Search Posts

Nyheder2021marts25

Tegn abonnement på BioNyt!

Vil du hjælpe med at finde nyheder? DO YOU WANT TO HELP FINDING SCIENCE NEWS? Email: bionyt@gmail.com Phone-sms: (45)21729908

Astrophysicists simulate microscopic clusters from the Big Bang
The very first moments of the Universe can be reconstructed mathematically even though they cannot be observed directly. Physicists from the Universities of Göttingen and Auckland (New Zealand) have greatly improved the ability of complex computer simulations to describe this early epoch. They discovered that a complex network of structures can form in the first trillionth of a second after the Bi
5h
TEORI: Almindelig rhhinovirus-forkølelse vil kunne udkonkurrere Covid19-coronavirus i celler, der inficeres samtidig af de to virus. Det kan bremse coronavirus, men ikke i sig selv eliminere coronavirus-pandemien. 
Ny forskning skaber begejstring: Forkølelse kan udkonkurrere coronavirus
Den virus, der giver os almindelig forkølelse, kan holde coronavirus ude af kroppens celler, viser ny forskning.
200+
Astronomers Release Stunning New Image of Black Hole
In 2019, a team of astronomers released the first image ever taken of a black hole. It was hailed as a major breakthrough by the scientific community. Now, the same team is revealing an entirely new view of the same object: a massive black hole at the center of Messier 87 (M87), a supergiant galaxy 53 million light years from Earth. The new image, released by the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) col
10K
Pandemic periods: why women's menstrual cycles have gone haywire
A majority of menstruating women have experienced changes to their cycle over the last year, surveys suggest. One of the main culprits? Persistent stress We will not look back on the past year as a vintage one for the human body. Since March 2020, many of us have experienced physical manifestations of stress that correspond to living through a global pandemic. From low energy and headaches to cha
15h
There Appears to Be a Huge Chunk of an Ancient Planet Buried Inside Earth
Ancient Shrapnel There are two gigantic blobs of dense material lurking in the lower depths of the Earth's mantle beneath West Africa and the Pacific Ocean. Thousands of miles wide, the blobs have been one of the planet's best-kept secrets — and baffled for scientists for decades. Now, there's mounting evidence that the blobs might be remnant shards from an ancient protoplanet named Theia that cr
3K
What is DNA?
DNA is a molecule that contains the instructions an organism needs to develop, live and reproduce.
7min
I Have Come to Bury Ayn Rand – Issue 98: Mind
My father, Sloan Wilson, wrote novels that would help define 1950s America. I loved and admired him, but the prospect of following in the footsteps of The Man in the Grey Flannel Suit and A Summer Place was like being expected to climb Mount Everest. My love of nature provided an alternative path. I would become an ecologist, spending my days researching plants and animals, which fascinated me si
19h
Where do the gender differences in the human pelvis come from?
The pelvis is the part of the human skeleton with the largest differences between females and males. The female birth canal is on average more spacious and exhibits shape features that enable birth of a large baby with a big brain. Thus far it was unclear when these pelvic differences first appeared in human evolution. Barbara Fischer from the University of Vienna and her coauthors have published
5h
Plant gene found in insect, shields it from leaf toxins
Millions of years ago, aphid-like insects called whiteflies incorporated a portion of DNA from plants into their genome. A Chinese research team, publishing March 25th in the journal Cell, reveals that whiteflies use this stolen gene to degrade common toxins plants use to defend themselves against insects, allowing the whitefly to feed on the plants safely.
6h
Octopuses have two alternating sleep states, study shows
Octopuses are known to sleep and to change color while they do it. Now, a study publishing March 25 in the journal iScience finds that these color changes are characteristic of two major alternating sleep states: an "active sleep" stage and a "quiet sleep" stage. The researchers say that the findings have implications for the evolution of sleep and might indicate that it's possible for octopuses t
6h
Old-growth forest carbon sinks overestimated
The claim that old-growth forests play a significant role in climate mitigation, based upon the argument that even the oldest forests keep sucking CO2 out of the atmosphere, is being refuted by researchers at the University of Copenhagen. The researchers document that this argument is based upon incorrectly analyzed data and that the climate mitigation effect of old and unmanaged forests has been
9h
The Sublime Absurdity of a Big, Stuck Boat
Yesterday, with only a few minutes left in my weekly Zoom appointment with my therapist, I decided to derail the proceedings to ask her what I believed was an essential question. It had nothing to do with my fear of vulnerability or difficulty asking for help; in fact, it had nothing to do with me at all. Had she seen the stuck boat? The boat, of course, is the Ever Given, a massive container shi
1h
New protein helps carnivorous plants sense and trap their prey
The brush of an insect's wing is enough to trigger a Venus flytrap to snap shut, but the biology of how these plants sense and respond to touch is still poorly understood, especially at the molecular level. Now, a new study by Salk and Scripps Research scientists identifies what appears to be a key protein involved in touch sensitivity for flytraps and other carnivorous plants.
5h
Green leafy vegetables essential for muscle strength
Eating just one cup of leafy green vegetables every day could boost muscle function, according to new research. The study found that people who consumed a nitrate-rich diet, predominantly from vegetables, had significantly better muscle function of their lower limbs.
1d
Palm oil production can grow without converting rainforests and peatland
Palm oil, the most important source of vegetable oil in the world, is derived from the fruit of perennial palm trees, which are farmed year-round in mostly tropical areas. The palm fruit is harvested manually every 10 days to two weeks, then transported to a mill for processing, and ultimately exported and made into a dizzying array of products from food to toiletries to biodiesel.
5h
A revised position for the primary strand of the Pleistocene-Holocene San Andreas fault in southern California
The San Andreas fault has the highest calculated time-dependent probability for large-magnitude earthquakes in southern California. However, where the fault is multistranded east of the Los Angeles metropolitan area, it has been uncertain which strand has the fastest slip rate and, therefore, which has the highest probability of a destructive earthquake. Reconstruction of offset Pleistocene-Holoc
1d
Ancient megafaunal mutualisms and extinctions as factors in plant domestication
By clearing forests, burning grasslands, plowing fields and harvesting crops, humans apply strong selective pressures on the plants that survive on the landscapes we use. Plants that evolved traits for long-distance seed-dispersal, including rapid annual growth, a lack of toxins and large seed generations, were more likely to survive on these dynamic anthropogenic landscapes. In a new article, res
4h
Bald Eagle Killer Identified
After a nearly 30-year hunt, researchers have shown that a neurotoxin generated by cyanobacteria on invasive plants is responsible for eagle and waterbird deaths from vacuolar myelinopathy.
1h
Seven in 10 UK Covid patients still affected months after leaving hospital
Five-month long Covid study finds that sufferers fall into four categories based on symptoms Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Seven in 10 patients hospitalised with Covid-19 have still not fully recovered after five months, and they appear to cluster into four distinct categories based on their symptoms, research suggests. The study, one of the world's largest into lo
1d
Neuralink Co-Founder Has an Idea for a New Religion Based on Drugs
Max Hodak, the entrepreneur who co-founded neurotech company Neuralink alongside Elon Musk, has an idea for an entirely new religion — and it involves tripping on natural substances to feel the presence of God. "Increasingly believe there is an opportunity for a new religion," Hodak tweeted in reply to productivity startup Forte Labs founder Tiago Forte. Forte had said that "after a decade as an
1d
Delhi reportedly halts AstraZeneca Covid vaccine exports as cases soar
Temporary hold put on exports of vaccines by Serum Institute of India to meet demand at home Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Delhi has reportedly put a temporary hold on all major exports of the AstraZeneca coronavirus vaccine made by the Serum Institute of India (SII) to meet demand at home as infections surge. The move, first reported by Reuters, will affect suppli
1d
Reproduction without pregnancy: would it really emancipate women? | Jenny Kleeman
It may sound far-fetched, but a breakthrough in Israel has brought us a step closer to creating artificial wombs for humans A team of Israeli scientists announced the mother of all inventions last week. Researchers from the Weizmann Institute of Science revealed in the journal Nature that they had successfully gestated hundreds of mice inside an artificial womb. They placed newly fertilised eggs
10h
A Better Way to Judge Joe Biden
Soon, we will be pelted by 100-day assessments of the Biden administration, sweeping claims spurred by the arrival of a round number. Then, before we're ready, a crop of those who want to replace Joe Biden will ask to be measured for the job. Before all of this starts, we have a window in which to think about what the presidency entails and what skills we should look for in those who have it or w
11h
GCHQ releases 'most difficult puzzle ever' in honour of Alan Turing
12 riddles linked to new £50 note featuring the codebreaker may take seven hours to crack GCHQ has released its "most difficult puzzle ever", a set of 12 riddles linked to design elements of the new £50 note featuring the mathematician and codebreaker Alan Turing. The questions begin with a relatively straightforward crossword-style puzzle that starts by asking where GCHQ's predecessor agency, wh
11h
New £50 note featuring Alan Turing to enter circulation in June
Polymer banknote pays tribute to scientist who cracked Enigma code during second world war A new £50 note featuring Alan Turing, the scientist best known for his codebreaking work during the second world war, has been unveiled by the Bank of England and will go into circulation on 23 June, the date of his birth. The Bank of England governor, Andrew Bailey, was due to reveal the design, which inco
14h
An Eerie Glow in the Sky Might Come From Mars's Direction
Joshua Rhoades was standing near an abandoned farmhouse in rural Illinois on a windy night in early March, fiddling with his camera, when he noticed what he called "a faint, eerie, ethereal glow" above him. A pillar of light had illuminated the darkness, stretching from the horizon—a hint of sun, but it was nearly 8 p.m. There was nothing alarming about the sight, though it was, by one definition
1d
Scientist Who Defended Epstein and Pedophilia Reinstated to Free Software Foundation Board
Hello Again Richard Stallman, the former MIT scientist who previously endorsed pedophilia and went out of his way to defend Jeffrey Epstein , is back. Stallman gave a surprise announcement over the weekend that he is once again a board member of the Free Software Foundation (FSF), a non-profit dedicated to promoting open source software. The news didn't exactly sit well with FSF members, Ars Tech
1d
'Dimming the sun': $100m geoengineering research programme proposed
All options to fight climate crisis must be explored, says national academy, but critics fear side-effects The US should establish a multimillion-dollar research programme on solar geoengineering, according to the country's national science academy. In a report it recommends funding of $100m (£73m) to $200m over five years to better understand the feasibility of interventions to dim the sun, the
6h
Scientists Pin Down When Earth's Crust Cracked, Then Came to Life
In 2016, the geochemists Jonas Tusch and Carsten Münker hammered a thousand pounds of rock from the Australian Outback and airfreighted it home to Cologne, Germany. Five years of sawing, crushing, dissolving and analyzing later, they have coaxed from those rocks a secret hidden for eons: the era when plate tectonics began. Earth's fractured carapace of rigid, interlocking plates is unique in the
6h
A US Military Fighter Jet Accidentally Shot Itself With a Gatling Gun
Self Own The most expensive weapon ever built, an F-35B fighter jet, accidentally shot itself while flying over Arizona earlier this month. The jet, which costs around $135.8 million each, had an externally mounted Gatling gun discharge a 25mm armor piercing high explosive incendiary round into itself, causing at least $2.5 million in damage, a military official confirmed to Military.com . During
6h
Police Shut Down China's First Sex Doll Brothel
Sex Sells Police in Shenzhen, China shut the country's first sex doll hotel, one of two establishments where men can pay $28 to spend an hour with inanimate sex dolls, state-run online magazine Sixth Tone reports . "There was no explanation or legal documentation from the authorities," proprietor Li Bo told the magazine. The hotel first opened in 2018 in an area known to house major multinational
1d
The Guy Who Sold a $69 Million NFT Thinks NFTs Are Pretty Dumb
Selling Out? It was meant to be a watershed moment for cryptocurrencies. Digital artist Beeple, otherwise known as Mike Winkelmann, sold his digital artwork "The First 5000 Days" as a non-fungible token (NFT) through the auctionhouse Christie's for a record-breaking $69 million . His share: $53 million worth of ether. But rather than HODL-ing, which is crypto-slang for holding a cryptocurrency ra
3h
New AI Is Designed to Debate People, and It Could Ruin Social Media
IBM's Project Debater, a powerful AI algorithm designed to challenge the most skilled human minds at speech and debate, is stronger than ever. The autonomous debating system, as it's described in a research paper published in the journal Nature last week, can stitch together coherent and convincing arguments from the content of millions of news articles. The tech is getting more and more sophisti
5h
Calling the Atlanta Shootings a Hate Crime Isn't Nearly Enough
In 2002, the brutal beating of a junior by his classmate at Morehouse College, in Atlanta, made national headlines. The case marked Georgia's prosecutorial debut of its hate-crime statute, on the grounds that the perpetrator, 19-year-old Aaron Price, had accused 20-year-old Gregory Love of making a sexual advance toward him in a shower stall, and spouted homophobic rants as he retrieved the baseb
9h
Long-Haulers Are Pushing the Limits of COVID-19 Vaccines
When I spoke with Letícia Soares on March 12, day 335 of her battle with COVID-19, she was celebrating an anniversary of sorts. It had been 11 months to the day since the start of her illness—an unrelenting sickness that has pinwheeled her through more than 65 symptoms, including fatigue, nausea, migraines, diarrhea, chest pain, hair loss, asthma, abdominal pain, brain fog, heart problems, and pa
9h
UK Covid live news: backlash over plan to have pub landlords check Covid status
Latest updates: Boris Johnson tells MPs landlords could set criteria for entry, including demanding customers provide Covid vaccine certificate EU leaders push back against plan to halt Covid vaccine exports Plans to let pub landlords check Covid status criticised as dangerous Pubs that check Covid status may be allowed to drop social distancing Coronavirus – latest global updates See all our cor
11h
New coronavirus variant, described as 'double mutant', reported in India
Experts say there is no evidence that the new variant found in Maharashtra is more transmissible or lethal Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage India has reported a new variant of the coronavirus as it struggled with the highest single-day tally of new infections and deaths this year. The variant, described by officials as a "double mutant", has been found in more than 20
19h
Crypto Titan Makes Grandiose, Nonsense Claim That NFTs "Liberate" Art
Cameron Winklevoss, the crypto investor and advocate you probably know best as "one of the two guys Armie Hammer played in that Facebook movie," believes that NFTs are going to change art forever. "NFTs liberate art," Winklevoss tweeted on Sunday. "Traditional art is confined to time and space. You have to be in the right city, go to a museum, be invited to someone's home, etc. Anyone, anywhere w
1d
Mysterious swirling light gives new insights into black holes
Experts discover crucial evidence that could reveal how magnetic fields behave around black holes An image that captures streaks of polarised light swirling around a supermassive black hole is providing new insight into how galaxies can project streams of energy thousands of light-years outward from their core. Black holes are places where the pull of gravity is so strong that even light cannot e
1d
Europe Builds Autonomous Robotic Orb to Explore Lunar Caves
Rolling Away The European Space Agency is now testing a new robot that it plans to ship off to the Moon, where it will freely explore lunar caves. The robot, DAEDALUS, appears to be little more than a robotic orb — the ESA even compared it to a "hamster ball" in a press release about the project. But it's packed with tools that will not only help scientists better understand the Moon's caves, but
1d
This new image shows off magnetic fields swirling around a black hole
Astronomers have released a brand-new image of the supermassive black hole at the center of the M87 galaxy. It's a sharper follow-up to a historic 2019 picture, showing the polarized light that traces the monster's magnetic field lines. The background: The Event Horizon telescope made history on April 10, 2019, when it released the first ever image of a black hole . The bright orange circle, loca
1d
Welsh rabbits serve up prehistoric finds on tiny Skokholm Island
Stone age tool used 9,000 years ago dug up by burrowing bunnies on island off Pembrokeshire Fresh insights into a remote Welsh island's ancient past have emerged thanks to the efforts of burrowing rabbits – and the sharp eyesight of two nature wardens. The bunnies on Skokholm Island , which lies in the Celtic Sea, two miles off the coast of Pembrokeshire, kicked up two pebbles and some shards of
4h
Amazing Video Zooms All the Way From Earth to First Photographed Black Hole
Fast Travel The European Southern Observatory released a new video on Wednesday that takes viewers sailing through space, all the way from the surface of the Earth to a nearby supermassive black hole . The video zooms far, far faster than anything could ever make the trip in person, of course. Even traveling at the speed of light — the theoretical speed limit of the universe that's beyond unattai
4h
The Obscure Case That Could Blow Up American Civil-Rights and Consumer-Protection Laws
On Monday, the Supreme Court heard a case that focuses on obscure and technical points of property law, but has the potential to devastate major areas of law, such as rent control and civil rights. The case, Cedar Point Nursery v. Hassid , involves a decades-old California law that allows agricultural labor organizers to enter commercial farms in order to meet with farmworkers and educate them ab
10h
Can humans travel through wormholes in space?
Sci-fi movies and books love wormholes—how else can we hope to travel through interstellar distances? But wormholes are notoriously unstable; it's hard to keep them open or make them big enough. Two new papers offer some hope in solving both of these issues, but at a high price. Imagine if we could cut paths through the vastness of space to make a network of tunnels linking distant stars somewhat
1d
Rapid lateral flow tests 'should not be used for test and release'
Cochrane review says rapid antigen tests correctly identify only 58% of asymptomatic people Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Rapid lateral flow tests for Covid do not work well in people with no symptoms and should not on their own be used to allow people to go to work or school or to travel, experts have said. The UK has bought millions of rapid tests which give resu
1d
If you're ecstatic after a trip to the shops, it's your brain thanking you for the novelty | Richard A Friedman
The monotony of lockdown life has starved us of spontaneity and serendipity, which enhance learning and memory Richard A Friedman is a professor of clinical psychiatry at Weill Cornell Medical College I hit a wall in late February and felt that life had taken on a quality of stultifying sameness. Was it Wednesday or Sunday? I couldn't really tell: every day of the week felt identical because ther
8h
New Details Leak About Apple's Virtual Reality Headset
Mixed Reality The Apple rumor mill is in full swing when it comes to the company's upcoming mixed-reality headset device. According to the latest word on the street, courtesy of documents obtained by analyst Ming-Chi Kuo and seen by MacRumors , the headset will incredibly light, weighing in at less than 150 grams, which is even less than an iPhone 12. That'd also make it weigh far less than its m
1d
Humanoid Robot Sophia Sells 12 Second Video NFT for Almost $700,000
Robot Art Robots are taking over the art world. Take, for instance, celebrity humanoid robot Sophia, who — or, uh, "which"? — just sold a digital artwork as a non-fungible token (NFT) for $688,888, Reuters reports . Sophia teamed up with Italian digital artist Andrea Bonaceto to produce a combination of various elements, plucked from Bonaceto's works. The robot even mixed in some of her own physi
1h
Once Imperiled, America's Bald Eagle Populations Are Soaring
The number of bald eagles in the lower 48 states has quadrupled since 2009, according to a new survey. The findings are a bright spot in an otherwise troubling picture for American birds. (Image credit: Prisma Bildagentur/Universal Images Group via Getty Images)
2h
After Atlanta, My Parents' Silence Haunts Me
When the group of teenagers surrounded my father, he might have been standing by a crate of watermelons, one hand palming a fruit, the other knocking at it for hollowness. Or maybe he was looking at the fish nestled in ice, assessing whether the cod or the halibut appeared fresher. I don't know; I wasn't there. What I do know is that the teenagers, white and maskless, coughed all over him. "You'r
4h
Something Is Ripping Apart the Nearest Star Cluster to Earth
An invisible force is tearing apart the closest star cluster to the Solar System — and astronomers are trying to figure out what it is, as Science Alert reports . The ripping apart isn't much of a surprise in and of itself. Gravitational forces tend to rend apart star clusters to form tidal streams, which are essentially rivers of stars. But something else, far more violent, appears to be causing
5h
Scientists bridge disparate approaches to belief dynamics
Why do individuals change some beliefs quickly, but fiercely resist changing other beliefs? On issues like climate change, vaccinations, and genetically modified foods, we're heavily influenced not only by the people around us, but also by the information we receive, our environments, and our individual cognition.
8h
Some artists found a lifeline selling NFTs. Others worry it's a trap.
Anna Podedworna first heard about NFTs a month or so ago, when a fellow artist sent her an Instagram message trying to convince her to get on board. She found it really off-putting, like a pitch for a pyramid scheme. He had the best of intentions, she thought: NFTs, or non-fungible tokens, are basically just a way of selling and buying anything digital, including art, that's supported by cryptocu
11h
This is how (almost) anyone can train to be an astronaut
In his 1979 book of the same name, Tom Wolfe described astronauts as needing the "right stuff"—meaning they had to be in top physical and mental shape to withstand the rigors and dangers of space travel. In the days of the Apollo missions, you had to be an experienced pilot to stand much chance of getting into the program. But the idea of commercial space travel always promised that one day, you
1d
This Classy Startup Is Working on Lab-Grown Elk, Wagyu Beef
A new startup is pitching top-tier new lab-grown meat products: Wagyu meatloaf, lamb burgers, and elk sausages, TechCrunch reports . The company, called Orbillion Bio, recently demoed its exotic cultured meat products at an event space in San Francisco. The idea is to focus on replacing higher end meats, thereby facing less pressure to dramatically lower prices to stay competitive, as is the case
1d
Mystery Disease Outbreak Kills Girl in Nigeria, Sickens Dozen More
A sudden outbreak of a mysterious, unidentified disease has spread among dozens of students in Nigeria, at least one of whom has already died as a result. Over 30 girls from the Government Girls College in Sokoto were hospitalized, Director of Public Health at the Sokoto state Ministry of Health Ahmed Abdulrahman told Nigeria's TVC News . Initially, health officials thought that the students were
49min
Elon Musk: Tesla Cybertruck Will Have "No Handles"
Can't Handle This According to Tesla CEO Elon Musk, the company's long-awaited electric pickup will sport a strange new design feature — or, rather, lack a common one. "There will be no handles," Musk said in a cryptic tweet . The truck, set to roll out later this year, is set to be a hulking wedge of reinforced stainless steel. The design was lauded by some as daring, while others had far less k
2h
What Killed These Bald Eagles? After 25 Years, We Finally Know.
It was 1996, Bill Clinton was president, and endangered bald eagles were dying in his home state of Arkansas. Twenty-nine were found dead at a man-made reservoir called DeGray Lake, before deaths spread to two other lakes. But what really puzzled scientists was how the eagles acted before they died. The stately birds were suddenly flying straight into cliff faces. They hit trees. Their wings droo
3h
An election system that puts voters (not politicians) first | Amber McReynolds
From hours-long lines and limited polling locations to confusing and discriminatory registration policies, why is it so hard to vote in the US? Voting rights expert Amber McReynolds offers a proven alternative: a new process, already happening in parts of the country, that could bring accountability, transparency and equity to the outdated and sputtering system that American democracy currently re
5h
New light on baryonic matter and gravity on cosmic scales
Scientists estimate that dark matter and dark energy together are some 95% of the gravitational material in the universe while the remaining 5% is baryonic matter, which is the "normal" matter composing stars, planets and living beings. However, for decades, almost one-half of this matter has not been found. Now, using a new technique, a team including researchers from the Instituto de Astrofísica
9h
No Country Thrives on Instability Like Iran
Before he became president, Joe Biden spent decades seeking reconciliation in the Middle East. By his second term as vice president, his frustration with feuding nations and factions was palpable. "Notwithstanding all of the hundreds of hours I and others spent with each of their leaders, they didn't resolve a core problem of how the hell they're gonna live together," he told The New Yorker in 20
10h
Are You Dreaming Too Big?
" How to Build a Life " is a weekly column by Arthur Brooks, tackling questions of meaning and happiness. C ommencement season is just around the corner. Whether in person or over a live-stream, graduates and their families will follow the long-honored tradition of listening to speeches studded with unoriginal chestnuts like following your dreams, shooting for the stars, and believing that you ca
11h
OPINION: 5 Ways To Make The Vaccine Rollout More Equitable
Getting the COVID-19 vaccine into most Americans' arms will involve much more than a good supply and logistics. Values such as equity, deep listening, and informed choice are crucial, too. (Image credit: Octavio Jones/Getty Images)
12h
You can't bullshit a bullshitter, or can you? – podcast
In 2019, Ian Sample delved into the mind of a bullshitter , talking to psychologists about what prompts people to spout nonsense and gibberish. Recently, one of the researchers he spoke to, Shane Littrell, published a study asking – can you bullshit a bullshitter? Not being able to resist diving into the dark arts of BS once more, Ian Sample invited Shane back on the podcast to hear the answer an
16h
The Dish runs back to the moon: Parkes telescope to support commercial lunar landings
Australian observatory that shared Apollo 11 images reaches deal with US company Intuitive Machines The Parkes radio telescope in regional New South Wales , which famously shared Apollo 11's landing images to more than 600 million people in 1969, will provide support to new commercial lunar missions this year aimed at ultimately creating a "sustainable presence" for humans on the moon . "The Dish
19h
In this Dutch town, the euro's fictional bridges are now real
The euro banknotes feature seven different bridges – all of them fictional. They represent periods instead of places, so as not to offend anyone. But one Dutch town has turned monetary fiction into monumental fact. ​Wonderful subcategory In topography, there's a wonderful subcategory of places that existed first in the imagination before they materialized on the map. Examples range in size from t
23h
Chandra X-ray data sonification: Stellar, galactic, and black hole
This latest installment from our data sonification series features three diverse cosmic scenes. In each, astronomical data collected by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and other telescopes are converted into sounds. Data sonification maps the data from these space-based telescopes into a form that users can hear instead of only see, embodying the data in a new form without changing the original c
1d
How humans develop larger brains than other apes
A new study is the first to identify how human brains grow much larger, with three times as many neurons, compared with chimpanzee and gorilla brains. The study identified a key molecular switch that can make ape brain organoids grow more like human organoids, and vice versa.
1d
Automatic trail cameras keep wildlife research going during pandemic
For scientists, especially graduate students, who conduct fieldwork, every day is precious. Researchers meticulously prepare their equipment, procedures and timelines to make sure they get the data they need to do good science. So you can imagine the collective anxiety that fell across academia in spring 2020 when COVID-19 struck and many universities suspended in-person activities, including fiel
1d
Effective Field Theories and the nature of the universe
What is the world made of? This question, which goes back millennia, was revisited by theoretical physicist Steven Weinberg from the University of Texas in Austin, TX, USA in the first of an international seminar series, 'All Things EFT.' Weinberg's seminar has now been published as an article in the journal EPJ H.
1d
Listen: The Crime of Refusing Vaccination
Listen and subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Podcasts In 1902, a Swedish American pastor named Henning Jacobson refused to get the smallpox vaccine. This launched a chain of events that landed the Massachusetts pastor in a landmark 1905 Supreme Court case in which the Court considered the delicate balancing act between individual liberty over our bodies and our duty to one a
13h
Marswatch: high hopes for first powered controlled flight on another planet
Mars mission's next major milestone will be deployment of Ingenuity, a small helicopter Welcome to the first in a new series of occasional Marswatch columns. With the change of administration in America, the moon landings scheduled for 2024 are likely to be moved back to their original target of 2028. So we thought we'd change our focus to Mars. The big news at Mars is the landing of Nasa's rover
15h
Waste from making purple corn chips yields a natural dye, supplements, kitty litter
The more colorful a food, the more nutritious it probably is. For example, purple corn contains compounds associated with a reduced risk of developing diabetes and heart disease. The cobs contain the same compounds but are typically thrown out. Now, researchers report a step-wise biorefinery approach in ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering that uses the whole cob, producing a dye and a possible
1d
Shining light to make hydrogen
Decarbonizing the economy and achieving the transition from fossil fuels to renewable energies is one of the most urgent global challenges of the 21st century. Hydrogen can play a key role in this process as a promising climate-neutral energy vehicle. Yet, the so-called green hydrogen economy requires that hydrogen production be based exclusively on renewable energy. In addition, it should ideally
1d
Study: Does the label "straight" worsen perceptions of gay people?
In a recent study published in The Journal of Sex Research, heterosexual people were asked to rate their impressions of fictitious men. Some of the fictitious men were described as "heterosexual," the others as "straight." Across multiple studies, participants reported worse impressions of gay men after being exposed to the word "straight," but only if the participants were highly religious. It's
23h
The case of the cloudy filters: Solving the mystery of the degrading sunlight detectors
More than 150 years ago, the Sun blasted Earth with a massive cloud of hot charged particles. This plasma blob generated a magnetic storm on Earth that caused sparks to leap out of telegraph equipment and even started a few fires. Now called the Carrington Event, after one of the astronomers who observed it, a magnetic storm like this could happen again anytime, only now it would affect more than
5h
Detecting photons transporting qubits without destroying quantum information
Even though quantum communication is tap-proof, it is so far not particularly efficient. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics want to change this. They have developed a detection method that can be used to track quantum transmissions. Quantum information is sent over long distances in the form of photons (i.e. light particles). However, these are quickly lost. Finding out afte
7h
Anabolic androgenic steroids accelerate brain aging
Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS), a synthetic version of the male sex hormone testosterone, are sometimes used as a medical treatment for hormone imbalance, and its use is known to have many side effects, ranging from acne to heart problems to increased aggression. A new study now suggests that AAS can also have deleterious effects on the brain, causing it to age prematurely.
7h
Urban agriculture can help, but not solve, city food security problems
While urban agriculture can play a role in supporting food supply chains for many major American cities—contributing to food diversity, sustainability and localizing food systems—it is unrealistic to expect rooftop gardens, community plots and the like to provide the majority of nutrition for the population of a metropolis.
5h
A disposable living laser printed on chip for drug screening
Scientists have created a new way to monitor subtle drug interactions between bacteria and antibiotics. By using a common office inkjet printer, researchers from NTU Singapore and China developed a disposable living laser on chip by encapsulating living bacteria inside. Strong laser emissions generated from bacteria inside the droplet will be dramatically enhanced during drug interactions. This br
9h
Australians Face Worst Flooding in Decades
Days of extreme rainfall have swamped large areas of Australia, especially in the state of New South Wales. Hundreds of people have been rescued, tens of thousands have been evacuated, and at least two deaths have been reported so far. As the weather system begins to move away, recovery efforts are now starting in some of the dozens of communities that were declared disaster zones. Collected belo
1d
When Your Fad Diet Fails, And It Probably Will, 'Just Eat'
Diets often fail in the long term, because they're too strict or require unnatural eating habits. In a new book, Barry Estabrook turns to science and history to find a weight-loss regimen that works. (Image credit: Michele Abercrombie/NPR)
1h
When synthetic evolution rhymes with natural diversity
Researchers at GMI—Gregor Mendel Institute of Molecular Plant Biology of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and The Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) use two complementary approaches to unveil a co-evolutionary mechanism between bacteria and plants and also explain complex immune response patterns observed in the wild. Together the papers change
7h
Optical fiber could boost power of superconducting quantum computers
The secret to building superconducting quantum computers with massive processing power may be an ordinary telecommunications technology – optical fiber. Physicists have measured and controlled a superconducting quantum bit (qubit) using light-conducting fiber instead of metal electrical wires, paving the way to packing a million qubits into a quantum computer rather than just a few thousand.
1d
How tiny machines become capable of learning
Living organisms, from bacteria to animals and humans, can perceive their environment and process, store and retrieve this information. They learn how to react to later situations using appropriate actions. A team of physicists have developed a method for giving tiny artificial microswimmers a certain ability to learn using machine learning algorithms.
2h
What is killing bald eagles in the U.S.?
Bald eagles, as well as other wildlife, have been succumbing to a mysterious neurodegenerative disease in the southern United States since the 1990s. New research by the Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) in Germany and the University of Georgia, U.S., identifies the cause of these deaths: a toxin produced by cyanobacteria that grow on invasive aquatic plants. The problem is potential
3h
Small robot swimmers that heal themselves from damage
Living tissue can heal itself from many injuries, but giving similar abilities to artificial systems, such as robots, has been extremely challenging. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Nano Letters have developed small, swimming robots that can magnetically heal themselves on-the-fly after breaking into two or three pieces. The strategy could someday be used to make hardier devices for environment
1d
The Atlantic Daily: Violent Crime in America Is Surging Again
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . First Atlanta, now Boulder. For the second time in a week, Americans are grieving the victims of a mass shooting. President Joe Biden has renewed calls for tougher gun regulations . Both incident
8h
Water mission takes on space weather
For well over a decade, ESA's SMOS satellite has been delivering a wealth of data to map moisture in soil and salt in the surface waters of the oceans for a better understanding of the processes driving the water cycle. While addressing key scientific questions, this exceptional Earth Explorer has repeatedly surpassed expectations by returning a wide range of unexpected results, often leading to p
7h
The Brilliance in Francis Bacon's Early Failures
In 2013, Francis Bacon's painting Three Studies of Lucian Freud sold for $142 million, setting the world record (since surpassed ) for the most expensive painting sold at auction. His second – and third – highest-selling paintings, one of which was sold as recently as the summer of 2020, place him firmly in the art-market ranks of Pablo Picasso, Claude Monet, and other blue-chip masters. The simi
10h
Gravitational lenses could allow a galaxy-wide internet
As Carl Sagan once said, "The sky calls to us. If we do not destroy ourselves, we will one day venture to the stars." And our first emissaries to the stars will be robotic probes. These interstellar probes will be largely autonomous, but we will want to communicate with them. At the very least, we will want them to phone home and tell us what they've discovered. The stars are distant, so the probe
8h
Climate change has reduced ocean mixing far more than expected
The ocean is dynamic in nature, playing a crucial role as a planetary thermostat that buffer global warming. However, in response to climate change, the ocean has generally become stabler over the past 50 years. Six times stabler, in fact, than previously estimated—as shown by a new study that researchers from the CNRS, Sorbonne University, and IFREMER have conducted within the scope of an interna
1d
Researchers find the secret of the bunny hop: it's all in the genes
Scientists pinpoint gene necessary for animals to adopt a typical gait by studying breed of rabbit that can't hop It sounds like a conundrum that Rudyard Kipling would have tackled in his Just So stories , but it turns out the reason why rabbits hop is rooted not in fables but genetics. Researchers say that by studying an unusual breed of bunny that walks on its front paws, they have pinpointed a
3h
Scientists find evidence that novel coronavirus infects the mouth's cells
Scientists has found evidence that SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, infects cells in the mouth. The findings point to the possibility that the mouth plays a role in transmitting SARS-CoV-2 to the lungs or digestive system via saliva laden with virus from infected oral cells. A better understanding of the mouth's involvement could inform strategies to reduce viral transmission within and
4h
Aerosol formation in clouds
Researchers have explored how chemical reactions in clouds can influence the global climate. They found that isoprene, the dominant non-methane organic compound emitted into the atmosphere, can strongly contribute to the formation of organic aerosols in clouds.
1d
Researchers improve plant prime editing efficiency with optimized pegRNA designs
Precision genome editing enables the precise modification of DNA in living cells, thus enabling a breadth of opportunities for plant breeding. Prime editors, developed by Prof. David R. Liu and his colleagues, permit the installation of desired edits in a programmable target site. They are composed of an engineered Cas9 nickase (H840A)-reverse transcriptase (RT) fusion protein and a prime editing
4h
Zooming in on muscle cells
An international team has produced the first high-resolution 3D image of the sarcomere, the basic contractile unit of skeletal and heart muscle cells, by using electron cryo-tomography. Electron cryo-tomography capability of imaging structures directly in frozen muscle cells could translate into future medical treatments for muscle diseases and a better understanding of the aging process.
8h
Diabetes drug may help women who have repeated miscarriages – study
Type of stem cell deficiency is common among women who lose pregnancies, and sitagliptin may help A common diabetes drug may be able to help women who have repeated miscarriages, researchers have found, after they identified that a certain type of stem cell deficiency is common among women who lose pregnancies. A study for the Tommy's National Miscarriage Research Centre in London discovered that
3h
Emergency Alarm Reportedly Goes Off on SpaceX Dragon Capsule Docked to Space Station
Fire, Fire The SpaceX Crew Dragon dubbed Resilience, currently docked to the International Space Station after launching in November of last year, just reportedly scared the bejesus out of the station's crew. The capsule "annunciated false emergency messages for Fire and Rapid Depress as well as other erroneous messages yesterday," NASASpaceFlight managing editor Chris Bergin reported in a Thursd
6min
Shining a healing light on the brain
Scientists report a novel noninvasive treatment for brain disorders based on breakthroughs in both optics and genetics. It involves stimulation of neurons by means of radioluminescent nanoparticles injected into the brain and exposed to X-rays.
8h
Weird earthquake reveals hidden mechanism
The wrong type of earthquake in an area where there should not have been an earthquake led researchers to uncover the cause for this unexpected strike-slip earthquake — where two pieces of crust slide past each other on a fault — in places where subduction zone earthquakes — one geologic plate slipping beneath another — are common.
1d
Toward a better understanding of societal responses to climate change
As the signs of today's human-caused climate change become ever more alarming, research into the ways past societies responded to natural climate changes is growing increasingly urgent. Scholars have often argued that climatic changes plunge communities into crisis and provide the conditions that lead societies to collapse, but a growing body of research shows that the impacts of climate change on
1d
A better treatment for sickle cell disease
Sickle cell disease is the most prevalent inherited blood disorder in the world, affecting 70,000 to 100,000 Americans. However, it is considered an orphan disease, meaning it impacts less than 200,000 people nationally, and is therefore underrepresented in therapeutic research.
23h
A Pesky Insect Took an Evolutionary Shortcut
Among the vegetable world's most incorrigible villains, the whitefly ranks high. Pale, squishy, and smaller than a sesame seed, these sap-sucking bugs terrorize more than 600 plant species, infecting them with deadly viruses and smearing their leaves with sweet, sticky liquids that encourage the growth of molds. Whiteflies resist pesticides . They dupe plants into mounting the wrong defenses . Th
5h
On-chip torsion balance with femtonewton force resolution at room temperature
The torsion balance contains a rigid balance beam suspended by a fine thread as an ancient scientific instrument that continues to form a very sensitive force sensor to date. The force sensitivity is proportional to the lengths of the beam and thread and inversely proportional to the fourth power of the diameter of the thread; therefore, nanomaterials that support the torsion balances should be id
8h
Researchers reveal how lipids and water molecules regulate 5-HT receptors
Serotonin, or 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), is a kind of neurotransmitter. 5-HT can regulate multifaceted physiological functions such as mood, cognition, learning, memory, and emotions through 5-HT receptors. 5-HT receptors are a type of G protein-coupled receptor and can be divided into 12 subtypes in humans. As drug targets, they play a vital role in the treatment of schizophrenia, depression, an
9h
Division and growth of synthetic vesicles
One big challenge for the production of synthetic cells is that they must be able to divide to have offspring. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, a team from Heidelberg has now introduced a reproducible division mechanism for synthetic vesicles. It is based on osmosis and can be controlled by an enzymatic reaction or light.
9h
Semiconductor qubits scale in two dimensions
The heart of any computer, its central processing unit, is built using semiconductor technology, which is capable of putting billions of transistors onto a single chip. Now, researchers have shown that this technology can be used to build a two-dimensional array of qubits to function as a quantum processor. Their work is a crucial milestone for scalable quantum technology.
1d
How grasslands respond to climate change
"Based on field experiments with increased carbon dioxide concentration, artificial warming, and modified water supply, scientists understand quite well how future climate change will affect grassland vegetation. Such knowledge is largely missing for effects that already occurred in the last century," says Hans Schnyder, Professor of Grassland at the TUM.
1d
Researchers develop 15-minute test to assess immune response
Researchers from Critical Analytics for Manufacturing Personalized-Medicine (CAMP) have developed a new label-free immune profiling assay that profiles the rapidly changing host immune response in case of infection, in a departure from existing methods that focus on detecting the pathogens themselves, which can often be at low levels within a host. This novel technology presents a host of advantag
9h
Exploring the nanoworld in 3D
Imagine a cube on which light is projected by a flashlight. The cube reflects the light in a particular way, so simply spinning the cube or moving the flashlight makes it possible to examine each aspect and deduce information regarding its structure. Now, imagine that this cube is just a few atoms high, that the light is detectable only in infrared, and that the flashlight is a beam from a microsc
3h
Beware of fellow bacteria bearing gifts: Research presents new potential antimicrobial agents
Skoltech researchers examined the antibiotic compounds that employ a 'Trojan horse' strategy to get into a bacterial cell unrecognized and prevent the synthesis of proteins, ultimately killing the cell. They were able to identify new gene clusters that look like those of known 'Trojan horses' – these likely guide the biosynthesis of new antimicrobials that require further investigation. The review
1d
Technology uses 'single' approach to develop electronics, acoustics
An innovator developed a new approach to creating popular thin films for devices across a broad range of fields, including optics, acoustics and electronics. Epitaxial lithium niobate (LNO) thin films are an attractive material for electronics and other devices. These films offer flexibility and other properties that are important to manufacturers.
2h
Decline in black cherry regeneration may herald wider forest change
In the heart of black cherry's native range, including a part of the Allegheny Hardwoods that bills itself as the "Black Cherry Capital of the World," the tree's regeneration, growth and survival have all been declining for more than a decade. In a new analysis, a team of USDA Forest Service and University of Missouri scientists identify likely factors behind the tree's decline and, more significa
1d
Scientist discovers a new type of 'bi-molecule' with applications for quantum sensors
Dr. Rosario González-Férez, a researcher at the Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics and the Carlos I Institute of Theoretical and Computational Physics of the University of Granada, has published an article titled "Ultralong-Range Rydberg Bi-molecules" in Physical Review Letters. The results of the study show a new type of bi-molecule formed from two nitric oxide (NO) molecules, bo
7h
Researchers capture first 3D super-resolution images in living mice
Researchers have developed a new microscopy technique that can acquire 3-D super-resolution images of subcellular structures from about 100 microns deep inside biological tissue, including the brain. By giving scientists a deeper view into the brain, the method could help reveal subtle changes that occur in neurons over time, during learning, or as result of disease.
7h
Aerosol formation in clouds: Studying climate modeling's last great uncertainty factor
Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI have studied for the first time how chemical reactions in clouds can influence the global climate. They found that isoprene, the dominant non-methane organic compound emitted into the atmosphere, can strongly contribute to the formation of organic aerosols in clouds. They published their results today in the journal Science Advances.
1d
Researchers optimize materials design using computational technologies
The process of fabricating materials is complicated, time-consuming and costly. Too much of one material, or too little, can create problems with the product, forcing the design process to begin again. Advancements in the design process are needed to reduce the cost and time it takes to produce materials with targeted properties.
1d
Speleothem record of mild and wet mid-Pleistocene climate in northeast Greenland
The five interglacials before the Mid-Brunhes Event (MBE) [c.430 thousand years (ka) ago] are generally considered to be globally cooler than those post-MBE. Inhomogeneities exist regionally, however, which suggest that the Arctic was warmer than present during Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 15a. Using the first speleothem record for the High Arctic, we investigate the climatic response of northeast
1d
This Tenet Shows Time Travel May Be Possible – Issue 98: Mind
Time travel has been a beloved science-fiction idea at least since H.G. Wells wrote The Time Machine in 1895. The concept continues to fascinate and fictional approaches keep coming, prodding us to wonder whether time travel is physically possible and, for that matter, makes logical sense in the face of its inscrutable paradoxes. Remarkably, last year saw both a science-fiction film that illumina
19h
Paraguay's first satellite deployed from the International Space Station
On March 14, the Paraguayan Space Agency (AEP) deployed a satellite from the International Space Station to help track a tiny parasite that causes Chagas disease. The satellite, Guaranisat-1, is the first developed and put into orbit by Paraguay. An estimated 8 million people in Mexico, Central America, and South America have Chagas disease, which if untreated can be life-threatening. Large-scale
5h
This Shape-Shifting Robot Can Rearrange Its Body to Walk in New Environments
Imagine running on a cement footpath, and then suddenly through dry sand. Just to keep upright, you would have to slow down and change the way you run. In the same way, a walking robot would have to change its gait to handle different surfaces. Generally, we humans and most robots can only change how we run. But what if we could also change the shape of our bodies to run as fast and safely as pos
7h
Iceland's volcanic eruption could be a long hauler
A volcanic eruption in Iceland has transformed a tranquil green valley into an ominous-looking scene, its first dark secrets beginning to emerge as volcanologists suggest the eruption could last longer than previously thought.
5h
New nanotech gives boost to detection of cancer and disease
Early screening can mean the difference between life and death in a cancer and disease diagnosis. That's why University of Central Florida researchers are working to develop a new screening technique that's more than 300 times as effective at detecting a biomarker for diseases like cancer than current methods.
5h
Blackout in the Brain Lab – Issue 98: Mind
When the power goes out, the two young scientists are plunged into pitch blackness. After exclamations and fumbling they turn their phone lights on, creating bisecting cones that spear wildly at the darkness and dance over the ceiling. "I guess they didn't take seriously the idea of a power outage in a Manhattan research facility?" Kierk says. "And it's past midnight. We might be the only ones he
19h
Electrochemical synthesis of formate from carbon dioxide using a tin/reduced graphene oxide catalyst
Decreasing the emission and efficient utilization (fixation) of carbon dioxide (CO2) are worldwide issues to prevent global warming. Promotion of the use of renewable energy is effective in reducing CO2 emissions. However, since there are large time-dependent fluctuations and large regional differences in renewable energy production, it is necessary to establish a fixation technology to allow effi
1d
Scientists realize real-time GW-BSE investigations on spin-valley exciton dynamics
Prof. Zhao Jin's research team from University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) has made important progress in the development of spin-valley exciton dynamics. The research developed an ab initio nonadiabatic molecular dynamics (NAMD) method based on spin-resolved exciton dynamics. The team gained the first clear and complete physical picture of valley exciton dynamics in MoS2 from the pe
4h
The world's longest bottlebrush polymer ever synthesized
NIMS and RIKEN have succeeded in synthesizing the longest ever bottlebrush polymer. This polymer—resembling a green foxtail—is composed of a main chain and numerous side chains grafting from it. The team also succeeded in giving various chemical properties to the ultralong bottlebrush polymer. These achievements are expected to substantially advance the current synthetic methods of bottlebrush pol
7h
New research confirms presence of highly invasive apple snail in Kenya
New research published today by scientists at CABI and the Kenya Plant Health Inspectorate Service (KEPHIS) confirms that the apple snail (Pomacea canaliculata) has been discovered in Kenya for the first time. Widely considered to be one of the most invasive invertebrates of waterways and irrigation systems, the apple snail threatens Kenya's rice production and raises the questions: How much damag
9h
Oligonucleotides And Their Discontents
I remember being at a chemistry meeting in New Jersey back in around 1990 or 1991, where a speaker mentioned in passing that most of the people in the room would probably soon be offered a chance to move to California and work for some small company trying to develop antisense drugs. There was a wave of laughter, especially from people who'd already had such headhunter calls, and it really was a
1d
Aspiring Researcher in Cognitive Psychology
Hi, everyone! I'm not really sure where to ask but I'm hoping to get answers from people who are in the field already. I'm a behavioral science graduate and hoping to start a career in research or is related to cognitive psychology. However, courses in cognitive psychology or neuroscience are not offered in my country and I'm having a hard time to look for RA positions or any related field becaus
3min
What are the units of motivation called that motivate a person to form or change their belief?
Suppose a person sees a television commercial which emphasizes the benefits of a new shampoo brand. That television commercial likely has a small impact to motivate the potential customer to form or change their belief about that particular shampoo brand. My desire to empirically understand what motivates the formation or change of a person's belief stems from the idea of "utility" and "utils" fr
3min
Study About Babies 3-18 Months Who Experienced Something Stressful/Scary (mod approved)
Hi everyone! (post approved by u/respeckKnuckles ) My name is Alagia and I'm a researcher with UC San Francisco. We are currently doing interviews with parents of infants under 1.5 years of age to learn about how stressful/scary events impact families with babies. This interview is done through Zoom and we give out a $40 Amazon gift card after. The purpose of our study is to evaluate whether babi
3min
A discord server that you will enjoy!
An academic hub where casual conversation, personal expression, and intellectual exploration are all encouraged! An internet refuge to discuss humanities and sciences within a welcoming and inclusive community! An adaptive environment that will grow and develop with its members! Soul Sanctum : where heart, mind, and spirit meet. Come join us, and see what you think! https://discord.gg/Aqu7vyEY5j
3min
[Academic] Personalized Trial of Light Therapy for Fatigue (ages 18-59, residing in the U.S., male/ethnicities)
The Center for Personalized Health at Northwell Health is currently recruiting for a virtual, at-home trial using light therapy for symptoms of fatigue. Participants can be located anywhere in the United States, and there are no in-person visits required. As a Personalized Trial, this study is built to focus on just you, and your outcomes. If you are interested in learning more, please visit http
3min
Musical phonemes?
I'm honestly not sure which subreddit to post this on. I'm an avid follower of both /r/linguistics and /r/musictheory among other related subreddits, but somehow I wasn't sure that either would be the right place for this. For background, I'm from the United States and was brought up in a thoroughly Western musical context, so I expect I've cognitively internalized the 12-TET tuning system used i
3min
cog sci kids be like
LoOOoK At mE I aM StEm SmArT bUt AlSo LiKe PsYcHoLoGy pLs ValIdAtE Me I am cog sci kid submitted by /u/BitterBass5567 [link] [comments]
3min
Bringing Total Worker Health® to a multinational agribusiness in Latin America
Researchers from the Center for Health, Work & Environment (CHWE) at the Colorado School of Public Health have published a paper in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health studying the effectiveness of applying Total Worker Health (TWH) in an international context. The study, led by a team at CHWE, is the first to examine how a TWH framework operates outside of a west
21min
Turning wood into plastic
Plastics are one of the world's largest polluters, taking hundreds of years to degrade in nature. A research team, led by YSE professor Yuan Yao and Liangbing Hu from the University of Maryland, has created a high-quality bioplastic from wood byproducts that they hope can solve one of the world's most pressing environmental issues.
21min
A T-cell stimulatory protein and interleukin-10 synergize to prevent gut inflammation
Researchers have found an unexpected synergy between a T-cell stimulatory protein — the ICOS ligand — and interleukin-10, an immunoregulatory cytokine, to prevent inflammatory bowel disease in mice. The study will aid the understanding of, and future research into, this immune disorder, which includes Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. About 1.6 million Americans have inflammatory bowel dis
35min
Ryan vs. Axman | Street Outlaws: Mega Cash Days
Stream Full Episodes of Street Outlaws: Mega Cash Days: discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/street-outlaws-mega-cash-days Discovery ► https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/street-outlaws-mega-cash-days Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: http
45min
Researchers harvest energy from radio waves to power wearable devices
From microwave ovens to Wi-Fi connections, the radio waves that permeate the environment are not just signals of energy consumed but are also sources of energy themselves. An international team of researchers, led by Huanyu "Larry" Cheng, Dorothy Quiggle Career Development Professor in the Penn State Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, has developed a way to harvest energy from radio
57min
What is life? Why cells and atoms haven't answered the question.
Erwin Schrödinger's 1944 book "What Is Life?" revolutionized how physicists thought about the 'laws of life.' Schrödinger anticipated how DNA would hold life's blueprints. In recent years, however, a new path forward has appeared that holds a unique promise. Rather than reduce biology to physics, the new direction would transform them both. Scientists working across domains now think that underst
1h
Diamond 'panini press' mimics carbonate in lower mantle
New research clarifies what happens to carbonates in Earth's lower mantle. The high temperatures and pressures of the Earth's mantle forge carbon-rich minerals known as carbonates into diamond. But the fate of carbonates that travel even deeper underground—to the lower mantle—has been less clear. No one has ever recovered a sample from so deep. Researchers are unearthing an answer with lab tools
1h
The 'great leveler' revisited: Why the COVID pandemic might boost inequality in society
A study by prof. Bas van Bavel and prof. Marten Scheffer shows that throughout history, most disasters and pandemics have boosted inequality instead of leveling it. Whether such disastrous events function as levelers or not, depends on the distribution of economic wealth and political leverage within a society at the moment of crisis. Their findings on the historical effects of crises on equality
1h
Fast-acting, color-changing molecular probe senses when a material is about to fail
Materials that contain special polymer molecules may someday be able to warn us when they are about to fail, researchers said. Engineers at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign have improved their previously developed force-sensitive molecules, called mechanophores, to produce reversible, rapid and vibrant color change when a force is applied.
1h
Rural Alaskans struggle to access and afford water
Water scarcity in rural Alaska is not a new problem, but the situation is getting worse with climate change. Lasting solutions must encourage the use of alternative water supplies like rainwater catchment and gray water recycling. They must also address the affordability of water related to household income, say researchers from McGill University.
2h
New technology enables ultrafast identification of COVID-19 biomarkers
Universitätsmedizin Berlin and the Francis Crick Institute have developed a mass spectrometry-based technique capable of measuring samples containing thousands of proteins within just a few minutes. It is faster and cheaper than a conventional blood count. To demonstrate the technique's potential, the researchers used blood plasma collected from COVID-19 patients. Using the new technology, they id
2h
New study maps wildlife microbiota
Wild Biotech, a preclinical stage drug discovery & development company emerging out of stealth mode, today announces the publication of its first major paper, which appears in the journal Science. The study mapped the gut microbiota of animals in the wild on an unprecedented scale, adding millions of potentially novel microbiome-based therapeutics for human diseases to the company's already massiv
2h
Tired of video conferencing? Research suggests you're right to question its effectiveness
In the year since the coronavirus pandemic upended how just about every person on the planet interacts with one another, video conferencing has become the de facto tool for group collaboration within many organizations. The prevalent assumption is that technology that helps to mimic face-to-face interactions via a video camera will be most effective in achieving the same results, yet there's littl
2h
'It captures so much of Turing's work': Bank of England unveils new £50 note – video
A new £50 note featuring Alan Turing, the scientist best known for his codebreaking work during the second world war, has been unveiled by the Bank of England and will go into circulation on 23 June, the date of his birth. Turing was prosecuted for homosexual acts in 1952, and an inquest concluded that Turing's death from cyanide poisoning two years later was suicide. The Bank of England governor
2h
SARS-CoV-2 antibodies last days for some, decades for others
Antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 wane at different rates, lasting for days in some people, while remaining in others for decades, researchers have found. The new study shows that the severity of the infection could be a deciding factor in having longer-lasting antibodies. People with low levels of neutralizing antibodies may still be protected from COVID-19 if they have a robust T-cell immunity. The
2h
Tissue-restricted control of established central nervous system autoimmunity by TNF receptor 2-expressing Treg cells [Immunology and Inflammation]
CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells are central modulators of autoimmune diseases. However, the timing and location of Treg cell–mediated suppression of tissue-specific autoimmunity remain undefined. Here, we addressed these questions by investigating the role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor 2 (TNFR2) signaling in Treg cells during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis…
2h
Comparing treatment strategies to reduce antibiotic resistance in an in vitro epidemiological setting [Evolution]
The rapid rise of antibiotic resistance, combined with the increasing cost and difficulties to develop new antibiotics, calls for treatment strategies that enable more sustainable antibiotic use. The development of such strategies, however, is impeded by the lack of suitable experimental approaches that allow testing their effects under realistic epidemiological…
2h
A RIPK1-regulated inflammatory microglial state in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis [Neuroscience]
Microglial-derived inflammation has been linked to a broad range of neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric conditions, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Using single-cell RNA sequencing, a class of Disease-Associated Microglia (DAMs) have been characterized in neurodegeneration. However, the DAM phenotype alone is insufficient to explain the functional complexity of microglia, particu
2h
Drosophila Fezf functions as a transcriptional repressor to direct layer-specific synaptic connectivity in the fly visual system [Neuroscience]
The layered compartmentalization of synaptic connections, a common feature of nervous systems, underlies proper connectivity between neurons and enables parallel processing of neural information. However, the stepwise development of layered neuronal connections is not well understood. The medulla neuropil of the Drosophila visual system, which comprises 10 discrete layers (M1…
2h
Identifying "more equal than others" edges in diverse biochemical networks [Systems Biology]
Biological systems often perform multiple tasks, and they face trade-offs while attempting to do so efficiently. Thus, the design of biological systems and their constituent units tend to pass through extensive trial and error to achieve optimality (1). This optimization is similar to that done for human-made machines, where efficient…
2h
Generation of SARS-CoV-2 reporter replicon for high-throughput antiviral screening and testing [Microbiology]
Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) research and antiviral discovery are hampered by the lack of a cell-based virus replication system that can be readily adopted without biosafety level 3 (BSL-3) restrictions. Here, the construction of a noninfectious SARS-CoV-2 reporter replicon and its application in deciphering viral replication mechanisms…
2h
Leveraging the 5G network to wirelessly power IoT devices
Researchers at Georgia Institute of Technology's ATHENA have uncovered an innovative way to tap into the over-capacity of 5G networks, turning them into "a wireless power grid" for powering Internet of Things (IoT) devices. The breakthrough leverages a Rotman lens-based rectifying antenna capable of millimeter-wave harvesting at 28 GHz. The innovation could help eliminate the world's reliance on b
3h
New study published in Science maps wildlife microbiota
Wild Biotech, a preclinical stage drug discovery & development company emerging out of stealth mode, today announces the publication of its first major paper, which appears in the journal Science. The study mapped the gut microbiota of animals in the wild on an unprecedented scale, adding millions of potentially novel microbiome-based therapeutics for human diseases to the company's already massiv
3h
Scientists identify 'Goldilocks' protein critical for getting immune response 'just right'
Scientists at Sinai Health say they have discovered a new pathway that controls dangerous overreactions in a body's immune system, including deadly forms of hyper-inflammation.In new findings out today in the journal Science, researchers at the Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute (LTRI) detail how a protein known as WAVE2, a protein expressed in all immune cells, plays a critical role in mainta
3h
Genomic sieve analysis can inform SARS-CoV-2 vaccine development
As concern has grown over COVID-19 variants and their implications for how well COVID-19 vaccines will protect against the virus, researchers have proposed a method to examine instances of SARS-COV-2 infections in people who have received a COVID-19 vaccine. Genomic sieve analysis of these so-called "breakthrough" SARS-CoV-2 infections in COVID vaccine trials is a critical tool to identify viral m
3h
HIV vaccine candidate's mysteries unlocked 20 years later
About two decades after first devising a new kind of vaccine, Oregon Health & Science University researchers are unlocking why it stops and ultimately clears the monkey form of HIV in about half of nonhuman primates – and why it's a promising candidate to stop HIV in people. Scientific papers that were simultaneously published today in the journals Science and Science Immunology, describe how unus
3h
Rapid speciation via the evolution of pre-mating isolation in the Ibera Seedeater
Behavioral isolation can catalyze speciation and permit the slow accumulation of additional reproductive barriers between co-occurring organisms. We illustrate how this process occurs by examining the genomic and behavioral bases of pre-mating isolation between two bird species ( Sporophila hypoxantha and the recently discovered S. iberaensis ) that belong to the southern capuchino seedeaters, a
3h
Three-dimensional vectorial imaging of surface phonon polaritons
Surface phonon polaritons (SPhPs) are coupled photon-phonon excitations that emerge at the surfaces of nanostructured materials. Although they strongly influence the optical and thermal behavior of nanomaterials, no technique has been able to reveal the complete three-dimensional (3D) vectorial picture of their electromagnetic density of states. Using a highly monochromated electron beam in a sca
3h
Enhanced optical asymmetry in supramolecular chiroplasmonic assemblies with long-range order
Chiral assemblies of plasmonic nanoparticles are known for strong circular dichroism but not for high optical asymmetry, which is limited by the unfavorable combination of electrical and magnetic field components compounded by strong scattering. Here, we show that these limitations can be overcome by the long-range organization of nanoparticles in a manner similar to the liquid crystals and found
3h
SARS-CoV-2 Mpro inhibitors with antiviral activity in a transgenic mouse model
The COVID-19 pandemic caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) continually poses serious threats to global public health. The main protease (M pro ) of SARS-CoV-2 plays a central role in viral replication. We designed and synthesized 32 new bicycloproline-containing M pro inhibitors derived from either boceprevir or telaprevir, both of which are approved antivirals.
3h
Intranasal fusion inhibitory lipopeptide prevents direct-contact SARS-CoV-2 transmission in ferrets
Containment of the COVID-19 pandemic requires reducing viral transmission. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection is initiated by membrane fusion between the viral and host cell membranes, which is mediated by the viral spike protein. We have designed lipopeptide fusion inhibitors that block this critical first step of infection and, on the basis of in vitro effica
3h
The molecular assembly of the marsupial {gamma}{mu} T cell receptor defines a third T cell lineage
αβ and T cell receptors (TCRs) are highly diverse antigen receptors that define two evolutionarily conserved T cell lineages. We describe a population of μTCRs found exclusively in non-eutherian mammals that consist of a two-domain (V-C) -chain paired to a three-domain (Vμ-Vμj-Cμ) μ-chain. μTCRs were characterized by restricted diversity in the V and Vμj domains and a highly diverse unpaired Vμ d
3h
Comment on "Large-scale GWAS reveals insights into the genetic architecture of same-sex sexual behavior"
The phenotypic measures used by Ganna et al . (Research Articles, 30 August 2019, p. 882) lump together predominantly heterosexual, bisexual, and homosexual individuals, including those who have experimented with a same-sex partner only once. This may have resulted in misleading associations to personality traits unrelated to understood categories of human sexuality. Scientific studies of human s
3h
Liver type 1 innate lymphoid cells develop locally via an interferon-{gamma}-dependent loop
The pathways that lead to the development of tissue-resident lymphocytes, including liver type 1 innate lymphoid cells (ILC1s), remain unclear. We show here that the adult mouse liver contains Lin – Sca-1 + Mac-1 + hematopoietic stem cells derived from the fetal liver. This population includes Lin – CD122 + CD49a + progenitors that can generate liver ILC1s but not conventional natural killer cell
3h
WAVE2 suppresses mTOR activation to maintain T cell homeostasis and prevent autoimmunity
Cytoskeletal regulatory protein dysfunction has been etiologically linked to inherited diseases associated with immunodeficiency and autoimmunity, but the mechanisms involved are incompletely understood. Here, we show that conditional Wave2 ablation in T cells causes severe autoimmunity associated with increased mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activation and metabolic reprogramming that enge
3h
The microbiome and human cancer
Microbial roles in cancer formation, diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment have been disputed for centuries. Recent studies have provocatively claimed that bacteria, viruses, and/or fungi are pervasive among cancers, key actors in cancer immunotherapy, and engineerable to treat metastases. Despite these findings, the number of microbes known to directly cause carcinogenesis remains small. Criticall
3h
Response to Comment on "Large-scale GWAS reveals insights into the genetic architecture of same-sex sexual behavior"
Hamer et al . argue that the variable "ever versus never had a same-sex partner" does not capture the complexity of human sexuality. We agree and said so in our paper. But Hamer et al . neglect to mention that we also reported follow-up analyses showing substantial overlap of the genetic influences on our main variable and on more nuanced measures of sexual behavior, attraction, and identity.
3h
Photoinduced receptor confinement drives ligand-independent GPCR signaling
Cell-cell communication relies on the assembly of receptor-ligand complexes at the plasma membrane. The spatiotemporal receptor organization has a pivotal role in evoking cellular responses. We studied the clustering of heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide–binding protein (G protein)–coupled receptors (GPCRs) and established a photoinstructive matrix with ultrasmall lock-and-key interaction pairs to
3h
Age groups that sustain resurging COVID-19 epidemics in the United States
After initial declines, in mid-2020 a resurgence in transmission of novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) occurred in the United States and Europe. As efforts to control COVID-19 disease are reintensified, understanding the age demographics driving transmission and how these affect the loosening of interventions is crucial. We analyze aggregated, age-specific mobility trends from more than 10 mill
3h
Hunting the eagle killer: A cyanobacterial neurotoxin causes vacuolar myelinopathy
Vacuolar myelinopathy is a fatal neurological disease that was initially discovered during a mysterious mass mortality of bald eagles in Arkansas in the United States. The cause of this wildlife disease has eluded scientists for decades while its occurrence has continued to spread throughout freshwater reservoirs in the southeastern United States. Recent studies have demonstrated that vacuolar my
3h
Photochemical intermolecular dearomative cycloaddition of bicyclic azaarenes with alkenes
Dearomative cycloaddition reactions represent an ideal means of converting flat arenes into three-dimensional architectures of increasing interest in medicinal chemistry. Quinolines, isoquinolines, and quinazolines, despite containing latent diene and alkene subunits, are scarcely applied in cycloaddition reactions because of the inherent low reactivity of aromatic systems and selectivity challen
3h
A 35-million-year record of seawater stable Sr isotopes reveals a fluctuating global carbon cycle
Changes in the concentration and isotopic composition of the major constituents in seawater reflect changes in their sources and sinks. Because many of the processes controlling these sources and sinks are tied to the cycling of carbon, such records can provide insights into what drives past changes in atmospheric carbon dioxide and climate. Here, we present a stable strontium (Sr) isotope record
3h
Molecular mechanism of cytokinin-activated cell division in Arabidopsis
Mitogens trigger cell division in animals. In plants, cytokinins, a group of phytohormones derived from adenine, stimulate cell proliferation. Cytokinin signaling is initiated by membrane-associated histidine kinase receptors and transduced through a phosphorelay system. We show that in the Arabidopsis shoot apical meristem (SAM), cytokinin regulates cell division by promoting nuclear shuttling o
3h
Controlling quantum many-body dynamics in driven Rydberg atom arrays
The control of nonequilibrium quantum dynamics in many-body systems is challenging because interactions typically lead to thermalization and a chaotic spreading throughout Hilbert space. We investigate nonequilibrium dynamics after rapid quenches in a many-body system composed of 3 to 200 strongly interacting qubits in one and two spatial dimensions. Using a programmable quantum simulator based o
3h
Stabilizing black-phase formamidinium perovskite formation at room temperature and high humidity
The stabilization of black-phase formamidinium lead iodide (α-FAPbI 3 ) perovskite under various environmental conditions is considered necessary for solar cells. However, challenges remain regarding the temperature sensitivity of α-FAPbI 3 and the requirements for strict humidity control in its processing. Here we report the synthesis of stable α-FAPbI 3 , regardless of humidity and temperature,
3h
Twin study shows spanking can lead to antisocial behavior
Harsh parenting practices such as spanking, not genetics, are linked to higher levels of behavior problems in children, according to a new study with twins. Among identical twins whose genes match perfectly but whose parents punished differently, the children who were spanked or yelled at more had a higher likelihood of showing antisocial behavior. "Studies into the effects of physical punishment
3h
New Image of Supermassive Black Hole Reveals Swirling Magnetic Fields
Black holes push our understanding of physics to the very edge. There are plenty of theories about how the universe works near the event horizon of these massive collapsed stars, and the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) project could tell us which ones are right. The EHT gave us the iconic 2019 image of a black hole , the first one ever produced. Now, the team has conducted new observations of the s
3h
In certain circumstances, outsourcing poses risks to vendors
Outsourcing routine tasks, like payroll, customer service, and accounting, offers well-known benefits to businesses and contributes to an economy in which entrepreneurial vendors can support industry and expand employment. However, new research from the Lally School of Management at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute discovered that not all client-vendor relationships are beneficial for the vendors.
4h
Toxin in potatoes evolved from a bitter-tasting compound in tomatoes
A multi-institutional collaboration has revealed that α-solanine, a toxic compound found in potato plants, is a divergent of the bitter-tasting α-tomatine, which is found in tomato plants. The research group included Associate Professor Mizutani Masaharu and Researcher Akiyama Ryota et al. of Kobe University's Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Assistant Professor Watanabe Bunta of Kyoto Uni
4h
Researchers realized homogenization of surface active sites of heterogeneous catalyst
Recently, a team led by Professor Wu Changzheng from School of Chemistry and Materials Science from University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) in cooperation with a team led by Prof. Wu Hengan from School of Engineering Science, realized the homogenization of surface active sites of heterogeneous catalyst by dissolving the electrocatalytic active metal in molten gallium. The related resu
4h
Bolagen talar tyst om framtida miljöskulder
Det kostar multum att städa upp efter gamla oljekällor. Men miljörelaterade återställningskostnader syns sällan i bolagens årsredovisningar. Bristfällig redovisning kan göra att framtida miljöskulder underskattas och skattebetalarna får stå för notan, menar Mari Paananen, docent i företagsekonomi vid Göteborgs universitet. – Jag tror att den framtida miljöskulden i form av återställningskostnader
4h
Gearing up nanoscale machines
Gear trains have been used for centuries to translate changes in gear rotational speed into changes in rotational force. Cars, drills, and basically anything that has spinning parts use them. Molecular-scale gears are a much more recent invention that could use light or a chemical stimulus to initiate gear rotation. Researchers at Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST), Japan, in partner
4h
Protein fingerprinting in minutes
Researchers from Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin and the Francis Crick Institute have developed a mass spectrometry-based technique capable of measuring samples containing thousands of proteins within just a few minutes. It is faster and cheaper than a conventional blood count. To demonstrate the technique's potential, the researchers used blood plasma collected from COVID-19 patients. Using
4h
Comprehensive Covalent Probe Time
I really enjoyed this new paper on ChemRxiv, a Munich/Michigan/Berkeley collaboration on reactive covalent groups and their profile across different proteins. There have been a number of papers addressing this subject before, but this one is the most comprehensive one I've ever seen, and it's a valuable resource. Most of the covalent probes (and nearly all of the covalent drugs) that you see are
4h
New nanotransistors keep their cool at high voltages
Power converters play an essential role in electric vehicles and solar panels, for example, but tend to lose a lot of power in the form of heat in the electricity conversion process. Thanks to a new type of transistor developed at EPFL, these converters can perform at substantially improved efficiencies, especially in high-power applications.
5h
DNA damage 'hot spots' discovered within neurons
Researchers at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) have discovered specific regions within the DNA of neurons that accumulate a certain type of damage (called single-strand breaks or SSBs). This accumulation of SSBs appears to be unique to neurons, and it challenges what is generally understood about the cause of DNA damage and its potential implications in neurodegenerative diseases.
5h
Soft robotic dragonfly signals environmental disruptions
Engineers at Duke University have developed an electronics-free, entirely soft robot shaped like a dragonfly that can skim across the water and react to environmental conditions such as pH, temperature or the presence of oil. The proof-of-principle demonstration could be the precursor to more advanced, autonomous, long-range environmental sentinels for monitoring a wide range of potential telltale
5h
New clues to classic cancer target found in immune cells
New clues to a long-pursued drug target in cancer may reside within immune cells, researchers have discovered. The new findings not only shed new light on cancer immunology, they also suggest clinical trials related to this key target — an interaction that destabilizes the important p53 tumor suppressor protein — may unnecessarily be excluding a large number of patients.
5h
A clue to how some fast-growing tumors hide in plain sight
Viruses churn out genetic material in parts of the cell where it's not supposed to be. Cancer cells do too. A new study shows that a tumor-suppressor enzyme called DAPK3 is an essential component of a multi-protein system that senses misplaced genetic material in tumor cells, and slows tumor growth by activating the fierce-sounding STING pathway.
5h
Singing in the Brain: Bird Neuroscience
Many of us have adopted new hobbies or interests in this strange quarantine world. For me, I've started to really appreciate birds. Birds and birdsong are almost omnipresent and for those of us living in more developed areas, they are oftentimes one of our only real reminders of and connections to the natural world. So, Continue reading ""
5h
Two new species of already-endangered screech owls discovered in Amazon rainforest
The Amazon rainforest is teeming with creatures unknown to science—and that's just in broad daylight. After dark, the forest is a whole new place, alive with nocturnal animals that have remained even more elusive to scientists than their day-shift counterparts. In a new paper in Zootaxa, researchers described two new species of screech owls that live in the Amazon and Atlantic forests, both of whi
5h
Svensk coronastrategi kan leda till ökad segregation
Den svenska coronastrategin har drabbat vissa grupper hårdare än andra, menar Nazem Tahvilzadeh, lektor i statsvetenskap: – En nedstängning eller eventuellt hårdare restriktioner hade kunnat ge bättre möjligheter för olika yrkesgrupper att isolera sig, säger han. Låginkomsttagare drabbas enligt flera studier hårdare av viruset och dess konsekvenser, bland annat eftersom de har svårare att isolera
5h
Not all grasses pack the same allergenic punch
New research reveals a potential link between pollen from certain grass species and respiratory health issues such as asthma and hay fever. The research, which brings together health care data and ground-breaking ecological techniques, could set a roadmap for refining pollen forecasts and assist the 400 million people worldwide with allergic rhinitis and more than 300 million asthmatics . Current
5h
Så lär sig barn genom samtalet i förskolan
Hur går det till när barn i förskolan tillägnar sig ny kunskap genom samtal med andra barn och med pedagoger? Det undersöks i en avhandling från Göteborgs universitet. – Barns meningsskapande är en flerdimensionell process där de erfarenheter som barn har med sig sedan tidigare, den sociala interaktionen på förskolan och de normer och förhållningssätt som finns på förskolan samverkar, säger Ann-C
5h
EU's top court rejects effort to force tougher climate rules
The European Union's top court on Thursday rejected an effort by a Scandinavian youth group and families around the world to force the EU to set more ambitious targets for reducing greenhouse gas emissions, arguing that they were not "individually" affected by Europe's climate policy.
5h
Will COVID-19 vaccines need to be adapted regularly?
Influenza vaccines need to be evaluated every year to ensure they remain effective against new influenza viruses. Will the same apply to COVID-19 vaccines? Researchers from Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin compared the evolution of endemic 'common cold' coronaviruses with that of influenza viruses. The researchers predict that, while the pandemic is ongoing, vaccines will need to undergo regul
5h
Common Alzheimer's treatment linked to slower cognitive decline
Cholinesterase inhibitors are a group of drugs recommended for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, but their effects on cognition have been debated and few studies have investigated their long-term effects. A new study involving researchers from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden and published in the journal Neurology shows persisting cognitive benefits and reduced mortality for up to five years af
5h
The CNIO describe how embryonic stem cells keep optimal conditions for use in regenerative medicine
* Researchers from the Proteomics Core Unit at CNIO have described molecular mechanisms, unknown to date, involved in the maintenance of the naïve state of the embryonic stem cells* The naïve state is optimal for the quest for treatments for heart disease or neurodegenerative disorders, but it is also the most unstable and difficult to maintain* The results of the study, published in 'Nature Commu
5h
A new way to visualize mountains of biological data
Studying genetic material on a cellular level, such as single-cell RNA-sequencing, can provide scientists with a detailed, high-resolution view of biological processes at work. This level of detail helps scientists determine the health of tissues and organs, and better understand the development of diseases such as Alzheimer's that impacts millions of people. However, a lot of data is also generat
5h
Arctic sponge survival in the extreme deep-sea
For the first time, researchers from the SponGES project collected year-round video footage and hydrodynamic data from the mysterious world of a deep-sea sponge ground in the Arctic. Deep-sea sponge grounds are often compared to the rich ecosystems of coral reefs and form true oases. In a world where all light has disappeared and without obvious food sources, they provide a habitat for other inver
5h
Researchers discover new organic conductor
Salts are far more complicated than the food seasoning—they can even act as electrical conductors, shuttling current through systems. Extremely well studied and understood, the electrical properties of salts were first theorized in 1834. Now, nearly 200 years later, researchers based in Japan have uncovered a new kind of salt.
5h
Does selfishness evolve? Ask a cannibal
Biologists have used one of nature's most prolific cannibals to show how social structure affects the evolution of selfish behavior. Researchers showed they could drive the evolution of less selfish behavior in Indian meal moths with habitat changes that forced larval caterpillars to interact more often with siblings.
6h
Detecting hidden signals
A research team based at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in Laurel, Maryland has applied two theoretical tools of quantum information to extremely sensitive signal detection tasks. Their research suggests that honing this sensitivity to detect signals while rejecting background noise will enable the use of quantum detectors even when this surrounding noise is strong relative to
6h
Tråd av cellulosa kan göra stor nytta för elektroniska textiler
Elektroniska textiler är ofta beroende av sällsynta, och ibland giftiga, material. Det kan komma att ändras med hjälp av en tråd av cellulosa. – Miniatyrstora elektroniska prylar som vi bär på kroppen ökar allt mer i våra dagliga liv. Idag är de ofta beroende av sällsynta, eller i en del fall giftiga, material som dessutom riskerar att bygga upp stora elektroniska avfallsberg. Därför är behovet a
6h
New UCF nanotech gives boost to detection of cancer and disease
Early screening can mean the difference between life and death in a cancer and disease diagnosis. That's why University of Central Florida researchers are working to develop a new screening technique that's more than 300 times as effective at detecting a biomarker for diseases like cancer than current methods. The technique was detailed recently in the Journal of the American Chemical Society and
6h
Study reveals how long-term infection and inflammation impairs immune response as we age
A study published led by Dr. Katherine King, associate professor at Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children's Hospital, shows for the first time that long-term infection and chronic inflammation drive CH mediated by the loss of Dnmt3a function. In addition, the study offers key insights into the mechanism by which chronic inflammation leads to CH and demonstrates the critical role of DNMT3a
6h
Game on: Science edition
Inspired by the mastery of artificial intelligence (AI) over games like Go and Super Mario, scientists at the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) trained an AI agent – an autonomous computational program that observes and acts – how to conduct research experiments at superhuman levels by using the same approach. The Brookhaven team published their findings in the journal Machine Learnin
6h
Nearly half of poison control calls for supersized alcopops involve underage drinkers
Supersized alcopops are ready-to-drink flavored alcoholic beverages that have up to five times the alcohol content of beer and appear to be marketed toward young drinkers. A new George Mason University study led by Dr. Matthew Rossheim found that calls to U.S. poison control centers for supersized alcopops disproportionately involved underage drinkers compared to calls for other alcohol products.
6h
Evidence for reduced antibody protection against SARS-CoV-2 variants
A team led by Markus Hoffmann and Stefan Pöhlmann of the German Primate Center – Leibniz Institute for Primate Research and Jan Münch of the Ulm University Medical Centre has found that the SARS-CoV-2 variants B.1.351 and P.1 are no longer inhibited by an antibody used for COVID-19 therapy. In addition, these variants are less efficiently inhibited by antibodies from recovered patients and vaccina
6h
Salivary gland cells revealed as sites of COVID-19 infection
Scientists have shown that SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, can infect specific cells in the salivary gland in the mouth. The study revealed that salivary gland cells could play a role in transmission of the SARS-CoV-2 virus to the lungs or digestive system via saliva, and could help explain some of the oral symptoms experienced by COVID-19 patients. Understanding the involvement of mou
6h
ArtEmis: Affective language for visual art
A new project in affective artificial intelligence is teaching machines to understand human emotions and interact with people using abstract concepts, such as "freedom" and "love." This technology is expected to play a critical role in developing the next generation of customer feedback monitoring services and health providers.
6h
Headline: How energy modelling influences policymaking and vice versa
Energy models are used to explore different options for the development of energy systems in virtual "laboratories". Scientists have been using energy models to provide policy advice for years. As a new study shows, energy models influence policymaking around the energy transition. Similarly, policymakers influence the work of modellers. Greater transparency is needed to ensure that political cons
6h
Personalized shot could train the body to find and kill cancer
Researchers have developed a new therapeutic vaccine that uses a patient's own tumor cells to train their immune system to find and kill cancer. Immunotherapy, which recruits the body's own immune system to attack cancer, has given many cancer patients a new avenue to treat the disease. But many cancer immunotherapy treatments can be expensive, have devastating side effects, and only work in a fr
6h
Renewable energy, new perspectives for photovoltaic cells
In the future, photovoltaic cells could be "worn" over clothes, placed on cars or even on beach umbrellas. These are just some of the possible developments from a study published in Nature Communications by researchers at the Physics Department of the Politecnico di Milano, working with colleagues at the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg and Imperial College London.
6h
TPU scientists develop sensor with nanopores for definition doping in blood
Scientists of Tomsk Polytechnic University jointly with colleagues from different countries have developed a new sensor with two layers of nanopores. In the conducted experiments, this sensor showed its efficiency as a sensor for one of the doping substances from chiral molecules. The research findings are published in Biosensors and Bioelectronics (IF: 10,257; Q1) academic journal.
6h
Researchers dig deeper into how migrating cells interact in the body
In a study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, a team formed by Mechanical Engineering Associate Professor Amrinder Nain, graduate researchers Jugroop Singh and Aldwin Pagulayan, and Johns Hopkins Assistant Professor Brian Camley, pivoted from traditional testing methods to more accurately observe how moving cells behave when they encounter one another.
6h
Automated embryo selection system might rise likelihood of success in treating infertility
The team of researchers at Kaunas University of Technology (KTU), Lithuania applied artificial intelligence (AI) methods to evaluate data of human embryo development. The AI-based system photographs the embryos every five minutes, processes the data of their development and notifies any anomalies observed. This increases the likelihood of choosing the most viable and healthy early-stage embryo for
6h
A divided cell is a doubled cell
One big challenge for the production of synthetic cells is that they must be able to divide to have offspring. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, a team from Heidelberg has now introduced a reproducible division mechanism for synthetic vesicles. It is based on osmosis and can be controlled by an enzymatic reaction or light.
6h
New documentation: Old-growth forest carbon sinks overestimated
The claim that old-growth forests play a significant role in climate mitigation, based upon the argument that even the oldest forests keep sucking CO2 out of the atmosphere, is being refuted by researchers at the University of Copenhagen. The researchers document that this argument is based upon incorrectly analysed data and that the climate mitigation effect of old and unmanaged forests has been
6h
The imaginary part of quantum mechanics really exists!
For almost a century, physicists have been intrigued by the fundamental question: why are complex numbers so important in quantum mechanics, that is, numbers containing a component with the imaginary number i? It was assumed that they are only a mathematical trick to facilitate the description of phenomena, and only results expressed in real numbers have a physical meaning. However, researchers ha
6h
SMART develops rapid deterministic lateral displacement assay to assess immune response
SMART researchers developed a 15-min label-free immune profiling assay requiring only 20 μL of unprocessed blood using unconventional L and Inverse-L shaped pillars of deterministic lateral displacement microfluidic technology. This new assay profiles the often volatile host immune response, resulting in a more accurate assessment of patient pathophysiology. Current methods for early diagnosis of
6h
Wind energy and bat fatalities: How improving acoustic monitoring could protect biodiversity
In order to assess the risk of bats dying at wind turbines, it is common practice to record the acoustic activity of bats within the operating range of the rotor blades. For this purpose, ultrasonic detectors are attached to the nacelles of the mast top. In a recent analysis, a team of scientists led by the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) concludes that the effectiven
7h
More protein doesn't mean more strength in resistance-trained middle-aged adults
A 10-week muscle-building and dietary program involving 50 middle-aged adults found no evidence that eating a high-protein diet increased strength or muscle mass more than consuming a moderate amount of protein while training. The intervention involved a standard strength-training protocol with sessions three times per week. None of the participants had previous weightlifting experience.
7h
How improving acoustic monitoring of bats could help protecting biodiversity
In order to assess the risk of bats dying at wind turbines, it is common practice to record the acoustic activity of bats within the operating range of the rotor blades. In a recent analysis, a team of scientists led by the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) concludes that the effectiveness of this acoustic monitoring is insufficient to reliably predict mortality risk, e
7h
New study sheds light on how X and Y chromosomes interact
Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have investigated how the X and Y chromosomes evolve and adapt to each other within a population. The results show that breaking up coevolved sets of sex chromosomes could lead to lower survival rates among the offspring—something that could be of importance in species conservation, for example. The study is published in the journal PNAS.
7h
If we imagine the cell as an orchestra, what is conducting the symphony?
Our bodies are made up of trillions of cells, and each of those cells is made up of countless biological molecules with specialized functions that keep the cells alive. When those molecules malfunction, it can lead to disease. If we imagine the cell as an orchestra, with many musicians who each have a small part to play, then what conducts all of these musicians and keeps them organized and harmon
7h
Exercise can improve sleep quality even when you don't perceive a difference
University of Tsukuba researchers have found that 60 minutes of vigorous exercise improved objective measures of sleep, particularly by reducing the amount of time it takes to fall asleep and by enhancing the stability and power of slow waves during non-rapid eye movement sleep. However, the participants did not report a subjective increase in sleep quality. Thus, exercise may improve sleep qualit
7h
Kontrakt på fårskinn svårare att förfalska
I en ny studie har brittiska forskare analyserat juridiska dokument, som finns bevarade från tidigmodern tid (1500-tal) ändå in på 1900-talet. Dokumenten täcker in allt från husförsäljning till äktenskapsuppgörelser. Av de drygt 650 pergamenten visade sig 95 procent bestå av fårskinn, till skillnad från exempelvis religiösa texter som oftare skrevs på pergament av kalvskinn, ett ovanligare materia
7h
3 Ebola drugs block SARS-CoV-2 replication in the lab
Three commonly used antiviral and antimalarial drugs effectively prevented replication of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, in a lab setting, a new study shows. The work also underscores the necessity of testing compounds against multiple cell lines to rule out false negative results. Researchers looked at antiviral drugs that have proven effective against Ebola and the Marburg virus: t
7h
Civics education isn't boosting youth voting or volunteerism
After the insurrection, the impeachment, the trial and ongoing partisanship in 2021, many Americans are looking to civics education as a source of hope, according to George Washington University's Center on Education Policy, which reports that "Nearly all Americans (97%) agree that public schools should be teaching civics."
8h
Starting smoking cessation in hospitalized patients would reduce many premature deaths
Each year in the U.S., about 30 million hospitalizations occur in individuals 18 and older. Of these, more than 7 million are current cigarette smokers whose average hospital stay is several days. Researchers say that starting smoking cessation therapy during hospitalization and maintaining high adherence post-discharge can markedly improve permanent quit rates in these patients with minimal to no
8h
Study of NCOA3 yields novel findings of melanoma progression
For the first time, activation of nuclear receptor coactivator 3 (NCOA3) has been shown to promote the development of melanoma through regulation of ultraviolet radiation (UVR) sensitivity, cell cycle progression and circumvention of the DNA damage response. Results of a pre-clinical study led by Mohammed Kashani-Sabet, M.D., Medical Director of the Cancer Center at Sutter's California Pacific Med
8h
The very first structures in the Universe
The first moments of the Universe can be reconstructed mathematically even though they cannot be observed directly. Physicists from Göttingen University have greatly improved the ability of complex computer simulations to describe this moment, discovering that a complex network of structures can form in the first trillionth of a second after the Big Bang. These microscopic clumps have masses of on
8h
Insufficient financial reporting may lead to underestimation of environmental liabilities
European listed companies in the energy and mining sector provide, to say the least, sparse information on future environmental costs in their annual reports. Researchers believe that stricter guidelines are required as the lack of information may lead to underestimation of environmental liabilities, resulting in that future generations may have to bear the burden of cleanup costs.
8h
Researchers improve the algorithm that describes the hydrological changes in Mediterranean wetlands
Researchers from the Cavanilles Institute of Biodiversity and Evolutionary Biology at the University of Valencia, in collaboration with the University of Castilla-La Mancha, have perfected the existing genetic programming (GP) algorithms to analyze water fluctuations in the Mediterranean wetlands of the Iberian Peninsula. In an article published in the journal Remote Sensing they have shown that t