed of calcium, silicon and oxygen — is cheap to produce and non-toxic. Many of the existing infrared semiconductors contain toxic chemical elements, such as cadmium and tellurium. The new material may be used to develop less expensive and safer near-infrared semiconductors.
7h
The Atlantic Daily: The Future of American Party Politics
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . This month, President Joe Biden signed a historic $1.9 trillion coronavirus-relief package. Now the president's advisers are expected to recommend up to $3 trillion in new spending to boost the e
8h
Scientists created edible films for food packaging
An international group of scientists from India and Russia has created edible food films for packaging fruits, vegetables, poultry, meat, and seafood. Films consist of natural ingredients, they are safe for health and the environment. In addition, films are water-soluble and dissolve by almost 90% in 24 hours. Description of the research and results of experiments are published in the Journal of F
9h
Scientists study potential volcanic impacts on future global land monsoon precipitation changes
Scientists have found global precipitation significantly decreased in the year following large volcanic eruptions, as evidenced by paleoclimate reconstructions and historical observations. Decreased precipitation is a robust post-volcano eruption signal in the monsoon climate, and scientists want to explore volcanos' roles in future climate. However, major volcanic eruptions are generally not incl
11h
Dismissive reviews: A cancer on the body of knowledge
Observers describe the quantity of research information now produced variously as "torrent," "overload," "proliferation," or the like. Technological advances in computing and telecommunication have helped us keep up, to an extent. But, I would argue, scholarly and journalistic ethics have not kept pace. As a case in point, consider the journal article literature review. Its … Continue reading
13h
Using econometrics to define effective COVID-19 lockdown strategies
Konstantinos Tatsiramos, Professor of Labour Economics in the Department of Economics and Management of the University of Luxembourg, and colleagues Nikos Askitas (Coordinator of Data and Technology, IZA-Institute of Labor Economics) and Bertrand Verheyden (Senior Researcher, Luxembourg Institute of Socio-Economic Research) evaluate the effects of 8 lockdown policies on the daily number of confirm
10h
For New York's First Offshore Windfarm, an Unexpected Hurdle
Wainscott, a hamlet in the wealthy New York enclave of the Hamptons, is the unlikely setting for a rancorous battle over what would be the state's first offshore wind farm. The turbines themselves won't be visible from Wainscott beach — instead, the subject of the turmoil is an underground extension cable.
13h
Phytol may be promising for eco-friendly agrochemicals to control root-knot nematodes
Root-knot nematodes (RKNs, Meloidogyne spp.) infect a broad range of plants, including several agriculturally important species such as cotton, soybean and corn, as well as various vegetables and ornamentals. These parasites cause roots to develop galls that result in severe plant damage and, ultimately, important crop losses. Growers currently use synthetic nematicides to manage RKNs; however, th
1d
Changes in Antarctic marine ecosystems
Understanding the evolution of the polar sea ice is not enough to study the effects of the climate change on marine ecosystems in Antarctic seafloors. It is also necessary to determine the intensity of phytoplankton local production during the Antarctic summer, as stated in a new study by a research team of the Faculty of Biology and the Biodiversity Research Institute (IRBio) of the University of
2h
Metasurfaces for manipulating terahertz waves
THz waves have a plethora of applications ranging from biomedical and medical examinations, imaging, environmental monitoring, to wireless communications, because of abundant spectral information, low photon energy, strong penetrability, and shorter wavelength. THz waves with technological advances not only determined by high-efficiency sources and detectors but also decided by a variety of high-q
5h
Time-expanded phase-sensitive optical time-domain reflectometry
Distributed optical fiber sensing (DOFS) is currently a mature technology that allows 'transforming' a conventional fiber optic into a continuous array of individual sensors, which are distributed along its length. Between the panoply of techniques developed in the field of DOFS, those based on phase-sensitive optical time-domain reflectometry (ΦOTDR) have gained a great deal of attention, mainly
7h
Why are young adults having less casual sex?
Casual sex is on the decline for both young men and women, according to a Rutgers University-New Brunswick study that found less alcohol consumption among both genders is a major reason, while playing video games and living at home with parents are another—but only for men.
7h
Viktlösa batterier kan göra prylar superlätta
Forskare på Chalmers har tillverkat ett strukturellt batteri som är tio gånger bättre än alla tidigare. Det innehåller kolfiber som parallellt fungerar som elektrod, strömledare och bärande material. Batteriet öppnar dörren för så kallad "viktlös" energilagring i till exempel fordon och farkoster. – Nästa generations strukturella batteri har mycket stor potential. Om man ser till konsumentteknik
7h
Glock ghost guns up for grabs on the dark web
Australians have access to a wide variety of untraceable 'ghost guns' online along with a significant market of 3D printed weapon blueprints and kits, according to a new study from The Australian National University (ANU).
10h
Andfåddhet – vad beror det på?
För tusentals människor i Sverige drabbar andfåddheten redan när de går upp från sängen på morgonen. Andfåddheten jagar dem dygnet runt och både begränsar och förkortar deras liv. Jacob Sandberg forskar om detta ämne, och berättar här om sin forskning.
14h
Whales warned each other about 19th century hunters
Newly digitized whalers' logbooks allow researchers to analyze trends in 19th-century whaling. The records show that whales soon learned to anticipate and evade predation from humans. The behavioral changes suggest social learning at work since the change in their behavior occurred too quickly to be evolutionary. Until someone works out a way to communicate with them, we can't really know how sma
20min
ET Deals: Save $550 On Dell XPS 8940 Intel Core i5 Nvidia GTX 1660 Ti Gaming Desktop, Roborock S6 Robot Vacuum and Mop for $401
Today you can save $550 on a gaming desktop from Dell that comes equipped with an Intel Core i5 processor and an Nvidia GeForce GTX 1660 Ti graphics card. This makes the system well suited for gaming at 1080p resolutions. There's also an excellent discount on a Roborock S6 robot vacuum that's marked down to just $401.99. Dell XPS 8940 Intel Core i5-10400 Gaming Desktop w/ Nvidia GeForce GTX 1660
1h
Researchers develop technology allowing researchers to image wetland soil activity in real time
Featured on the cover of the Soil Science Society of America Journal, researchers at the University of Maryland (UMD) and the Spanish National Research Council partnered to create a new camera allowing for the imaging of wetland soil activity in real time. This camera gives the classic IRIS (indicator of reduction in soils) technology a big upgrade. IRIS is used universally by researchers and soil
2h
Curbing COVID-19 on campuses nationwide
While COVID-19 cases may be on the decline, the virus is still prevalent nationwide, and higher education institutions need to prepare for a successful 2021 academic year. New research from Clemson University in The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health, one of the world's premier peer-reviewed general medical journals, indicates how surveillance-based informative testing (SBIT) mitigates the spread of
2h
Study on Personality and Video Game Usage (Everyone, 18+)
Hello Everyone, We here at the MindSPACE lab are investigating what types of experiences and personality traits influence people's interest in playing video games and, if they do play, video-game performance and preference for the type of game. We would like to invite you to participate in our online survey, which explores the following topics: short-term memory, visual-motor skills and video-gam
2h
A hs senior interested in undergrad psychology b.s., should I consider cogsci instead?
I plan to entire UCSD this fall with a clinical psychology major, and have plans of pursuing graduate school (potentially in school psychology) Should I consider majoring in cognitive science instead which enables the options of 1. Later pursuing grad school in psychology 2. Have opportunities to work after graduating in fields of psych+UX? (I have this idea because psych degrees have limited opt
2h
Has anyone used Psytoolkit? Need help!
Is there any way to set up a two part study on psytoolkit? For ex- 30 minute first session and another 30 minute session a week later. Both sessions containing different tasks/questions. submitted by /u/lyzajay15 [link] [comments]
2h
SARS-CoV-2 spread undetected months before first cases
The SARS-CoV-2 virus likely circulated undetected for at most two months before reports of the first human cases of COVID-19 in Wuhan, China in late December 2019, researchers report. The researchers also note that their simulations suggest that the mutating virus dies out naturally more than three-quarters of the time without causing an epidemic. "A lot has been learned over the last year about
3h
Researchers hunt for drugs that keep HIV latent
When the human immunodeficiency virus infects cells, it can either exploit the cells to start making more copies of itself or remain dormant–a phenomenon called latency. Keeping these reservoirs latent is a challenge. A new paper has found a way to look for chemicals that can keep the virus suppressed into its dormant state.
3h
Neutrons reveal unpredicted binding between SARS-CoV-2, hepatitis C antiviral drug
Researchers at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory used neutron scattering to investigate the interactions between telaprevir, a drug used to treat hepatitis C viral infection, and the SARS-CoV-2 main protease, the enzyme responsible for enabling the virus to reproduce. Unforeseen changes in the electric charges were discovered in the drug binding site of the protease enzyme that were not predicted
3h
Shock-and-kill versus block-and-lock: Targeting the fluctuating and heterogeneous HIV-1 gene expression [Cell Biology]
Despite effective antiretroviral therapy, HIV-1 persistence in the latent reservoir remains the major barrier to cure. Current strategies for HIV-1 eradication require either inducing HIV-1 expression to expose latently infected cells for immune clearance [known as the "shock-and-kill strategy" (1)] or silencing HIV-1 expression for a prolonged drug-free remission [known…
4h
Health and economic impact of the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in hindering antimicrobial resistance in China [Economic Sciences]
Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) poses a serious threat to global public health. However, vaccinations have been largely undervalued as a method to hinder AMR progression. This study examined the AMR impact of increasing pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) coverage in China. China has one of the world's highest rates of antibiotic use…
4h
Cancer-specific loss of TERT activation sensitizes glioblastoma to DNA damage [Genetics]
Most glioblastomas (GBMs) achieve cellular immortality by acquiring a mutation in the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter. TERT promoter mutations create a binding site for a GA binding protein (GABP) transcription factor complex, whose assembly at the promoter is associated with TERT reactivation and telomere maintenance. Here, we demonstrate increased…
4h
Evidence of ideal excitonic insulator in bulk MoS2 under pressure [Applied Physical Sciences]
Spontaneous condensation of excitons is a long-sought phenomenon analogous to the condensation of Cooper pairs in a superconductor. It is expected to occur in a semiconductor at thermodynamic equilibrium if the binding energy of the excitons—electron (e) and hole (h) pairs interacting by Coulomb force—overcomes the band gap, giving rise…
4h
Ecological variation and institutionalized inequality in hunter-gatherer societies [Anthropology]
Research examining institutionalized hierarchy tends to focus on chiefdoms and states, while its emergence among small-scale societies remains poorly understood. Here, we test multiple hypotheses for institutionalized hierarchy, using environmental and social data on 89 hunter-gatherer societies along the Pacific coast of North America. We utilize statistical models capable of…
4h
miRNA-independent function of long noncoding pri-miRNA loci [Cell Biology]
Among the large, diverse set of mammalian long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), long noncoding primary microRNAs (lnc-pri-miRNAs) are those that host miRNAs. Whether lnc-pri-miRNA loci have important biological function independent of their cognate miRNAs is poorly understood. From a genome-scale lncRNA screen, lnc-pri-miRNA loci were enriched for function in cell proliferation,…
4h
Magnetically driven short-range order can explain anomalous measurements in CrCoNi [Engineering]
The presence, nature, and impact of chemical short-range order in the multi-principal element alloy CrCoNi are all topics of current interest and debate. First-principles calculations reveal that its origins are fundamentally magnetic, involving repulsion between like-spin Co–Cr and Cr–Cr pairs that is complemented by the formation of a magnetically aligned…
4h
Inflammatory signaling sensitizes Piezo1 mechanotransduction in articular chondrocytes as a pathogenic feed-forward mechanism in osteoarthritis [Medical Sciences]
Osteoarthritis (OA) is a painful and debilitating condition of synovial joints without any disease-modifying therapies [A. M. Valdes, T. D. Spector, Nat. Rev. Rheumatol. 7, 23–32 (2011)]. We previously identified mechanosensitive PIEZO channels, PIEZO1 and PIEZO2, both expressed in articular cartilage, to function in chondrocyte mechanotransduction in response to injury…
4h
Effects of faster aging show up by midlife
For those whose bodies age more quickly than others, the cumulative effects show up as early as midlife, when signs of dementia and physical frailty begin to emerge, according to a study led by Duke researchers. The findings in the journal Nature Aging suggest that identifying and treating the diseases of old age should begin by the time people celebrate their 45th birthday, before the problems e
4h
Social context affects gendered views of STEM subjects in England and Japan
Concern over attractiveness to the opposite sex affects the masculine image of physics and mathematics only in England, while having a negative view of intellectual women is correlated with a masculine image of mathematics as a field only in Japan, according to a survey conducted in the two countries by a Japanese research group. This comparative study shows that programs to increase women's repre
4h
Studying Bats With 'Virus Hunters' in the Philippines
Eloisa Lopez , a staff photographer with Reuters, recently spent time with researchers who call themselves the "virus hunters," as they caught and studied bats in the Philippines. They set up wide nets near roosts, then carefully untangle any trapped bats and measure and swab them, before returning them to the wild. The data collected in this project, run by the University of the Philippines at L
5h
Mad dephosphorylation at the nuclear pore is essential for asymmetric stem cell division [Cell Biology]
Stem cells divide asymmetrically to generate a stem cell and a differentiating daughter cell. Yet, it remains poorly understood how a stem cell and a differentiating daughter cell can receive distinct levels of niche signal and thus acquire different cell fates (self-renewal versus differentiation), despite being adjacent to each other…
5h
DNA affinity purification sequencing and transcriptional profiling reveal new aspects of nitrogen regulation in a filamentous fungus [Genetics]
Sensing available nutrients and efficiently utilizing them is a challenge common to all organisms. The model filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa is capable of utilizing a variety of inorganic and organic nitrogen sources. Nitrogen utilization in N. crassa is regulated by a network of pathway-specific transcription factors that activate genes necessary…
5h
The evolution of ancestral and species-specific adaptations in snowfinches at the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau [Evolution]
Species in a shared environment tend to evolve similar adaptations under the influence of their phylogenetic context. Using snowfinches, a monophyletic group of passerine birds (Passeridae), we study the relative roles of ancestral and species-specific adaptations to an extreme high-elevation environment, the Qinghai–Tibet Plateau. Our ancestral trait reconstruction shows that…
5h
A glutaminase isoform switch drives therapeutic resistance and disease progression of prostate cancer [Medical Sciences]
Cellular metabolism in cancer is significantly altered to support the uncontrolled tumor growth. How metabolic alterations contribute to hormonal therapy resistance and disease progression in prostate cancer (PCa) remains poorly understood. Here we report a glutaminase isoform switch mechanism that mediates the initial therapeutic effect but eventual failure of hormonal…
5h
CMT2N-causing aminoacylation domain mutants enable Nrp1 interaction with AlaRS [Biochemistry]
Through dominant mutations, aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases constitute the largest protein family linked to Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT). An example is CMT subtype 2N (CMT2N), caused by individual mutations spread out in AlaRS, including three in the aminoacylation domain, thereby suggesting a role for a tRNA-charging defect. However, here we found that two…
5h
A highly selective and potent CXCR4 antagonist for hepatocellular carcinoma treatment [Pharmacology]
The CXC chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) receptor and its ligand, CXCL12, are overexpressed in various cancers and mediate tumor progression and hypoxia-mediated resistance to cancer therapy. While CXCR4 antagonists have potential anticancer effects when combined with conventional anticancer drugs, their poor potency against CXCL12/CXCR4 downstream signaling pathways and systemic…
5h
ICOS ligand and IL-10 synergize to promote host-microbiota mutualism [Immunology and Inflammation]
Genome-wide association studies have identified ICOSLG, which encodes the inducible costimulator ligand (ICOSLG or ICOSL) as a susceptibility locus for inflammatory bowel disease. ICOSL has been implicated in the enhancement of pattern recognition receptor signaling in dendritic cells, induction of IL-10 production by CD4 T cells, and the generation of…
5h
Cingulo-opercular control network and disused motor circuits joined in standby mode [Neuroscience]
Whole-brain resting-state functional MRI (rs-fMRI) during 2 wk of upper-limb casting revealed that disused motor regions became more strongly connected to the cingulo-opercular network (CON), an executive control network that includes regions of the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) and insula. Disuse-driven increases in functional connectivity (FC) were specific to…
5h
Assembly of a dsRNA synthesizing complex: RNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASE 2 contacts the largest subunit of NUCLEAR RNA POLYMERASE IV [Plant Biology]
In plants, transcription of selfish genetic elements such as transposons and DNA viruses is suppressed by RNA-directed DNA methylation. This process is guided by 24-nt short-interfering RNAs (siRNAs) whose double-stranded precursors are synthesized by DNA-dependent NUCLEAR RNA POLYMERASE IV (Pol IV) and RNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASE 2 (RDR2). Pol IV and…
5h
CODY enables quantitatively spatiotemporal predictions on in vivo gut microbial variability induced by diet intervention [Systems Biology]
Microbial variations in the human gut are harbored in temporal and spatial heterogeneity, and quantitative prediction of spatiotemporal dynamic changes in the gut microbiota is imperative for development of tailored microbiome-directed therapeutics treatments, e.g. precision nutrition. Given the high-degree complexity of microbial variations, subject to the dynamic interactions among host,…
5h
Free-energy changes of bacteriorhodopsin point mutants measured by single-molecule force spectroscopy [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Single amino acid mutations provide quantitative insight into the energetics that underlie the dynamics and folding of membrane proteins. Chemical denaturation is the most widely used assay and yields the change in unfolding free energy (ΔΔG). It has been applied to >80 different residues of bacteriorhodopsin (bR), a model membrane…
5h
Early-stage dynamics of chloride ion-pumping rhodopsin revealed by a femtosecond X-ray laser [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Chloride ion–pumping rhodopsin (ClR) in some marine bacteria utilizes light energy to actively transport Cl− into cells. How the ClR initiates the transport is elusive. Here, we show the dynamics of ion transport observed with time-resolved serial femtosecond (fs) crystallography using the Linac Coherent Light Source. X-ray pulses captured structural…
5h
Functional monovalency amplifies the pathogenicity of anti-MuSK IgG4 in myasthenia gravis [Immunology and Inflammation]
Human immunoglobulin (Ig) G4 usually displays antiinflammatory activity, and observations of IgG4 autoantibodies causing severe autoimmune disorders are therefore poorly understood. In blood, IgG4 naturally engages in a stochastic process termed "Fab-arm exchange" in which unrelated IgG4s exchange half-molecules continuously. The resulting IgG4 antibodies are composed of two different binding…
5h
Natural variability contributes to model-satellite differences in tropical tropospheric warming [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
A long-standing discrepancy exists between general circulation models (GCMs) and satellite observations: The multimodel mean temperature of the midtroposphere (TMT) in the tropics warms at approximately twice the rate of observations. Using a large ensemble of simulations from a single climate model, we find that tropical TMT trends (1979–2018) vary…
5h
Rescue of codon-pair deoptimized respiratory syncytial virus by the emergence of genomes with very large internal deletions that complemented replication [Microbiology]
Recoding viral genomes by introducing numerous synonymous but suboptimal codon pairs—called codon-pair deoptimization (CPD)—provides new types of live-attenuated vaccine candidates. The large number of nucleotide changes resulting from CPD should provide genetic stability to the attenuating phenotype, but this has not been rigorously tested. Human respiratory syncytial virus in which…
5h
Paxbp1 controls a key checkpoint for cell growth and survival during early activation of quiescent muscle satellite cells [Cell Biology]
Adult mouse muscle satellite cells (MuSCs) are quiescent in uninjured muscles. Upon muscle injury, MuSCs exit quiescence, reenter the cell cycle to proliferate and self-renew, and then differentiate and fuse to drive muscle regeneration. However, it remains poorly understood how MuSCs transition from quiescence to the cycling state. Here, we…
5h
Mitochondrial metabolism is essential for invariant natural killer T cell development and function [Immunology and Inflammation]
Conventional T cell fate and function are determined by coordination between cellular signaling and mitochondrial metabolism. Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are an important subset of "innate-like" T cells that exist in a preactivated effector state, and their dependence on mitochondrial metabolism has not been previously defined genetically or…
5h
New insights into ice multiplication using remote-sensing observations of slightly supercooled mixed-phase clouds in the Arctic [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Secondary ice production (SIP) can significantly enhance ice particle number concentrations in mixed-phase clouds, resulting in a substantial impact on ice mass flux and evolution of cold cloud systems. SIP is especially important at temperatures warmer than −10 ○C, for which primary ice nucleation lacks a significant number of efficient…
5h
Primary cilia and the reciprocal activation of AKT and SMAD2/3 regulate stretch-induced autophagy in trabecular meshwork cells [Cell Biology]
Activation of autophagy is one of the responses elicited by high intraocular pressure (IOP) and mechanical stretch in trabecular meshwork (TM) cells. However, the mechanosensor and the molecular mechanisms by which autophagy is induced by mechanical stretch in these or other cell types is largely unknown. Here, we have investigated…
5h
Shape anisotropy-governed locomotion of surface microrollers on vessel-like microtopographies against physiological flows [Engineering]
Surface microrollers are promising microrobotic systems for controlled navigation in the circulatory system thanks to their fast speeds and decreased flow velocities at the vessel walls. While surface propulsion on the vessel walls helps minimize the effect of strong fluidic forces, three-dimensional (3D) surface microtopography, comparable to the size scale…
5h
GFAP hyperpalmitoylation exacerbates astrogliosis and neurodegenerative pathology in PPT1-deficient mice [Neuroscience]
The homeostasis of protein palmitoylation and depalmitoylation is essential for proper physiological functions in various tissues, in particular the central nervous system (CNS). The dysfunction of PPT1 (PPT1-KI, infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis [INCL] mouse model), which catalyze the depalmitoylation process, results in serious neurodegeneration accompanied by severe astrogliosis in the..
5h
Conservation of the HBV RNA element epsilon in nackednaviruses reveals ancient origin of protein-primed reverse transcription [Microbiology]
Hepadnaviruses, with the human hepatitis B virus as prototype, are small, enveloped hepatotropic DNA viruses which replicate by reverse transcription of an RNA intermediate. Replication is initiated by a unique protein-priming mechanism whereby a hydroxy amino acid side chain of the terminal protein (TP) domain of the viral polymerase (P)…
5h
The rotational and divergent components of atmospheric circulation on tidally locked planets [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Tidally locked exoplanets likely host global atmospheric circulations with a superrotating equatorial jet, planetary-scale stationary waves, and thermally driven overturning circulation. In this work, we show that each of these features can be separated from the total circulation by using a Helmholtz decomposition, which splits the circulation into rotational (divergence-free)…
5h
Staphylococcus aureus adapts to the host nutritional landscape to overcome tissue-specific branched-chain fatty acid requirement [Microbiology]
During infection, pathogenic microbes adapt to the nutritional milieu of the host through metabolic reprogramming and nutrient scavenging. For the bacterial pathogen Staphylococcus aureus, virulence in diverse infection sites is driven by the ability to scavenge myriad host nutrients, including lipoic acid, a cofactor required for the function of several…
5h
Gain-of-function factor H-related 5 protein impairs glomerular complement regulation resulting in kidney damage [Immunology and Inflammation]
Genetic variation within the factor H–related (FHR) genes is associated with the complement-mediated kidney disease, C3 glomerulopathy (C3G). There is no definitive treatment for C3G, and a significant proportion of patients develop end-stage renal disease. The prototypical example is CFHR5 nephropathy, through which an internal duplication within a single CFHR5…
5h
Nongenetic individuality, changeability, and inheritance in bacterial behavior [Microbiology]
Isogenic populations often display remarkable levels of phenotypic diversity even in constant, homogeneous environments. Such diversity results from differences between individuals ("nongenetic individuality") as well as changes during individuals' lifetimes ("changeability"). Yet, studies that capture and quantify both sources of diversity are scarce. Here we measure the swimming behavior of…
5h
The number of catalytic cycles in an enzyme's lifetime and why it matters to metabolic engineering [Systems Biology]
Metabolic engineering uses enzymes as parts to build biosystems for specified tasks. Although a part's working life and failure modes are key engineering performance indicators, this is not yet so in metabolic engineering because it is not known how long enzymes remain functional in vivo or whether cumulative deterioration (wear-out),…
5h
Evolved increases in hemoglobin-oxygen affinity and the Bohr effect coincided with the aquatic specialization of penguins [Evolution]
Dive capacities of air-breathing vertebrates are dictated by onboard O2 stores, suggesting that physiologic specialization of diving birds such as penguins may have involved adaptive changes in convective O2 transport. It has been hypothesized that increased hemoglobin (Hb)-O2 affinity improves pulmonary O2 extraction and enhances the capacity for breath-hold diving….
5h
The structure of the native cardiac thin filament at systolic Ca2+ levels [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Every heartbeat relies on cyclical interactions between myosin thick and actin thin filaments orchestrated by rising and falling Ca2+ levels. Thin filaments are comprised of two actin strands, each harboring equally separated troponin complexes, which bind Ca2+ to move tropomyosin cables away from the myosin binding sites and, thus, activate…
5h
A localized adaptor protein performs distinct functions at the Caulobacter cell poles [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Asymmetric cell division generates two daughter cells with distinct characteristics and fates. Positioning different regulatory and signaling proteins at the opposing ends of the predivisional cell produces molecularly distinct daughter cells. Here, we report a strategy deployed by the asymmetrically dividing bacterium Caulobacter crescentus where a regulatory protein is programmed…
5h
Activated nanoscale actin-binding domain motion in the catenin-cadherin complex revealed by neutron spin echo spectroscopy [Applied Physical Sciences]
As the core component of the adherens junction in cell–cell adhesion, the cadherin–catenin complex transduces mechanical tension between neighboring cells. Structural studies have shown that the cadherin–catenin complex exists as an ensemble of flexible conformations, with the actin-binding domain (ABD) of α-catenin adopting a variety of configurations. Here, we have…
5h
PPAR{gamma} marks splenic precursors of multiple nonlymphoid-tissue Treg compartments [Immunology and Inflammation]
Foxp3+CD4+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) regulate most types of immune response as well as several processes important for tissue homeostasis, for example, metabolism and repair. Dedicated Treg compartments—with distinct transcriptomes, T cell receptor repertoires, and growth/survival factor dependencies—have been identified in several nonlymphoid tissues. These Tregs are specifically adapted to…
5h
Rapid hyperpolarization and purification of the metabolite fumarate in aqueous solution [Chemistry]
Hyperpolarized fumarate is a promising biosensor for carbon-13 magnetic resonance metabolic imaging. Such molecular imaging applications require nuclear hyperpolarization to attain sufficient signal strength. Dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization is the current state-of-the-art methodology for hyperpolarizing fumarate, but this is expensive and relatively slow. Alternatively, this important bio
5h
SPAAC-NAD-seq, a sensitive and accurate method to profile NAD+-capped transcripts [Genetics]
Nicotinamide adenine diphosphate (NAD+) is a novel messenger RNA 5′ cap in Escherichia coli, yeast, mammals, and Arabidopsis. Transcriptome-wide identification of NAD+-capped RNAs (NAD-RNAs) was accomplished through NAD captureSeq, which combines chemoenzymatic RNA enrichment with high-throughput sequencing. NAD-RNAs are enzymatically converted to alkyne-RNAs that are then biotinylated using a cop
5h
Vaccination as a social contract: The case of COVID-19 and US political partisanship [Social Sciences]
Korn et al. (1) present evidence that vaccination constitutes a "social contract." In three controlled experiments, participants who chose to be vaccinated in an experimental vaccination game (I-Vax) (2, 3) reduced their generosity toward unvaccinated, but not toward vaccinated, others. This was the case regardless of group membership, which was…
5h
Early volatile depletion on planetesimals inferred from C-S systematics of iron meteorite parent bodies [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
During the formation of terrestrial planets, volatile loss may occur through nebular processing, planetesimal differentiation, and planetary accretion. We investigate iron meteorites as an archive of volatile loss during planetesimal processing. The carbon contents of the parent bodies of magmatic iron meteorites are reconstructed by thermodynamic modeling. Calculated solid/molten alloy…
5h
Restriction of food intake by PPP1R17-expressing neurons in the DMH [Neuroscience]
Leptin-deficient ob/ob mice eat voraciously, and their food intake is markedly reduced by leptin treatment. In order to identify potentially novel sites of leptin action, we used PhosphoTRAP to molecularly profile leptin-responsive neurons in the hypothalamus and brainstem. In addition to identifying several known leptin responsive populations, we found that…
5h
TMEM70 and TMEM242 help to assemble the rotor ring of human ATP synthase and interact with assembly factors for complex I [Biochemistry]
Human mitochondrial ATP synthase is a molecular machine with a rotary action bound in the inner organellar membranes. Turning of the rotor, driven by a proton motive force, provides energy to make ATP from ADP and phosphate. Among the 29 component proteins of 18 kinds, ATP6 and ATP8 are mitochondrial…
5h
Selective cysteine-to-selenocysteine changes in a [NiFe]-hydrogenase confirm a special position for catalysis and oxygen tolerance [Biochemistry]
In [NiFe]-hydrogenases, the active-site Ni is coordinated by four cysteine-S ligands (Cys; C), two of which are bridging to the Fe(CO)(CN)2 fragment. Substitution of a single Cys residue by selenocysteine (Sec; U) occurs occasionally in nature. Using a recent method for site-specific Sec incorporation into proteins, each of the four…
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An enzyme-based biosensor for monitoring and engineering protein stability in vivo [Biochemistry]
Protein stability affects the physiological functions of proteins and is also a desirable trait in many protein engineering tasks, yet improving protein stability is challenging because of limitations in methods for directly monitoring protein stability in cells. Here, we report an in vivo stability biosensor wherein a protein of interest…
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Public data from three US states provide new insights into well integrity [Environmental Sciences]
Oil and gas wells with compromised integrity are a concern because they can potentially leak hydrocarbons or other fluids into groundwater and/or the atmosphere. Most states in the United States require some form of integrity testing, but few jurisdictions mandate widespread testing and open reporting on a scale informative for…
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Invasiveness is linked to greater commercial success in the global pet trade [Ecology]
The pet trade has become a multibillion-dollar global business, with tens of millions of animals traded annually. Pets are sometimes released by their owners or escape, and can become introduced outside of their native range, threatening biodiversity, agriculture, and health. So far, a comprehensive analysis of invasive species traded as…
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UMD develops technology allowing researchers to image wetland soil activity in real time
Researchers at the University of Maryland (UMD) and the Spanish National Research Council partnered to create a new camera allowing for the imaging of wetland soil activity in real time. This camera gives the classic IRIS (indicator of reduction in soils) technology a big upgrade, allowing researchers to visualize the soil reduction process. This technology opens up new research avenues, and gives
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Delaying 2nd doses of COVID-19 vaccines has benefits, but effects depend on immunity
Delaying second doses of COVID-19 vaccines should reduce case numbers in the near term; however, the longer term case burden and the potential for evolution of viral 'escape' from immunity will depend on the robustness of immune responses generated by natural infections and one or two vaccine doses, according to a study from McGill University and Princeton University published recently in Science.
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OnePlus Unveils the OnePlus 9, 9 Pro, and OnePlus Watch
OnePlus has revealed its latest phones today , but there's not much about them the internet doesn't already know thanks to the numerous leaks and teasers. The OnePlus 9 Pro is the flagship OP phone, and the OnePlus 9 is a slightly more budget-oriented version of the phone. While the OnePlus 9 Pro is almost a thousand bucks, the OnePlus 9 is more than $200 less expensive. OnePlus is also finally t
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Fear of COVID-19 is killing patients with other serious diseases
During the COVID-19 pandemic, Joseph S. Alpert, MD, Editor-in-Chief of The American Journal of Medicine, published by Elsevier, has observed that although non-COVID inpatients suffered from the usual mix of conditions such as heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbations, the Internal Medicine inpatient population was distinctly different from what he had seen over the past
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OCD among new mothers more prevalent than previously thought
Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) among those who have recently given birth is more common than previously thought, and much of this can be attributed to thoughts of harm related to the baby, new UBC research has found. The researchers also learned that OCD can go undetected when new parents aren't asked specifically about infant-related harm.
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Elon Musk Says He'll Be Landing Starships on Mars "Well Before 2030"
Elon Musk really can't wait to get to Mars — and he thinks his space company will be landing there sooner rather than later. In a new tweet, Musk promised that "SpaceX will be landing Starships on Mars well before 2030." According to the billionaire, however, the real challenge will be to make "Mars Base Alpha self-sustaining." In context, Musk may have been trying to distract from a more substan
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Highlands of diversity: Another new chameleon from the Bale region, Ethiopia
Once again, the importance of the Bale Mountains in Ethiopia as a unique hotspot of species diversity is stressed: a new chameleon species from the northern slopes of this remarkable Afromontane plateau was discovered and described by Thore Koppetsch and his colleagues in the peer-reviewed, open-access scientific journal Zoosystematics and Evolution. In honour of his outstanding research and passi
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'Passion' may be the wrong thing to search for in hiring
Hiring and school decisions based on an individual's "passion" are likely to miss talent, according to a new study. The research finds that passion is a stronger predictor of achievement in some cultures than in others, where parental support matters just as much. Imagine you're hiring for a job or admitting students to a college: One applicant expresses great passion for the work, while another
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BioRescue develops ethical risk assessment for northern white rhino rescue programme
Advanced Assisted Reproductive Technologies (aART) push the boundaries of what can be done to create new offspring. Consequently, new ethical questions regarding the application of these tools arise and need to be answered, and relevant animal welfare issues to be addressed. In order to ensure that the ethical risk assessment matches the technological breakthrough with aART, the BioRescue consorti
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How to spot 'emotional suffering' during COVID (and what to do)
A year after the pandemic outbreak, Stephanie Marcello has tips for spotting the signs of emotional distress in yourself and others, as well as recommendations for steps you can take to treat it. According to a recent Pew Poll, three-in-10 people say the COVID-19 outbreak has changed their lives in a major way, with 21% of US adults still experiencing high levels of psychological distress a year
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Exercise boosts blood flow to the brain, study finds
It's not just your legs and heart that get a workout when you walk briskly; exercise affects your brain as well. A new study by researchers at UT Southwestern shows that when older adults with mild memory loss followed an exercise program for a year, the blood flow to their brains increased. The results were published online today in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease.
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COVID-19 vaccination hesitancy remains unchanged
Daily national surveys by Carnegie Mellon University show that while COVID-19 vaccine uptake has increased, the proportion of vaccine-hesitant adults has remained unchanged. The concerns about a side effect remain high, especially among females, Black adults and those with an eligible health condition.
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These baby great white sharks love to hang out near New York
Uncovering detailed travel patterns and habitat use of sharks along and across shelf territories has been historically challenging—especially for most pelagic shark species—which remain offshore for most of their lives. Their vertical diving behavior has been a subject of inquiry for a long time, and for young sharks in particular, has remained elusive.
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Containing the coronavirus effects on the nervous system
Research conducted at the Institut national de la recherche scientifique (INRS) has identified ways to prevent the spread of infection within the central nervous system (CNS). The study, led by Professor Pierre Talbot and his research associate Marc Desforges, now at CHU-Sainte-Justine, was published in the Journal of Virology.
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Protecting and managing forests with AI
Drought, heat, and pest infestation: Climate change is threatening forests in Germany and represents a big challenge in forest management. A joint project of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and EDI GmbH, a spinoff of KIT, now provides support. Together with partners in the forestry sector, they are developing the EDE 4.0 assistance system. Based on artificial intelligence (AI), it helps fo
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Microchip models of human lungs enable better understanding of disease, immune response
In Biomicrofluidics, researchers review lung-on-chip technologies that represent the vital properties of lung tissue and are capable of recapitulating the fundamental aspects of various pathologies. The researchers reviewed various lung-on-chips and their applications in examining, diagnosing, and treating human viruses, including the coronavirus that causes COVID-19. The knowledge accumulated pav
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USPSTF statement on screening for hearing loss in older adults
The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) concludes that current evidence is insufficient to make a recommendation about screening for hearing loss in asymptomatic adults 50 and older. Nearly 16% of U.S. adults 18 and over report difficulty hearing. Hearing loss has been associated with an increased risk of falls, hospitalizations, social isolation and cognitive decline.
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Variable pay schemes can make workers ill
Fatigue, depression, sleep disorders, burnout: the number of cases where employees are unable to work for mental health-related reasons has increased dramatically in recent years. Researchers at Ruhr-Universität Bochum have long been keeping a critical eye on this development in society, especially in the corporate world. Together with colleagues from the University of Houston, they have now demon
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New results challenge leading theory in physics
Researchers at UZH and CERN have just released new intriguing results. According to the international research collaboration that runs the Large Hadron Collider beauty (LHCb) experiment, the latest measurements strengthen hints for a deviation with respect to the theoretical expectations. If confirmed, the findings point towards physics beyond the Standard Model such as a new fundamental force.
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Possible futures from the intersection of nature, tech and society | Natsai Audrey Chieza
Biodesigner Natsai Audrey Chieza prototypes the future, imagining a world where people and nature can thrive together. In this wildly imaginative talk, she shares the vision behind her innovation lab, which works at the intersection of nature, technology and society to create sustainable materials and models for the future. Chieza invites us to consider what kind of world we wish for — and what s
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Who Is Amy B. Scher?
Amy B. Scher is a proponent of energy medicine and things like astrology and homeopathy. She claims to be a "science geek," but how could anyone who understands science think that tapping on the breastbone will fix the thymus? The post first appeared on Science-Based Medicine .
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New anti-cancer therapy: Converting glioma cells into neurons
Glioma is a fatal neurological disorder that has limited interventional treatment, despite extensive research over the past several decades. A research team led by Dr. Gong Chen,has developed a novel gene therapy to reprogram glioma cells into functional neurons, shedding new light on glioma treatment. The work has been published in Cancer Biology & Medicine on March 22, 2021
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Evidence fills in nursing home COVID death information gap
COVID-19-related deaths among nursing home residents declined from March to November 2020, according to a new study. The findings also show the deadliest period of time for nursing home residents followed the pandemic's arrival, when the virus spiked in spring 2020. The COVID-19 pandemic has had devastating effects in US nursing homes and long-term care facilities, resulting in an estimated 1.2 m
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Team pinpoints what makes fruit flies champion fliers
Researchers have uncovered the underlying genetics that make flies so good at flying. Flies have evolved excellent flying skills thanks to a set of complicated interactions between numerous genes that influence wing shape, muscle function, and nervous system development, as well as the regulation of gene expression during development, according to their study. "Fruit flies are colloquially named
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Recurrent neural network advances 3D fluorescence imaging
3D fluorescence imaging often requires time-consuming and tedious mechanical scanning of samples. UCLA researchers devised a new recurrent neural network that reconstructs 3D images of fluorescent specimens from sparsely sampled 2D images, providing ~30-fold reduction in the number of scans required. This approach presents a rapid and flexible method for 3D imaging of fluorescent objects while als
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Poll: Learning setbacks a top concern for parents
Parents across the U.S. are conflicted about reopening schools. Most are at least somewhat worried that a return to the classroom will lead to more coronavirus cases, but there's an even deeper fear that their children are falling behind in school while at home.
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Pandemic exacerbates challenges for international energy transition
The Covid-19 Crisis is deepening the divide between energy transition frontrunners and laggards. In a new publication, researchers from the Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies (IASS) in Potsdam present an overview of the global impact of the coronavirus pandemic on the energy sector. Their findings show that low- and middle-income countries need more support in their efforts to ditch fos
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Words conveyed with gesture
When we need to convey an ever-increasing number of subtle meanings, the iconicity of pantomime limits communication. This is when we need something more arbitrary, and that is a spoken word, says prof. Przemys?aw ?ywiczy?ski about his research into the origins of language.
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Aging cells in abdominal fluid cause increased peritoneal dissemination of gastric cancer
Through an analysis of cell fractions from malignant ascites, cellular senescence of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) has been found to be important in the progression of gastric cancer peritoneal dissemination foci. This understanding should enable the development of new treatments for peritoneal cancer dissemination by targeting cancer cells at dissemination sites and CAFs in patients with p
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New Spacecraft, Now In Orbit, Will Demo Space Junk Cleanup
With space being as big as it is, aerospace companies and governments have felt justified leaving their junk in orbit. You know, a rocket booster here, a strut there. Unfortunately, everyone has been treating low-Earth orbit like their own personal garbage heap for too long, and scientists are beginning to worry about collisions and even chain reactions that could make space around Earth too dang
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High-performance quasi-2D perovskite light-emitting diodes: from materials to devices
Quasi-two-dimensional (quasi-2D) perovskites have emerged as one of the most promising materials for next generation light-emitting diodes (LEDs) application. Towards this goal, Scientist in China presented an overview of how to obtain high-performance LEDs by the investigation of the correlation between device performance and underlying photophysics of the materials. The review will provide a sys
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1 western butterfly population has dropped 99.9% since the 1980s
Western butterfly populations are declining at an estimated rate of 1.6% per year, according to a new report. The report, published in Science , looks at more than 450 butterfly species, including the western monarch, whose latest population count revealed a 99.9% decline since the 1980s. "The monarch population that winters along the West Coast plummeted from several hundred thousand just a few
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Scientists reveal regenerative treatment path for diabetic foot ulcers
A discovery involving multiple teams from across Scripps Research has revealed a powerful new approach for treating diabetic foot ulcers, which affect millions of people in the US and often lead to serious complications. By targeting a gene that controls tissue growth and regeneration, the scientists were able to boost cell division at the site of injury and repair chronic wounds quickly.
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Virtual pollination trade uncovers global dependence on biodiversity for food consumption
A study in Science Advances assessed the contribution of pollinators to international market flows and showed that nature conservation worldwide is essential to sustain current food consumption patterns. This interdisciplinary research across the fields of economics, ecology and environmental sciences revealed that developed countries are particularly reliant on imported pollinator-dependent crops
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Rodenticides in the environment pose threats to birds of prey
In recent decades, the increased use of chemicals in many industries has led to environmental pollution of water, soil and also wildlife. In addition to plant protection substances and human and veterinary medical drugs, rodenticides have had toxic effects on wildlife. A new scientific investigation from scientists of the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW), the Julius Kü
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New technologies, new responsibilities: Ethical risk assessment for northern white rhino rescue program
The BioRescue consortium develops and applies new technological approaches as a last straw for saving critically endangered species such as the northern white rhinoceros. advanced assisted reproductive technologies (aART) push the boundaries of what can be done to create new offspring. Consequently, new ethical questions regarding the application of these tools arise and need to be answered, and r
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Stranded endangered false killer whale divulges a dietary first
Researchers found something unexpected inside a rare false killer whale that stranded dead on Maui in February 2021, and it could ultimately help the endangered species. The whale was an insular false killer whale, the most critically endangered species of dolphins and whales in Hawaiian waters. While investigating it's cause of death, the University of Hawaiʻi Marine Mammal Health and Stranding L
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Daily briefing: The future of variant-proof vaccines
Nature, Published online: 22 March 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00787-5 Rare COVID reactions might hold key to variant-proof vaccines. Plus: Biden's pick for the next head of NASA and carbon emissions from bottom trawling exceed those from air travel.
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