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Artificial intelligence as a co-driver
Artificial intelligence (AI) is becoming more common in many branches of industry and online retailing. Traditional lines of work, such as transport logistics and driving, are developing in a similar direction. Scientists have now investigated how efficient the use of AI is in the commercial management of trucks. Their answer: the best option is an intelligent combination of human decision-making
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Weekend reads: JAMA editor placed on leave pending investigation; Harvard prof sanctioned for Epstein ties; when bad science goes uncorrected
Before we present this week's Weekend Reads, a question: Do you enjoy our weekly roundup? If so, we could really use your help. Would you consider a tax-deductible donation to support Weekend Reads, and our daily work? Thanks in advance. The week at Retraction Watch featured: "Riddled with errors": Study of cell phones and breast cancer … Continue reading
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Hidden dwarf galaxies revealed in first images of the "cosmic web"
An international team of scientists has taken the first image of the web like structure that shapes the cosmos. The images are the first direct look at the largest known objects in the universe. The images also suggest far more dwarf galaxies exist than previously thought, provoking questions about how they form. You might not have heard of them if you aren't an astronomer, but the largest known
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A Contest Is Sending These Mere Mortals Into Orbit For Free
Earlier this year, a billionaire named Jared Isaacman announced that he was picking three lucky winners to go to on a free multi-day journey into orbit on board a SpaceX Crew Dragon capsule. Isaacman, who is helping finance the expedition — and will be joining in on the fun himself — announced at the time that he's looking to raise money for childhood cancer research through a raffle. Bone cancer
48min
Clearing of woody weeds in Baringo County, Kenya, may yield major livelihood benefits
Clearing the invasive woody weed Prosopis julifora and grassland restoration in Baringo County, Kenya, may have significant financial benefits for local stakeholders and contribute to climate change mitigation.Climate change, land degradation, and invasive alien species (IAS) such as Prosopis julifora are major threats to people's livelihoods in arid and semi-arid areas with each of these having n
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Putting a spin on Heusler alloys
A study published in the journal Science and Technology of Advanced Materials summarizes the major achievements made to-date in Heusler alloy research. "Our review article can serve as an ideal reference for researchers in magnetic materials," says Atsufumi Hirohata of the University of York, UK, who specializes in spintronics.
4h
Standing out: Unusual magnetic transition in perovskite oxide can help boost spintronics
Transition metal perovskite oxides exhibit several desirable properties, including high-temperature superconductivity and electrocatalysis. Now, scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology explore the structure and properties of a perovskite oxide, PbFeO3, in anticipation of the unusual charge distribution and exotic magnetic transitions displayed by such systems. They report two of the magnetic t
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Carbon labeling reduces our carbon dioxide footprint—even for those who try to remain uninformed
Climate labels informing us of a meat product's carbon footprint cause many people to opt for climate-friendlier alternatives. This applies to people who are curious about a product's carbon footprint, as well as to those who actively avoid wanting to know more. The finding is published in a new study from, among others, the University of Copenhagen. As such, climate labeling food products can be
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ATLAS searches for pairs of Higgs bosons in a rare particle decay
Since the Higgs boson was discovered in 2012, scientists at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) have been studying the properties of this very special particle and its relation to the fundamental mechanism essential to the generation of mass of elementary particles. One property that remains to be experimentally verified is whether the Higgs boson is able to couple to itself, known as self-coupling. S
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The diversity of stomatal development regulation in Callitriche is related to the intrageneric diversity in lifestyles [Plant Biology]
Stomata, the gas exchange structures of plants, are formed by the division and differentiation of stem cells, or meristemoids. Although diverse patterns of meristemoid behavior have been observed among different lineages of land plants, the ecological significance and diversification processes of these different patterns are not well understood. Here we…
34min
New oil palm map to inform policy and landscape-level planning
IIASA researchers have used Sentinel 1 satellite imagery from the European Space Agency to produce a map of the extent and year of detection of oil palm plantations in Indonesia, Malaysia, and Thailand that will help policymakers and other stakeholders understand trends in oil palm expansion while also providing an accurate map for landscape-level planning.
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The egg in the X-ray beam: A peek at what happens to an egg when you cook it
A team of scientists has been using DESY's X-ray source PETRA III to analyze the structural changes that take place in an egg when you cook it. The work reveals how the proteins in the white of a chicken egg unfold and cross-link with each other to form a solid structure when heated. Their innovative method can be of interest to the food industry as well as to the broad field of research surroundi
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High-entropy-stabilized chalcogenides with high thermoelectric performance
Thermoelectric technology can generate electricity from waste heat, although their performance can result in a bottleneck for wider applications. Materials scientists can regulate the configurational entropy of a material by introducing different atomic species to tune phase composition and extend the performance optimization space. In a new report now on Science, Binbin Jang et al. used an n-type
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Although not venemous, a mouse's bite holds venomous potential
We are not venomous, and neither are mice – but within our genomes lurks that potential, suggest scientists The researchers found that the genetic foundation required for oral venom to evolve is present in both reptiles and mammals. The study also provides the first concrete evidence of an underlying molecular link between venom glands in snakes and salivary glands in mammals.
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Six pregnancy complications are among red flags for heart disease later in life
Women who have high blood pressure during pregnancy, gestational diabetes, preterm delivery, small-for-gestational-age delivery, pregnancy loss or placental abruption are more likely to develop cardiovascular disease later in life compared to women who had no pregnancy complications.Health care systems' transition of care for women after pregnancy complications should include more vigorous cardiov
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Serial reproduction reveals the geometry of visuospatial representations [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
An essential function of the human visual system is to locate objects in space and navigate the environment. Due to limited resources, the visual system achieves this by combining imperfect sensory information with a belief state about locations in a scene, resulting in systematic distortions and biases. These biases can…
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Kloke Hans – världens smartaste häst?
Hästen som kunde räkna Den tyske hästen Kloke Hans ("der Kluge Hans", internationellt mest känd som "Clever Hans") var en sensation på sin tid. I början på 1900-talet turnerade den … Continued Inlägget dök först upp på Vetenskap och Folkbildning .
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Prosthetic fin could save injured rare turtles
Researchers from AUT BioDesign Lab have developed a prosthetic fin to rehabilitate injured sea turtles. Healthy oceans need sea turtles, but they are unfortunately frequently injured by human factors such as boats and fishing nets, with all seven species now endangered. A damaged fin limits swimming range and survival and prevents female turtles from returning to land to lay eggs. A successful pro
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Master Your Guitar Skills the New Age Way with PocketGuitar
You might think that strumming a guitar without an actual instrument would be like playing soccer without a ball. And back in the day, you may have been right. But now that technology has caught up to the world of music, you can hit those riffs and chords without a guitar string in sight and conjure up some pretty sweet tunes, all thanks to this fabulous innovation . Say hello to the PocketGuitar
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Study shows survival mechanism for cells under stress
New research reveals how cancer cells endure stress and survive. Publishing in Molecular Cell, an international research team identified mechanisms that human and mouse cells use to survive heat shock and resume their original function—and even pass the memory of the experience of stress down to their daughter cells.
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An industrially viable competitor to silicon-based solar cells is in the works
Kanazawa University led-researchers Assistant Professor Md. Shahiduzzaman and Professor Tetsuya Taima, in collaboration with Tokai University, The Hong Kong Polytechnique University (Hong Kong), Waseda University, The National University of Malaysia (Malaysia), and Stanford University (USA) developed a perovskite solar cell that optimized light incoupling, light trapping, and other essential prope
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Presynaptic {alpha}2{delta} subunits are key organizers of glutamatergic synapses [Neuroscience]
In nerve cells the genes encoding for α2δ subunits of voltage-gated calcium channels have been linked to synaptic functions and neurological disease. Here we show that α2δ subunits are essential for the formation and organization of glutamatergic synapses. Using a cellular α2δ subunit triple-knockout/knockdown model, we demonstrate a failure in…
34min
Nytt poröst material kan göra förnybar energi från vatten
Att framställa vätgas från vatten med hjälp av solljus är en möjlig källa till förnybar energi i framtiden. Forskare vid Linköpings universitet har utvecklat ett material, så kallat nanoporöst kubiskt kiselkarbid, som har lovande egenskaper för att fånga solenergi och klyva vatten för sådan vätgasproduktion. – Vi behöver utveckla nya hållbara energisystem för att möta både världens energibehov oc
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About 50% of people in UK have antibodies against coronavirus
Study by Office for National Statistics based on data from blood test results Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Half of people in the UK now have antibodies against coronavirus, either through infection or vaccination, tests conducted by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) show. According to the most recent coronavirus infection survey , an estimated 54.7% of the
9min
Climate crisis: Keeping hope of 1.5°C limit alive is vital to spurring global action
Ever since governments at the 2015 Paris climate summit set 1.5°C as the desired limit for global warming, scientists and journalists alike have regularly asked whether it is achievable. The question arose again recently when the UN published a report of national emission-cutting pledges for the next decade. It will be posed regularly before the publication of the IPCC's Sixth Assessment Report in
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A general-purpose force field for coarse-grained molecular dynamics
Simulating the interactions between atoms and molecules is important for many scientific studies. However, accurate simulations can take a long time, which limits their use. To speed up simulations without sacrificing too much detail, Siewert-Jan Marrink, Professor of Molecular Dynamics at the University of Groningen, designed a set of parameters that allow fast but accurate coarse-grained simulat
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Measuring shoreline retreat with Earth observation satellites
Climate change is having an undeniable influence on coastal areas. A substantial proportion of the world's sandy coastlines are already eroding owing to increased storm surges, flooding and sea level rise. With our coastal environments in constant change, Earth observation satellites are being used to better strengthen our knowledge of changing coastlines.
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Faster and less-invasive atomic force microscopy for visualizing biomolecular systems
High-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM) is an imaging technique that can be used for visualizing biological processes, for example the activity of proteins. Nowadays, typical HS-AFM frame rates are as high as 12 frames per second. In order to improve the capabilities of the method, so that it can be applied to an ever expanding range of biological samples, better video rates are needed, though
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Understanding how cells repair DNA may lead to targeted cancer treatments
The human body is made up of trillions of cells that divide throughout a person's lifetime. Each time a cell divides, its genetic material is copied and reproduced so the duplicate carries the same information. This process of DNA replication happens continuously in humans and cells use a series of biological safety nets to make sure the process goes smoothly.
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Image: Engine of Atlantis
The second European Service Module that will power the Orion spacecraft on a crewed flyby of the moon is fitted with a special engine at Airbus facilities in Germany.
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UMD reports six novel variants for CRISPR-Cas12a in plants, expanding genome engineering
Associate professor of Plant Science at the University of Maryland Yiping Qi continues to innovate genome editing and engineering in plants, with the ultimate goal of improving the efficiency of food production. His new work contributes six novel variants of CRISPR-Cas12a in plants, testing first in rice as a major global crop. In addition to broadening possible gene editing targets, these tools c
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Herpesvirus triggers cervical cancer affecting nearly one in four adult sea lions
After more than three decades of research, scientists have proven that the cancer affecting up to one in four adult California sea lions necrospied at The Marine Mammal Center in Sausalito, CA, is caused by a sexually transmitted herpesvirus. The cancer, known as sea lion urogenital carcinoma, has clear parallels to cervical cancer in humans and provides a helpful model for human cancer study.
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How will the biggest tropical trees respond to climate change?
Giant trees in tropical forests, witnesses to centuries of civilization, may be trapped in a dangerous feedback loop according to a new report in Nature Plants from researchers at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) in Panama and the University of Birmingham, U.K. The biggest trees store half of the carbon in mature tropical forests, but they could be at risk of death as a result of
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Why are optical refractive indices so small?
Pink Floyd's Dark Side of the Moon cover, voted the greatest classical rock album of all time, intended to portray the prism and dispersion of light into a rainbow as a certain metaphorical symbolism and a light show that was never celebrated. However, they really were not aware of the fact that this image would be used by many to help illustrate the concept of refractive index and how light chang
15min
Mysterious living monuments
Scientists think that climate change may have greater impact the largest trees in tropical forests, and the death of these giants has a major impact on the forest, but because these monumental trees are few and far between, almost nothing is known about what causes them to die.
17min
First interstellar comet may be the most pristine ever found
New observations indicate that the rogue comet 2I/Borisov, which is only the second and most recently detected interstellar visitor to our Solar System, is one of the most pristine ever observed. Astronomers suspect that the comet most likely never passed close to a star, making it an undisturbed relic of the cloud of gas and dust it formed from.
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Scientists Engineer Synthetic Bacteria That Multiplies Like the Real Thing
FrankenBacteria The first-ever bacteria with a genetic code engineered entirely from scratch in a lab is now growing, splitting, and multiplying just like any unicellular organism found in nature. National Institute of Standards and Technology scientists (NIST) first developed the bacteria JCVI back in 2010, according to a press release on the project. Since then, it's been a matter of improving
25min
Associations between adolescent cannabis use and young-adult functioning in three longitudinal twin studies [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
Observational studies have linked cannabis use to an array of negative outcomes, including psychiatric symptoms, cognitive impairment, and educational and occupational underachievement. These associations are particularly strong when cannabis use occurs in adolescence. Nevertheless, causality remains unclear. The purpose of the present study was thus to examine associations between prospectively..
34min
Upgraded CRISPR/Cas9 tools for tissue-specific mutagenesis in Drosophila [Genetics]
CRISPR/Cas9 has emerged as a powerful technology for tissue-specific mutagenesis. However, tissue-specific CRISPR/Cas9 tools currently available in Drosophila remain deficient in three significant ways. First, many existing gRNAs are inefficient, such that further improvements of gRNA expression constructs are needed for more efficient and predictable mutagenesis in both somatic and…
34min
Molecular mechanism of abnormally large nonsoftening deformation in a tough hydrogel [Applied Physical Sciences]
Tough soft materials usually show strain softening and inelastic deformation. Here, we study the molecular mechanism of abnormally large nonsoftening, quasi-linear but inelastic deformation in tough hydrogels made of hyperconnective physical network and linear polymers as molecular glues to the network. The interplay of hyperconnectivity of network and effective load…
34min
A limited role of NKCC1 in telencephalic glutamatergic neurons for developing hippocampal network dynamics and behavior [Neuroscience]
NKCC1 is the primary transporter mediating chloride uptake in immature principal neurons, but its role in the development of in vivo network dynamics and cognitive abilities remains unknown. Here, we address the function of NKCC1 in developing mice using electrophysiological, optical, and behavioral approaches. We report that NKCC1 deletion from…
34min
Mapping temperature-dependent conformational change in the voltage-sensing domain of an engineered heat-activated K+ channel [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Temperature-dependent regulation of ion channel activity is critical for a variety of physiological processes ranging from immune response to perception of noxious stimuli. Our understanding of the structural mechanisms that underlie temperature sensing remains limited, in part due to the difficulty of combining high-resolution structural analysis with temperature stimulus. Here,…
34min
Interplays of electron and nuclear motions along CO dissociation trajectory in myoglobin revealed by ultrafast X-rays and quantum dynamics calculations [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Ultrafast structural dynamics with different spatial and temporal scales were investigated during photodissociation of carbon monoxide (CO) from iron(II)–heme in bovine myoglobin during the first 3 ps following laser excitation. We used simultaneous X-ray transient absorption (XTA) spectroscopy and X-ray transient solution scattering (XSS) at an X-ray free electron laser…
34min
ZYP1 is required for obligate cross-over formation and cross-over interference in Arabidopsis [Genetics]
The synaptonemal complex is a tripartite proteinaceous ultrastructure that forms between homologous chromosomes during prophase I of meiosis in the majority of eukaryotes. It is characterized by the coordinated installation of transverse filament proteins between two lateral elements and is required for wild-type levels of crossing over and meiotic progression….
34min
miR-218-2 regulates cognitive functions in the hippocampus through complement component 3-dependent modulation of synaptic vesicle release [Neuroscience]
microRNA-218 (miR-218) has been linked to several cognition related neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders. However, whether miR-218 plays a direct role in cognitive functions remains unknown. Here, using the miR-218 knockout (KO) mouse model and the sponge/overexpression approaches, we showed that miR-218-2 but not miR-218-1 could bidirectionally regulate the contextual and…
34min
Fluid-like elastic response of superionic NH3 in Uranus and Neptune [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Nondipolar magnetic fields exhibited at Uranus and Neptune may be derived from a unique geometry of their icy mantle with a thin convective layer on top of a stratified nonconvective layer. The presence of superionic H2O and NH3 has been thought as an explanation to stabilize such nonconvective regions. However,…
34min
Invariant plastic deformation mechanism in paramagnetic nickel-iron alloys [Engineering]
The Invar anomaly is one of the most fascinating phenomena observed in magnetically ordered materials. Invariant thermal expansion and elastic properties have attracted substantial scientific attention and led to important technological solutions. By studying planar faults in the high-temperature magnetically disordered state of Ni1−cFec, here we disclose a completely different…
34min
The crystal structure of a 250-kDa heterotetrameric particle explains inhibition of sheddase meprin {beta} by endogenous fetuin-B [Biochemistry]
Meprin β (Mβ) is a multidomain type-I membrane metallopeptidase that sheds membrane-anchored substrates, releasing their soluble forms. Fetuin-B (FB) is its only known endogenous protein inhibitor. Herein, we analyzed the interaction between the ectodomain of Mβ (MβΔC) and FB, which stabilizes the enzyme and inhibits it with subnanomolar affinity. The…
34min
The myosin II coiled-coil domain atomic structure in its native environment [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
The atomic structure of the complete myosin tail within thick filaments isolated from Lethocerus indicus flight muscle is described and compared to crystal structures of recombinant, human cardiac myosin tail segments. Overall, the agreement is good with three exceptions: the proximal S2, in which the filament has heads attached but…
34min
Tuning interactions between spins in a superconductor [Applied Physical Sciences]
Novel many-body and topological electronic phases can be created in assemblies of interacting spins coupled to a superconductor, such as one-dimensional topological superconductors with Majorana zero modes (MZMs) at their ends. Understanding and controlling interactions between spins and the emergent band structure of the in-gap Yu–Shiba–Rusinov (YSR) states they induce…
34min
Substrate discrimination and quality control require each catalytic activity of TRAMP and the nuclear RNA exosome [Biochemistry]
Quality control requires discrimination between functional and aberrant species to selectively target aberrant substrates for destruction. Nuclear RNA quality control in Saccharomyces cerevisiae includes the TRAMP complex that marks RNA for decay via polyadenylation followed by helicase-dependent 3′ to 5′ degradation by the RNA exosome. Using reconstitution biochemistry, we show…
34min
Potent neutralization of Rift Valley fever virus by human monoclonal antibodies through fusion inhibition [Immunology and Inflammation]
Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), an emerging arboviral and zoonotic bunyavirus, causes severe disease in livestock and humans. Here, we report the isolation of a panel of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) from the B cells of immune individuals following natural infection in Kenya or immunization with MP-12 vaccine. The B cell…
34min
Use of NAD tagSeq II to identify growth phase-dependent alterations in E. coli RNA NAD+ capping [Genetics]
Recent findings regarding nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+)-capped RNAs (NAD-RNAs) indicate that prokaryotes and eukaryotes employ noncanonical RNA capping to regulate gene expression. Two methods for transcriptome-wide analysis of NAD-RNAs, NAD captureSeq and NAD tagSeq, are based on copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) click chemistry to label NAD-RNAs. However, copper ions
34min
Turn-on mode diarylethenes for bioconjugation and fluorescence microscopy of cellular structures [Chemistry]
The use of photoswitchable fluorescent diarylethenes (fDAEs) as protein labels in fluorescence microscopy and nanoscopy has been limited by labeling inhomogeneity and the need for ultraviolet light for fluorescence activation (on-switching). To overcome these drawbacks, we prepared "turn-on mode" fDAEs featuring thienyl substituents, multiple polar residues, and a reactive maleimide…
34min
Modeling DNA trapping of anticancer therapeutic targets using missense mutations identifies dominant synthetic lethal interactions [Genetics]
Genetic screens can identify synthetic lethal (SL) interactions and uncover potential anticancer therapeutic targets. However, most SL screens have utilized knockout or knockdown approaches that do not accurately mimic chemical inhibition of a target protein. Here, we test whether missense mutations can be utilized as a model for a type…
36min
Researchers develop tool to simplify diagnoses for children facing medical complexities
Brenna Morse, a UMass Lowell graduate and current nurse of children with complex conditions who has been a faculty member in the Solomont School of Nursing since 2015, and a team of researchers from Boston Children's Hospital have developed a method through which health-care providers can more readily identify the medical issue being experienced by a child who cannot communicate it on their own.
54min
Bespoke neuroblastoma therapy weaponizes cell metabolism
Preclinical research from VCU Massey Cancer Center published recently in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences shows that the combination of two existing drugs can exploit the metabolic "hunger" of a particularly aggressive type of neuroblastoma to kill cancer cells without inflicting too much collateral damage to healthy tissue.
1h
This Solar Charger Is Perfect for All Your Outdoor Adventures
There's nothing more annoying than your phone dying at an inopportune time. However, when you're at work, or running errands, or working out at the gym, a dead phone battery is really just an inconvenience. And at least you have a few options to deal with it. You might be able to find an outlet and charge it for a few minutes, or maybe you can charge while you drive from the grocery store to the
1h
Water splitting for solar energy conversion
In order to enable large-scale hydrogen production using solar energy, particulate photocatalysts are being researched as a simple and cost-effective solution to splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen. It is necessary to develop a photocatalyst that can efficiently use visible light, which accounts for a large part of solar energy, in the water decomposition reaction. Barium tantalum oxynitride
1h
Graphene made from tires makes concrete stronger
Researchers have optimized a process to convert waste from rubber tires into graphene that can strengthen concrete. The environmental benefits of adding graphene to concrete are clear, says chemist James Tour. " Concrete is the most-produced material in the world, and simply making it produces as much as 9% of the world's carbon dioxide emissions," says Tour, professor of computer science and of
1h
New AI-based versatile software for tracking many cells in 3D microscope videos
The first deep-learning software was developed as a versatile tool for tracking cells and extracting their signals from ~100 cells in a moving worm brain, in a zebrafish heart, and ~1,000 cultured cancer cells in 3D microscope videos. The method demonstrates significant improvements in tracking capabilities on various metrics including the possible number of tracked objects, robustness, and comput
1h
In the deep sea, the last ice age is not yet over
Gas hydrates are a solid compound of gases and water that have an ice-like structure at low temperatures and high pressures. Compounds of methane and water, so-called methane hydrates, are found especially at many ocean margins—also in the Black Sea. In addition to a possible use as an energy source, methane hydrate deposits are being investigated for their stability, as they can dissolve with cha
1h
Environmental antimicrobial resistance driven by poorly managed urban wastewater
Researchers from Newcastle University, UK, working with colleagues at King Mongkut's University of Technology Thonburi (KMUTT) in Thailand and the Institute of Urban Environment of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, analyzed samples of water and sediment taken from aquaculture ponds and nearby canals at five locations in central Thailand's coastal region.
1h
Study suggests supporting Indonesian women in conservation supports biodiversity
In a new study published in Conservation Science and Practice, researchers at the University of Maryland (UMD) partnered with Indonesian experts to explore the motivations and challenges of women pursuing a career in conservation sciences in Indonesia. Given that Indonesia is one of the most biodiverse countries on the planet but is simultaneously experiencing extreme rates of deforestation, it is
1h
Social media addiction linked to cyberbullying
New research suggests that these increased hours spent online may be associated with cyberbullying behaviors. According to a study by the University of Georgia, higher social media addiction scores, more hours spent online, and identifying as male significantly predicted cyberbullying perpetration in adolescents.
1h
Scientists develop ultra-thin terahertz source
Physicists from the University of Sussex have developed an extremely thin, large-area semiconductor surface source of terahertz, composed of just a few atomic layers and compatible with existing electronic platforms.
1h
How to talk to people about climate change
As our planet warms, seas rise and catastrophic weather events become more frequent, action on climate change has never been more important. But how do you convince people who still don't believe that humans contribute to the warming climate?
1h
Discovery of a mechanism for making superconductors more resistant to magnetic fields
Superconductivity is known to be easily destroyed by strong magnetic fields. NIMS, Osaka University and Hokkaido University have jointly discovered that a superconductor with atomic-scale thickness can retain its superconductivity even when a strong magnetic field is applied to it. The team has also identified a new mechanism behind this phenomenon. These results may facilitate the development of
1h
Blood Clots and the AZ Vaccine, Revisited
Once again, what's going on with vascular events and the AZ/Oxford vaccine? I last wrote about this situation a couple of weeks ago, and it's taken some real turns since then. At that point several EU countries had suspended dosing, but over the next week several began administering the vaccine again after the European Medicines Agency recommended it, in some cases with advisories about which age
1h
Vaccin mot covid-19 – samlade artiklar
Vaccineringen mot covid-19 är i full gång. Här har vi samlat alla artiklar från Forskning.se om vaccinationer i allmänhet och vaccin mot corona i synnerhet. Vaccineringen mot covid-19 har lett till ett ökat intresse för vacciner i allmänhet. Vad händer i kroppen när man vaccineras? Vad innehåller vaccin mot corona – mer än sin verksamma substans? Hur skulle världen ha sett ut om inte vacciner fan
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UMD study suggests supporting Indonesian women in conservation supports biodiversity
Researchers at the University of Maryland (UMD) partnered with Indonesian experts to explore the motivations and challenges of Indonesian women pursuing a career in conservation sciences. Indonesia is one of the most biodiverse countries on the planet but is simultaneously experiencing extreme rates of deforestation. With more diverse voices representing global conservation, the country and others
1h
Land-based learning reconnects Indigenous youth to their cultures, says Elizabeth Fast
Elizabeth Fast, an associate professor of applied human sciences in the Faculty of Arts and Science, wanted to help Indigenous youth reconnect with their cultures in safe and accessible ways. Along with a youth advisory group composed of Indigenous youth (some of whom are also students), she has been organizing a series of land-based learning retreats revolving around Indigenous traditions and cer
1h
T cells recognize recent SARS-CoV-2 variants
When variants of SARS-CoV-2 emerged, concern arose that they might elude protective immune responses generated by prior infection or vaccination, potentially making re-infection more likely or vaccination less effective. NIAID researchers and colleagues analyzed blood cell samples from 30 people who had contracted and recovered from COVID-19 prior to the emergence of virus variants. They found tha
1h
In fish, parents' stressful experiences influence offspring behavior via epigenetic changes
Parents who are exposed to predators pass on information about risky environments to their offspring through changes in gene expression—but how that information affects offspring differs depending on the sex of the parent. My colleagues and I showed this using sticklebacks—a small species of freshwater fish whose brightly colored males care for developing eggs—in a series of papers recently publis
2h
Show us your best stargazing photos
Whether you are a seasoned astronomer or new to stargazing, we'd like to see your photos from the last few weeks Have you taken a recent photograph of the cosmos that you're particularly proud of? Whether you are a seasoned astronomer or new to stargazing, we would like to hear from you. Continue reading…
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COVID-19 pandemic has led to more advanced-stage cancer diagnoses, physician survey finds
Physician leaders of radiation therapy clinics say that new patients are arriving for treatment with more advanced disease than before the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a new survey from the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO). The national survey fielded Jan. 15-Feb. 7 also found that treatment postponements and deferrals have largely subsided and that clinics continue to use a vari
2h
Shining, colored LED lighting on microalgae for next-generation biofuel
As biofuels continue to present challenges, microalgae are gaining momentum as a biofuel energy crop. In the Journal of Renewable and Sustainable Energy, researchers show how a combination of monochromatic red and blue LED illumination on one type of microalga can enhance its growth and increase the biosynthesis of critical components, such as lipids, for microalgae feedstock development. The rese
2h
Cervical cancer testing tech could replace pap smears, save lives
Emerging technologies can screen for cervical cancer better than Pap smears and, if widely used, could save lives in areas where access to health care may be limited. In Biophysics Reviews, scientists at Massachusetts General Hospital write advances in nanotechnology and computer learning are among the technologies helping develop HPV screening that take the guesswork out of the precancer tests. T
2h
Selfie culture: What your choice of camera angle says about you
Over the past decade, selfies have become a mainstay of popular culture. If the #selfie hashtag first appeared in 2004, it was the release of the iPhone 4 in 2010 that saw the pictures go viral. Three years later, the Oxford English Dictionary crowned "selfie" word of the year.
2h
The seeds of change helping African farmers grow out of poverty | Andrew Youn
Farmers stand at the center of the world, says Andrew Youn, cofounder of One Acre Fund, an agricultural organization that's empowering sub-Saharan farm families with the loans, seeds, fertilizer and training needed to increase crop yields and end hunger. Meet Therese Niyonsaba, a Rwandan farmer who shares how the program helped her family prosper, and learn more about One Acre Fund's goal to lead
2h
Expert: 3 things could ease COVID-19 spread in prisons
Since the start of the pandemic, there have been more than 492,000 documented cases of COVID-19 among inmates and staff in US prisons, jails, and detention centers, according to the COVID Prison Project. That's nearly as many cases as in the entire state of Minnesota. Further, there have been more than 2,500 deaths due to the coronavirus. As high as they are, these numbers are likely an undercoun
2h
What happens underground during hydraulic fracturing
A research team from Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) and McGill University in Montreal is investigating what exactly happens underground when the earth in western Canada shakes as a result of hydraulic fracturing activities. The team, headed by Bochum-based Professor Rebecca Harrington, wants to fundamentally understand how earthquakes occur—whether human induced or natural. "The hydraulic fracturin
2h
Using holographic endoscopes to observe distant objects
Scientists are developing tools to observe the biological machinery in in vivo animal models to be able to understand and better treat severe brain diseases like Alzheimer's disease and many other conditions. Holographic endoscopes attracted researchers' interest because of their potential to conduct minimally invasive observations inside the human body.
2h
The egg in the X-ray beam
Scientists have been using DESY's X-ray source PETRA III to analyse the structural changes that take place in an egg when you cook it. The work reveals how the proteins in the white of a chicken egg unfold and cross-link with each other. The method can be of interest to the food industry as well as to the broad field of protein research, as the groups report in the journal Physical Review Letters.
2h
Clever trick enables 20 times faster imaging with electron microscopy
Researchers at Delft University of Technology (TU Delft) have expanded upon a clever trick and increased the speed of electron microscope imaging by a factor of 20. A simple adjustment is all that is needed: applying a voltage to the specimen holder. Through this simple intervention, a specimen that would normally take an electron microscope a week to image can now be inspected in a single night o
2h
Groundwater discharge affects water quality in coastal waters
Water quality management in the ocean often targets visible pollution sources such as sewage, rivers or ships. A new global study, led by researchers at the University of Gothenburg, reveals that invisible groundwater discharges may be just as important driving nitrogen into coastal waters.
2h
Helping childhood-onset lupus patients stay healthy as adults
DALLAS – March 30, 2021 – UT Southwestern researchers have identified factors that put patients with childhood-onset lupus at elevated risk for poor outcomes, such as end-stage renal disease or death, as they transition from pediatric to adult health care. The findings, published online in Seminars in Arthritis and Rheumatism, emphasize the precarious nature of this period and shine a spotlight on
2h
Teachers can use popular media to address anti-Asian bias, research shows
Recent incidents of racial discrimination and violence against Asians and Asian-Americans in the United States have prompted critical discussions about how to talk about such biases with younger age groups. New research from the University of Kansas shows using critical race media literacy, or examining how race and gender are addressed in popular culture, can be an effective way to discuss those
2h
Gender discrimination threatens crop yield among smallholder farmers in Africa, researchers say
A study examining bean productivity among smallholder farmers in Tanzania, has found that on average, yields are 6% lower among female than male farmers. Women are often 'invisible' in agriculture, researchers say, due to social structural barriers and national agricultural policies, which do not address discriminatory land rights; education and agricultural information and decision making, which
2h
New biopharmaceutical quality control method in testing
A new method for monitoring biopharmaceutical product quality was recently put to the test by The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and 28 laboratories representing the biopharmaceutical industry, instrument and software vendors, and the federal government. The results of this interlaboratory study were recently published in the Journal of the American Society for Mass Spectrom
3h
Cannibalistic pantry moths prove a key principle of evolution
Researchers studied cannibalism among commonly-found moths to test an evolutionary principle. The scientists concluded that moths with more sibling interaction were less selfish. The principle applies to humans and other animals. A common moth, found in pantries, could explain a crucial link between society and selfishness, according to a new study. Researchers showed that an increase in sibling
3h
How can the United States stop mass shootings?
As Americans emerge from the COVID-19 pandemic, two mass shootings within a week have made clear the reality of the other US epidemic: gun violence. On March 16, a gunman killed eight people at three Atlanta-area massage businesses, and on March 22, 10 people were gunned down in a Boulder, Colorado grocery store. Here, John J. Donohue, III , who was an expert witness for the city of Boulder in it
3h
Long-retracted papers are still cited in major journals
Even after scientific papers are retracted, hundreds of studies cite them as evidence. Roughly four retractions occur per 10,000 publications, mostly in medicine, life sciences, and chemistry journals. Journals should implement control measures that block the publication of papers that cite retracted papers. Andrew Wakefield's 1998 study linking vaccines with autism was riddled with holes. All 12
3h
How Scientists Used Ultrasound to Read Monkeys' Minds
Thanks to neural implants, mind reading is no longer science fiction . As I'm writing this sentence, a tiny chip with arrays of electrodes could sit on my brain, listening in on the crackling of my neurons firing as my hands dance across the keyboard. Sophisticated algorithms could then decode these electrical signals in real time. My brain's inner language to plan and move my fingers could then
3h
The neural mechanism of a circulatory response to stress
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba discovered a novel mechanism by which the brain regulates the cardiovascular system in response to stress. By electrically stimulating the lateral habenula, the researchers found that it regulates heart rate and blood pressure via the autonomic nervous system. They then showed that this effect depends on specific receptor subtypes of the neurotransmitter
3h
The third generation of siRNA delivery system makes RNAi therapy feasible
Chen-Yu Zhang's group reprogram host liver with genetic circuits to direct the synthesis and self-assembly of siRNAs into secretory exosomes. In vivo assembled siRNAs are systematically distributed to multiple tissues or targeted to specific tissues (e.g., brain), inducing potent target gene silencing in these tissues. The therapeutic value of this strategy is demonstrated in a variety of diseases
3h
Narwhal tusks show mercury spike in the Arctic
Studying narwhal tusks reveals that their diet and exposure to pollution have shifted over the past half century in response to sea-ice decline. Human emissions have also led to a sharp rise in the presence of mercury in recent years, the researchers report. In the Arctic, climate change and pollution are the biggest threats to top predators like narwhals. "Our research shows that climate change
4h
Research help please! Social/Forensic/Cognitive psychology-related online study.
Apologies if these kinds of posts are not allowed but I don't see a rule against them. I am in need of more male (aged 18+) participants for my research project study due to a gender imbalance in my current sample. I am having no luck on the SampleSizes and main Psychology subreddits, probably due to the massive volume of other study requests. I'm a psychology student in Ireland and I need about
4h
Books combined with audio improve preschooler vocab
Using audio-enhanced, interactive, pre-recorded storybooks can improve the vocabulary of at-risk preschoolers, a new study shows. That's good news for getting a vulnerable population of children ready for school. "While we are working with children who are only 4 or 5 years old, we teach them the vocabulary words they will need to know when they eventually enter elementary or middle school," says
4h
If You're Worried About Adderall Tolerance, This Groundbreaking Supplement Can Help
Every day, millions of people rely on stimulants like Adderall to help them maintain attention and stay focused on tasks. Unfortunately, while these stimulants work well, they often come with a lot of side effects. Moreover, when you use them for a prolonged period of time, you start to build up a tolerance. And unless you can find a way to reduce that tolerance, you'll be forced to up your dosag
4h
COVID-19 news from Annals of Internal Medicine
1) Spatial Inequities in COVID-19 Testing, Positivity, Confirmed Cases and Mortality; 2) Injustice in Health: Now Is the Time to Change the Story; 3) Toward Understanding COVID-19 Recovery: National Institutes of Health Workshop on Postacute COVID-19; 4) Update Alert 8: Epidemiology of and Risk Factors for Coronavirus Infection in Health Care Workers
4h
Gender and social background influence the choice of upper secondary school
Young people's choice of upper secondary school is strongly affected by their gender and their parents' educational background. Instead of reducing this division, the reforms that have been implemented in recent decades have actually resulted in an increase. This is shown in a new dissertation from the University of Gothenburg.
4h
Marriage choices may affect pay gap, inequality
Sharing household roles can promote gender and income equality within households, but research suggests it could also increase inequality between households. The new study asks: How do people's marriage choices affect the labor market, and ultimately gender wage gaps and income inequality? Despite achieving gradual progress closing gender gaps in recent decades, women around the world still lag b
5h
Boston Dynamics Unveils 'Stretch' Box Lifting Robot
Boston Dynamics has spent years posting creepy videos of lifelike robots, but it started selling its first real product last year in the form of a $75,000 robot dog called Spot . Now, the company has unveiled its second production model robot, and the first designed for commercial warehouse applications. It's called Stretch, and you'll be able to buy one next year. You might want to start saving
5h
Learn How Data Centers Work With This $40 Electrical Engineering Bundle
Our need for data centers is almost bottomless, and their resource demands are equally huge. For example, keeping these racks of servers from melting in the heat of their own processing requires so much cooling, Microsoft tried submerging them in the ocean . That said, learning the electrical engineering behind them is a great way to start a new career, or learn how to build a better server farm
5h
The communal misconduct by Zhenhe Suo in Olso
"the Committee believes that when carelessness or scientific dishonesty can be found in so many articles with so many different authors in question, there must be a lack of training and / or lack of control over data handling. The committee therefore believes that it is qualified probability that there has been an institutional system error when it comes to training. The committee believes that go
6h
Da B&O var ejer af en glad fabrik
PLUS. Tidligere B&O-direktør har skrevet en bog om, hvordan man agerer som chef for et datterselskab, når man både får støtte og møder modstand fra moderselskabet.
6h
Paper about calculating ocean currents runs aground
A paper arguing that conventional methods of calculating ocean currents are flawed has been retracted because its own calculations ran aground. The article, "A Complete Formula of Ocean Surface Absolute Geostrophic Current," was written by Peter Chu, of the Naval Ocean Analysis and Prediction Laboratory, part of the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey. Chu is … Continue reading
7h
När blir börsinvesteringar mest lönsamma?
Att investera med hjälp av lånade pengar, så kallad hävstång, kan ge höga vinster men också stora förluster. En avhandling från Handelshögskolan i Umeå undersöker om det finns en optimal nivå av hävstång. I sin avhandling har Christian Lundström Tjurhufvud analyserat vinsten från två typer av handelsstrategier på börsen: handelsstrategier baserade på så kallad teknisk analys och den långsiktiga v
7h
Kön och social bakgrund styr gymnasievalet
Ungdomars gymnasieval är fortfarande starkt präglat av kön och föräldrarnas utbildningsbakgrund. De reformer som genomförts de senaste decennierna har snarare ökat uppdelningen och bidragit till segregation. – I skuggan av samhällsdebatten om det fria skolvalet fortsätter valet av program och ämnen på gymnasiet att bidra till segregation och uppdelning av elever. Gymnasieskolan är extremt könsseg
7h
Direct identification of Mott Hubbard band pattern beyond charge density wave superlattice in monolayer 1T-NbSe2
Nature Communications, Published online: 30 March 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22233-w The relationship between Mott state and charge density wave state in two dimensional materials remains unclear. Here, Liu et al. reveal spatial distribution of a Mott-Hubbard band in monolayer 1T-NbSe2 forming a new periodic pattern in addition to the well-known CDW pattern.
8h
1/f-noise-free optical sensing with an integrated heterodyne interferometer
Nature Communications, Published online: 30 March 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22271-4 Suppressing 1/f-shaped low-frequency noise is critical but fundamentally challenging to both electrical and optical transducers. Here, the authors demonstrate a 1/f-noise-free optical sensor with integrated CMOS-compatible heterodyne interferometer and an upconversion amplifying technique, which suppresses the
8h
Direct observation of excitonic instability in Ta2NiSe5
Nature Communications, Published online: 30 March 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22133-z Concominant structural and electronic phase transitions in the excitonic insulator candidate Ta2NiSe5 make the identification of the driving mechanism of the transition challenging. Here, the authors report evidence for electronically-driven transition via Raman susceptibility measurements.
8h
Beam image-shift accelerated data acquisition for near-atomic resolution single-particle cryo-electron tomography
Nature Communications, Published online: 30 March 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22251-8 Tomographic reconstructions of cryopreserved specimens enable in-situ structural studies. Here, the authors present the beam image-shift electron cryo-tomography (BISECT) approach that accelerates data collection speed and improves the map resolution compared to earlier approaches and present the in vitro struc
8h
Model-based assessment of replicability for genome-wide association meta-analysis
Nature Communications, Published online: 30 March 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-21226-z In genome-wide association meta-analysis, it is often difficult to find an independent dataset of sufficient size to replicate associations. Here, the authors have developed MAMBA to calculate the probability of replicability based on consistency between datasets within the meta-analysis.
8h
Reprogramming of the FOXA1 cistrome in treatment-emergent neuroendocrine prostate cancer
Nature Communications, Published online: 30 March 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22139-7 The molecular processes that lead to neuroendocrine prostate cancer after treating prostate adenocarcinoma (PRAD) are not well understood. Here the authors show that regulation by FOXA1 and changes in the epigenomic profile drive the transition from PRAD to a neuroendocrine phenotype.
8h
Peginterferon Lambda-1a for treatment of outpatients with uncomplicated COVID-19: a randomized placebo-controlled trial
Nature Communications, Published online: 30 March 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22177-1 Here the authors report the results of randomized, single-blind, placebocontrolled trial on the effects of a asingle subcutaneous dose of Peginterferon Lambda-1a (Lambda) in 120 outpatients with mild to moderate COVID-19, showing that while treatment is well tolerated it does not shorten the duration of SARS-Co
8h
Fasting acts as diet catalyst
Those who need to change their eating habits to normalise their blood pressure should start with a fast. In the journal "Nature Communications", MDC and ECRC scientists explain why patients can use it as a tool to improve their health in the long term.
8h
Tidigare diagnostik ger kortare köer till ortopeden
Många patienter som söker vård för långvarig höft- och ljumsksmärta blir remitterade till ortopedkirurgen. Sjukgymnasten Anders Pålssons doktorsavhandling från Lunds universitet visar att patienterna upplever låg livskvalitet och har låg fysisk funktion. Om smärtan kan ringas in och diagnosticeras redan på vårdcentralen kan patienternas dryga väntan på rätt behandling kortas.
10h
Why is it hard to get our head around fungi? (part one)
Our colleagues from The age of extinction, Phoebe Weston and Patrick Greenfield, are back with two new episodes. We often talk as if we know what species exist in the world – but we don't. Could misclassifying the notoriously cryptic fungi have broader implications for what we know about the environment, and how we care for it?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod
13h
Progeria: New treatment could extend lives of children with 'premature aging' syndrome
Progeria is an "accelerated aging" disease that causes children to die of "old age" at around 13 to 15 years. There are only two existing treatments, and both have unpleasant side effects. A promising new therapy based on biotechnology increases the lifespan of mice by over 60% and is ready for human clinical trials. Progeria is an extremely rare genetic disorder that causes children to present w
15h
Your neighborhood may influence your COVID-19 risk
Markers of the pandemic's impact – testing rates, positivity ratio (cases among total tests), case rates by overall population and deaths – are clustered in neighborhoods, with low-income and predominantly minority communities experiencing worse outcomes than wealthier and predominantly white neighborhoods.
20h
Relationship between psoriasis treatments and cardiovascular risk explained
Patients with psoriasis, an autoimmune skin disorder, often have cardiovascular disorders as well. Hence, it is important for patients and clinicians to understand how treatments for psoriasis may influence cardiovascular disease risks. A review article recently published in Chinese Medical Journal offers a useful summary of how the existing treatment options for psoriasis influence a patient's li
20h
The race is on, but cooling industry needs to accelerate net zero efforts
A new UN report, "Cooling Suppliers: Who's Winning the Race to Net Zero," finds that, despite some efforts to reduce climate changing emissions, 49 of 54 companies assessed have yet to commit to ambitious net-zero targets. The sector is key: Cooling-related emissions are expected to double by 2030 and triple by 2100. By 2050, space cooling alone will consume as much electricity as China and India
20h
High risk of acute kidney injury in patients undergoing treatment for infected total knee replacement
Acute kidney injury (AKI) occurred in nearly 20 percent of patients who underwent surgery with implantation of antibiotic-loaded "spacers" and intravenous (IV) antibiotics for the treatment of deep infections after total knee arthroplasty, reports a study in The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio in partnership with Wolters Kluwer.
21h
This Cutting-Edge Sleep App Will Help You Fall Asleep in Just Two Minutes
Getting quality sleep can be challenging under normal circumstances, but it's especially hard when you're going through times of increased stress. The good news is that there are a lot of tools out there that use the latest advancements in sleep science to help you overcome your sleep troubles. And one of the most innovative tools is the Restly Sleep App, which uses a variety of strategies to hel
21h
Zika virus helps kill deadly brain cancer in mice
The Zika virus can activate immune cells to destroy glioblastoma, an aggressive brain cancer, a new study with mice shows. The virus gives a powerful boost to an immunotherapy drug and sparks long-lasting immunological memory that can ward off tumor recurrence for at least 18 months, the researchers found. The findings, published in JCI Insight , suggest the virus might hold a key to unlocking th
21h
How important is civility for democracy? For Habermas, not very.
Have we become unreasonable? In democracies around the world, anxious commentators exhort their fellow citizens to be more open-minded, more willing to engage in good-faith debate. In our era of hyperpolarisation, social-media echo chambers and populist demagogues, many have turned to civility as the missing ingredient in our public life. So, how important is civility for democracy? According to
21h
Lab model offers hope for macular degeneration patients
University of Rochester researchers have created a 3D lab model using patient-derived tissues that mimics the areas of the retina affected in age-related macular degeneration (AMD), which affects an estimated 196 million people. They believe this could lead to finding specific drugs for individual patients to treat a disease that currently has no cure.
22h
New 3D-Printed Antenna Can Harvest Power From 5G Signals
Carriers are rolling out 5G networks across the globe, promising to deliver lightning-fast data to devices of all shapes and sizes. So far, the speed claims of 5G have been little more than smoke and mirrors. However, the architects of 5G technology may have unwittingly provided the key to wireless power. A team at Georgia Tech has developed a small, 3D-printed antenna that can harvest power from
23h
Intentional youth firearm injuries linked to sociodemographic factors
Firearm injuries are a leading and preventable cause of injury and death among youth – responsible for an estimated 5,000 deaths and 22,000 non-fatal injury hospital visits each year in American kids. A new study led by researchers at Children's National Hospital, finds that sociodemographic factors related to intent of injury by firearm may be useful in guiding policy and informing tailored inter
23h
Working long hours may increase odds of second heart attack
Among patients who return to work after a heart attack, those who work more than 55 hours per week, compared to those working an average full-time job of 35-40 hours a week, increase their odds of having a second heart attack by about twofold, according to a prospective cohort study published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.
23h
Viewing medical evidence through a new PRISMA
In a new open-access Guidelines & Guidance paper published in PLOS Medicine, Matthew Page of Monash University, Melbourne, Australia and co-authors present PRISMA 2020, an updated version of the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses reporting checklist. The new guideline paper is also being published in the British Medical Journal, Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, Sys
23h
Gene variants increase risk of clogged arteries
New research identifies a gene that likely plays a causal role in coronary artery disease, independent of cholesterol levels. The gene also likely has roles in related cardiovascular diseases, including high blood pressure and diabetes. The new findings appear in the journal Science Translational Medicine . Studying mice and genetic data from people, the researchers found that the gene—called SVE
23h
Organ-on-a-chip could personalize sickle cell treatment
An organ-on-a-chip device could offer a more personalized approach to treating sickle cell disease. Sickle cell disease is the most prevalent inherited blood disorder in the world, affecting 70,000 to 100,000 Americans. However, it is considered an orphan disease, meaning it affects less than 200,000 people nationally, and is therefore underrepresented in therapeutic research. "I'm trying to crea
23h
The Challenges of Managing Earth's Long-Term Surface Temperature Records
Ensuring the accuracy of Earth's long-term global and regional surface temperature records is a challenging, constantly evolving undertaking. There are lots of reasons for this, including changes in the availability of data, technological advancements in how land and sea surface temperatures are measured, the growth of urban areas, and changes to where and when temperature data are collected, to
1d
TGen-ASU review suggests added sugars are contributing to liver disease among children
A review of more than 20 studies by researchers at Arizona State University and the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), an affiliate of City of Hope, suggests that nonalcoholic fatty-liver disease (NAFLD) is a growing dietary problem for children across the globe. NAFLD affects more than 1-in-10 children in the U.S. and now is the nation's most common chronic liver disease within thi
1d
How to take the lead in your career
Nature, Published online: 29 March 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00811-8 At any stage, building leadership skills can help scientists promote their ideas and bring out the best in others.
1d
AI spots cell structures that humans can't
Nature, Published online: 26 March 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00812-7 Models can predict the location of cell structures from light-microscopy images alone, without the need for harmful fluorescence labelling.
1d
Nearly 3,000 shipping containers have fallen into the ocean since November
At any given time, 6,000 containerships are moving the vast majority of global trade on the world's oceans. The average number of annual containership accidents has been on a downtrend for the past decade, but accidents have become more common since the start of the pandemic. One factor behind the recent rise in containership accidents could be rising demand for imported goods from U.S. consumers
1d
Så kan EU minska sitt bidrag till skövling av regnskog
Palmolja, sojabönor, kakao och kaffe är exempel på varor som vi importerar inom EU och som bidrar till skövling av regnskog. Chalmersforskare har undersökt vilka åtgärder som kan förhindra avskogningen. Mer än hälften av den tropiska avskogningen är kopplad till produktion för export av livsmedel och djurfoder, till exempel palmolja, sojabönor, trävaror, kakao och kaffe, varor som EU är en stor i
1d
Varför idrottar flickor med utomeuropeisk bakgrund mindre?
Flickor idrottar mindre än pojkar – och särskilt flickor med utlandsfödda föräldrar. Kan föräldrarnas syn på idrottande vara en förklaring? Det har forskare undersökt. En aktiv fritid och ett idrottsutövande för alla är en stor del av den svenska folkrörelsen. Ändå är det fler pojkar än flickor som idrottar. Bland flickor med utomeuropeiskt födda föräldrar är det ännu färre som deltar i idrottsfö
1d
NIST develops privacy-preserving 'encounter metrics' that could slow down future pandemics
As part of urgent efforts to fight COVID-19, a science is rapidly developing for measuring the number of encounters and the different levels of interaction in a group. At the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), researchers are applying that science to a concept they have created called "encounter metrics." They have developed an encrypted method that can be applied to a device s
1d
New model simulates the temperature rise of laser-heated skin
Laser technology is popularly used to treat skin pigmentation today. But, skin damage resulting from excessive heating during laser irradiation is a major obstacle in laser treatment technology. In a new study, researchers from Japan put forward a new model for simulating laser-skin interaction, paving the way for a new, safe approach to laser treatment.
1d
SARS-CoV-2 positivity in asymptomatic-screened dental patients
Asymptomatic carriage of SARS-CoV-2 is a potentially significant source of transmission, yet remains relatively poorly understood. The study "SARS-CoV-2 Positivity in Asymptomatic-screened Dental Patients" published in the Journal of Dental Research (JDR), investigated SARS-CoV-2 infection in asymptomatic dental patients to inform community surveillance and improve understanding of risks in the de
1d
'ArtEmis' AI spots emotions in paintings
Researchers have built an algorithm that can capture the emotions that an image evokes. Experts in artificial intelligence have gotten quite good at creating computers that can " see " the world around them—recognizing objects, animals, and activities within their purview. These have become the foundational technologies for autonomous cars, planes, and security systems of the future. But now a te
1d
Inherited traits boost risk that teen weed users keep it up
At least a small portion of the risk for developing into an adult marijuana user may be related to inherited behaviors and traits that appear during adolescence, according to a new study. While some youth experiment with marijuana but don't go on to long-term use, others develop a problematic pot habit that continues into adulthood. The new findings appear in the journal Addiction . "Our analysis
1d
Another Martini for better simulations
Simulating the interactions between atoms and molecules is important for many scientific studies. However, accurate simulations can take a long time, which limits their use. To speed up simulations without sacrificing too much detail, University of Groningen Professor of Molecular Dynamics Siewert-Jan Marrink designed a set of parameters that allow fast but accurate coarse-grained simulations. In
1d
Younger age of first drug use associated with faster development of substance use disorder
A new study shows that in the time after first trying cannabis or first misusing prescription drugs, the percentages of young people who develop the corresponding substance use disorder are higher among adolescents (ages 12-17) than young adults (ages 18-25). In addition, 30% of young adults develop a heroin use disorder and 25% develop a methamphetamine use disorder a year after first using heroi
1d
WIC Nutrition Program increased enrollment shifting from paper vouchers to electronic
The U.S. government's Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children, usually abbreviated as WIC, saw a jump in enrollment of nearly 8 percent in states that implemented a federally mandated switch from paper vouchers to electronic benefit cards (EBTs), according to a study led by researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.
1d
A 200-million-year delay in permanent atmospheric oxygenation
Nature, Published online: 29 March 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03393-7 Sulfur isotope and iron–sulfur–carbon systematics on marine sediments indicate that permanent atmospheric oxygenation occurred around 2.22 billion years ago, about 100 million years later than currently estimated.
1d
Pandemic measures disproportionately harm women's careers
Nature, Published online: 29 March 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00854-x Family responsibilities incurred by shutdowns — and existing bias — disrupted the mental health, productivity and work–life balance of US female academic scientists, finds study.
1d
The Remnants of Theia May Still Exist Deep Inside the Earth
The impact of Earth and Theia, as depicted by a NASA artist. (The photo at the top of the story shows the same thing, but visualized by a National Geographic artist instead.) There are two enormous provinces of unusual rock that sit at the bottom of the mantle, just above the Earth's core. One of them is located underneath Africa and one is under the Pacific Ocean. They're called Large Low Shear
1d
Research unlocks the genomic secrets of organisms that thrive in extreme deep-sea
A study led by scientists at Hong Kong Baptist University (HKBU) has decoded the genomes of the deep-sea clam (Archivesica marissinica) and the chemoautotrophic bacteria (Candidatus Vesicomyosocius marissinica) that live in its gill epithelium cells. Through analysis of their genomic structures and profiling of their gene expression patterns, the research team revealed that symbiosis between the t
1d
First steps towards revolutionary ULTRARAM™ memory chips
A new type of universal computer memory – ULTRARAM™ – has taken a step closer towards development with a successful experiment."Universal memory" is a memory where the data is robustly stored, but can also easily be changed; something that was widely considered to be unachievable until now. The new non-volatile RAM, called ULTRARAM™, is a working implementation of so-called 'universal memory', pro
1d
Analysis of the sensitivity of the UK (B.1.1.7) and South African (B.1.351) variants to SARS-CoV-2
Scientists from the Institut Pasteur joined forces with Orléans Regional Hospital, Tours University Hospital, Créteil Intercommunal Hospital, Strasbourg University Hospital and Georges Pompidou European Hospital to study the sensitivity of these two variants to neutralizing antibodies present in the serum samples of people who have been vaccinated or previously infected with SARS-CoV-2. They compa
1d
How can medicine close its gender pay gap?
Women account for half of all doctors and medical trainees in Canada, but too often in medicine, that's where gender equality ends. Studies show female physicians earn less, advance slower and face higher risks of burnout than their male peers. So, what can the profession do about it?
1d
Supplement may reverse effects of stress in the womb
A dietary supplement called docosahexanoic acid may guard against the effects of maternal stress on unborn males during early development, a new study shows. Neurodevelopmental disorders like autism and schizophrenia disproportionately affect males and are directly linked to early life adversity caused by maternal stress and other factors, which nutrition might affect. The underlying reasons for
1d
Natural resources decrease income inequality in resource-rich countries
A group of researchers from Russia, Germany, the Czech Republic, and Switzerland contest the common belief that resource-based economies have higher levels of within-country inequality than resource-scarce economies. The researchers document a direct causal link between natural resources and within-country inequality and conclude that the extraction of oil and gas can reduce inequality or has no s
1d
Getting on top of rural Asia's blood pressure
Multi-country trial finds low-cost intervention to improve hypertension management in rural communities is cost-effective. Consisting of home visits by community healthcare workers, physician training and coordination with public health care infrastructure, the intervention can be scaled up in low- and middle-income countries.
1d
HKBU-led research unlocks the genomic secrets of organisms that thrive in extreme deep-sea
A study led by scientists at Hong Kong Baptist University (HKBU) has decoded the genomes of the deep-sea clam (Archivesica marissinica) and the chemoautotrophic bacteria (Candidatus Vesicomyosocius marissinica) that live in its gill epithelium cells. Through analysis of their genomic structures and profiling of their gene expression patterns, the research team revealed that symbiosis between the t
1d
Progress in the study of the left atrial function index in cardiovascular disease
In a new publication from Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications; DOI https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2021.0002, Pei Huang, Yi Zhang, Yi Tang, Qinghua Fu, Zhaofen Zheng, Xiaoyan Yang, Yingli Yu from The First Affiliated Hospital of Hunan Normal University) Chang Sha, China and Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin, China consider the study of the left atrial function index
1d
Appropriate use of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators at a single academic center
In a new publication from Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications; DOI https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2021.0005, Nikhil H. Shah, Steven J. Ross, Steve A. Noutong Njapo, Justin Merritt, Andrew Kolarich, Michael Kaufmann, William M. Miles, David E. Winchester, Thomas A. Burkart, and Matthew McKillop consider appropriate use of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators at a single academic center.
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Using 3-D Lorenz Scatter Plots to detect patients with atrioventricular node double path
In a new publication from Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications; DOI https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2021.0006, Li Jingxiu, Zhang Fujun, Wei Xijin and Peng Ding from Anhui Provincial Hospital, Hefei, China, Chizhou Second People's Hospital, Chizhou, China, The Affiliated Hospital of Shandong University of TCM, Jinan, China and The Sixth Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Qing
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'Fitbit' for mussels could monitor freshwater for toxic stuff
Researchers have created a new system that lets them remotely monitor the behavior of freshwater mussels. The system could be used to alert researchers to the presence of toxic substances in aquatic ecosystems. "When mussels feed, they open their shells; but if there's something noxious in the water, they may immediately close their shells, all at once," says study coauthor Jay Levine, a professo
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Inflammation-fighting protein could improve treatment of rheumatoid arthritis
New research led by scientists at Washington State University has found that a protein known as GBP5 appears to play a key role in suppressing inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis, a potentially debilitating disease in which the immune system attacks the body's own joint tissues. Published in the journal Arthritis & Rheumatology, the discovery could someday lead to new treatments to slow or halt t
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SwRI scientists discover a new auroral feature on Jupiter
The SwRI-led Ultraviolet Spectrograph (UVS) orbiting Jupiter aboard NASA's Juno spacecraft has detected new faint aurora features, characterized by ring-like emissions, which expand rapidly over time. SwRI scientists determined that charged particles coming from the edge of Jupiter's massive magnetosphere triggered these auroral emissions.
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Atezolizumab-induced autoimmune diabetes mellitus presenting with diabetic ketoacidosis
In a new publication from Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications; DOI https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2021.0007, Sharen Lee and Gary Tse from Laboratory of Cardiovascular Physiology, Hong Kong, HKG, China, Second Hospital of Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, China and Xiamen Cardiovascular Hospital, Xiamen, China consider a case of atezolizumab-induced autoimmune diabetes mellitus presenting
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Myocardial fibrosis in pathogenesis, diagnosis & treatment of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy
In a new publication from Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications; DOI https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2021.0008, Zeyi Cheng, Miaomiao Qi, Chengyuan Zhang and Yanxia Mao from Sichuan University, Sichuan, China, Second Hospital of Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, China and The Second Medical School of Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, China consider myocardial fibrosis in the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and
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Imaging aims to see if rectal cancer remains after treatment
A new imaging method could one day help some people who've had treatment for rectal cancer avoid unnecessary surgeries after complete tumor destruction from chemoradiation. The new method can differentiate between rectal tissues with residual cancers and those without tumors after chemotherapy and radiation. Rectal cancer , along with colon cancer, is the third-most common type of cancer in the U
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Calcium-sensing receptor of immune cells and diseases
In a new publication from Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications; DOI https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2021.0009, Wenxiu Liu, Yutong Guo, Yue Liu, Jiaxing Sun and Xinhua Yin from The First Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Heilongjiang, China consider calcium-sensing receptors of immune cells and diseases.
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Running with face masks/respirators detrimental to respiratory and cardiovascular systems
In a new publication from Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications; DOI https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2021.0010, Yidan Wang, Gary Tse and Guoliang Li from The First Affiliated Hospital of Xi'an Jiaotong University, Shaanxi, China and Second Hospital of Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, China consider how running with face masks or respirators can be detrimental to the respiratory and cardiov
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Microtransitions: What makes working from home so frustrating
Working from home increases frustration and can lead to potential conflicts between live-in partners. Sound familiar? In the working paper "Mitigation of Work-Family Frustration in Dual-Earner Couples during COVID-19: The Role of ICT Permeability, Planning, and Gender Effect," Bocconi's Massimo Magni, Associate Professor at the Department of Management and Technology, shows how the "work-life shoc
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Europe Plans 20,000 GPU Supercomputer to Create 'Digital Twin' of Earth
GPU prices are not moving in the right direction. Anyone who's tried to buy a graphics card lately knows how tough it can be to find something in stock, let alone for a reasonable price. The European Union, however, thinks this is a grand time to slap 20,000 GPUs into a supercomputer with the aim of studying climate change with a simulated twin of our planet. The plan to create a digital twin of
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Twist Bioscience and Biotia Receive U.S. FDA Emergency Use Authorization for First Hybridization Capture-Based Next-Generation Sequencing SARS-CoV-2 Assay
Twist Bioscience Corporation (NASDAQ: TWST), a company enabling customers to succeed through its offering of high-quality synthetic DNA using its silicon platform, and Biotia, Inc., a company that uses proprietary analytical software for infectious disease diagnostics, today received Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the SARS-CoV-2 Next-Generati
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Rekordmeget netbank-svindel i 2020
Aldrig før er så mange kunder blevet svindlet via netbank som i 2020, viser tal fra Finans Danmark. Ofrene er typisk ældre kvinder, der bliver franarret Nemid- og login-oplysninger til netbank, når kriminelle ringer og udgiver sig for at være fra banken.
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Techtopia 187: Kampen om sikkerhed på nettet
Hvad er vigtigst: At bekæmpe bedrageri eller pædofili på nettet? Spørgsmålet er sat på spidsen, men det er centralt i diskussionen om, hvem der skal styre sikkerheden i din færd på nettet. Skal det være techgiganten Google eller din lokale internetudbyder med politiet som mulig gæst?
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Elon Musk – "It's not really possible to match the human brain in 2021 for any amount of money imo, but it will be possible probably in a few years"
You will have to view the comment's section for the relevant link as this particular content is not allowed or permitted for topical discussion. Even in Name as I rudely was alerted when trying to append the information in the previous thread. I am trying to rectify this now as that comment is subject to move about the discussion page and is easily lost, if possible I will link to the comment in
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Paper claiming Muslim patients are "particularly sensitive" retracted
A paper about medical treatment for migrant patients in Germany has been retracted after the authors made unsupported claims that Muslims are "particularly sensitive" to pain. The paper, titled "Diversität im klinischen Alltag der Augenheilkunde," or "Diversity in everyday clinical practice in ophthalmology," in English, was published in Der Ophthalmologe, a German medical journal, in … Continue r
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Development of highly efficient platinum catalysts for hydroalkoxylation and hydroamination of unactivated alkenes
Nature Communications, Published online: 29 March 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22287-w The direct addition of an O–H (hydroalkoxylation) or an N–H (hydroamination) bond across an alkene is a useful strategy to access biologically relevant heterocycles. Here, the authors report "donor–acceptor"-type platinum catalysts that are effective for both hydroalkoxylation and hydroamination of unactivated
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Measuring 3D orientation of nanocrystals via polarized luminescence of rare-earth dopants
Nature Communications, Published online: 29 March 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22158-4 Determining the orientation of nanoscale objects in three-dimensional space has typically required complicated optical setups. Here, the authors develop a simple method to retrieve the 3D orientation of luminescent, lanthanide-doped nanorods from a single-shot emission spectrum.
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Reversed evolution of grazer resistance to cyanobacteria
Nature Communications, Published online: 29 March 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22226-9 Anthropogenic changes, such as eutrophication from lake pollution, can lead to rapid evolution. Comparing Daphnia resurrected from generations adapted to historical pollution to contemporary, post-cleanup populations finds that Daphnia rapidly reversed their evolved resistance to harmful cyanobacteria.
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An ecological approach to structural flexibility in online communication systems
Nature Communications, Published online: 29 March 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22184-2 Human perceptual and cognitive abilities are limited resources and consequently cheaply available information translates into hypercompetition for rewarding outcomes. Here the authors show, with empirical analysis and an ecological model, that actors-memes ecosystems evolve towards a narrow set of emergent, nat
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UXT chaperone prevents proteotoxicity by acting as an autophagy adaptor for p62-dependent aggrephagy
Nature Communications, Published online: 29 March 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22252-7 p62/SQSTM1 acts as a key mediator in the selective autophagy of protein aggregates, or aggrephagy. Here the authors identify the prefoldin-like chaperone UXT as an autophagy adaptor of p62 dependent aggrephagy and show that ectopic UXT expression delays motor neuron degeneration in a Xenopus model.
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Recent global decrease in the inner-core rain rate of tropical cyclones
Nature Communications, Published online: 29 March 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22304-y How the rainfall intensity of tropical cyclones changes with climate change is not well known. Here, the authors show that while the rain rate in the outer region of TCs is clearly increasing between 1999 and 2018, it decreases significantly in the inner-core of TCs during 1999-2018.
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A haemagglutination test for rapid detection of antibodies to SARS-CoV-2
Nature Communications, Published online: 29 March 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22045-y Serological detection of antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 can help establish rates of seroconversion. Here the authors develop a red cell agglutination test to detect antibodies against the receptor binding domain for distribution free of charge to qualified research groups.
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Cryo-EM structures of HIV-1 trimer bound to CD4-mimetics BNM-III-170 and M48U1 adopt a CD4-bound open conformation
Nature Communications, Published online: 29 March 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-21816-x Conformational changes of HIV's Env protein are required for its function in fusing the viral and host cell membranes. Here the authors describe how two small molecules alter the confirmation of Env trimers, and show they can induce structural changes similar to those occur upon receptor binding.
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Stroke rate 4 times higher in Black adults than whites
Black middle-aged adults had an incidence rate of stroke 4 times higher than that of white middle-aged adults, according to a Kaiser Permanente study published March 29 in Hypertension.The large national prospective study highlights the need to raise awareness among young and middle-aged Black adults about the impact of high blood pressure, called hypertension, on stroke, the research team said.
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What the heck happened to John Ioannidis?
John Ioannidis is one of the most published and influential scientists in the world, someone whose skewering of bad medical research we at SBM have frequently lauded over the years. Then the COVID-19 pandemic hit. Since then, Prof. Ioannidis has been publishing dubious studies that minimize the dangers of the coronavirus, shown up in the media to decry "lockdowns," and, most recently, "punched do
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One in five Colorado high school students has access to firearms
Twenty percent of high school students have easy access to a handgun, according to a new study from the Colorado School of Public Health on the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. The findings highlight that it is relatively easy to access a handgun in Colorado for high school students. This finding, combined with the high prevalence of feeling sad or depressed and suicide attempts, is
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Linguistics major to cognitive science or HCI?
Hello, I'm considering a linguistics major in college (as most schools do not have cognitive science). Is this a realistic major to pursue cognitive science or HCI in grad school (Masters/PhD)? Also…how much mathematics should one take in undergrad for grad school? One semester of Calc? Stats? Thanks. submitted by /u/allthelovely-people [link] [comments]
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This Amazing Noise Cancelling App Mutes Distractions on Both Ends of Your Call
Ever since the pandemic struck, millions of office workers now find themselves working from home. While this can be flexible and efficient, common household noise is a huge distraction. Whether it comes from your blender, washing machine, dogs, kids, or other factors, these noises can significantly impact your online meetings and phone calls, making them almost unworkable, and making you look ver
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'Zombie' genes in the brain get to work after you die
While most brain cells do nothing or quickly degrade at death, others swing into high gear, sprouting long arms. While you're alive, the cells are involved in inflammation. Over the course of 24 hours after death, they get busier and busier. As bioethicist L. Syd M Johnson of SUNY-Upstate Medical University tells Big Think, "Death is not an event — it's a process." It's not as if there's a big on
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The great free will debate
What does it mean to have—or not have—free will? Were the actions of mass murderers pre-determined billions of years ago? Do brain processes trump personal responsibility? Can experiments prove that free will is an illusion? Bill Nye, Steven Pinker, Daniel Dennett, Michio Kaku, Robert Sapolsky, and others approach the topic from their unique fields and illustrate how complex and layered the free
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This 100% American Business Makes Safe N95 Masks
Like it or not, face masks are here to stay for at least the foreseeable future. Companies are making face masks more stylish , but it's not so much about style as it is about safety. With the vaccine rollout slowly making the world a bit safer and more open for entertaining and travel, it's important that you don't let your guard down. Whether you're feeling more comfortable about going out to e
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In brief: Unsettled Ground; Genesis; Inferno – reviews
Twins unravel their family history when their mother dies; myths, science and the origins of the universe; and a harrowing account of postpartum psychosis Claire Fuller Fig Tree, £14.99, pp304 Fifty-one-year-old twins Julius and Jeanie still live with their mother, Dot, in a ramshackle rural cottage. Their father died years earlier in a tractor accident for which the twins blame local landowner S
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TDC fordobler fibernet-hastighed med ny teknologi
Som det første selskab i Danmark åbner TDC NET nu for brugen af den nye passive optiske netværksteknologi XGS-PON. Den nye teknologi mere end fordobler de udbudte hastigheder i det eksisterende fibernet og skal på sigt give danske husstande hastigheder på op til 10 Gbit/s.
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Make No Decisions in Life without Taking AI into Consideration
Note: For a better formatted version you can read the original article here . Stay awhile and listen … This is important for you. I'm saying this with confidence even though I don't know a thing about you, as there is no way you can fully isolate yourself from this paradigm change happening right now. And it's almost a matter of life or death — especially if you're not particularly rich, or talen
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Proceeding speed at 99.9 percentile, what field should I go into?
Hi all! I just completed a diagnostic test by a licensed psychologist. I score at 99.9 percentile for processing speed. I think it's a significant number that I took big notice of. I was wondering people in what kind of field share similar traits? Still exploring career options. Thank you!! submitted by /u/boobooma [link] [comments]
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Neuroscience of free will & Libet's experiment
Hey all. I read a bit about Benjamin Libet's experiment that says we become aware of our own decisions after we have unconsciously decided. There is also a later experiment that found the same thing, afaik. I did some search to see if there are any studies that disprove this phenomenon but all I could find were philosophical disagreements. Is this an accepted theory in cogsci? Or are there studie
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Put The Solar System In Your Living Room With These Celestial Lamps
The moon is many things to us. It's an object of poetry, a celestial body, a potential storage unit for all human knowledge . Yet before it was that, it was a source of light, a tradition these moon lamps continue. The Original Moon Lamp ($48.99, 9% Off) Pictured above, the lamp that started it all is crafted from NASA's moon imagery. It can easily toggle between white and golden light from its L
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New surgery may help amputees control muscles and sense their 'phantom limb'
MIT researchers have invented a new type of amputation surgery that can help amputees to better control their residual muscles and sense where their "phantom limb" is in space. This restored sense of proprioception should translate to better control of prosthetic limbs, as well as a reduction of limb pain, the researchers say. In most amputations, muscle pairs that control the affected joints, su
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Researchers discover why cold induces tooth pain and hypersensitivity — and how to stop it
Researchers have demonstrated a novel function for odontoblasts: the ability to respond to cold by initiating electrical signals in nerves that register as pain. The discovery delineates the molecular mechanism for tooth pain due to cold. Oil of cloves, an age-old remedy for dental pain, inhibits the odontoblasts' cold-sensing and may present a pharmacologic solution to teeth that are hypersensiti
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Bariatric surgery cuts cancer risk for some people with obesity
Bariatric surgery can significantly reduce the risk of cancer—especially obesity-related cancers—by as much as half in certain people, a new study shows. The research, published in the journal Gastroenterology , is the first to show bariatric surgery significantly decreases the risk of cancer in people with severe obesity and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The risk reduction is even mo
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Lasers show how 'turbulent dynamos' create huge magnetic fields
Researchers have captured, for the first time in a laboratory setting, the process thought to be responsible for generating and sustaining astrophysical magnetic fields. In a paper in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , the researchers report the findings could help explain the origin of large-scale magnetic fields that have been observed but didn't match theoretical calculation
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COVID-19: A retrospective by the numbers
Presents a brief overview of the eight COVID-19 editorials published in DMPHP over the past year and using them as a framework to follow the evolution of the Pandemic over time. A review of the salient epidemiological and clinical dimensions of COVID-19 over time is given as well as a discussion of the medical and public health impacts of the disease and the interventions and policies put in place
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Estrogen receptor {beta} and treatment with a phytoestrogen are associated with inhibition of nuclear translocation of EGFR in the prostate [Medical Sciences]
Knockout of ERβ in the mouse leads to nuclear expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in the prostate. To examine whether ERβ plays a similar role in the human prostate, we used four cohorts of men: 1) a Swedish cohort of normal prostates and PCa (prostate cancer) of different…
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Supportive management practice and intrinsic motivation go together in the public service [Social Sciences]
Drawing on over 4,000,000 individual and 2,000 agency observations across five countries, this paper examines the relationship between features of an employee's work environment and intrinsic motivation in public agencies. It finds that practices which foster employees' sense of autonomy, competence, and relatedness are associated with substantially higher levels of…
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Iron colloids dominate sedimentary supply to the ocean interior [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Dissolution of marine sediment is a key source of dissolved iron (Fe) that regulates the ocean carbon cycle. Currently, our prevailing understanding, encapsulated in ocean models, focuses on low-oxygen reductive supply mechanisms and neglects the emerging evidence from iron isotopes in seawater and sediment porewaters for additional nonreductive dissolution processes….
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DNA hypomethylation in tetraploid rice potentiates stress-responsive gene expression for salt tolerance [Plant Biology]
Polyploidy is a prominent feature for genome evolution in many animals and all flowering plants. Plant polyploids often show enhanced fitness in diverse and extreme environments, but the molecular basis for this remains elusive. Soil salinity presents challenges for many plants including agricultural crops. Here we report that salt tolerance…
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CD4 receptor diversity represents an ancient protection mechanism against primate lentiviruses [Microbiology]
Infection with human and simian immunodeficiency viruses (HIV/SIV) requires binding of the viral envelope glycoprotein (Env) to the host protein CD4 on the surface of immune cells. Although invariant in humans, the Env binding domain of the chimpanzee CD4 is highly polymorphic, with nine coding variants circulating in wild populations….
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Racial wealth gap has roots in promises of land
The United States made two promises—and it kept one but not the other. The tale can help us understand the existing wealth gap between African Americans and white Americans. One of those promises, that of "40 acres and a mule," officially was made in 1865. The US government decided that newly freed African Americans should have a plot of land to call their own. Three years earlier, when 90% of Af
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The Oldest Evidence of Life on Earth is Being Stolen
Earth amalate Fri, 03/26/2021 – 13:59 Image Media credits Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator Media rights Copyright American Institute of Physics Researchers and Aboriginal people are working to protect 3.5-billion-year-old stromatolite fossils in western Australia. Friday, March 26, 2021 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer https://www.insidescience.org/news/oldest-evidence-life-earth-being-stolen
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