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Shanna Swan: 'Most couples may have to use assisted reproduction by 2045'
The professor of environmental medicine explains how chemicals in plastics are causing our fertility to decline – and what we can do about it Shanna Swan is a professor of environmental medicine and public health at Mount Sinai school of medicine in New York City, studying fertility trends. In 2017 she documented how average sperm counts among western men have more than halved in the past 40 year
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Boris Johnson branded irresponsible over 'back to the office' call
Scientists alarmed as prime minister suggests people have had enough 'days off' while Labour pushes the right to work from home Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Boris Johnson has sparked new controversy over when employees should return to their workplaces by suggesting people have had enough "days off" at home during the pandemic, and should try to go back to their o
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Canada suspends use of AstraZeneca Covid vaccine for those under 55
Immunisation panel says there is 'substantial uncertainty about the benefit' of the vaccine given risk of rare type of blood clot See all our coronavirus coverage Canada on Monday suspended the use of the Oxford/AstraZeneca coronavirus vaccine for people under 55 following concerns it might be linked to rare blood clots. The pause was recommended by the National Advisory Committee on Immunization
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How mRNA Technology Could Change the World
Synthetic mRNA, the ingenious technology behind the Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines, might seem like a sudden breakthrough, or a new discovery. One year ago, almost nobody in the world knew what an mRNA vaccine was, for the good reason that no country in the world had ever approved one. Months later, the same technology powered the two fastest vaccine trials in the history of science. Like s
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New Treatment Makes Teeth Grow Back
A new experimental treatment could someday give people a way to grow missing teeth , if early research on lab animals holds up. Scientists at Japan's Kyoto University and the University of Fukui developed a monoclonal antibody treatment that seems to trigger the body to grow new teeth, according to research published last month in the journal Science Advances . If upcoming experiments continue to
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Humans Are Rapidly Losing the Ability to Procreate, Scientist Warns
An environmental medicine professor is sounding the alarm on humanity's rapidly declining fertility rates — and she says chemicals in plastics are largely to blame. Shanna Swan, professor of environmental medicine and public health at Mount Sinai's Icahn School of Medicine in New York City, helped complete a major study in 2017 that discovered sperm count amongst men in Western countries has drop
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Sports Should Boycott Georgia
Major League Baseball is scheduled to hold its 91st All-Star Game at Truist Park in Atlanta on July 13—the first time in 21 years the league's annual showcase is to be played in that city. But pro baseball should extend Atlanta's All-Star drought, and other sports should avoid scheduling their own signature events in Georgia, to show Republican state lawmakers that their latest efforts at voter s
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DARPA Is Working on a Gigantic, Flying Aircraft Carrier
Paging Nick Fury The Pentagon has a bold plan to keep aircraft carriers relevant to the future of warfare: taking them out of the water and lifting them up into the sky. The plan sounds laughably similar to the Helicarriers from the Marvel Cinematic Universe movies, but The Economist reports that DARPA, the Pentagon's research division, is dead serious about getting the program off the ground. Th
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Study identifies a new type of diurnal effect for cosmic ray-boosted dark matter
Over the past few decades, astrophysicists and cosmologists have gathered various observations hinting at the existence of dark matter (DM), a type of matter that does not absorb, reflect or emit light, and thus cannot be detected using conventional techniques for observing electromagnetic radiation. While physicists have predicted its existence based on astrophysical and cosmological observations
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We Need to Talk About the AstraZeneca Vaccine
The AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine is indispensable right now. As one of the first vaccines out of the gate, it's been at the center of the World Health Organization's plan to roll out some 2 billion doses to 92 nations by the end of the year. It's also one of just a handful of vaccines that are already being produced and distributed on such a massive scale that they might change the near-term cour
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Researchers discover how animals grow their pointy body parts
An interdisciplinary team at Monash University discovered a new universal rule of biological growth that explains surprising similarities in the shapes of sharp structures across the tree of life, including teeth, horns, claws, beaks, animal shells, and even the thorns and prickles of plants.
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Monkeys experience the visual world the same way people do
When humans look out at a visual landscape like a sunset or a beautiful overlook, we experience something—we have a conscious awareness of what that scene looks like. This awareness of the visual world around us is central to our everyday existence, but are humans the only species that experiences the world consciously? Or do other non-human animals have the same sort of conscious experience we do
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A mouse's bite holds venomous potential, finds new study
We are not venomous, and neither are mice—but within our genomes lurks that potential, suggest scientists from the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) and the Australian National University. Reporting this week in PNAS, the researchers found that the genetic foundation required for oral venom to evolve is present in both reptiles and mammals.
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A new way to observe laser interactions could improve laser-based manufacture
Despite the enormous amount of research over the decades into lasers and their applications, scientists have difficulty accurately and directly observing fine details of their interactions with materials. For the first time, researchers have found a way to acquire such data from a production laser using low-cost equipment. The technique could vastly improve the accuracy of items cut or etched with
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Study reports six novel variants for CRISPR-Cas12a in plants, expanding genome engineering
In a new publication in Nature Communications, associate professor of Plant Science at the University of Maryland Yiping Qi continues to innovate genome editing and engineering in plants, with the ultimate goal of improving the efficiency of food production. His recent work contributes six novel variants of CRISPR-Cas12a that have never before been proven in plants, testing them first in rice as a
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Scientists zero in on the role of volcanoes in the demise of dinosaurs
Earth has experienced five major mass extinction events over the past 500 million years. Massive volcanic eruptions have been identified as the major driver of the environmental changes that precipitated at least three of these extinction events. The fifth and most recent event—the end-Cretaceous mass extinction—occurred 66 million years ago and was responsible for wiping out dinosaurs. Researcher
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Object classification through a single-pixel detector
Machine vision systems have many applications, including self-driving cars, intelligent manufacturing, robotic surgery and biomedical imaging, among many others. Most of these machine vision systems use lens-based cameras, and after an image or video is captured, typically with a few megapixels per frame, a digital processor is used to perform machine-learning tasks, such as object classification
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Australasian genetic influence spread wider in South America than previously thought
A team of researchers from Universidade de São Paulo, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul and Universitat Pompeu Fabra, has found evidence of a genetic Australasian influence in more parts of South America than just the Amazon. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes their study of a genomic dataset from multiple South American populat
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Oil and natural gas production emit more methane than previously thought
The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is underestimating methane emissions from oil and gas production in its annual Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks, according to new research. The research team found 90 percent higher emissions from oil production and 50 percent higher emissions for natural gas production than EPA estimated in its latest inventory.
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Theoretical physicists predict quantum interactions within 3D molecules
Within the realm of quantum mechanics, the generation of quantum entanglement remains one of the most challenging goals. Entanglement, simply put, is when the quantum state of each particle or a group of particles is not independent of the quantum states of other particles or groups, even over long distances. Entangled particles have always fascinated physicists, as measuring one entangled particl
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Deep genetic affinity between coastal Pacific and Amazonian natives evidenced by Australasian ancestry [Anthropology]
Different models have been proposed to elucidate the origins of the founding populations of America, along with the number of migratory waves and routes used by these first explorers. Settlements, both along the Pacific coast and on land, have been evidenced in genetic and archeological studies. However, the number of…
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Reconciling early Deccan Traps CO2 outgassing and pre-KPB global climate [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
A 2 to 4 °C warming episode, known as the Latest Maastrichtian warming event (LMWE), preceded the Cretaceous–Paleogene boundary (KPB) mass extinction at 66.05 ± 0.08 Ma and has been linked with the onset of voluminous Deccan Traps volcanism. Here, we use direct measurements of melt-inclusion CO2 concentrations and trace-element…
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New research: Photovoltaics can make the world fossil-free faster than expected
A team of researchers led by Aarhus University and including experts from universities and knowledge institutions in the US, Europe, Japan and Australia has published an article in the scientific journal Joule confirming that the role of solar photovoltaics in future green energy systems ought to be significantly upgraded. The team highlights limitations in models used by the UN Intergovernmental
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Fasting alters the gut microbiome reducing blood pressure and body weight in metabolic syndrome patients
Nature Communications, Published online: 30 March 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22097-0 Nutritional modification including fasting has been shown to reduce cardiometabolic risk linked to western diet. Here the authors show implementation of fasting resulted in alterations to the intestinal microbiota, and circulating immune cells, improving blood pressure and body weight in patients with metabolic
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What we're getting wrong in the conversation about mental health | Lucy Foulkes
Increased use of psychiatric language means ordinary distress is being medicalised, while the seriously ill are not being heard Many years ago, in the fading hours of a house party, I sat outside in the garden with an old friend. From inside came the distant thud of music and pockets of laughter – a thousand miles from the conversation we were having. My friend's relationship had ended a few week
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Boy finds fossil up to 500m years old in his West Midlands garden
Sid Jhamat, six, from Walsall came upon a horn coral while using his fossil-hunting kit to find worms A six-year-old boy has found a fossil dating back millions of years in his garden after receiving a fossil-hunting kit for Christmas. Siddak Singh Jhamat, known as Sid, said he was excited to find the fossil in his garden in Walsall after digging for worms. Continue reading…
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Strange, Distant Space Object Is Sending Out Ultra-Low Frequency Radio Signals
The USS Jellyfish Researchers have detected ultra-low radio frequencies being emitted from a jellyfish-shaped object in a distant galaxy cluster. The mysterious object is located 340 million lightyears from Earth in the galaxy cluster Abell 2877, according to ScienceNews . The researchers behind a paper published in The Astrophysical Journal say they used the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) radio
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Much-feared asteroid Apophis won't hit Earth for at least 100 years, Nasa says
Chunk of space rock was once the 'poster child for hazardous asteroids' but it will be a while before humans need to worry about it again Nasa has given Earth the all clear on the chances of an asteroid called Apophis hitting our planet any time in the next century, having worried space scientists for over 15 years. The 340-metre (1,100ft) chunk of space rock hit the headlines in 2004 after its d
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Follow-up Covid jabs will be focus in April, says vaccines minister
Nadhim Zahawi hails milestone of 30m first doses and says UK still on track to protect all adults by July Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The minister for vaccine deployment, Nadhim Zahawi, has said that April will be the "second-dose month", as the UK passed the milestone of giving a first jab to 30 million people, comprising the vast majority of those in the first
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How Mary Wortley Montagu's bold experiment led to smallpox vaccine – 75 years before Jenner
A new book celebrates the trailblazing work of the English aristocrat, who successfully inoculated her daughter It was a daring and dangerous experiment that paved the way for the development of the first safe vaccine and saved countless lives. Yet when Lady Mary Wortley Montagu deliberately infected her own daughter with a tiny dose of smallpox – successfully inoculating the three-year-old child
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Smoking Will Disappear Within a Generation, Experts Say
According to experts at analyst firm Jefferies, Bloomberg reports , smokers may soon be poised to disappear from many markets. "With regulators and tobacco ambitions increasingly aligned, in many countries, no smokers within a generation could become a reality," analyst Owen Bennett wrote in a recent statement. "If smoke-free is to happen, this is only achieved with the support of [reduced-risk p
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Watch an Oil Refinery Explode After Possibly Getting Hit by Lightning
Oil Refinery Fire An Indonesian oil refinery on the island of Java caught on fire early Monday, ballooning into a massive column of fire and smoke. The incident seriously injured six people and forced 1,000 nearby residents from their homes, The New York Times reports . Drone footage uploaded to Reddit shows the true extent of the blaze. The smoke blows so thick that it totally obscures the morni
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Watch the Amazing Moment as the Giant Ship Finally Gets Unstuck
Ever Given After six days of being wedged in the banks of the Suez Canal, the giant container ship known as the "Ever Given" finally broke free on Monday afternoon local time. It posed a massive disruption as it blocked the waterway, with hundreds of cargo ships waiting at either end of the canal. The canal accounts for an astonishing 12 percent of global trade. But now, videos uploaded to social
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America's Immigration Amnesia
I n the early 2000s, Border Patrol agents in the Rio Grande Valley of South Texas were accustomed to encountering a few hundred children attempting to cross the American border alone each month. Some hoped to sneak into the country unnoticed; others readily presented themselves to officials in order to request asylum. The agents would transport the children, who were exhausted, dehydrated, and so
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New Machine Screams at Dogs About How Great They Are
The Dog Detector Some of us have coped with quarantine by baking or learning new instruments. Others have created AI-powered computers to scream compliments at every dog that passes by. Alright that last one might be just a little specific. But that's what happened when Ryder Damen of the YouTube channel "Ryder Calm Down" used machine learning to create a computer that shouted compliments at dogs
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The Flaw at the Center of Purity Culture
The summer before my sophomore year of high school, I dedicated my life to Jesus and became a Christian. As one of the few Asians at my school, outside Atlanta, I found refuge in local Korean churches, where I met like-minded friends. Week by week, our hangouts after church became less about finding comfort in our Korean American selves and more about finding our identity in Christ. A big part of
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Capitalism won't save us from Covid, no matter what Boris Johnson might think | Mariana Mazzucato
His claim that 'greed' was the driver behind the UK's vaccine success ignores the huge role of state funding Boris Johnson has attributed the UK's vaccine success to "capitalism" and "greed" . Though these were crude remarks, if the prime minister's words are any indication of his vision for how the UK can recover from the pandemic, there are worrying implications for the country's policies at ho
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Bob Pape was a beloved father and foster carer. Did 'eat out to help out' cost him his life?
Last August, Pape and his family went on a city break to Birmingham, making the most of chancellor Rishi Sunak's discount scheme. The day after he arrived home, his symptoms began Amanda Pape didn't want to go on a city break to Birmingham during a pandemic, but her husband, Bob, a 53-year-old lawyer, insisted. "Bob was convinced that the government would not allow people to travel if it wasn't s
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New Device Uses Ambient 5G to Wirelessly Power Your Devices
5G Power A team of researchers from Georgia Tech has created a 3D printed antenna that can harvest electromagnetic energy from 5G signals and use it as a power source. The researchers claim the technology could one day turn 5G networks into "a wireless power grid" for small internet-connected devices and sensors — a fascinating alternative, or augmentation, for battery-powered gadgets. The main d
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Chief COVID Advisor: Trump Could Have Prevented Hundreds of Thousands of Deaths
Former White House coronavirus advisor Dr. Deborah Birx believes that hundreds of thousands of deaths could have been prevented by the Trump administration after the first initial surge. Birx made the stunning admission that the White House could have done more to protect Americans during an interview with CNN 's Dr. Sanjay Gupta . Though the program is slated to be released on Sunday evening, cl
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The UK's randomised coronavirus trials are a global success story | David Spiegelhalter and Anthony Masters
For more than a year the Recovery programme has used the NHS to test many Covid treatments, saving lives worldwide As it is a novel disease, inevitably there have been numerous suggestions for treatments for Covid-19, ranging from herbal tonics to the anti-malarial hydroxychloroquine , as advocated by the former US president. The question is: what treatments work best? It is not enough just to co
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CDC Director Says She's "Scared," Begs Americans to Take COVID Seriously
Despite the ongoing, accelerating vaccine rollout, the number of new daily coronavirus cases in the United States is once again starting to creep upward. And that has CDC Director Dr. Rochelle Walensky scared, she told reporters during a Monday morning briefing. "I'm gonna pause here, I'm gonna lose the script, and I'm gonna reflect on the recurring feeling I have of impending doom," Walensky sai
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Formerly Homeless Man Now Living in 3D Printed House
Housewarming For the first time, a formerly homeless person has moved in and is now comfortably housed within a 3D-printed tiny home. Tim Shea, a 70-year-old man who has struggled with addiction and homelessness, moved into a 400-square-foot house printed out by the nonprofit New Story and the construction tech firm ICON back in September, according to Green Matters . That's a huge step forward f
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'I Didn't Realize How Much of a Machine It Is'
To be a fan of The Bachelor is to accept a set of contradictions. It professes to help people find true love, but via artificial means. Contestants will say they're on the show "for the right reasons," but later admit to non-romantic motives or bristle at the thought of getting engaged. It implies that love is universal by casting a wide net for suitors, but it didn't feature a Black lead until M
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Safe, stable, sold at cost: AstraZeneca's vaccine deserves celebration, not scorn
The company has struggled, like its rivals, to keep up with demand. But it has achieved great things at low prices AstraZeneca is one of the shining stars of the pandemic. Not only did it produce a vaccine where other big players failed, the UK-Swedish company has pledged to sell it at cost until it is able to declare the pandemic over. Because the vials that contain Astra's vaccine can be kept in
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Starship Prototype Launches in Heavy Fog, Blows Up Dramatically
SpaceX launched its latest full-scale Starship prototype to a height of ten kilometers this morning — but we couldn't see very much this time around. This time, we only heard the explosion that rocked the launch site. The sky lit up in orange hues, suggesting at what we could've seen if it wasn't for the heavy fog blanketing the the space company's Boca Chica, Texas, launch site. It's another wor
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An Entire Group of Whales Has Somehow Escaped Human Attention
The marine biologist Jay Barlow likes to say that he went looking for the last of the Ice Age mastodons and instead bumped into a unicorn. It's a land-based metaphor to help us, a landlubbing species, make sense of what he witnessed late last year, though in fact the mystery unfolded entirely out of sight of land. In 2014, a team of scientists described acoustic recordings taken far off the coast
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Mystery brain disorder baffles Canadian medicine
Spasms, memory loss and hallucinations among symptoms of 43 patients in Acadian region of New Brunswick province Doctors in Canada are concerned they could be dealing with a previously unknown brain disease amid a string of cases involving memory loss, hallucinations and muscle atrophy. Politicians in the province of New Brunswick have demanded answers, but with so few cases, experts say there ar
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University scientists deconstruct Covid-19 vaccines and publish 'recipe' on open web
Stanford University scientists determine sequences of Pfizer and Moderna vaccines from vials set to be discarded Scientists have determined the "recipes" for two Covid-19 vaccines using leftovers in vials bound for the trash and published the mRNA sequences on Github, the online repository for software code. The group of scientists from Stanford University were able to determine the sequences of
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Crystal brains and witches' butter: discover the fabulous world of fungi
The UK's woods are full of strange specimens. But they aren't easy to identify – even for the experts Why is it hard to get our head around fungi? – podcast A host of otherworldly characters are squatting in the wood. Conventional toadstools make way for more gelatinous bodies slopping around fallen trees, dead wood and tree stumps during the coldest months of the year. Many are wood-decaying fun
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Why Democrats Might Need to Play Dirty to Win
T o hear Democratic leaders decry gerrymandering as part of their current bid to enact landmark voting-rights legislation, you'd think the centuries-old practice was a mortal threat to the republic. But political necessity could soon demand that Democrats drop their purity act. To keep their narrow House majority, they might have to deploy the tactic everywhere they can, and every bit as aggressi
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Autism more common in children in England than previously thought – study
Cambridge researchers find prevalence varied by ethnicity and levels of deprivation in largest data analysis yet Autism is more common among children in England than previously thought, with rates higher among Black pupils than their white peers, researchers have revealed. Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) affects communication and behaviour and is thought to affect 1-2% of people around the world,
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Boston Dynamics Shows Off New Warehouse Robot
Big Stretch Robot creator Boston Dynamics has released its next ominous creation: the "Stretch." This robot isn't destined to frolic in fields, like some of its brethren . Stretch has a far more mundane job, requiring it to spend much of its life indoors. As its name implies, the robot has one giant arm and is "designed to automate box moving tasks in warehouses and distribution centers," accordi
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Long-Missing Midsize Black Hole Flashes Into View
At the heart of almost every large galaxy lies an object of immense proportions — a supermassive black hole. Up to billions of times more massive than our sun, these titans drive the evolution of the galaxies they inhabit. Yet astronomers can't figure out how they got so big. Some appear to have formed as early as 600 million years after the Big Bang , when the universe was just 4% of its current
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This Is What Life Looks Like After Vaccination
Vincent Migeat / Agence VU / Redux I didn't feel weepy the first time I hugged my two granddaughters postvaccination. What I felt instead was a softening, a physical relief, a deep sense that things could be normal again, as I sank down to the floor with the 2-year-old and let her nestle into my lap. This relief, I thought, is what a vaccine has given me. For months, our interactions had been del
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America's Rural-Jail-Death Problem
This is the second in a five-part series about deaths in American jails. Read the first here . Illustrations by Molly Crabapple I n the early-morning hours of January 7, 2019, when it became clear that 30-year-old Christopher Hall might die, no medical staff were on duty at the Boyd County Detention Center. Hall had been booked into the rural eastern-Kentucky jail in the final days of 2018 on a d
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First Covid jab cuts infection risk by 62% in England care home residents
People infected after having vaccine may also be less likely to transmit virus, initial findings show Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage A government-funded study of care home residents in England has found that their risk of infection with Covid-19 – either symptomatic or asymptomatic – fell by 62% five weeks after they received their first Oxford/AstraZeneca or Pfizer
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NASA Offers $400 Million for Companies to Build New Space Stations
Wanted: New Space Stations Are you looking to make some money? Do you want to work with NASA? Do you have a private aeronautics company capable of building and manufacturing habitable spacecraft? Well, you're in luck! NASA is offering up to $400 million to companies to develop private space stations for low Earth orbit (LEO). The agency announced the Commercial LEO Destinations (CLD) project last
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Britain's 'brutal' cuts to overseas aid put African science projects in peril
Lifesaving research on fighting drought and climate change at risk after snap decision to halt crucial funding For two years, the Rwandan-born scientist Anita Etale has been leading efforts to develop cheap methods to clean contaminated water supplies, a widespread problem in Africa. Based at Witwatersrand University in Johannesburg, South Africa, Etale had a £300,000 grant from Britain's Royal S
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Indonesian 'Mountain Of Fire' Erupts Again
Mount Merapi on the Indonesian island of Java has been erupting regularly and is considered a highly active volcano. No injuries were reported after Saturday's eruptions, but officials advise caution. (Image credit: Agung Supriyanto/AFP via Getty Images)
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5 Ways Elon Musk Can Help the Ship Trapped in the Suez Canal
The plight of the massive cargo ship haplessly trapped in the Suez Canal has captured the hearts and minds of the entire world. However, one person has been suspiciously quiet about the whole situation: Elon Musk. After all, this was the same guy who created an entire submarine to free the Thai children trapped in a cave in 2018. Which begs the question: Why hasn't the Technoking of Tesla propose
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Elon Musk Tweets Image of Robot With Genitals
Crane Erection Elon Musk took a break from crushing union organizing efforts and coming up with nonsense business role titles for himself to post a meme to Twitter on Friday evening. The Tesla CEO sent a tweet ostensibly to show off a crane to be used to haul and lift material for SpaceX missions, or even help out around the Tesla factory. "Check out our new crane," Musk tweeted. Spoiler: It was
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The Bombs That Never Went Off
You were probably busy with other things in September 2020. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg had died. The raging COVID-19 pandemic had erupted at the White House. President Donald Trump had debated Joe Biden. So you might have missed a news item from Kazakhstan: the elimination of the last weapons-grade uranium in that country. In a program jointly operated with the United States, Kazak
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The Moral Cost of Choosing Stability Over Justice
Updated at 9:55 a.m. ET on March 29, 2021. W hen Nancy Pelosi was asked "Why bother?" with Donald Trump's second impeachment trial, given that he was no longer president, the speaker of the House replied: "You cannot go forward until you have justice." It was a simple but powerful statement that Americans understand in a personal and visceral way after the January 6 insurrection on Capitol Hill.
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Government Sources Say Military Is Holding Back Evidence of UFOs
Walled Off Some government agencies are standing in the way of efforts to catalog reports of "unidentified aerial phenomenon," Politico reports , citing several current and former government officials. Back in 2017, reports emerged of a secretive Pentagon program that was tasked to look into unexplained UFO sightings in military airspace. Several of these incidents were caught on video, and in Ja
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After Latest Explosion, Elon Musk Vows to Test Another Starship Within Days
Another day, another Starship prototype explosion. In November, SpaceX's SN8 met its early damage after smashing into the ground, followed by SN9 in February. SN10 came closest to touching down successfully earlier this month, appearing to make a soft landing before blowing to bits mere minutes later. Less than a month later, SpaceX rolled out its SN11 prototype onto the launchpad. This morning's
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VW's New "Voltswagen" Name Not an April Fool's Joke
Voltswagen German carmaker Volkswagen is really rebranding its North American division to "Voltswagen," a nod to its electrified future. The company accidentally leaked the news, as spotted by CNBC , on Monday afternoon, with many suggesting it may have been a poorly timed April fool's joke. Now, VW has confirmed that is indeed renaming the division in a press release . "We might be changing out
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The Vaccine Line Is an Illusion
I've always been a rule follower. So when I learned that my state, Virginia, was currently vaccinating only people older than 65, people with health conditions, and essential workers, I decided to patiently wait my turn. I didn't prowl around pharmacies and hospitals at closing time, hoping for an extra dose. A few weeks ago, I signed up for Virginia's COVID-vaccine waitlist, closed my laptop, an
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Scientists Post Recipe for Moderna's COVID Vaccine for Free Online
A team of scientists at Stanford University have posted the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine's mRNA sequences it uses to fight the coronavirus and posted it on GitHub for anybody to download , Motherboard reports . "RNA vaccines have become a key tool in moving forward through the challenges raised both in the current pandemic and in numerous other public health and medical challenges," reads the four-pa
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Apes show dramatically different early immune responses compared to monkeys
A new study out of the University of Chicago and the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign in humans, chimpanzees, rhesus macaques and baboons has found key differences in early gene expression in response to pathogen exposure, highlighting the importance of choosing the right animal model for the right questions. The study was published on March 26 in Proceedings of the National Academy of Scie
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'No quick fix': improving empathy requires prolonged and intense therapy, experts say
Adults can enhance their empathy but successful patients need 'a certain base level' to begin with, according to psychologists • Former branch secretary surprised Laming revelations 'didn't happen sooner' Experts have warned "there is no quick fix" for improving empathy, as besieged Coalition MP Andrew Laming takes leave to undertake an empathy training course the government has ordered him to co
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Covid probably passed to humans from bats via other animal, finds WHO report
Much-delayed report from team that visited Wuhan all but rules out lab leak theory Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Covid-19 probably passed to humans from a bat via an intermediary animal, an international expert mission to China has concluded in a report, with investigators all but ruling out a laboratory leak. The intermediate host hypothesis was deemed "likely to
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Why People Keep Asking Which Vaccine You Got
The vaccines are here, and with them, the promise of getting back to some sort of normal. Over the coming months, many Americans will be returning to offices or schools, traveling to see family and friends, eating cheeseburgers inside sports bars. But the vaccines' arrival has also provided a more immediate relief: giving people something to talk about. After a year of awkward conversation , the
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Dark matter is the most likely source of excess of gamma rays from galactic center
In the recent past, space missions dedicated to the study of astrophysical signals in the high-energy spectrum revealed a series of enigmatic excesses not predicted by the theoretical models. In order to find an explanation for these anomalies, many solutions have been proposed. The most exciting hypothesis invokes the contribution of the elusive dark matter, the mysterious form of matter four tim
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South Korean President Announces Plans To Land On The Moon By 2030
Seoul to Satellite South Korean President Moon Jae-in announced a lofty goal last week: To launch a rocket developed in his country that's capable of landing a robotic lander on the Moon by 2030. In a speech given on March 25 at the Naro Space Center in Goheung, South Korea, President Moon unveiled plans to develop South Korea's space program to land on Earth's only natural satellite along with s
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There's a Better Way to Date Online—If You Like Trains
As a single person wandering through the world, it can be difficult to find someone who loves all the right things: parks, subways, bike lanes, human-scale buildings, high-density housing, debates over the ideal length of a city block. Even on a dating app, you can't always tell from a profile who might be thinking, behind a smile, I hate cars . But if this is exactly the sort of partner—or frien
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Closing the Social Distance
After a year spent social distancing, mask wearing and sheltering in place, the prospect of readjusting to in-person social engagements can be a daunting one.
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How lighthouse keepers show us the way in dark, isolated times
The importance of a beacon and having fortitude are key for lighthouse keepers – clues for us all when there's little else around Imagine being a lighthouse keeper. Before I dropped beneath the surface of this secluded, often secretive, occupation, the idea brought to mind wind-blown seagulls, or a bearded sea dog chewing his pipe. Such is the romantic notion many of us have about lighthouses. Th
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The Final Word on Tina Turner
Before "What's Love Got to Do With It" was a Grammy Hall of Fame record, the title of an Angela Bassett–fronted biopic, or a No. 1 hit on the Billboard Hot 100, it was a breathy little ditty sung by the British pop group Bucks Fizz. After the ABBA-reminiscent band recorded its rendition, the songwriter Terry Britten took his track to a very different artist who initially disliked it, before she b
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Why Ships Keep Crashing
When a big jet airplane crashes, it almost always makes headlines around the world, and for good reason: Fatal passenger accidents are extremely rare . Right now, though, the eyes of the world are on the Ever Given, the massive container ship still stubbornly lodged between the banks of the Suez Canal. The Ever Given's predicament is both highly unusual and typical: Seldom does a ship get stuck i
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Government Orders Elon Musk to Delete Anti-Union Tweet
Backspace Key The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) announced on Thursday that the electric automaker Tesla and its CEO Elon Musk violated federal labor law, and ruled that Musk has to delete an anti-union tweet from 2018. In this case, Musk had discouraged Tesla workers against unionizing within the United Automobile, Aerospace and Agricultural Implement Workers of America (UAW) by implying
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Scientist: If Asteroids Threaten Earth, We Should Blow Them Up With Missiles
Missile Command Italian astronomer and mathematician Claudio Maccone has a grand vision for how we can protect the Earth from any killer asteroids that dare to come our way. Basically, it boils down to blowing them up missiles, according to CNET . Lots of missiles, stationed in space around the planet, that would destroy or deflect space rocks that venture too close. Maccone's been at this for a
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Mathematicians Find a New Class of Digitally Delicate Primes
Take a look at the numbers 294,001, 505,447 and 584,141. Notice anything special about them? You may recognize that they're all prime — evenly divisible only by themselves and 1 — but these particular primes are even more unusual. If you pick any single digit in any of those numbers and change it, the new number is composite, and hence no longer prime. Change the 1 in 294,001 to a 7, for instance
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Realism About the Border Is in Short Supply
Despite some claims on cable news that President Joe Biden was " caught off guard " or " completely unprepared ," his administration foresaw the growing number of unaccompanied child migrants at the southwestern border. I worked in Barack Obama's White House during a similar surge in 2014. After the November election, I served on the Biden transition team, helping prepare the new administration f
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NASA begins final assembly of spacecraft destined for asteroid Psyche
A major component of NASA's Psyche spacecraft has been delivered to the agency's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Southern California, where the phase known as assembly, test, and launch operations is now underway. Over the next year, the spacecraft will finish assembly and undergo rigorous checkout and testing before it's shipped to Cape Canaveral, Florida, for an August 2022 launch to the main aster
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Fiber Optics Could Be the Key to Million-Qubit Quantum Computers
Bridging the gap between the c r yogenically-cooled inner working s of quantum computers and the conventional electronics that control them is an outstanding challenge. Current approaches look unlikely to scale, but new research suggests optical fibe r could be the key to creating devices big enough to revolutionize computing . The past decade has seen significant breakthroughs in quantum computi
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Radioactive molecules may help solve mystery of missing antimatter
Stars, galaxies, and everything in the universe, including our own bodies, are comprised of so-called regular matter. Regular matter includes atoms and molecules, which are made up of tiny particles, such as electrons, protons, and neutrons. These particles dominate our universe, vastly outnumbering their lesser-known counterparts: antimatter particles. First experimentally discovered in 1932 by t
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Ancient computer found in shipwreck decoded by scientists
Today, if you want to know when the next solar eclipse is going to be, you turn to Google. If you lived in ancient Greece, though, you might have used a device now known as the Antikythera mechanism . Considered the world's first analog computer, this marvel of ancient engineering used dozens of bronze gears to predict the positions of the Moon, Sun, and five planets, as well as the timing of sol
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Watch a Robot 3D Printing the Rocket for Relativity Space's First Orbital Launch
Relativity Space has the audacious goal of 3D printing 95 percent of a rocket and sending it to orbit. Getting to space is hard. But completely reinventing how rockets are manufactured at the same time? Harder. Six-year-old upstart Relativity may nail both by the end of this year. After several years designing, building, and testing their Terran 1 rocket, they're nearly ready to roll. This week t
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What AI Can Teach Us About the Myth of Human Genius
"Everyone knows it is impossible to turn the eyeball around, such that the pupil can peer inside the skull." So says the narrator of Stanislaw Lem's 1974 short story, "The Mask," in which a young woman struggles to describe the experience of realizing that, under her skin, she is a robot. The story's plot is fast-paced, but the reason the text is compelling—and upsetting—is Lem's skill at bending
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The science and technology that can help save the ocean
Here on Earth, we have more detailed maps of Mars than of our own ocean, and that's a problem. A massive force for surviving climate change, the ocean absorbs 90% of the heat caused by emissions and generates 50% of the oxygen we breathe. "We have the ocean to thank for so many aspects of our safety and well-being," says Dawn Wright, oceanographer and chief scientist at geographic information sys
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The road to quantum computing is paved in qubits
The race for the quantum computer will most likely be decided at the quantum bit (qubit) – the smallest information unit of the quantum computer. The coupling of several qubits into a computing system is currently one of the greatest challenges in the development of quantum computers. A key question is which physical system and which material are best suited for qubits. Development of qubits based
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Astronomy and landscape in the city of Caral, the oldest city in the Americas
A team of researchers, led by the Instituto de Ciencias del Patrimonio (Incipit-CSIC) and the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC), in collaboration with the team from the Arqueological Zone of Caral (Perú) led by Dr. Ruth Shady Solís, has established the relation between the position of the monuments of the Supe Culture (Perú), their orientations, and some astronomical and topographic featu
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Astronomers discover new galaxy clusters hiding in plain sight
MIT astronomers have discovered new and unusual galactic neighborhoods that previous studies overlooked. Their results, published today, suggest that roughly 1 percent of galaxy clusters look atypical and can be easily misidentified as a single bright galaxy. As researchers launch new cluster-hunting telescopes, they must heed these findings or risk having an incomplete picture of the universe.
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How Confident Are We That Dark Matter Is Real?
In the 1970s astronomer Vera Rubin was observing the Andromeda galaxy and discovered something very curious. Andromeda is a spiral galaxy, like our own, and spins like a pinwheel. The "spinning" is comprised of all the individual stars (and gas and dust, but the stars are what we can see) revolving around all the mass within their orbit. If you run the numbers, as stars get further away from the
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Pantry moths who eat each other prove a key principle of evolution
Researchers studied cannibalism among commonly-found moths to test an evolutionary principle. The scientists concluded that moths with more sibling interaction were less selfish. The principle applies to humans and other animals. A common moth, found in pantries, could explain a crucial link between society and selfishness, according to a new study. Researchers showed that an increase in sibling
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What does Moderna's Covid jab mean for the UK vaccine rollout?
US shot is as effective as existing jabs and is easier to store than Pfizer's – but it is not cheap Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The vaccine that Dolly Parton helped fund is to be used as part of the UK's coronavirus vaccine arsenal next month, but how crucial is the Moderna shot to the country's rollout? Continue reading…
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Scientists Complete First Human Test of Vaccine Against Brain Cancer
Scientists have tested a special vaccine intended to help the body fight brain cancers for the first time in humans. As detailed in a new paper published by the journal Nature , the team of researchers from the German Cancer Research Center (DFKZ) have created an early version of a vaccination that could trigger an immune response inside brain tumor tissues. Some usually incurable train tumors, c
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Trump's Presidency Is Over. So Are Many Relationships.
American political discourse was not exactly harmonious five years ago, but over the course of Donald Trump's presidency, it corroded even further. What's called the national conversation is really just millions of people communicating with each other, and if you could tune out all the yelling, you might be able to detect some of the silences that have arisen when two people stopped talking entir
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Party Primaries Must Go
W hy did so many Republicans— 147 of them —object to the Electoral College result on January 6? Most voted to overturn the election out of fear. Not fear of the angry mob that had invaded the Capitol hours earlier, but fear of the voters who might threaten their reelection––specifically in their next party primary. This is the "primary problem" in the U.S. political system today: A small minority
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Ancient physics: How Democritus predicted the atom
The idea of the atom goes as far back as the ancient Greek philosopher Democritus in about 400 B.C.E. This led to his "theory of eidôla " to explain how our minds create the illusion of reality. Democritus was one of the first determinists, arguing that a world made only of atoms and controlled by the laws of physics left no room for free will. Philosophers love "The Matrix". It's the perfect int
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Building customer relationships with conversational AI
We've all been there. "Please listen to our entire menu as our options have changed. Say or press one for product information…" Sometimes, these automated customer service experiences are effective and efficient—other times, not so much. Many organizations are already using chatbots and virtual assistants to help better serve their customers. These intelligent, automated self-service agents can h
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Keeping covid vaccines cold isn't easy. These ideas could help.
In order to truly end the pandemic, it will be essential to get vaccines to all parts of the world. The first part of that challenge involves boosting the supply and securing doses for all , but even if enough vaccines become ready, the next hurdles are storage and distribution. For some covid vaccines, that means shuttling through what's known as the "cold chain," a series of very well chilled e
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What If Clippy Was Your Life Coach?
Immersive theater group Future Proof's new dating sim PSweet is set inside a Microsoft Office-esque world, and it's every bit as odd and amazing as you'd imagine.
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The U.S. Doesn't Know How to Treat Its Allies
President Joe Biden is promising the world that " America is back ," but his effort to reclaim global leadership shouldn't come at the expense of the country's closest friends. At a NATO foreign ministers' meeting last week, Secretary of State Antony Blinken sharply criticized Germany's efforts to get more natural gas from Russia through a pipeline project known as Nord Stream 2. The president, B
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YouTube Banning Staged Animal Rescue Videos
A Disturbing Trend In a move that'll have you saying, "Why the hell wasn't this already a thing," YouTube is putting a ban on staged animal rescue videos. The social media platform told The Times that there is a "disturbing trend" of videos showcasing animals put in deadly situations, only to have them be "rescued" by the filmmakers. Videos of these fake animal rescues include puppies being const
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Screen Covid patients and NHS staff for post-traumatic stress, expert urges
Head of Royal College of Psychiatrists warns that the emotional toll from the pandemic could last for years Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage One of Britain's leading psychiatrists has warned that "all the dials are pointing the wrong way" on the nation's mental health, as he raises concerns of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among patients and NHS staff in the a
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Democracies Keep Vaccines for Themselves
Earlier this month, the United States promised to send Canada and Mexico a total of 4 million doses of the AstraZeneca vaccine, which is not yet being used to inoculate Americans against COVID-19. The commitment of 2.5 million vaccines to Mexico represents the largest single pledge of vaccine doses from one country to another so far in this crisis. Those doses are going to a neighbor in great nee
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A voice game boom is giving kids a break from screen time
In a Massachusetts home, a family gathers around the kitchen table. The parents tune in to the device that sits at the head of the table. Moments later, a cheery voice quiets the chatter as the whole family settles in to listen. No, this isn't a scene from the golden era of the wireless. This is the Daniels home during covid-19 lockdown, and the focus of the family's attention is Yoto , an audio
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After Their Second Vaccine Kicks In, This Is How People Are Reentering Society
SO FAR, MORE THAN 87 MILLION AMERICAN adults have gotten at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine — and over half of those folks are already fully vaccinated. That means that for a rapidly growing chunk of the population, there's finally a light at the end of the tunnel, meaning the most restrictive aspects of life under lockdown may soon come to an end. That doesn't mean that the pandemic will mi
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Child Tweets Nonsense From Official US Military Account
Secret Code On Monday, the US Strategic Command — that's the agency that controls the military's nukes — tweeted a bizarre string of characters that left the internet confused and perhaps mildly concerned. Not that there's anything wrong with occasionally firing up Twitter and broadcasting ";l;;gmlxzssaw" to the world, of course. But Stratcom helps oversee and manage the country's nuclear arsenal
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An ecosystem to overhaul China's health care
Like many countries, China has a health care problem. Changing demographics and lifestyles mean demand for health care is outstripping growth in medical resources and its cost is rising faster than the insurance premium. With 250 million people over the age of 60, the world's most populous country is ageing. Diseases associated with more affluent societies, such as cardiovascular conditions and d
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Astronomers inspect black hole X-ray binary MAXI J1348–630
An international team of astronomers has carried out a comprehensive radio and X-ray monitoring of a black hole X-ray binary known as MAXI J1348–630. The observational campaign provided important insights into the evolution of the source's compact and transient jets. The study was presented in a paper published March 22 on arXiv.org.
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Oil-eating bacteria could help to tackle spills
A team of scientists from Heriot-Watt University has created an underwater observatory in the Faroe-Shetland Channel—and found its waters are teeming with oil-eating bacteria that could help deal with future oil spills.
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A new spin on energy-efficient electronics
The promising field of spintronics seeks to manipulate electron spin to make a new breed of small and low-power electronic devices. A recent study used Argonne's Advanced Photon Source to bring the widespread use of spintronics closer to reality.
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Researchers shed new light on DNA replication
In preparation for cell division, cells need to replicate the DNA that they contain. A team of researchers from TU Delft, collaborating with investigators from the Francis Crick Institute in London, has now shown that the protein building blocks involved in the initial steps of DNA replication are mobile but reduce their speed at specific DNA sequences on the genome. Their findings, which were pub
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The Moderna and Pfizer vaccines are 90% effective at stopping infection in the real world too
The news: A "real-world" study of 3,950 people in six states found that two doses of the Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines cut the risk of infection by 90%. The findings are broadly in line with the 95% and 94% efficacy that the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines showed, respectively, in their clinical trials. The details: The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study recruited essential wo
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Queensland Covid outbreak: experts say hospitals already 'stressed' and health workers exposed
Two separate clusters of UK variant spread in Brisbane when unvaccinated health workers contracted coronavirus The Queensland hospital system was already "stressed" before the latest Covid outbreak partly because everyone with the virus is moved from hotel quarantine into hospital, but not all hospital workers have been vaccinated yet, experts say. There are now two separate clusters of the infec
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Why is it hard to get our head around fungi? (part one) – podcast
Our colleagues from The age of extinction , Phoebe Weston and Patrick Greenfield, are back with two new episodes. We often talk as if we know what species exist in the world – but we don't. Could misclassifying the notoriously cryptic fungi have broader implications for what we know about the environment, and how we care for it? Continue reading…
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Jordan's worsening water crisis a warning for the world
Prolonged and potentially destabilizing water shortages will become commonplace in Jordan by 2100, new research finds, unless the nation implements comprehensive reform, from fixing leaky pipes to desalinating seawater. Jordan's water crisis is emblematic of challenges looming around the world as a result of climate change and rapid population growth.
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Air pollution and physical exercise: When to do more or less
Physical activity is important in preventing heart and blood vessel disease in young people so long as they don't undertake very strenuous activity on days when air pollution levels are high, according to a nationwide study of nearly 1.5 million people published in the European Heart Journal.
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Probing wet fire smoke in clouds: Can water intensify the earth's warming?
A first-of-its-kind instrument that samples smoke from megafires and scans humidity will help researchers better understand the scale and long-term impact of fires—specifically how far and high the smoke will travel; when and where it will rain; and whether the wet smoke will warm the climate by absorbing sunlight.
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Activity is good: Varied activity is better
The recommendations are clear: physical activity is good for mental health. But it also depends on how varied it is. That's what a new study shows, pointing to one of the reasons why well-being suffers during the pandemic.
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A Bouncing, Swinging New Detection Method
Derek Lowe Here's an ingenious new detection technique for biomolecules that builds on a number of reports over the last few years. People have been working on electrochemical detectors using DNA constructs on electrode surfaces, but this would appear to be an improved way to do it. A team from Toronto reports using a "molecular pendulum" attached to an electrode surface, as shown at right. An an
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Scientists find explanation for abnormally fast release of gas from nuclear fuel
Scientists at MIPT have found a possible explanation for the anomalously fast release of gas from nuclear fuel. Supercomputer simulations have uncovered an unexpected mechanism for accelerating the escape of gas bubbles from the uranium dioxide crystal matrix to the surface. The result points the way to eliminate the paradoxical discrepancy of several orders of magnitude between existing theoretic
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Image: Hubble spots a galaxy with a peculiar arm
This image taken with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope features NGC 7678—a galaxy with one particularly prominent arm, located approximately 164 million light-years away in the constellation of Pegasus (the Winged Horse).
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Scientists discover a new auroral feature on Jupiter
The SwRI-led Ultraviolet Spectrograph (UVS) orbiting Jupiter aboard NASA's Juno spacecraft has detected new faint aurora features, characterized by ring-like emissions, which expand rapidly over time. SwRI scientists determined that charged particles coming from the edge of Jupiter's massive magnetosphere triggered these auroral emissions.
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Apes constantly reinvent the wheel
Great apes do not pass on their behavior to the next generation. Unlike humans, they do not copy the specific knowledge of those around them, instead learning it anew in each generation. This is shown in a study by Dr. Alba Motes-Rodrigo and Dr. Claudio Tennie of the "Tools and Culture in Early Hominins" research group at the University of Tübingen. "Metaphorically speaking, apes constantly have t
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In New Zealand, Locals Rally to Save Fossils from Destruction
For over a decade, a mining company allowed scientists to explore one of New Zealand's most spectacular fossil sites. When the site changed hands, it seemed the fossils would all be crushed to dust. But New Zealanders rallied behind the fossils. Has public resistance saved the site for science?
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Here's How We'll Know an AI Is Conscious – Facts So Romantic
Zombies are supposed to be capable of asking any question about the nature of experience. It's worth wondering, though, how a person or machine devoid of experience could reflect on experience it doesn't have. Photograph by Ars Electronica / Flickr The Australian philosopher David Chalmers famously asked whether "philosophical zombies" are conceivable—people who behave like you and me yet lack su
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Starwatch: don't miss gossamer beauty of the zodiacal light
Now is the best time of year to see glow caused by sunlight scattering off dust particles in space Now is the best time of the year to see the zodiacal light in the evening sky from the northern hemisphere. It's a subtle glow that takes some effort to notice, but is always worth your time because of its gossamer beauty. Continue reading…
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Gamla bomullstyger kan bli etanol
Nästintill inga av de textilier som slängs i världen återvinns. I en ny studie har en forskargrupp förfinat en teknik för hur man kan omvandla bomull till glukos, som i sin tur kan bli nylon, spandex eller etanol.
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Cities worldwide dim lights to mark Earth Hour
Cities around the world were turning off their lights Saturday for Earth Hour, with this year's event highlighting the link between the destruction of nature and increasing outbreaks of diseases like Covid-19.
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White House Considering Temporary Lift On COVID Vaccine IP Protections
The White House is reportedly considering suspending intellectual property protections for COVID-19 vaccines in order to give underserved nations more access to vaccines. The temporary lift on IP shields would include both COVID vaccines and treatments, several anonymous sources told CNBC . Doing so would allow other countries to replicate them for their own fight against the global pandemic. Thi
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This Week's Awesome Tech Stories From Around the Web (Through March 27)
ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE AI Could Enable 'Swarm Warfare' for Tomorrow's Fighter Jets Will Knight | Wired "Last March, [the Pentagon's] Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (Darpa) invited teams to develop AI systems capable of controlling fighter jets in aerial combat situations that exceed human abilities, including scenarios involving several aircraft. AI could allow multiple aircraft to 's
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More chances to see the Northern Lights
Activity on the sun, crucial for generating the charged particles we see in the sky as the aurora, is now on the increase . Our BBC Weather Watchers have grabbed some great shots of the recently and there could be more opportunities in the coming years as solar activity increases. Simon King finds out more.
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Differential regulation of local mRNA dynamics and translation following long-term potentiation and depression [Neuroscience]
Decades of work have demonstrated that messenger RNAs (mRNAs) are localized and translated within neuronal dendrites and axons to provide proteins for remodeling and maintaining growth cones or synapses. It remains unknown, however, whether specific forms of plasticity differentially regulate the dynamics and translation of individual mRNA species. To address…
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Plants remember drought
During drought, plants use a signalling molecule known from animals to limit their water loss. The molecule provides them with a kind of memory of how dry the day was.
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Så kan AI hjälpa dig att köpa rätt klädstorlek online
Kunder klickar hem flera exemplar av samma plagg och skickar tillbaka storleken som inte passar. Den höga andelen returer tär på miljön och på e-handelsföretagens ekonomi. Med nya teknologiska lösningar försöker branschen få kunden att hitta rätt storlek direkt. – Kan man hitta ett verktyg för detta kommer returer att minska drastiskt, säger industridoktorand Anna-Maria Petisme.
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Cardiorespiratory fitness improves grades at school
Studies indicate a link between children's cardiorespiratory fitness and their school performance: the more athletic they are, the better their marks in the main subjects. Similarly, cardiorespiratory fitness is known to benefit cognitive abilities. But what is the real influence of such fitness on school results? Researchers tested pupils from eight Geneva schools. Their results show that there i
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Depression affects visual perception
Information processing by the brain is altered in depressed individuals. A study conducted at the University of Helsinki found that in depressed patients, the processing of visual perceptions is also different.
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Light pollution from satellites 'poses threat' to astronomy
Mega-constellations could cause scientists to miss out on crucial discoveries, warn researchers Artificial satellites and space junk orbiting the Earth can increase the brightness of the night sky, researchers have found, with experts warning such light pollution could hinder astronomers' ability to make observations of our universe. There are more than 9,200 tonnes of space objects in orbit arou
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The Unending Assaults on Girlhood
Girlhood, Melissa Febos writes in her new essay collection of the same name, is "a darker time for many than we are often willing to acknowledge." The overall impression she creates is a collage of discomfitingly familiar rites of passage, all distinct and yet all tied together by a thread of learned self-abnegation. The book reads at moments like a meme built from various half-buried abuses and
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The Atlantic Daily: A Playlist for Spring Cleaning
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox. Growing up, I dreaded the routine arrival of what my mom and younger sister cheerfully called "Cinderella Saturdays." As the name suggests, we'd spend those mornings cleaning the house, checking o
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Controlling bubble formation on electrodes
Using electricity to split water into hydrogen and oxygen can be an effective way to produce clean-burning hydrogen fuel, with further benefits if that electricity is generated from renewable energy sources. But as water-splitting technologies improve, often using porous electrode materials to provide greater surface areas for electrochemical reactions, their efficiency is often limited by the for
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Chronic inflammatory liver disease: Cell stress mechanisms identified
Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a rare, chronic, inflammatory disease of the bile ducts and is difficult to treat, since its causes have not yet been adequately researched. An international research consortium has now succeeded in identifying a new prognostic factor for PSC from liver biopsies. This is so-called cellular ER stress.
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Primate innate immune responses to bacterial and viral pathogens reveals an evolutionary trade-off between strength and specificity [Evolution]
Despite their close genetic relatedness, apes and African and Asian monkeys (AAMs) differ in their susceptibility to severe bacterial and viral infections that are important causes of human disease. Such differences between humans and other primates are thought to be a result, at least in part, of interspecies differences in…
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Decoding smell
How does the nose know? Scientists now detail how the inborn ability to recognize certain odors is encoded in the nervous system of mice.
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Watch Dirt Spray Up as Starship Debris Lands Next to Camera
Orange Cloud SpaceX launched yet another full-scale prototype of its Mars-bound Starship early Tuesday morning at its test facilities in Boca Chica, Texas. Thanks to heavy fog, we had to watch the ensuing explosion in the form of a lit up orange cloud. The team at NASASpaceflight , who had set up remote cameras to record the events, are now reviewing the footage — and it's not pretty. Rain of Deb
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Mummified parrots point to trade in the ancient Atacama desert
Ancient Egyptians mummified cats, dogs, ibises and other animals, but closer to home in the South American Atacama desert, parrot mummies reveal that between 1100 and 1450 CE, trade from other areas brought parrots and macaws to oasis communities, according to an international and interdisciplinary team.
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COVID-19: Analysis of the sensitivity of the UK (B.1.1.7) and South African (B.1.351) variants to SARS-CoV-2 neutralizing antibodies
In a new study, scientists demonstrate that the UK variant to SARS-CoV-2 is neutralized to the same degree as the reference virus (D614G), whereas the South African variant is less sensitive to neutralizing antibodies. To neutralize the South African variant, the antibody concentrations need to be six times higher than for D614G. This difference in sensitivity was also observed in vaccinated indiv
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Availability Bias Is Messing With Summer Planning
Last spring, Jared Kushner predicted that the coronavirus pandemic would soon end and that the United States would be " really rocking again " by July. Some critics saw his statement, which proved so fatally wrong, as a form of deceit. I saw evidence of something more pitiful: Kushner had fallen prey to optimism bias and availability bias. Optimism clouded his judgment. He wanted things to be bet
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First steps towards revolutionary ULTRARAM™ memory chips
A new type of universal computer memory – ULTRARAM™ – has taken a step closer towards development with a successful experiment. 'Universal memory' is a memory where the data is robustly stored, but can also easily be changed; something that was widely considered to be unachievable until now. The new non-volatile RAM, called ULTRARAM™, is a working implementation of so-called 'universal memory', pr
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A scalable empathic supervision intervention to mitigate recidivism from probation and parole [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
Incarceration is a pervasive issue in the United States that is enormously costly to families, communities, and society at large. The path from prison back to prison may depend on the relationship a person has with their probation or parole officer (PPO). If the relationship lacks appropriate care and trust,…
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'Delay is as dangerous as denial': scientists urge Australia to reach net zero emissions faster
Heatwaves to double and many properties will be uninsurable if global heating reaches 3C, Australian Academy of Science says Global heating of 3C would more than double the number of annual heatwaves in some parts of Australia, leave properties uninsurable due to flood and fire risk, and make many of the country's ecosystems "unrecognisable", according to Australia's leading scientists. The Austr
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Paying to clear-cut the rain forests
In the last few years, as climate changes continues to become more severe, there has been a growing push for rich countries to pay poorer ones to preserve and protect rain forests and other tropical forests. However, according to a new study in Nature Ecology & Evolution, RIHN Associate Professor Keiichiro Kanemoto and Senior Researcher Nguyen Tien Hoang show that other financial motives, namely i
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Provisional COVID-19 infrastructure induces large, rapid increases in cycling [Sustainability Science]
The bicycle is a low-cost means of transport linked to low risk of transmission of infectious disease. During the COVID-19 crisis, governments have therefore incentivized cycling by provisionally redistributing street space. We evaluate the impact of this new bicycle infrastructure on cycling traffic using a generalized difference in differences design….
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Here's How Russia and China Are Helping the U.S.
While Western countries spar over access to the world's vaccine supply, China and Russia have been busy giving away theirs. This distribution of millions of doses, either for free or cheaply, to low- and middle-income nations has been met with skepticism by leaders in the United States and Europe, many of whom have raised concerns over the safety of the jabs, as well as Beijing's and Moscow's mot
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Stellar eggs near galactic center hatching into baby stars
Astronomers found a number of stellar eggs containing baby stars around the center of the Milky Way using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). Previous studies had suggested that the environment there is too harsh to form stars. These findings indicate that star formation is more resilient than researchers thought.
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Detecting for carpal tunnel syndrome with a smartphone game
A research group developed a game application for smartphones that estimates the possibility of carpal tunnel syndrome with machine learning. The program acquires the trajectory of the thumb during a game play in 30 sec — 1 minute, and detects the possibility of the disease.
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A forgotten settlement in the Cradle of Humankind adds a note to southern African history
About 50km outside South Africa's biggest city, Johannesburg, lies one of the most important sites in human prehistory: the Cradle of Humankind. Here, at sites like the Sterkfontein Caves, Swartkrans, Drimolen and Kromdraai, researchers have unearthed amazing fossil evidence from the Plio-Pleistocene (the last five million years). It is especially famous for the discovery of fossilized hominin—anc
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The unforeseen benefits of lockdown | Letters
Frank Land touches on the new opportunities provided by technology for exploration and novel experiences, while Ya'ir Klein says the pandemic has given us time for reflection, and Louise Smith uses science to explain strange happenings I can appreciate Richard Friedman's concerns about the damage lockdown can do to our brains and mental states ( If you're ecstatic after a trip to the shops, it's
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Biological Effects of Space Travel
Humans are simply not adapted to space. We evolved in 1G, the amount of gravity near the surface of the Earth, and are well suited to that environment. Spending a lot of time in microgravity, such as aboard the ISS, has a number of physiological effects. Now that some astronauts have been spending long periods of time aboard the ISS, researchers have been better able to understand these effects.
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Early Universe explosion sheds light on elusive black hole
Scientists discover one of the first black holes of its kind. Intermediate mass black holes (100 to 100,000 times the mass of the sun) have only been directly detected once before (LIGO, last year). They form an important link between the smaller black holes left behind after the deaths of stars, and the supermassive black holes which lurk in the hearts of every galaxy. The astrophysicists also fi
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Exploring the moon's shadowed regions using beamed energy
In less than three years, astronauts will return to the moon for the first time since the Apollo Era. As part of the Artemis Program, the purpose is not only to send crewed missions back to the lunar surface to explore and collect samples. This time around, there's also the goal of establishing vital infrastructure (like the Lunar Gateway and a Base Camp) that will allow for "sustained lunar explo
1d
Even with regular exercise, astronaut's heart left smaller after a year in space
With NASA preparing to send humans to Mars in the 2030s, researchers are studying the physical effects of spending long periods in space. Now a new study by scientists at UT Southwestern shows that the heart of an astronaut who spent nearly a year aboard the International Space Station shrank, even with regular exercise, although it continued to function well.
22h
EU plan threatens British participation in hi-tech research
Commission security proposal would restrict UK access to Horizon Europe quantum computing project Britain will join China in being locked out of research with the EU on cutting-edge quantum technology, such as new breeds of supercomputers, due to security concerns under a European commission proposal opposed by academics and 19 member states. At a meeting on Friday, commission officials said the
27min
Why the capitalist market model destroys the safeguards of some professions
The young doctor was desperate. 'I need to talk to my patients,' she said, 'and give them time to ask questions." "Some of them are foreign-born and struggle with the language, and all of them are in distress! But I hardly have the time to explain the essentials to them. There's all the paperwork, and we're constantly understaffed.' Such grievances have become sadly familiar – not only in medicin
1d
Doubling down on headache pain
It's not uncommon for people who experience a concussion to have moderate to severe headaches in the weeks after the injury. A new study has found a combination of two drugs, both common anti-nausea medications, given intravenously in the emergency room may relieve those headaches better than a placebo.
1d
Cells rely on their crampons to avoid slipping
Scientists have highlighted the key role of a protein called paxillin, which enables cells to perceive their environment and anchor at the right place with the help of cellular 'crampons'. Indeed, without functional paxillin, the cell is unable to attach properly and slips continuously. These results shed new light on how cells adhere or migrate, mechanisms essential to the good functioning of our
1d
Researchers first to link silicon atoms on surfaces
Materials such as gallium arsenide are extremely important for the production of electronic devices. As supplies of it are limited, or they can present health and environmental hazards, specialists are looking for alternative materials. So-called conjugated polymers are candidates. These organic macromolecules have semi-conductor properties, i.e. they can conduct electricity under certain conditio
5h
Astronomers thought comet Borisov was pretty boring. They were wrong
Our solar system is full of comets that whizz by as we track them over centuries. But humans have so far seen only two visiting objects from outside the solar system. There's 'Oumuamua, the interstellar asteroid that we think might actually be a flat pancake-like rock originating from the remains of an exoplanet similar to Pluto. It's so weird that people thought maybe it was an alien spacecraft.
33min
Deciphering the secrets of printed electronics
A team of researchers has published a comprehensive review of the development of printed electronics. This will enable researchers to address problems within the field of flexible, bendable, stretchable and intelligent electronics.
22h
Political beliefs shape whether we notice social inequality
Those on the left of the political spectrum are more likely than those on the right to notice social inequality, but only when it affects typically disadvantaged groups, a new study from the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University has shown.
22h
How cells transport molecules with 'active carpets'
New fundamental physics research provides insights on the process of diffusion in complex systems such as living organisms. This new theoretical framework has broad implications for active surfaces, such as ones found in bacterial biofilms, active coatings, and pathogen-clearance mechanisms for human health.
1d
Ant invasion: How pets become pests
When I was a teenager, I volunteered in the rainforest exhibit at an aquarium. A few times a week, we'd get a phone call from someone looking to donate a pet that they could no longer care for. Mostly turtles and frogs. The occasional parrot. Once, a retired dancer wanted to find a new home for two boa constrictors that had been part of her act.
1d
An improved safety standard for bionic devices
While bionic devices are very safe, there has been no standard test for moisture leakage into the devices – until now. Researchers say a standard test will be increasingly important as bionic implants become more common.
5h
Mapping policy for how the EU can reduce its impact on tropical deforestation
EU imports of products including palm oil, soybeans, and beef contribute significantly to deforestation in other parts of the world. In a new study, researchers evaluated over a thousand policy proposals for how the EU could reduce this impact, to assess which would have the largest potential to reduce deforestation – while also being politically feasible.
1d
Genomic secrets of organisms that thrive in extreme deep-sea
Scientists have decoded the genomes of the deep-sea clam (Archivesica marissinica) and the chemoautotrophic bacteria (Candidatus Vesicomyosocius marissinica) that live in its gill epithelium cells. Through analysis of their genomic structures and profiling of their gene expression patterns, the research team revealed that symbiosis between the two partners enables the clams to thrive in extreme de
1d
A coupled human-natural system analysis of freshwater security under climate and population change [Environmental Sciences]
Limited water availability, population growth, and climate change have resulted in freshwater crises in many countries. Jordan's situation is emblematic, compounded by conflict-induced population shocks. Integrating knowledge across hydrology, climatology, agriculture, political science, geography, and economics, we present the Jordan Water Model, a nationwide coupled human–natural-engineered syst
34min
Coastal lupine faces specific extinction threat from climate change
Climate change is altering the world we share with all living things. But it's surprisingly difficult to single out climate change as an extinction threat for any one particular species protected under the Endangered Species Act. A new analysis of population data shows that climate change represents a specific extinction threat for an endangered coastal lupine plant.
21h
How coastal forests are managed can impact water cycle
Younger trees take up and release less water than mature trees 10 years or older, researchers from North Carolina State University found in a new study that tracked how water moves through wetland pine forests near the North Carolina coast.
22h
The model minority myth hides the racist and sexist violence experienced by Asian women
Six women of Asian descent were among eight people tragically killed in a targeted shooting on March 16 in Atlanta. The initial denial by the Atlanta police that this was a hate crime, along with some news reports highlighting the offender's version of the incident, evoked a swift reaction by communities all over North America. Many spoke of the invisibility of anti-Asian racism.
1d
Narwal tusks reveal mercury exposure related to climate change
In the Arctic, climate change and pollution are the biggest threats to top predators like narwals. Studying the animals' tusks reveals that diet and exposure to pollution have shifted over the past half century in response to sea-ice decline. Human emissions have also led to a sharp rise in the presence of mercury in recent years, according to an international team of researchers.
23h
This ultrathin sensor could save your lungs—and the climate
Nitrogen dioxide, an air pollutant emitted by fossil fuel-powered cars and gas-burning stoves is not only bad for the climate—it's bad for our health. Long-term exposure to NO2 has been linked to increased heart disease, respiratory diseases such as asthma, and infections.
1d
Laser lights the way
Despite the enormous amount of research over the decades into lasers and their applications, there have been few ways to accurately, efficiently, and directly observe fine details of their interactions with materials. For the first time, researchers have found a way to acquire such data from a production laser using low-cost equipment that could vastly improve the accuracy of items cut or etched w
1d
Increased precipitation and the watery miracles of Italian saints
Until now, historians have treated accounts of extreme weather events that might indicate climate change, or more specifically an increase in rainfall, with suspicion. Too many purely cultural factors, they argue, might have influenced one author or another to write about rains, droughts or floods.
1d
DNA: Metal double helix
Nanowires are vital components for future nanoelectronics, sensors, and nanomedicine. To achieve the required complexity, it is necessary to control the position and growth of the metal chains on an atomic level. A research team has introduced a novel approach that generates precisely controlled, helical, palladium-DNA systems that mimic the organization of natural base pairs in a double-stranded
3d
'Spacekime theory' could speed up research and heal the rift in physics
Our linear model of time may be holding back scientific progress. Spacekime theory can help us better understand the development of diseases, financial and environmental events, and even the human brain. This theory helps us better utilize big data, develop AI, and can even solve inconsistencies in physics. We take for granted the western concept of linear time. In ancient Greece, time was cyclic
1h
Factors that may predict next pandemic
New modeling identifies country-specific human and human-influenced environmental factors associated with disease outbreaks. A country's land area, human population density, and area of forest are associated with zoonotic diseases, like COVID-19. Human development index, average annual temperature, and health expenditure predict other kinds of disease.
58min
New statistical method eases data reproducibility crisis
A reproducibility crisis is ongoing in scientific research, where many studies may be difficult or impossible to replicate and thereby validate, especially when the study involves a very large sample size. Now researchers have developed a statistical tool that can accurately estimate the replicability of a study, thus eliminating the need to duplicate the work and effectively mitigating the reprod
3h
Researchers notice pattern on surface of leaves, uncover new clue about plant evolution
A doctoral student has identified a long-overlooked pattern in how plants evolved their equivalent of lungs — tiny pores on the surfaces of leaves called stomata. Using specialized imaging techniques and a plant species not often found in laboratories, researchers say this discovery reveals a key difference in the evolution of plants that live on land versus those that can grow in water.
15h
First detailed look at crucial enzyme advances cancer research
Because Taspase 1 dysregulation is increasingly implicated in the genesis and metastasis of various cancers, it has become an attractive candidate for drug development. But before this can happen, researchers will need a highly detailed blueprint of the structure of this protease. In a new study appearing in the Cell Press journal Structure, researchers from Arizona State University describe their
21h
Many planetary systems prematurely evaporate into thin air
When stars are born, large clouds of gas and dust form that are known as circumstellar discs. Research by Ph.D. candidate Francisca Concha-Ramírez shows that strong radiation from neighboring stars soon evaporates the dust in these discs, which can prevent planet formation at an early stage. Ph.D. defence on 6 April.
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Carried with the wind: Mass migration of Larch Budmoth to the Russian High Arctic
In the summer of 2020, hundreds of Larch Budmoths were observed on Vize Island, in the Russian High Arctic, likely transported over 1,200 km by air currents from Siberia. This is the first and only terrestrial invertebrate to ever be discovered on the island. This finding could mean that Vize island is less isolated from insect migrants than was commonly thought.
1d
The Mortifications of Beverly Cleary
The childhood memories we retain most searingly tend to involve shame. When I was 6, after being chided twice for talking too loudly during lunch, I was made to stand in the cafeteria by myself until the other kids finished their food. I can't even type that sentence without flushing at how conspicuously bad I felt, and how alone. Humiliation is a kind of trauma; when we experience it, our nervou
1h
Corridor test of Proba-3's formation flying sensors
The longest corridor in ESA's largest establishment was turned into a test site for one of the Agency's most ambitious future missions, Proba-3. The two satellites making up this mission will line up so that one casts a shadow onto the other, revealing inner regions of the Sun's ghostly atmosphere. But such precision formation flying will only be possible through a vision-based sensor system allow
5h
Homeroom: Returning to the Classroom Might Not Be Easy
Editor's Note: Every Tuesday, Abby Freireich and Brian Platzer take questions from readers about their kids' education. Have one? Email them at homeroom@theatlantic.com. Dear Abby and Brian, Our 11-year-old son has been in virtual learning since March 2020. It's been a daily struggle, to say the least. He is an only child who is incredibly social, and we can see the isolation taking its toll on h
6h
Did Earth eat the protoplanet it crashed into long ago?
Many experts believe that the Moon was formed when a protoplanet named Theia crashed into the Earth 4.5 billion years ago. One flaw in the theory has been that there's no remaining sign of Theia. New research suggests that Theia's mantle was subsumed by Earth and that large anomalous blogs of rock deep within the Earth are its remains. They're called "large low-shear-velocity provinces" (LLSVPs),
11h
New early warning system for self-driving cars
A team of researchers has developed a new early warning system for vehicles that uses artificial intelligence to learn from thousands of real traffic situations. The results show that, if used in today's self-driving vehicles, it can warn seven seconds in advance against potentially critical situations that the cars cannot handle alone – with over 85% accuracy.
58min
NASA's Curiosity Mars rover takes selfie with 'Mont Mercou'
At the start of March, NASA's Curiosity Mars rover began approaching an impressive rock formation that scientists dubbed "Mont Mercou," a nickname taken from a mountain in France. Standing about 20 feet (6 meters) tall, the outcrop is captured in all its majesty in a new selfie, as well as in a pair of panoramas that offer a 3D view. The selfie shows Curiosity in front of Mont Mercou with a new dr
1h

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