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Sorting out nanodiamonds with fluorescent centers
Scientists have long been working on improving their ability to use lasers to move small objects without actually touching them. This method of 'optical trapping and manipulation' is already utilized in optics, biological sciences and chemistry. But objects become much more difficult to control once they grow to nanoscale size.
5h
Less-advanced alien civilizations may be nearby — but we're not looking for them
A new paper outlines some of the most promising ways scientists and space agencies can search for evidence of extraterrestrial civilizations. Because of a concept called "contact inequality," the researchers suggested it's relatively unlikely humans will discover evidence of alien civilizations that have similar levels of technology to us. However, near-future technology could soon allow scientis
15h
What You're Saying When You Give Someone the Silent Treatment
Kipling Williams has studied the effects of the silent treatment for more than 36 years, meeting hundreds of victims and perpetrators in the process: A grown woman whose father refused to speak with her for six months at a time as punishment throughout her life. "Her father died during one of those dreaded periods," Williams told me. "When she visited him at the hospital shortly before his death,
6h
New particle experiment goes against standard physics
Researchers working on the Large Hadron Collider experiments obtained unusual results. The data suggests possible existence of new particles or interactions. The findings aren't accounted for by the Standard Model of particle physics. Scientists working on the Large Hadron Collider discovered new particles whose unusual behavior doesn't conform to the Standard Model of particle physics. The find
17h
Asdex Upgrade experimental facility generates its first plasma
For 30 years, the Asdex Upgrade has been paving the way for a fusion power plant that generates climate-neutral energy. The tokamak fusion plant was repeatedly expanded and improved during this time. Not least for this reason, it provides numerous insights that are incorporated into the design and operation of other fusion plants. For example, the Asdex Upgrade team has developed scenarios for the
4h
Eat me: The cell signal of death
Scientists at the Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (iCeMS) and colleagues in Japan have revealed molecular mechanisms involved in eliminating unwanted cells in the body. A nuclear protein fragment released into the cytoplasm activates a plasma membrane protein to display a lipid on the cell surface, signaling other cells to get rid of it. The findings were published in the journal M
7h
Top US Scientists Propose Research Into Blocking Sun to Fight Climate Change
In a new report , the US National Academies of Sciences (NAS) is recommending a budget of between $100 and $200 million over five years to study the feasibility of dimming the Sun, thereby making a dent in the fight against climate change, The Guardian reports . The technique, called solar geoengineering, involves either blocking sunlight by releasing tiny reflective particles — a "solar shield,"
4h
A Debt of Honor
A n Afghan I'll call Mohammad spent most of the past 12 years working on behalf of the United States government in Afghanistan—first in the U.S. embassy in Kabul, then for a Department of Defense contractor in the violent region where he was born in 1981, at the beginning of the four-decade Afghan wars, and where he lived with his wife and six children. In 2010, Mohammad applied for admission int
7h
Google's top security teams unilaterally shut down a counterterrorism operation
Google runs some of the most venerated cybersecurity operations on the planet: its Project Zero team, for example, finds powerful undiscovered security vulnerabilities, while its Threat Analysis Group directly counters hacking backed by governments, including North Korea, China, and Russia. And those two teams caught an unexpectedly big fish recently: an "expert" hacking group exploiting 11 power
8h
Mark Zuckerberg still won't address the root cause of Facebook's misinformation problem
In a congressional hearing about disinformation on Thursday, Representative Debbie Dingell, a Michigan Democrat, asked Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg to respond to a claim he once made about his own company: that the more likely content posted to Facebook is to violate the company's community standards, the more engagement it will receive. Is this, she asked, still accurate? Dingell cited a recent
20h
What Biden's First Press Conference Revealed
Joe Biden has a reputation as a softie—grandfatherly if you're inclined toward him, somewhat windy and elderly if you aren't. But when he reached for a phrase to define his approach to office during his first press conference, held today, he didn't pick an Irish poet or an American statesman. Instead, he quoted the hardheaded Teutonic conservative known as the "Iron Chancellor": "Politics is the
20h
Lightning may have provided a key mineral for early life on Earth
A chance discovery in suburban Illinois may change how we understand the dawn of life. Among other things, life needs water-soluble phosphorus, which was hard to come by 3.5 billion years back. This finding may imply that life has more opportunities to begin on other worlds than previously supposed. Even the youngest child often wonders where they came from. For many scientists, a group of people
20h
The Real Border Crisis
W hat is the border crisis? Is it the recent surge of migrants, or is it the treatment of those migrants in detention facilities? The answer to that question—or whether you consider the situation at the border to be a crisis at all—most likely determines what you think the Biden administration should do about it. For conservatives, the answer is clear: Democrats invited the increase in migrants w
3h
No one can find the animal that gave people covid-19
A wild-animal trader who caught a strange new virus from a frozen pangolin. A lab worker studying bat viruses who slipped up and sniffed the air under her biosafety hood. A man who suddenly fell ill after collecting bat guano from a cave to use for fertilizer. Were any of these scenarios what touched off the covid-19 pandemic? That is the question facing a joint international research team appoin
6h
Don't be fooled: Covid won't be cured by a panacea | Philip Ball
'Cure-alls' such as vitamin D and ivermectin seem appealing. But the truth is, specific diseases demand specific medicines If the coronavirus had struck in the middle ages, there would have been a cure. You could have got it at all good apothecaries, though not cheaply. It was called theriac , and it also cured epilepsy, indigestion, heart trouble and swellings and fevers of all kinds. The recipe
7h
My Mother's Pain
M y massage training began when I was 4 years old. On Sundays after church, my father would lie belly-down, head hanging off the side of the bed, while my mother guided me, step by step, up and down his back. The first few times, her arm hovered beside me as a guardrail in case I slipped. Beneath the human skin are many valleys, mounds, crevasses, and knobs. Balance and concentration are required
7h
Watch a SpaceX Rocket Stage Burn Up Spectacularly in the Earth's Atmosphere
Light Show On March 4, SpaceX launched its latest batch of broadband-beaming Starlink satellites into orbit using one of the company's workhorse Falcon 9 rockets. But the launch didn't go entirely as planned. The rocket's second stage failed to light its engines during deorbit and spent the last 23 days in space — until careening through the Earth's atmosphere last night in an epic light show. It
3h
Returning to Normal Means Recalibrating My Brain
Brushing my teeth is a struggle. I brush so hard, and for so long, that sometimes my gums bleed. I can't spit until I've touched each tooth carefully with the tip of my tongue. I open and close the medicine cabinet repeatedly, pressing my palm into the pointy corner of the mirror, until it feels like enough. I can't leave the bathroom until I've flipped the light switch on and off a dozen times.
7h
Andrew Ng: Forget about building an AI-first business. Start with a mission.
Andrew Ng has worn many hats in his life. You may know him as the founder of the Google Brain team or the former chief scientist at Baidu . You may also know him as your own instructor. He has taught countless students, curious listeners, and business leaders about the principles of machine learning through his wildly popular online courses. Now in his latest venture, Landing AI , which he starte
9h
Ridiculous Analysis Claims You Could Build a House on the Moon for $60 Million
UK credit broker Money.co.uk went through the effort of outlining how much it would cost to get a mortgage for a house on the Moon. "Ever wondered what it would be like to live amongst the stars and embrace a lunar lifestyle?" finance writer Salman Haqqi asked in a recent blog post on the topic. "Well, we're about to skyrocket the property market quite literally into space!" But the site's back-o
2h
Finding Zen in the Art of Puzzle Solving
The "eureka" or "aha" moment of insight is legendary in math and science, dating at least two millenniums back to the possibly apocryphal story of Archimedes rushing naked out of a bath, having hit upon the crucial idea for figuring out the composition of King Hiero's crown. Many scientific discoveries have been credited to such moments, from Newton's theory of gravity to Einstein's. These "aha"
4h
Ancient oral biome points to overall health
When a baby puts something from the floor in their mouth, we panic, but the mouth already contains thousands of bacteria. Now a team of researchers is looking at archaeological remains for an example of how Japanese oral biomes have changed and what they say about the people who owned those mouths and teeth.
4h
Covid third wave may overrun Africa's healthcare, warns WHO
Leap of 50% in cases in three months and just 7m jabs across continent 'infecting 11 health workers an hour' Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Rising cases of coronavirus in Africa threaten to overrun fragile healthcare systems and test the continent's much-touted resilience to the disease, according to the World Health Organization's regional office for the continent.
4h
Why America Is Beating Europe on Vaccination
Up until a few months ago, I'd felt sorry for my American friends and family, stuck in a Trumpian nightmare of science denial and a warped fealty to personal liberty so extreme that, even as pandemic casualties soared, some people took to screaming, even spitting, at anyone who told them to put on a face mask. The situation in France, where I live, was more under control. Today, however, as the g
8h
Helgoland by Carlo Rovelli review – a meditation on quantum theory
A skilled storyteller reflects on the genius of Werner Heisenberg, who developed the theory that explains the evolution of stars and makes computers possible There are two kinds of geniuses, argued the celebrated mathematician Mark Kac. There is the "ordinary" kind, whom we could emulate if only we were a lot smarter than we actually are because there is no mystery as to how their minds work. Aft
9h
Listen: A History of Pandemic Xenophobia and Racism
The recent shootings in Atlanta highlighted a surge of anti-Asian violence in the United States throughout the pandemic. Disease stigma and racism have together shaped pandemic response and policy for centuries. And so to better understand this history, on the podcast Social Distance , co-hosts James Hamblin and Maeve Higgins speak with Alexandre White, a sociologist and medical historian at John
15h
'We're back': rocket launch licence gives Australia's aerospace sector high hopes
Southern Launch facility on South Australia's Eyre Peninsula gets go-ahead to send up suborbital satellites Australia is one giant leap closer to becoming a space-faring nation again, with the first licence granted to establish a civilian rocket launch facility. The federal industry minister, Karen Andrews, announced on Thursday that South Australian company Southern Launch will be able to launch
11h
Underage Teens Caught Joyriding Tesla, Claim It Was Driving Itself
On Autopilot A pair of underage teens in Daytona Beach, Florida, got caught driving a Tesla Model Y on the wrong side of the road. When a Flagler County Sherrif's deputy pulled over the vehicle, nobody was in the driver's seat. The 14 and 15-year old girls were in the back and front passenger seat, Electrek reports . Their excuse: the Tesla was driving itself. Needless to say, despite the carmake
53min
Elon Musk Deletes Tweet Claiming Tesla Could Become World's Biggest Company in "Months"
Biggest Company Tesla CEO Elon Musk is extremely confident in his car company's near future success. So confident, in fact, that the billionaire tweeted early Friday morning that he thinks "there is a >0% chance Tesla could be the biggest company." And Tesla's valuation could skyrocket to such lofty heights "probably within a few months," the CEO added in a follow-up tweet — which he promptly del
16min
Journal of the paranormal has its first retraction
We should have seen this one coming. Or, maybe, they should have. A journal dedicated to the study of psychics, the paranormal and related fringe research has its first retraction, according to the editor. The Journal of Scientific Exploration says it detected plagiarism in a 2017 paper by Alejandro Parra, a well-known figure in the … Continue reading
8h
The Atlantic Daily: The 'Hate Crime' Label Isn't Enough
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox. Last week's shootings in the Atlanta area, which killed eight people, six of whom were Asian women, have intensified calls to confront anti-Asian racism. "The present hour feels like an awakening
5h
Book Review: An Open-Eyed History of Wildlife Conservation
In "Beloved Beasts," journalist Michelle Nijhuis traces the evolution of conservation, arguing that the past is a key repository of lessons hard learned through trial and error that is too often overlooked today. "We can move forward by understanding the story of struggle and survival we already have."
9h
A powerful solar storm hit Earth back in 1582
"A great fire appeared in the sky to the North, and lasted three nights," wrote a Portuguese scribe in early March, 1582. Across the globe in feudal Japan, observers in Kyoto noted the same fiery red display in their skies, too. Similar accounts of strange nighttime lights were recorded in Leipzig, Germany; Yecheon, South Korea; and a dozen other cities across Europe and East Asia.
5h
Stressed brain linked to broken heart
Heightened activity in the brain, caused by stressful events, is linked to the risk of developing a rare and sometimes fatal heart condition called Takotsubo syndrome (TTS), also known as 'broken heart' syndrome, according to new research.
4h
Single-stranded DNA as supramolecular template for highly organized palladium nanowires
Nanowires are vital components for future nanoelectronics, sensors, and nanomedicine. To achieve the required complexity, it is necessary to control the position and growth of the metal chains on an atomic level. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, a research team has introduced a novel approach that generates precisely controlled, helical, palladium–DNA systems that mimic the organization of natura
4h
New study investigates the integrity of oil and gas wells in multiple states
In a groundbreaking study, a research team that included a Johns Hopkins engineer compiled and analyzed an unprecedented amount of regulatory data that describe the integrity of oil and gas wells in multiple states. The study results, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, provides valuable insights for industry operators and regulatory agencies seeking to prevent well l
4h
The origin and uniqueness of Basque genetics revealed
The Basques are a unique population in Western Europe; their language is not related to any Indo-European language. Furthermore, genetically speaking, they have been considered to have distinct features. However, until now there was no conclusive study to explain the origin of their singularity.
1h
Mass bird die-off linked to wildfires and toxic gases
After an abnormally large number of migratory birds turned up dead in people's backyards in Colorado and other parts of western and central U.S. states, locals began to document their observations on a crowdsourced science platform called iNaturalist. Within the app, a special project was set up specifically for this die-off, which occurred in August and September 2020, so that records of the dead
3h
Huge uptick in lightning over the Arctic in past decade, research shows
A combined team of researchers from the University of Washington and the University of Otago has found that lightning strikes in the Arctic have been rising dramatically over the past decade. In their paper published in the journal Geophysical Research Letters, the group describes their study of data from the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN) and what they found.
3h
How microorganisms can help us get to net negative emissions
Many of the common items we use in our everyday lives—from building materials to plastics to pharmaceuticals—are manufactured from fossil fuels. To reduce our reliance on fossil fuels and reduce greenhouse gas emissions, society has increasingly tried turning to plants to make the everyday products we need. For example, corn can be turned into corn ethanol and plastics, lignocellulosic sugars can
7h
A bio-inspired mechano-photonic artificial synapse
Multifunctional and diverse artificial neural systems can incorporate multimodal plasticity, memory and supervised learning functions to assist neuromorphic computation. In a new report, Jinran Yu and a research team in nanoenergy, nanoscience and materials science in China and the US., presented a bioinspired mechano-photonic artificial synapse with synergistic mechanical and optical plasticity.
1h
Tips for keeping pets safe from household dangers
Certain everyday household items can pose a threat to pets' health, says Susan Nelson, clinical professor at the Kansas State University College of Veterinary Medicine. Here are some items and situations pets owners can watch for.
3h
The Books Briefing: Foodie Culture Will Change Again
It's been more than a year of big grocery-store hauls in preparation for cooking, and more cooking, and … more cooking. During the pandemic, whether you were lovingly tending to your sourdough starter or simply boiling some water for another box of mac and cheese, many of us became intimately familiar with our kitchens. And as Hannah Giorgis wrote , professional chefs adapted their culinary skill
4h
Plasmon-coupled gold nanoparticles useful for thermal history sensing
Researchers have demonstrated that stretching shape-memory polymers embedded with clusters of gold nanoparticles alters their plasmon-coupling, giving rise to desirable optical properties. One potential application for the material is a sensor that relies on optical properties to track an object or environment's thermal history.
2h
Stick to Covid rules as end of England lockdown approaches, public warned
Warning comes amid signs people are already mingling more before next step of easing restrictions Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The public have been warned to keep abiding by Covid rules as the end of lockdown approaches, amid a falling "sense of risk" and fresh data showing increased mingling between households. Before the further easing of rules in England on Mon
16min
A stable copper catalyst for carbon dioxide conversion
A new catalyst for the conversion of carbon dioxide (CO2) into chemicals or fuels has been developed by researchers at Ruhr-Universität Bochum and the University of Duisburg-Essen. They optimized already available copper catalysts to improve their selectivity and long-term stability. The results are described by the team led by Dr. Yanfang Song and Professor Wolfgang Schuhmann of the Bochum Center
1h
Scent of a species: The origins of the apple fly
Apple flies have fascinated scientists right from the mid-19th century, as they are a captivating example of speciation, the beginning of a new species. Correspondence between Charles Darwin and Benjamin Walsh, who observed the apple flies and hawthorn flies in North America, began the rich history of this scientific question in evolutionary biology. When settlers in North America introduced apple
3h
Molecule attacks coronavirus in a novel way
Scientists at the University of Bonn and the caesar research center have isolated a molecule that might open new avenues in the fight against SARS coronavirus 2. The active ingredient binds to the spike protein that the virus uses to dock to the cells it infects. This prevents them from entering the respective cell, at least in the case of model viruses. It appears to do this by using a different
3h
LiDAR acquires ranging signals with micron accuracy
Light Detection And Ranging (LiDAR) has been well known as it offers high ranging accuracy, and shows promising prospects in autonomous vehicles and various field. Traditional frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) LiDAR ranging is based on heterodyne detection, calculating unknown distance by extracting the frequency of the interference signal. However, such technique suffers from frequency m
6h
IFNAR1 signaling in NK cells promotes persistent virus infection
Inhibition of type 1 interferon (IFN-I) signaling promotes the control of persistent virus infection, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here, we report that genetic ablation of Ifnar1 specifically in natural killer (NK) cells led to elevated numbers of T follicular helper cells, germinal center B cells, and plasma cells and improved antiviral T cell function, resulting in ha
4min
Exploiting the acquired vulnerability of cisplatin-resistant tumors with a hypoxia-amplifying DNA repair-inhibiting (HYDRI) nanomedicine
Various cancers treated with cisplatin almost invariably develop drug resistance that is frequently caused by substantial DNA repair. We searched for acquired vulnerabilities of cisplatin-resistant cancers to identify undiscovered therapy. We herein found that cisplatin resistance of cancer cells comes at a fitness cost of increased intracellular hypoxia. Then, we conceived an inspired strategy t
4min
A cryo-electron tomography workflow reveals protrusion-mediated shedding on injured plasma membrane
Cryo–electron tomography (cryo-ET) provides structural context to molecular mechanisms underlying biological processes. Although straightforward to implement for studying stable macromolecular complexes, using it to locate short-lived structures and events can be impractical. A combination of live-cell microscopy, correlative light and electron microscopy, and cryo-ET will alleviate this issue. W
4min
Near-infrared light-triggered platelet arsenal for combined photothermal-immunotherapy against cancer
To address long-standing issues with tumor penetration and targeting among cancer therapeutics, we developed an anticancer platelet-based biomimetic formulation (N+R@PLTs), integrating photothermal nanoparticles (N) and immunostimulator (R) into platelets (PLTs). Exploiting the aggregative properties of platelets and high photothermal capacity, N+R@PLTs functioned as an arsenal by targeting defec
4min
Predicting the severity of the grass pollen season and the effect of climate change in Northwest Europe
Allergic rhinitis is an inflammation in the nose caused by overreaction of the immune system to allergens in the air. Managing allergic rhinitis symptoms is challenging and requires timely intervention. The following are major questions often posed by those with allergic rhinitis: How should I prepare for the forthcoming season? How will the season's severity develop over the years? No country ye
4min
Spectrally encoded single-pixel machine vision using diffractive networks
We demonstrate optical networks composed of diffractive layers trained using deep learning to encode the spatial information of objects into the power spectrum of the diffracted light, which are used to classify objects with a single-pixel spectroscopic detector. Using a plasmonic nanoantenna-based detector, we experimentally validated this single-pixel machine vision framework at terahertz spect
4min
Atomic-layer-confined multiple quantum wells enabled by monolithic bandgap engineering of transition metal dichalcogenides
Quantum wells (QWs), enabling effective exciton confinement and strong light-matter interaction, form an essential building block for quantum optoelectronics. For two-dimensional (2D) semiconductors, however, constructing the QWs is still challenging because suitable materials and fabrication techniques are lacking for bandgap engineering and indirect bandgap transitions occur at the multilayer.
4min
Cell-penetrating Alphabody protein scaffolds for intracellular drug targeting
The therapeutic scope of antibody and nonantibody protein scaffolds is still prohibitively limited against intracellular drug targets. Here, we demonstrate that the Alphabody scaffold can be engineered into a cell-penetrating protein antagonist against induced myeloid leukemia cell differentiation protein MCL-1, an intracellular target in cancer, by grafting the critical B-cell lymphoma 2 homolog
4min
Ancient genomic time transect from the Central Asian Steppe unravels the history of the Scythians
The Scythians were a multitude of horse-warrior nomad cultures dwelling in the Eurasian steppe during the first millennium BCE. Because of the lack of first-hand written records, little is known about the origins and relations among the different cultures. To address these questions, we produced genome-wide data for 111 ancient individuals retrieved from 39 archaeological sites from the first mil
4min
Latitude dictates plant diversity effects on instream decomposition
Running waters contribute substantially to global carbon fluxes through decomposition of terrestrial plant litter by aquatic microorganisms and detritivores. Diversity of this litter may influence instream decomposition globally in ways that are not yet understood. We investigated latitudinal differences in decomposition of litter mixtures of low and high functional diversity in 40 streams on 6 c
4min
Multimerization variants as potential drivers of neofunctionalization
Whole-genome duplications are common during evolution, creating genetic redundancy that can enable cellular innovations. Novel protein-protein interactions provide a route to diversified gene functions, but, at present, there is limited proteome-scale knowledge on the extent to which variability in protein complex formation drives neofunctionalization. Here, we used protein correlation profiling
4min
Colossal anomalous Nernst effect in a correlated noncentrosymmetric kagome ferromagnet
The transverse voltage generated by a temperature gradient in a perpendicularly applied magnetic field, termed the Nernst effect, has promise for thermoelectric applications and for probing electronic structure. In magnetic materials, an anomalous Nernst effect (ANE) is possible in a zero magnetic field. We report a colossal ANE in the ferromagnetic metal UCo 0.8 Ru 0.2 Al, reaching 23 microvolts
4min
Erosion of global functional diversity across the tree of life
Although one-quarter of plant and vertebrate species are threatened with extinction, little is known about the potential effect of extinctions on the global diversity of ecological strategies. Using trait and phylogenetic information for more than 75,000 species of vascular plants, mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, and freshwater fish, we characterized the global functional spectra of each of
4min
Loss of Ftsj1 perturbs codon-specific translation efficiency in the brain and is associated with X-linked intellectual disability
FtsJ RNA 2'-O-methyltransferase 1 ( FTSJ1 ) gene has been implicated in X-linked intellectual disability (XLID), but the molecular pathogenesis is unknown. We show that Ftsj1 is responsible for 2'- O -methylation of 11 species of cytosolic transfer RNAs (tRNAs) at the anticodon region, and these modifications are abolished in Ftsj1 knockout (KO) mice and XLID patient–derived cells. Loss of 2'- O
4min
Structural tuning of heterogeneous molecular catalysts for electrochemical energy conversion
Heterogeneous molecular catalysts based on transition metal complexes have received increasing attention for their potential application in electrochemical energy conversion. The structural tuning of first and second coordination spheres of complexes provides versatile strategies for optimizing the activities of heterogeneous molecular catalysts and appropriate model systems for investigating the
4min
Odontoblast TRPC5 channels signal cold pain in teeth
Teeth are composed of many tissues, covered by an inflexible and obdurate enamel. Unlike most other tissues, teeth become extremely cold sensitive when inflamed. The mechanisms of this cold sensation are not understood. Here, we clarify the molecular and cellular components of the dental cold sensing system and show that sensory transduction of cold stimuli in teeth requires odontoblasts. TRPC5 i
4min
Targeting Alzheimers disease with multimodal polypeptide-based nanoconjugates
Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most prevalent form of dementia, remains incurable mainly due to our failings in the search for effective pharmacological strategies. Here, we describe the development of targeted multimodal polypeptide-based nanoconjugates as potential AD treatments. Treatment with polypeptide nanoconjugates bearing propargylamine moieties and bisdemethoxycurcumin or genistein affor
4min
Oxidation of trimethylamine to trimethylamine N-oxide facilitates high hydrostatic pressure tolerance in a generalist bacterial lineage
High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) is a characteristic environmental factor of the deep ocean. However, it remains unclear how piezotolerant bacteria adapt to HHP. Here, we identify a two-step metabolic pathway to cope with HHP stress in a piezotolerant bacterium. Myroides profundi D25 T , obtained from a deep-sea sediment, can take up trimethylamine (TMA) through a previously unidentified TMA trans
4min
Fears climate crisis could increase allergy season severity by up to 60%
New tools could help predict extent and severity of hay fever and allergy-related asthma months ahead The climate emergency could increase future allergy season severity by up to 60%, a new pollen forecasting system suggests, while a separate system could predict the severity of grass pollen seasons months in advance. Such tools could help health professionals prepare for an increase in hay fever
4min
Los Angeles palm trees may be a major source of air pollution
California's restrictions on vehicle emissions have been so effective that in at least one urban area, Los Angeles, the most concerning source of dangerous aerosol pollution may well be trees and other green plants, according to a new study. Aerosols—particles of hydrocarbons referred to as PM 2.5 because they are smaller than 2.5 microns in diameter and easily lodge in the lungs—are proven to ca
4min
Functional consequences of global biodiversity loss guide future nature conservation
One million species are under threat of extinction worldwide, primarily due to adverse human impact. The loss of a species is an ethical tragedy, but additionally, it can have dramatic effects on the functioning of ecosystems on Earth. In each ecosystem, species have their roles. These roles depend on the characteristics of the species, like their size, weight, shape, reproductive capacity or the
10min
Ancient genomes trace the origin and decline of the Scythians
Generally thought of as fierce horse warriors, the Scythians were a multitude of Iron Age cultures who ruled the Eurasian steppe, playing a major role in Eurasian history. A new study published in Science Advances analyzes genome-wide data for 111 ancient individuals spanning the Central Asian Steppe from the first millennia BCE and CE. The results reveal new insights into the genetic events assoc
10min
What a carve-up: when French and British ruled the world
The fight for world dominance always seems to involve a contest between two superpowers. Back in 1805, it was the British versus the French, and this cartoon pokes fun at both. Pitt and Napoleon are carving out the big slices of the world-pudding – an image endlessly copied since. The Great Game The Great Game remains the same: how to gobble up most of the world, or at least more of it than your
41min
COVID-21: A Primer
Trying to remember March 2020 feels like sticking your head into a parallel universe. This time last year, Americans were just going into lockdown—presumably for two weeks—to protect themselves from a mysterious but deadly virus. We disinfected mail but didn't wear masks. Few of us knew that COVID-19 symptoms could last for months, that you might lose your sense of smell, or that your toes might
43min
COVID-19 spread is rare when schools use safe practices
New research finds that, when schools practice mandatory masking, social distancing, and frequent hand-washing, COVID-19 transmission is rare The pilot study in Missouri shows that's the case even with close contact of those who test positive for the virus. A close contact refers to anyone who has been within 6 feet for more than 15 minutes in a 24-hour period with someone infected with COVID-19.
1h
What Made Lucille Bluth So Funny
Arrested Development , the cult-beloved sitcom that debuted on Fox in 2003, was a joke-dense, fastidiously written, pun-packed satire of a poisonously entitled family. But wordplay alone was not what made Lucille Bluth, the matriarch of the clan, one of the funniest TV characters of all time. The actor Jessica Walter, who died on Wednesday at the age of 80, gets credit for that. Her character's h
1h
Microbial consumption of mineral nitrogen promotes HONO emissions in agricultural soils
A new study indicates that microbial nitrate reduction is an important nitrous acid (HONO) production pathway in aerobic soils. This suggests that the terrestrial ecosystems favoring it could be hotspots for HONO emissions, thereby influencing atmospheric chemistry. The study was published in March in Communications Earth and Environment.
1h
The persistent danger after landscape fires
Reactive oxygen species (ROS) cause oxidative stress at the cellular level. Research shows that this way, amongst others, they inhibit the germination capacity of plants, produce cytotoxins or exert toxic effects on aquatic invertebrates. Environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFR) are potential precursors of ROS because they can react with water to form these radical species. "Therefore, EPFR
1h
UTEP helps optimize COVID-19 vaccination clinics in the U.S.
Members of the UTEP faculty, staff and students observed several of El Paso's drive-though and walk-in clinics in early 2021. The team identified areas that likely created bottlenecks, which produce delays and other issues. They used the information from their observations to develop simulation models to experiment with a clinic's performance to further identify potential slowdowns, calculate reso
2h
Insights on operationalizing COVID-19 monoclonal antibody treatment
As evidence mounts supporting the use of monoclonal antibody treatment to reduce hospitalizations and deaths from COVID-19, UPMC and University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine physician-scientists are sharing the health system's experience administering the life-saving medication. In a report published today in Open Forum Infectious Diseases, the UPMC/Pitt team shares how it quickly established t
2h
Narcissism comes from insecurity, not inflated sense of self
Narcissism is driven by insecurity, and not an inflated sense of self, finds a new study by a team of psychology researchers. Its research, which offers a more detailed understanding of this long-examined phenomenon, may also explain what motivates the self-focused nature of social media activity . "…these narcissists are not grandiose, but rather insecure, and this is how they seem to cope with
3h
Pressure sensor with high sensitivity and linear response based on soft micropillared electrodes
In recent years, with the rapid development of flexible electronic skins, high-performance flexible tactile sensors have received more attention and have been used in many fields such as artificial intelligence, health monitoring, human-computer interaction, and wearable devices. Among various sensors, flexible capacitive tactile sensors have the advantages of high sensitivity, low energy consumpt
3h
Så kan nedsövda patienter förmedla smärta
Hur kan en nedsövd patient förmedla sitt behov av smärtlindring? Frågan har aktualiserats under pandemin, när många vårdats i respirator. Ett sätt är genom ett smärtskattningsverktyg som baseras på de gemensamma beteenden som nedsövda patienter uppvisar. Covid-19 kan ha stor påverkan på lungor och patienters förmåga att andas, vilket har gjort att många behövt vårdas i respirator på en intensivvå
3h
The brain area with which we interpret the world
Language, empathy, attention – as different as these abilities may be, one brain region is involved in all these processes: The inferior parietal lobe (IPL). Yet until now it was unclear exactly what role it plays in these profoundly human abilities. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences have now shown that the IPL comes into play when we need to interpret o
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Incurable cancer: Patients need palliative care support early on
For the first time in Germany, patients with incurable cancer have been systematically questioned about their palliative care needs from the time of their diagnosis and at regular intervals over the following twelve months. Observations at 20 treatment centres throughout Germany show that those affected endure great physical as well as psychological suffering and require palliative medical support
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Mapping COVID risk in urban areas: a way to keep the economy open
In a new study published in the Journal Risk Analysis, researchers in India propose a COVID Risk Assessment and Mapping (CRAM) framework that results in a zoned map that officials can use to place more targeted restrictions on high-risk communities. Successfully used by officials in Jaipur at the peak of the pandemic last spring, their framework could help other vulnerable countries avoid a shutdo
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DNA–Metal double helix
Nanowires are vital components for future nanoelectronics, sensors, and nanomedicine. To achieve the required complexity, it is necessary to control the position and growth of the metal chains on an atomic level. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, a research team has introduced a novel approach that generates precisely controlled, helical, palladium-DNA systems that mimic the organization of natura
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Robust cell junctions are critical for maintaining stem cell function
The skin is the largest organ in the human body, and its outermost part, called the epidermis, is replenished every three weeks. The cells fueling this renewal of the epidermal stem cells are found in specialized areas or niches, within a region of the hair follicle (or root) known as the 'bulge compartment'. The bulge compartment resident stem cells are multipotent meaning that they can contribut
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Is it likely that general artificial intelligence will never become ubiquitous?
I always see this sub talking about the consequences of artificial intelligence that exceeds human levels. Most seem to assume that a general AI would be used by every corporation around the world as a more efficient way to conduct businesses. But that seems like a very short sighted look at the subject. I mean sure, that very well could be a consequence, but is it really so likely that we don't
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Study Smarter With The Tools In This Super-Learner Bundle
We're adding to the store of human knowledge at a ferocious pace — in some disciplines, it's happening so quickly that what's cutting edge for a freshman is obsolete by the time they're a junior . That means no matter where you are in life, good study skills need to be a part of your repertoire. The Become a Super-Learner & Speed Reading Bundle, which is currently $29.99, 97% off , can make a bet
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Soft dragonfly robot skims water to spot environmental problems
An electronics-free, entirely soft robot shaped like a dragonfly can skim across water and react to environmental conditions such as pH, temperature, or the presence of oil. The proof-of-principle demonstration could be the precursor to more advanced, autonomous, long-range environmental sentinels for monitoring a wide range of potential telltale signs of problems. The soft robot is described in
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Controlled scar formation in the brain
When the brain suffers injury or infection, glial cells surrounding the affected site act to preserve the brain's sensitive nerve cells and prevent excessive damage. A team of researchers from Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin have been able to demonstrate the important role played by the reorganization of the structural and membrane elements of glial cells.
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A stable copper catalyst for CO2 conversion
A new catalyst for the conversion of carbon dioxide (CO2) into chemicals or fuels has been developed by researchers at Ruhr-Universität Bochum and the University of Duisburg-Essen. They optimized already available copper catalysts to improve their selectivity and long-term stability.
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Slc20a1b is essential for hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell expansion in zebrafish
Hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) include hematopoietic stem cells and several lineage-biased hematopoietic progenitor cells, which can provide all blood cell types in an adult organism. Among them, hematopoietic stem cells have the ability of self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation, and can rapidly respond under acute hematopoietic conditions. Meanwhile, the hematopoietic progeni
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Ugens debat: Oplad bilen eller forsvind?
PLUS. I sagaen om opladning af elbiler i det offentlige rum fortalte ing.dk sidste weekend, hvordan der i Oslo er indført ladepligt og tidsbegrænsning på ladepladser. Læsernes reaktioner understregede igen, at ladeproblemet fylder meget for elbilejere uden egen P-plads.
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Study analyses fish larval dispersal in western Mediterranean
A new study analyzes the larval dispersal of nine fish species in the western Mediterranean and identifies three large areas in which there is barely fish exchange, so fish would remain in the same area all their life. The study, published in the journal Progress in Oceanography, is led by experts of the Faculty of Biology of the University of Barcelona and the Biodiversity Research Institute (IRB
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The promise of super algae Galdiera: From volcanic springs to your plate
A microalga originally isolated from volcanic springs has all it takes to become the next 'superfood' on the market. Compared to Spirulina—a similar organism that's been popular as a food and feed supplement for half a century—Galdieria is cheaper and easier to grow, and even more nutritious. In a closed-circuit reactor, it can convert organic waste into valuable proteins. Those are the conclusion
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Investigating the rarity of the color blue in flowers
Blue is the favorite color of more people in the world than any other, and the "blue flower" is considered a symbol of romantic longing. In nature, however, there are only a few plant species whose flowers contain blue color pigments. An international research team led by Bayreuth ecologist Prof. Dr. Anke Jentsch has investigated the reasons for this. One important factor is the great chemical eff
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High-loading atomically dispersed Ir/MoC catalyst for hydrogenation reaction
Atomically dispersed catalysts have received extensive research attention, because they exhibit excellent activity and unique selectivity for many important catalytic reactions. The atomically dispersed nature of these metal catalysts confers their unique electronic structures as well as designated coordination-unsaturated environments for the optimized adsorption/activation of the reactants. One
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As Eligibility Widens, Concerns Over Vaccine Hesitancy Linger
Despite lingering fears about vaccine hesitancy, surveys continue to suggest that large — and growing — portions of the U.S. population are willing to get a shot against Covid-19. Already, more than 70 percent of people in the vulnerable over-65 demographic have received at least one dose of a vaccine.
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Longest bottlebrush polymer
Researchers have succeeded in synthesizing the longest ever bottlebrush polymer. This polymer — resembling a green foxtail — is composed of a main chain and numerous side chains grafting from it. The team also succeeded in giving various chemical properties to the ultralong bottlebrush polymer. These achievements are expected to substantially advance the current synthetic methods of bottlebrush
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Differences in snake venom composition raise questions about treatment
Snakebite kills around 58,000 Indians annually, and a majority of snakebites that lead to death or disability are attributed to the 'big four' of Indian snakes—the Russell's viper (Daboia russelii), one of the deadliest snake species in the world, the spectacled cobra (Naja naja), the common krait (Bungarus caeruleus) and the saw-scaled viper (Echis carinatus). Commercial antivenom treatment for s
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Survey finds new lifestyle preferences drive new era for workplace
As the COVID-19 pandemic sent millions of Americans home this time last year, many professionals struggled to navigate work and household responsibilities. But a recent survey from Harvard Business School Online shows that working online did work. In fact, many professionals even experienced advancement and growth—both on the job and at home—this year. "The past year has been difficult for everyon
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Scent of a species
One of the most fundamental questions in biology is how new species evolve, creating the vast biodiversity on our planet. Here, we present a story 160 years in the making, proposing how minor changes in the brain can lead to speciation.
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Incurable Leigh Syndrome: German scientists create first human model for rare disease
Leigh syndrome is the most severe mitochondrial disease in children. It usually leads to death within the first years of life. No causative treatment is currently available. One of the genes frequently mutated in patients is SURF1, which encodes for a protein involved in the process of energy generation in the cells. Now German scientists created first human model for rare disease to start underst
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New book critically examines anti-bias messaging in children's entertainment
Can peace between Israelis and Palestinians be achieved, in part, through anti-bias messaging in children's educational entertainment? That is the subject of a new book by Yael Warshel, assistant professor of telecommunications and media industries at Penn State, titled "Experiencing the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict: Children, Peace Communication and Socialization."
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Floating Solar Farms
Perhaps the biggest scientific, political, and practical challenge facing the world today is how to rapidly decarbonize our energy infrastructure. The goal is to do it fast enough to avoid total global warming in excess of 1.5 degrees Celsius, which we will probably fail to do. At the very least we want to avoid going over 2.0 degrees Celsius, which is more realistic but will still be a challenge
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Leap forward' in risk management of rectal cancer
The lab of Quing Zhu at the McKelvey School of Engineering, with assistance from the Washington University School of Medicine, has developed an imaging system that helps differentiate residual cancerous tissue from recovered healthy tissue after treatment in patients with rectal cancer, the third-most common cancer type in the U.S.
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Discovery of a third T cell lineage
In a paper published today in Science, an international team of scientists at the University of New Mexico (US), Monash University (Australia), and the US National Institutes of Health, has defined a novel T cell lineage, called γμ T cells, found only in marsupials (e.g. kangaroos and opossums) and monotremes (e.g. duckbill platypus).
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Forskare: Covidbehandling driver på mutationer
De nya coronavarianterna som nu sprids snabbt globalt kan ha uppstått hos covidpatienter med ett nedsatt immunförsvar som behandlats med blodplasma från tillfrisknade eller med konstgjorda antikroppar. Det verkar ha drivit på mutationerna varnar forskare i tidskriften Science.
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Parents, sex education begins at home
In recent days, Prime Minister Scott Morrison told Australians the treatment of women is not "of a scale that any government can simply change, it is something we must change as a society."
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Cooling homes without warming the planet
As incomes in developing countries continue to rise, demand for air conditioners is expected to triple by 2050. The surge will multiply what is already a major source of greenhouse gas emissions: Air conditioning is currently responsible for almost 20 percent of electricity use in buildings around the world.
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Automated alignment of optical fibers reduces errors and cost in photonic chip production
Photonic chips can play be a crucial role in applications such as autonomous driving or medical imaging due to their capacity for extremely fast and energy-efficient data transmission. However, their adoption is currently held back by the considerable cost involved in the production of these devices. Ph.D. candidate Matthijs van Gastel has developed new ways of assembling photonic devices using gl
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Scientific food systems help biodiversity, livelihoods
The extraordinary recovery of stocks of the prized estuarine hilsa (Tenualosa ilisha) fish, following restrictions on fishing imposed by the Bangladesh government, offers a lesson in how a scientifically-managed 'food systems' approach can manage trade-offs between livelihoods and conservation.
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Experts: Anti-Asian racism is snarled up with misogyny
Anti-Asian racism has a long history in the United States and often intertwines with misogyny, experts explain. On March 16, a man went on a shooting rampage at three Atlanta spas, killing eight people, including six Asian women. The killings have sparked outrage and fear in the Asian American community, but the suspect has denied that the killings were racially motivated. The suspect's claims an
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48% of Hawai'i families with children report food insecurity
Recent developments, trends and how to address food insecurity for Hawai'i families with children is the subject of a recent study led by a team of researchers at the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa's College of Social Sciences as part of its Health Policy Initiative. According to the "Addressing Hunger and Food Insecurity among Hawai'i's Families" report, sustained intervention and system-level ch
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How to hunt fossils responsibly: 5 tips from a professional paleontologist
Many of us, at some point or another, dreamed of hunting for dinosaur fossils when we grew up. Paleontology—the study of natural history through fossils—is the scientific reality of this. It encompasses all ancient lifeforms that left their trace in the earth, from stromatolites (microbial reefs up to 3.5 billion years old) to megafauna.
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Police attitudes about body cameras suggest cops may see benefits to being monitored
The majority of U.S. law enforcement agencies have either committed to or already implemented body cameras for their police officers. But officers' concerns about a loss of on-the-job autonomy are balanced out when they can access their own body camera footage, according to research from the McCombs School of Business at The University of Texas at Austin.
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New Spherical Robot Could Explore Lunar Caves
We've all been laser-focused on Mars as a site for future human outposts, but let's not forget about the Moon . It's only marginally less habitable than Mars right now, and it's a lot closer. Thanks to radiation and temperature variation, however, the safest place for a long-term human presence on the Moon might be underground. We don't know much about the Moon's subsurface environment, but the s
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Låta träden stå eller göra biobränsle – vad är klimatsmartast?
Skogen står i fokus för en intensiv debatt för tillfället. Den handlar, grovt förenklat, om när skogen gör mest klimatnytta. När den står och binder kol eller förvandlas till biomassa för bland annat bioenergi? – Tidsaspekten är central för frågan om skogen ger mest klimatnytta genom att stå kvar och binda kol, eller genom att vi tar ut biomassa för substitution för att ersätta fossil energi och
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This Wearable Stress Relief Device Calms Your Nervous System With Gentle Vibrations
If you're feeling overly stressed out and anxious, join the club. For the vast majority of us, the last year has been extraordinarily challenging. And that's putting it mildly. The good news is that advancements in science and technology are constantly being put to use solving everyday problems, so there are a ton of different tools available to help us deal with our frayed nerves, from weighted
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Hospital load and increased COVID-19 related mortality in Israel
Nature Communications, Published online: 26 March 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22214-z COVID-19 has caused many healthcare systems to become overwhelmed, potentially impacting patient care. Here, the authors show that COVID-19-related in-hospital mortality rates in Israel increased in periods of moderate or high hospital load, independent of patient characteristics.
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Interferometric control of magnon-induced nearly perfect absorption in cavity magnonics
Nature Communications, Published online: 26 March 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22171-7 Perfect absorption can be obtained for a single port device, or a device with multiple incident beams, but for multiport devices, the absorption is limited to around 50%. In this work, Rao et al. overcome this limitation, demonstrating near perfect absorption in a two port cavity magnon system.
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N-protein presents early in blood, dried blood and saliva during asymptomatic and symptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infection
Nature Communications, Published online: 26 March 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22072-9 Here the authors develop a single molecule array (Simoa) immunoassay for detection of SARS-CoV-2 nucleocapsid protein in venous and dried capillary blood as well as saliva. The assay shows good performance in symptomatic, asymptomatic, and pre-symptomatic PCR+ individuals.
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Oncolytic virotherapy induced CSDE1 neo-antigenesis restricts VSV replication but can be targeted by immunotherapy
Nature Communications, Published online: 26 March 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22115-1 Oncolytic viruses, such as vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), are a promising class of cancer therapeutics. Here the authors report that a mutation in the CSDE1 gene renders cancer cells resistant to VSV replication and oncolysis, but a mutation-derived escape-associated neoantigen could be exploited for immunot
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Neural alignment predicts learning outcomes in students taking an introduction to computer science course
Nature Communications, Published online: 26 March 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22202-3 Learning and remembering new information is a major challenge for students of all levels. Here, the authors show that "neural alignment" across brains is associated with learning success of STEM concepts in a real-life college course and predicts learning outcomes.
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P-selectin axis plays a key role in microglia immunophenotype and glioblastoma progression
Nature Communications, Published online: 26 March 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22186-0 Glioma-associated microglia/macrophages are central drivers of brain tumor pathology. Here the authors characterize the role of the P-selectin/PSGL-1 axis in the cross-talk between glioblastoma cells and microglia/macrophages and show that the therapeutic targeting of P-selectin limits glioblastoma progression
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A noninvasive fluorescence imaging-based platform measures 3D anisotropic extracellular diffusion
Nature Communications, Published online: 26 March 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22221-0 It is challenging to quantify anisotropic diffusion in biological systems. Here the authors report light-sheet imaging-based Fourier transform fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (LiFT-FRAP) to noninvasively determine 3D diffusion tensors of various biomolecules at physiological diffusivity.
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Linear and nonlinear chromatic integration in the mouse retina
Nature Communications, Published online: 26 March 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22042-1 This study shows that ganglion cells in mouse retina integrate chromatic visual signals either linearly or nonlinearly. Nonlinear chromatic integration depends on rod photoreceptor activity and on surround inhibition and may help detect chromatic boundaries, such as the skyline in natural scenes.
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School closures disproportionately hit disadvantaged students in the US
The uneven distribution of school closures in the U.S. since September 2020 threatens to exacerbate regional, racial and class-based divides in educational performance, according to research by Zachary Parolin of Bocconi University's Department of Social and Political Science, recently published in Nature Human Behavior. For example, in October, only 35% of white students were on distance learning
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Læger med subspeciale i kommunikation
Kommunikation og mødet med patienten er det fælles omdrejningspunkt for praktiserende læge Juliane Dinesen og Rikke Wesselhöft, der er ved at uddanne sig til speciallæge i børne- og ungdomspsykiatri. Sammen har de udviklet et kommunikationsforløb til andre sundhedsprofessionelle, der over de kommende fem år skal rulles ud i Region Syddanmark.
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Put An Extra Layer Of Security In Your Pocket With This Biometric Smart Wallet
Biometrics, using your unique physical features as identification tools, are already unlocking phones, and soon, a handprint could be all you need to pay for your order at a store. And yet, we'll still need the identification, cards, and more we keep in our wallets. Keeping that information secure has never been more important. The Cashew Wallet uses your fingerprint and Bluetooth to keep the imp
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