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The Fourth Surge Is Upon Us. This Time, It's Different.
Across the United States, cases have started rising again. In a few cities, even hospitalizations are ticking up. The twists and turns of a pandemic can be hard to predict, but this most recent increase was almost inevitable: A more transmissible and more deadly variant called B.1.1.7 has established itself at the precise moment when many regions are opening up rapidly by lifting mask mandates, i
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Researchers achieve world's first manipulation of antimatter by laser
Researchers with the CERN-based ALPHA collaboration have announced the world's first laser-based manipulation of antimatter, leveraging a made-in-Canada laser system to cool a sample of antimatter down to near absolute zero. The achievement, detailed in an article published today and featured on the cover of the journal Nature, will significantly alter the landscape of antimatter research and adva
18h
Scientists Discover X-Rays Blasting Out of Uranus
Unexpected Emissions X-rays are blasting out of Uranus, baffling scientists. The unusual radiation emanating from the distant planet is a first for Uranus, but isn't that unusual for the celestial bodies of our solar system, according to research published Wednesday in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics . The study, while unusual in its own right, could help solve some of the myst
13h
Quantum material's subtle spin behavior proves theoretical predictions
Using complementary computing calculations and neutron scattering techniques, researchers from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge and Lawrence Berkeley national laboratories and the University of California, Berkeley, discovered the existence of an elusive type of spin dynamics in a quantum mechanical system.
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Almost third of UK Covid hospital patients readmitted within four months
BMJ analysis of 48,000 records also finds one in eight patients die within four months of discharge Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Nearly a third of people who have been in hospital suffering from Covid-19 are readmitted for further treatment within four months of being discharged, and one in eight of patients dies in the same period, doctors have found. The strikin
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'Smoking gun' dark matter signature possibly identified
Scientists identified a data signature for dark matter that can potentially be detected by experiments. The effect they found is a daily "diurnal modulation" in the scattering of particles. Dark matter has not yet been detected experimentally. Dark matter, a type of matter that is predicted to make up around 27% of the known universe, has never been detected experimentally. Now a team of astrophy
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Decades of hunting detects footprint of cosmic ray superaccelerators in our galaxy
An enormous telescope complex in Tibet has captured the first evidence of ultrahigh-energy gamma rays spread across the Milky Way. The findings offer proof that undetected starry accelerators churn out cosmic rays, which have floated around our galaxy for millions of years. The research is to be published in the journal Physical Review Letters on Monday, April 5.
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British study links alcohol with lower risk of developing cataracts
Research finds lower risk among those who drink up to 14 units a week – especially if they drink red wine People who consume up to 14 units of alcohol a week have less chance of developing cataracts, especially if they drink red wine, a new British study has found. Antioxidants found in wine could help explain why moderate drinkers are at up to 23% less risk of having to have cataract surgery tha
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Man Downloads Wrong App, Losing $600,000 in Bitcoin
Robbed Blind Last month, a man named Phillipe Christodoulou picked up his phone, downloaded an app for a digital cryptocurrency wallet on the Apple app store, and signed in. Immediately, the scammers who built the app — which was disguised as a reputable crypto storage company — and snuck it onto the app store pilfered Christodoulou's 17.1 bitcoin, which at the time were worth $600,000, The Washi
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Why D.C. Is Failing at the Vaccination Game
Updated at 4:13 p.m. ET on March 31, 2021. W ashington's effort to quickly vaccinate the population against COVID-19 is a success just about everywhere except its own backyard. President Joe Biden pledged to administer 100 million vaccine doses within his first 100 days. After surpassing that goal with 41 days to spare , Biden doubled his pledge to 200 million doses . The CDC projects that 70 per
18h
Dig reveals 6,000-year-old salt hub in North Yorkshire
Archaeologist says neolithic discovery may be among oldest salt-processing sites in western Europe Neolithic people were manufacturing salt in Britain almost 6,000 years ago, before the building of Stonehenge and more than two millennia earlier than was first thought, a new archaeological discovery suggests. Excavations at a site at Street House farm in North Yorkshire have revealed evidence of t
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Virgin Galactic Unveils New Spaceship
VSS Imagine Virgin Galactic has unveiled its latest next-generation spaceship , which it's calling the VSS Imagine. The new addition to the space company's fleet is the first new class of SpaceShip III vehicles and follows the SpaceShipTwo designs the company has been testing. Apart from some minor design updates as compared to its SpaceShipTwo predecessors, the standout new feature is VSS Imagin
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UK scientists warn of 'catastrophic' impact of funding cuts
Loss of grants, driven by deep cuts to foreign aid, threatens research and international collaborations Senior scientists fear that deep cuts to government research spending will have "catastrophic" consequences for the UK, with projects cancelled midway through and some of the brightest minds moving to other countries. Hundreds of research projects tackling issues from the Covid pandemic to anti
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Harvard Halts Plans for Controversial Geoengineering Experiment
Solar geoengineering is a highly controversial concept to combat climate change . The idea is to block some of Sun's energy from reaching the Earth's surface by reflecting it back into space with small particles in the stratosphere. But experts are still not entirely sure about the risks involved, how well it would work — or indeed if it would work at all. And that has scientists worried. A Harva
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Artificial Placentas for Human Babies Coming Within Five Years, Scientist Says
A new "artificial placenta" that's currently under development may be able to support babies who are born too early, helping them finish developing and growing while staving off serious medical complications. Babies born prematurely face a higher risk of lifelong health problems or developmental disorders, since their bodies might not yet be prepared to breathe for themselves. Getting cut off fro
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Words Have Lost Their Common Meaning
H as American society ever been in less basic agreement on what so many important words actually mean? Terms we use daily mean such different things to different people that communication is often blunted considerably, and sometimes even thwarted entirely. The gap between how the initiated express their ideological beliefs and how everyone else does seems larger than ever. The word racism has bec
21h
Man Finds Exploded Piece of Starship Five Miles From Launch Site
Rapid Disassembly SpaceX's fourth full-scale Starship prototype launched, belly flopped — and promptly smashed into the ground. Heavy fog at the company's test site in Boca Chica, Texas, obscured the view of the event, leading many to question just how much damage ensued. This morning's explosion, however, appears to have been particularly heavy, with debris raining down from the skies a great di
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New App Claims to Make You Trip Like You're on LSD
A new smartphone app called Lumenate promises to alter your consciousness, something akin to an LSD trip, using flickering lights. And according to Vice , it may actually work. Its creators claim the app can help "guide your brain into a unique and powerful altered state of consciousness between that of deep meditation and classic psychedelics." In other words, a clearer mind or a great night's s
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China Shared Information With NASA About Its Mars Orbiter
Exchanging Data In a rare turn of events, China's National Space Administration (CNSA) exchanged information with NASA about its Mars orbiter, SpaceNews reports . Earlier this month, NASA's acting administrator Steve Jurczyk asked Congress for special approval to request information from NASA's Chinese counterpart in order to mitigate any risk of the two nations' spacecrafts colliding while orbit
13h
Cells Form Into 'Xenobots' on Their Own
Early last year, the biologist Michael Levin and his colleagues offered a glimpse of how versatile living matter can be. Levin and Douglas Blackiston , a member of his laboratory at the Allen Discovery Center of Tufts University, brought together nascent skin and muscle cells from a frog embryo and shaped the multicelled assemblies by hand. This sculpting process was guided by an algorithm develo
15h
The Vaccination Calculus Is Changing for New Parents
Updated at 5:57 p.m. on March 31, 2020. One year ago, around the end of March, Carly Taylor received a positive result for two tests in two consecutive weeks. The first was a test for the new coronavirus. The second was a pregnancy test. Her daughter, Ophelia, arrived on December 22, within days of the public debut of the first COVID-19 vaccines in the United States. In the weeks after, Taylor, a
15h
Dark Energy, Thought to Comprise Most of the Universe, Might Be Totally Fake
Square One Dark energy, the elusive energy that many physicists believe drives the continuous expansion of the universe, might not actually exist. In conventional models of the universe, about 68 percent of the universe is made of dark energy, with most of the remainder being taken up by dark matter. But University of Copenhagen scientists suggest in new preprint research that there's no actual n
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France to close schools and stop domestic travel after Covid surge
Emmanuel Macron announces three-week shutdown of schools after leaving restrictions 'until last moment' Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage France's schools are to close for at least three weeks and travel within the country will be banned for a month after Easter in an attempt to curb a dramatic surge in Covid-19 cases that threatens to overwhelm hospitals, Emmanuel Mac
16h
NASA's Mars Helicopter Just Unfurled Its Legs
Going Vertical NASA's Mars Perseverance rover is getting ready to gently lower the agency's Ingenuity helicopter onto the Martian surface below it. The four pound rotocopter is currently strapped to the rover's underbelly. But in a matter of days, Ingenuity will be placed on the surface to do what it was designed to do: attempt to fly on the surface of another planet. Images taken by the rover's
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Self-love or self-hate? The surprising truth about narcissists
They may seem grandiose, but some narcissists are just compensating for their deep-set insecurities. Others are out-and-out psychopaths Name: Narcissism. Age: It was the Greeks who named it, with the myth of Narcissus – the beautiful youth so in love with his own reflection that it killed him. The Roman poet Ovid produced the Technicolor version of this cautionary tale of self-love . Appearance:
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SpaceX Crew Dragon Will Feature Massive Glass Dome
A New View SpaceX has shown off its latest render of its Crew Dragon spacecraft, this time featuring an almost 180-degree glass dome, allowing future passengers to get an unprecedented view of their surroundings. "Probably most 'in space' you could possibly feel by being in a glass dome," boasted CEO Elon Musk in a Twitter reply . A new view for crew pic.twitter.com/iSVwUyJT5R — SpaceX (@SpaceX)
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Volkswagen Says It Lied to Reporters About Name Change
Volkswagen of America now admits that it lied to a number of reporters this week about rebranding its North American division to "Voltswagen," a nod to its dedication to electric vehicles. It's a confusing mess of a story, so here's what happened. VW communications teams intentionally leaked a draft about the rebranding earlier this week, as The Wall Street Journal reports. The media quickly pick
18h
Evidence of Neolithic people extracting salt from seawater 5,800 years ago
Archaeologist Stephen Sherlock, an independent scholar, has found evidence of Neolithic people extracting salt from seawater 5,800 years ago at Street House, Loftus, making it the oldest salt production facility ever discovered in Britain. He has published a paper outlining his findings on the Cambridge University Press site, Cambridge Core.
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Leaders of Covid-hit German states call for national lockdown
Leading virologist says country is in 'serious and complicated' stage of pandemic Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Regional leaders of two German states badly hit by a third wave of the pandemic have urged the rest of the country to re-impose a tough lockdown to flatten infection rates, as a leading virologist said Germany was in a "serious and complicated" stage of t
20h
Is this Danish island soon coming to a coast near you?
In 1991, Denmark constructed the world's first offshore wind farm. Now they're building an entire 'Energy Island' in the North Sea. As the U.S. catches up, Danish know-how could soon come to America. Giant wind farms ​ On Monday, President Biden designated a 'Wind Energy Area' in the waters between Long Island and New Jersey. It's part of an ambitious plan to build giant wind farms along the East
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Photos: The Great Vaccination Campaign
As of today, more than 565 million COVID-19 vaccine doses have been administered around the world, at a rate of about 14 million doses a day. Shots are being given at mass-vaccination sites, hospitals, small clinics, and in people's homes, as governments and organizations work to reach everyone currently eligible. The work has only just begun, though; despite encouraging early numbers, only 4 per
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NASA Shows Off Photo of Rock With Laser Holes From Mars Rover
Zap Zap NASA is showing off its Mars Perseverance rover's handiwork on a nearby rock. "While the helicopter is getting ready , I can't help checking out nearby rocks," the rover's official account wrote in a tweet today . "This odd one has my science team trading lots of hypotheses." While the helicopter is getting ready, I can't help checking out nearby rocks. This odd one has my science team tr
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Up Close With Iceland's Fagradalsfjall Volcano
Nearly two weeks since its initial eruption, the Fagradalsfjall volcano on Iceland's Reykjanes Peninsula continues to be active. The gentle nature of the lava flows so far and the volcano's proximity to the city of Reykjavik have allowed many hikers to make the trip to the site and witness the event up close. Here, a handful of recent images of visitors to Iceland's newest volcano.
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Biden Plans Huge Investment in Electric Vehicles
Going Green US President Joe Biden has announced that his administration intends to invest $174 billion in the domestic electric vehicle market. "His plan will enable automakers to spur domestic supply chains from raw materials to parts, retool factories to compete globally, and support American workers to make batteries and EVs," reads a brief posted to the White House's website today. Consumers
15h
The Strange Life of a Congressional Trump Basher, After Trump
E ric Swalwell is going through some stuff. A lot of people are—and not just those who, like him, have grown a scraggly pandemic beard under their mask. Like many members of Congress, Swalwell is still working through the anger and trauma caused by the attack on the Capitol. Like so many Americans, he's learning to live in a post-Trump United States, a post-Trump politics. He's still trying to fi
18h
LED light pollution is a major turnoff to some North American bats
Light pollution, or artificial light at night (ALAN), is a rapidly spreading form of environmental degradation that currently covers about 50% of the United States and 90% of Europe. It can have wide-ranging impacts to nocturnal wildlife by causing changes in foraging behavior, space use, predator-prey interactions, communication and reproduction. New research published this week in the journal Ec
21h
The Awesome Emptiness of Godzilla vs. Kong
In Godzilla vs. Kong , the plot is just an excuse to get to the titular brawl. The film follows a team traveling to Hollow Earth—the secret underground home of titans such as Godzilla and Kong—on behalf of a shady corporation seeking to harness its energy source. They transport Kong away from Skull Island so that he can guide them on their quest, but, uh-oh , Kong and Godzilla are ancient rivals,
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Analysis of ancient bones reveals Stone Age diet details
Fish was not on the menu of the hunter-gatherers of southern Europe 27,000 years ago. Surprisingly, people on the Iberian Peninsula in the Late Gravettian period mostly ate plants and land animals such as rabbits, deer and horses. An international team of researchers has been able to determine this for the first time on the basis of an isotope study of human fossils from the Serinyà caves in Catal
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WHO Head: We're Still Not Sure if COVID Escaped From a Lab
After a lengthy investigation into the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic in China, World Health Organization (WHO) researchers said that the coronavirus almost certainly jumped from infected animals to humans. But not everyone is convinced, The New York Times reports , including WHO director-general Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus. In particular, he's drawing attention to the lab leak hypothesis
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New Technique Identifies DNA Floating Through the Air
Environmental DNA Scientists found that they can capture free-floating DNA and use it to identify what specific animals are nearby just by sucking air through a special filter. It's a cool trick that should prove useful for conservationists and ecologists, Gizmodo reports , but the study is also fascinating from a human perspective. If DNA in the air can be used to track down specific species, it
17h
Boston Dynamics' New Warehouse Robot, Stretch, Moves 800 Boxes an Hour
This week, Boston Dynamics (whose dancing robots video I still can't watch without cracking up) unveiled the newest addition to its robot menagerie. Stretch is the less aesthetically pleasing but highly practical cousin of Atlas , Handle , and Spot , and it has the potential to bring significant changes to warehouse operations. As mundane as "warehouse operations" sounds, consider that online spe
19h
Indian astronomers probe X-ray pulsar 2S 1417–624
Using the Neutron Star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER) instrument aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and NASA's Swift spacecraft, astronomers from India have investigated an X-ray pulsar known as 2S 1417–624. Results of the study, published March 24 on arXiv.org, provide important information about the evolution of different timing and spectral properties of this source during its
20h
Higher testosterone levels in men linked to greater melanoma risk
Study finds testosterone associated with risk of developing potentially deadly skin cancer, but causation not proved Men with high levels of testosterone have an increased risk of developing a potentially deadly skin cancer, researchers have found. According to Cancer Research UK , which funded the study, one in 36 UK males and one in 47 UK females will be diagnosed with melanoma skin cancer in t
22h
Deepfake "Amazon workers" are sowing confusion on Twitter. That's not the problem.
The news: Ahead of a landmark vote that could lead to the formation of the first-ever labor union at a US-based Amazon warehouse, new Twitter accounts purporting to be Amazon employees started appearing. The profiles used deepfake photos as profile pictures and were tweeting some pretty laughable, over-the-top defenses of Amazon's working practices. They didn't seem real, but they still led to co
23h
The Great British Art Tour: the little dog that caused violent riots
With public art collections closed we are bringing the art to you, exploring highlights from across the country in partnership with Art UK. Today's pick: Brown Dog by Nicola Hicks, in Battersea Park In a secluded area of Battersea Park in London stands a sculpture of a small terrier on a plinth . Its diminutive size and situation belies a fascinating history that includes mass demonstrations, vio
5min
What on Earth Is Amazon Doing?
What the hell is Amazon doing? The company is behaving like a common troll on social media, which is not the usual stance for a giant corporation. As someone who has spent an ungodly amount of time studying brand behavior on the internet, I have a theory—but, first, let me back up. Over the past week, Amazon has mounted an aggressive public-opinion campaign in what appears to be an effort to disc
8h
Football teams retain home advantage with no crowd, study finds
Research carried out during Covid spectator bans suggests support is not a key factor in match results While football players sweat it out on the field, their supporters in the stadium shout and sing, giving those playing at home an advantage. When Covid-19 hit, some expected that home advantage to disappear when spectators had to watch games on screens – but research suggests home teams retain a
15h
Exploring how storytelling tropes cluster in popular films
An analysis of film tropes—common storytelling elements seen in different movies—explores combinations of tropes that tend to co-occur in films, identifying patterns that could help inform development of new movies. Pablo García-Sánchez and Juan Merelo of the University of Granada, and Antonio Velez-Estevez and Manuel Cobo from the University of Cádiz, Spain present these findings in the open-acce
15h
Study shows promise of quantum computing using factory-made silicon chips
The qubit is the building block of quantum computing, analogous to the bit in classical computers. To perform error-free calculations, quantum computers of the future are likely to need at least millions of qubits. The latest study, published in the journal PRX Quantum, suggests that these computers could be made with industrial-grade silicon chips using existing manufacturing processes, instead o
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Early humans in the Kalahari were as innovative as their coastal neighbors
Archaeological evidence in a rock shelter at the edge of the Kalahari Desert, South Africa, is challenging the idea that the origins of our species were linked to coastal environments. Published in Nature, Dr. Jayne Wilkins from Griffith University's Australian Research Centre for Human Evolution led an international collaboration which found evidence far from coastal sites of the complex symbolic
18h
A successful phonon calculation within the quantum Monte Carlo framework
The focus and ultimate goal of computational research in materials science and condensed matter physics is to solve the Schrödinger equation—the fundamental equation describing how electrons behave inside matter—exactly (without resorting to simplifying approximations). While experiments can certainly provide interesting insights into a material's properties, it is often computations that reveal t
18h
Radar study shows 46 million grasshoppers descended on Las Vegas
A team of researchers from the University of Oklahoma, and one from Notre Dame University, has found that on July 27, 2019, approximately 46 million pallid-winged grasshoppers hovered over Las Vegas, Nevada—one of the brightest-lit cities in the United States. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, the group describes using radar data to study the grasshoppers.
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New theory suggests uranium 'snowflakes' in white dwarfs could set off star-destroying explosion
A pair of researchers with Indiana University and Illinois University, respectively, has developed a theory that suggests crystalizing uranium "snowflakes" deep inside white dwarfs could instigate an explosion large enough to destroy the star. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, C. J. Horowitz and M. E. Caplan describe their theory and what it could mean to astrophysic
19h
Geoengineering researchers have halted plans for a balloon launch in Sweden
In an unexpected move, the advisory committee for a Harvard University geoengineering research project is recommending that the team suspend plans for its first balloon flight in Sweden this summer. The purpose of that initial flight was to evaluate the propelled balloon's equipment and software in the stratosphere. In subsequent launches, the researchers hope to release small amounts of particle
19h
In the Sonoran Desert, GIS Helps to Map Migrant Deaths
According to GIS maps, after the U.S. government intensified its border patrol and surveillance efforts, migrants began crossing through hotter, more rugged, and deadlier parts of the Sonoran Desert. Researchers are calling on governments to rethink how their policies on borderlands contribute to deaths.
23h
Listen to your heart? What this remarkable organ actually does
The heart is more than just a pump that pushes blood through our veins. It's also an organ that affects our thinking, feelings, perception and identity. The human heart is usually the size of one's fist, sometimes a little larger. It's made of two parts – the left and the right – that are not directly connected to one another. This is why sometimes they are called the left heart and the right hea
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Scientists show technology can save people from shark bites
With shark bites increasing in countries like Australia—scientists say the use of personal electronic deterrents is an effective way to prevent future deaths and injuries which could save the lives of up to 1063 Australians along the coastline over the next 50 years.
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The Weekly Planet: 3 Ways That Biden Could Green the Financial System
Every week, our lead climate reporter brings you the big ideas, expert analysis, and vital guidance that will help you flourish on a changing planet. Sign up to get T he Weekly Planet , our guide to living through climate change, in your inbox. One of the core ideas of this newsletter is that you can't fight climate change without altering the stuff of the world. The vehicles that people use to c
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Insight into the evolution of bones
A joint team of paleontologists has now for the first time analyzed bone structures in 400 million-year-old fossils of marine life at unprecedentedly high resolution and in 3D. To be able to view these structures, tomography experts at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) examined the samples under the focused ion beam of a scanning electron microscope to calculate 3D images from the data, achieving
15h
Synthetic mucus can mimic the real thing
More than just a sign of illness, mucus is a critical part of our body's defenses against disease. Every day, our bodies produce more than a liter of the slippery substance, covering a surface area of more than 400 square meters to trap and disarm microbial invaders.
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Exercise, healthy diet in midlife may prevent serious health conditions in senior years
Regular exercise and a healthy diet for middle-aged adults may be key to achieving optimal cardiometabolic health later in life. Cardiometabolic health risk factors include the metabolic syndrome, a cluster of health conditions such as excess body fat around the waist, high blood pressure, high blood sugar, abnormal cholesterol or triglyceride levels that increase the risk of heart disease, stroke
19h
Scientists turn to deep learning to improve air quality forecasts
Air pollution from the burning of fossil fuels impacts human health but predicting pollution levels at a given time and place remains challenging, according to a team of scientists who are turning to deep learning to improve air quality estimates. Results of the team's study could be helpful for modelers examining how economic factors like industrial productivity and health factors like hospitaliz
19h
First images of freshwater plumes at sea
The first imaging of substantial freshwater plumes west of Hawai'i Island may help water planners to optimize sustainable yields and aquifer storage calculations. University of Hawai'i at Mānoa researchers demonstrated a new method to detect freshwater plumes between the seafloor and ocean surface in a study recently published in Geophysical Research Letters.
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Oxford Nanopore float offers London a proper tech future
Planned IPO of life science group will test LSE's appetite for funding high-growth tech Oxford Nanopore to float on London Stock Exchange Another day, another tech float on the way for London. This one involves proper technology too: cutting-edge DNA sequencing and analytics, as opposed to takeaway food delivered by bicycle. Oxford Nanopore's likely arrival on the London Stock Exchange later this
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Small-molecule therapeutics: Big data dreams for tiny technologies
Small-molecule therapeutics treat a wide variety of diseases, but their effectiveness is often diminished because of their pharmacokinetics—what the body does to a drug. After administration, the body dictates how much of the drug is absorbed, which organs the drug enters, and how quickly the body metabolizes and excretes the drug again.
19h
First X-rays from Uranus discovered
Astronomers have detected X-rays from Uranus using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. This result may help scientists learn more about this enigmatic ice giant planet in our Solar System.
14h
Structural analyses of an RNA stability element interacting with poly(A) [Biochemistry]
Cis-acting RNA elements are crucial for the regulation of polyadenylated RNA stability. The element for nuclear expression (ENE) contains a U-rich internal loop flanked by short helices. An ENE stabilizes RNA by sequestering the poly(A) tail via formation of a triplex structure that inhibits a rapid deadenylation-dependent decay pathway. Structure-based…
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Karies eller parodontit – inte bara godisets fel
Minst en miljard människor i världen beräknas ha hål i tänderna (karies) eller tandlossning (parodontit). Sötsaker ökar risken, men hur bakteriefloran i munnens ser ut spelar stor också roll. Pågående forskning kan leda till snabbtest som avslöjar om man ligger i farozonen innan sjukdomen brutit ut. – I Sverige drabbas cirka tio procent av allvarlig karies eller tandlossning och andelen förväntas
20h
The Atlantic Daily: How to Head Off the New Surge
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox. America is entering its fourth coronavirus surge. And this time, it appears to be driven by an even deadlier variant of the virus. Luckily, the country is prepared, having already vaccinated tens
17h
NASA tests mixed reality, scientific know-how and mission operations for exploration
Mixed reality technologies, like virtual reality headsets or augmented reality apps, aren't just for entertainment—they can also help make discoveries on other worlds like the Moon and Mars. By traveling on Earth to extreme environments—from Mars-like lava fields in Hawaii to underwater hydrothermal vents—similar to destinations on other worlds, NASA scientists have tested out technologies and too
21h
Preconditions for life already present 3.5 billion years ago
Microbial life already had the necessary conditions to exist on our planet 3.5 billion years ago. This was the conclusion reached by a research team after studying microscopic fluid inclusions in barium sulfate (barite) from the Dresser Mine in Marble Bar, Australia. In their publication "Ingredients for microbial life preserved in 3.5-billion-year-old fluid inclusions," the researchers suggest th
17h
A feminist internet would be better for everyone
It's April 13, 2025. Like most 17-year-olds, Maisie grabs her phone as soon as she wakes up. She checks her apps in the same order every morning: Herd, Signal, TikTok. Herd started out as a niche social network aimed at girls, but everyone's on it these days, even the boys. Maisie goes to her personal page and looks at what she's pinned there: photos of her dog, her family, her school science pro
1h
New study sows doubt about the composition of 70 percent of our universe
Researchers the world over have long believed that 70 percent of the universe is composed of dark energy, a substance that makes it possible for the universe to expand at an ever-increasing rate. But in a new study, researchers tested a model which suggests that the universe's expansion is due to a dark substance with a kind of magnetic force.
16h
In pursuit of pragmatic solutions to pervasive problems
The Alibaba Damo Academy is a unique hybrid research and development (R&D) facility. An academically-oriented independent science organization established in 2017 in Hangzhou, China, it is also an arms-length research affiliate of its founder, Chinese internet technology giant Alibaba. Damo's project development pipelines are positioned around developing data-enabled technologies for fundamental
18h
Research reveals how a cell mixes its mitochondria before it divides
In a landmark study, a team led by researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine has discovered—and filmed—the molecular details of how a cell, just before it divides in two, shuffles important internal components called mitochondria to distribute them evenly to its two daughter cells.
20h
NASA's Webb Telescope General Observer scientific programs selected
Mission officials for NASA's James Webb Space Telescope have announced the selection of the General Observer programs for the telescope's first year of science, known as Cycle 1. These specific programs will provide the worldwide astronomical community with one of the first extensive opportunities to investigate scientific targets with Webb.
21h
Low mood or clinical depression? Taking a critical approach to psychology | Letters
Readers respond to Lucy Foulkes' article on what we are getting wrong in the conversation around mental health It is pleasing that Lucy Foulkes' experience ( What we're getting wrong in the conversation about mental health , 29 March) of supporting her friend through a relationship breakdown leads her to question the helpfulness of applying psychiatric diagnoses uncritically in this and other sit
17h
Pumping the 'brain brake' in pediatric anxiety
A new study reveals that an evidence-based treatment may 'fix' a human short circuit that leads to anxiety and, with the help of brain imaging, might predict treatment outcomes for adolescents with anxiety disorders. Researchers say this could determine medication effectiveness more quickly to help patients.
16h
'Agricomb' measures multiple gas emissions from… cows
After the optical frequency comb made its debut as a ruler for light, spinoffs followed, including the astrocomb to measure starlight and a radar-like comb system to detect natural gas leaks. And now, researchers have unveiled the "agricomb" to measure, ahem, cow burps.
15h
It pays to be tolerant: Dutch national identity
The roots of Dutch tolerance run deep. Perhaps its sources are to be found in centuries old Calvinist prescriptions, according to which everyone has the right to interpret the Bible in their own way. Or maybe in the economy, since international trade necessitated respect for others. "According to our report, there is no such thing as Dutch national identity," announced Máxima, Queen of the Nether
13h
Fast, portable test can diagnose COVID-19 and track variants
Clinicians using a new viral screening test can not only diagnose COVID-19 in a matter of minutes with a portable, pocket-sized machine, but can also simultaneously test for other viruses — like influenza — that might be mistaken for the coronavirus. At the same time, they can sequence the virus, providing valuable information on the spread of COVID-19 mutations and variants.
7h
Estimating lifetime microplastic exposure
Every day, people are exposed to microplastics from food, water, beverages and air. But it's unclear just how many of these particles accumulate in the human body, and whether they pose health risks. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology have developed a lifetime microplastic exposure model that accounts for variable levels from different sources and in different po
18h
Why the middle is neglected in politics and other spectrums
When people talk about the political spectrum, it's often in reference to "opposite sides." Whether the sides are "conservatives versus liberals," "Republicans versus Democrats," or "left versus right," the center is rarely included—and can be actively excluded, according to Santa Fe Institute research published this week in the journal PLOS ONE.
15h
Firms recruit 'dark' personalities for earnings management
Companies could be hiring that bad boss on purpose. According to new research in the Journal of Business Ethics, the 'dark' personality traits—questionable ethical standards, narcissistic tendencies—that make a boss bad also make that person much more likely to go along with manipulating earnings and may be the reason they got the job in the first place.
16h
Venus plots a comeback
In terms of space exploration, Mars is all the rage these days. This has left our closest neighbor, Venus—previously the most attractive planet to study because of its proximity and similar atmosphere to Earth—in the lurch. A new article in Chemical & Engineering News, the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, highlights how scientists and space agencies are turning their eyes back
16h
Carbon-neutral 'biofuel' from lakes
Lakes store huge amounts of methane. In a new study, environmental scientists offer suggestions for how it can be extracted and used as an energy source in the form of methanol.
16h
Special heat treatment improves novel magnetic material
Skyrmions—tiny magnetic vortices—are considered promising candidates for tomorrow's information memory devices which may be able to achieve enormous data storage and processing capacities. A research team led by the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) has developed a method to grow a particular magnetic thin-film material that hosts these magnetic vortices. A central aspect of this new met
17h
An organic material for the next generation of HVAC technologies
On sultry summer afternoons, heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems provide much-needed relief from the harsh heat and humidity. These systems, which often come with dehumidifiers, are currently not energy efficient, guzzling around 76% of the electricity in commercial and residential buildings.
1d
Where have I found peace in the pandemic? Taking part in a Covid vaccine trial
The time I've spent testing Novavax is the closest I've come to the eye of the storm – and it has put my other worries into perspective I've thoroughly enjoyed being a vaccine triallist. As I've mentioned before, I'm on the Novavax trial . When I look back on this past year, I'll remember my visits to the hospital with fondness. I've found them to be pleasant little diversions from the rhythm of
18h
Confronting plastic pollution to protect environmental and public health
Some 8,300 million metric tons of plastics have been manufactured since production exploded in the 1950s, with more than 75 percent ending up as waste and 15 million metric tons reaching oceans every year. Plastic waste fragments into increasingly smaller but environmentally persistent "microplastics," with potentially harmful effects on the health of people, wildlife and ecosystems. A new collect
1d
Ep. 54: Translating Portugal's Approach to Drugs and Addiction
This month: Twenty years ago Portugal decriminalized all drugs as part of a bigger national strategy to fight addiction. Last month Oregon became the first U.S. state to do the same, in a policy modeled off Portugal's approach — but many questions about how success may translate remain unanswered.
22h
A new technique to synthesize superconducting materials
Researchers who demonstrated superconducting materials at room temperatures last fall, now report a new technique in the quest to also create the materials at lower pressures. They describe separating hydrogen atoms from yttrium with a thin film of palladium inside a diamond anvil.
16h
Biodiversity is positively related to mental health
The higher the number of plant and bird species in a region, the healthier the people who live there. This was found by a new study published in Landscape and Urban Planning and led by the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv), the Senckenberg Biodiversity and Climate Research Centre (SBiK-F) and the Christian Albrechts University (CAU) in Kiel. The researchers found that, in
18h
Lab-made hexagonal diamonds stiffer than natural diamonds
For the first time, researchers have hard evidence that human-made hexagonal diamonds are stiffer than cubic diamonds found in nature and often used in jewelry. Hexagonal diamonds have been found at some meteorite impact sites and others have been made in labs but were either too small or existed to briefly for measurement. Now scientists have created hexagonal diamonds large enough to measure the
19h
Heat conduction record with tantalum nitride
A thermos bottle has the task of preserving the temperature—but sometimes you want to achieve the opposite: Computer chips generate heat that must be dissipated as quickly as possible so that the chip is not destroyed. This requires special materials with particularly good heat conduction properties.
18h
Curved plasmonic fluxes reveal new way to practical light manipulation within nanoscal
Scientists from Tomsk Polytechnic University jointly with Russian colleagues and researchers from Technical University of Denmark the first time have experimentally proved the existence of a two-dimensional (2D) curved flux of plasmonic quasiparticles, a plasmonic hook. A flat 2D hook is smaller than a 3D hook and possesses new properties, due to them, the researchers consider it as the most promi
20h
Engineers use tiny device to change songbird pitch, improve understanding of human speech
Scientific understanding of the brain regions responsible for speech and communication is limited. Consequently, knowledge of how to improve challenges such as speech impediments or language acquisition is limited as well. Using an ultra-lightweight, wireless implant, a team is researching songbirds – one of the few species that share humans' ability to learn new vocalizations – to improve scienti
19h
How Streptococcus pyogenes can survive on skin and cause skin infections
Streptococcus pyogenes is one of the most important bacterial causes of human skin infections. If S. pyogenes invades deep into the tissue, it can cause life-threatening illnesses, such as sepsis and toxic shock. With its limited supply of carbohydrates, the skin is generally an effective barrier against infection and not a good surface for the survival of S. pyogenes. To survive successfully and
20h
Decellularized spinach serves as an edible platform for laboratory-grown meat
Spinach, a cost-efficient and environmentally friendly scaffold, provided an edible platform upon which a team of researchers led by a Boston College engineer has grown meat cells, an advance that may accelerate the development of cultured meat, according to a new report in the advance online edition of the journal Food BioScience.
1d
Ancient Antarctica Was Blasted by a Giant Flamethrower From Space
Blast Zone About 430,000 years ago, a powerful blast of superheated gas and air incinerated the surface of Antarctica. The hellish inferno came down from space like a gigantic flamethrower after a football field-sized object entered and exploded within the Earth's atmosphere, according to Gizmodo . When it landed, the "airburst," as the University of Kent scientists who discovered it call it, it
12h
Mamma kan ha hetat mamma även på stenåldern
Ett 40-tal basala ord med samma språkljud återkommer i de flesta av jordens språk. En förklaring är att dessa ord är bekväma att uttala, och därför bevaras generation efter generation, visar forskning från Lunds universitet. I de flesta av världens språk har ett antal basala ord liknande ljud. Till exempel innehåller orden för mamma och näsa ofta "m" och "n" i nästan alla språk. – Mamma har troli
20h
Human hiking trails custom built for sauntering grizzlies
In the run up to hibernation, grizzly bears go on a colossal binge, consuming as many calories as possible to get them through the long winter. Yet, little was known about how much energy the massive mammals use as they shamble around their rugged territories. "Moving across the landscape in search of food can be a huge energetic expense for some animals," Carnahan says. Fortunately, the Washingto
1d
Scientists pinpoint our most distant animal relatives
Scientists believe they have pinpointed our most distant animal relative in the tree of life and, in doing so, have resolved an ongoing debate. Their work finds strong evidence that sponges – not more complex comb jellies – were our most distant relatives.
16h
Micro-environmental influences on artificial micromotors
By harvesting energy from their surrounding environments, particles named 'artificial micromotors' can propel themselves in specific directions when placed in aqueous solutions. In current research, a popular choice of micromotor is the spherical 'Janus particle' – featuring two distinct sides with different physical properties. Until now, however, few studies have explored how these particles int
17h
Mums med insekter? Jodå, attityden till livsmedel kan ändras
Svenskar åt inte insekter ens om de svalt. Det visar en ny studie som undersökt hur människor runt om i världen har uppfattat insekter som livsmedel. Men attityder kan förändras ganska snabbt – det har hänt med andra livsmedel. Insekter lyfts ofta fram som framtidens mat – en miljömässigt hållbar källa till protein. I stora delar av världen är det inte konstigt alls att äta insekter, men i Europa
18h
Sexist online translators get a little gender sensitivity training
Online translation tools have helped us learn new languages, communicate across linguistic borders, and view foreign websites in our native tongue. But the artificial intelligence (AI) behind them is far from perfect, often replicating rather than rejecting the biases that exist within a language or a society.
20h
Should we determine species through DNA? (part two) – podcast
In part two of The Age of Extinction takeover of Science Weekly, Patrick Greenfield and Phoebe Weston explore a relatively new and controversial technology called DNA barcoding that is helping scientists to differentiate between species – including fungi, which we heard about in part one . As the catastrophic loss of biodiversity around the world continues, could DNA barcoding at least allow us t
4h
Kuroshio current may be responsible for climatic discomfort in Tokyo, scientists find
Forty million people living in the Kanto region of Japan, which includes Tokyo, may be able to blame a meandering ocean current for increasing hot and humid summers, according to an analysis conducted by an international team of researchers. The Kuroshio Current flows north, bringing warm water from the tropics to Japan's southern coast. Since 2017, however, it has meandered off its traditional pa
18h
FDA Approves 2 Rapid, At-Home COVID Tests
The Food and Drug Administration approved two rapid coronavirus at-home tests made by Abbott's BinaxNOW and Quidel Quickvue. (Image credit: Jure Makovec/AFP via Getty Images)
24min
Why SARS-CoV-2 replicates better in the upper respiratory tract
Researchers have assessed virus growth and activation of the cellular defense mechanisms in the respiratory tract. They have shown that natural temperature differences that exist in the upper and lower respiratory tract have a profound influence on SARS-CoV-2 replication and subsequent innate immune activation in human cells. The findings can help to develop antiviral drugs and preventive measures
7h
Watch Hypnotic Drone Footage of Boiling Lava Taken Inside Iceland Volcano's Crater
The proliferation of drones bearing cameras has brought many a new sight. Like, a bird's-eye-view of sharks casually swimming at the local beach —which is, let's just say, unsettling—or, now, an eyewitness view of a high dive into an erupting volcano. When Fagradalsfjall, near Reykjavik, began its recent eruption—the first on the Reykjanes Peninsula in some 800 years —drone pilots took advantage.
11h
The electrical blueprints that orchestrate life | Michael Levin
DNA isn't the only builder in the biological world — there's also a mysterious bioelectric layer directing cells to work together to grow organs, systems and bodies, says biologist Michael Levin. Sharing unforgettable and groundbreaking footage of two-headed worms, he introduces us to xenobots — the world's first living robots, created in his lab by cracking the electrical code of cells — and d
14h
Revealing meat and fish fraud with a handheld 'MasSpec Pen' in seconds
Meat and fish fraud are global problems, costing consumers billions of dollars every year. On top of that, mislabeling products can cause problems for people with allergies, religious or cultural restrictions. Current methods to detect this fraud, while accurate, are slower than inspectors would like. Now, researchers have optimized their handheld MasSpec Pen to identify common types of meat and f
15h
Modeling the behavior of 2D materials under pressure
Scientists from the Skoltech Center for Energy Science and Technology (CEST) have developed a method for modeling the behavior of 2D materials under pressure. The research will help create pressure sensors based on silicene or other 2D materials. The paper was published in the ACS Nano journal.
18h
This Awesome STEM Toy Teaches Coding for Kids Without Using Screens
Everyone wants the best education possible for their kids. But it's hard to find enriching activities that don't involve setting them in front of yet another screen. And teaching them the fundamentals of STEM seems nearly impossible when you're limiting screen time. And according to data from Engineering For Kids , STEM workers earn 26-percent more than people without a STEM background. So if you
21h
Flood risk uncertainties assessed at the global scale
A research team from the Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo has conducted a detailed analysis of the uncertainties associated with flood risk modeling at the global scale. They found large uncertainties were mainly associated with runoff data. Flood magnitude is large in wet regions, but uncertainties in flood depth is larger in dry and mountainous regions affected by rare, e
21h
Building a culture of high-quality data
The era of big data has inundated nearly all scientific fields with torrents of newly available data with the power to stimulate new research and enable inquiry at scales not previously possible. This is particularly true for ecology, where rapid growth in remote sensing, monitoring, and community science initiatives has contributed to a massive surge in the quantity and kinds of environmental dat
21h
Processed meat linked to higher risk of mortality and cardiovascular disease
Results of a multinational study published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition suggest that individuals who eat processed meat are at higher risk of mortality and major cardiovascular disease events compared with individuals who do not eat processed meat. In contrast, the consumption of unprocessed red meat and poultry was not associated with higher mortality and cardiovascular disease r
21h
Melting ice sheets caused sea levels to rise up to 18 meters
It is well known that climate-induced sea level rise is a major threat. New research has found that previous ice loss events could have caused sea-level rise at rates of around 3.6 meters per century, offering vital clues as to what lies ahead should climate change continue unabated.
5min
Felaktigt aktiverade immunceller bakom diabetes hos barn
Typ 1-diabetes är den allvarligaste kroniska sjukdomen hos barn, och omkring 900 barn under 18 år insjuknar i Sverige varje år (se ruta). Sjukdomen beror på att kroppens eget immunförsvar felaktigt angriper och dödar de så kallade betacellerna som tillverkar insulin. Ett tidigt tecken på att ett barn ligger i riskzonen är att blodet innehåller så kallade auto-antikroppar, alltså antikroppar mot nå
10min
Croatia acts to save its iconic Istrian goat
With wavy horns and a sturdy build, the Istrian goat stands proudly on Croatia's national flag. But in the pastures where the white-furred animal hails from, the breed is almost nowhere to be seen.
35min
Listen: The 'Rock Doc' Who Prescribed 1.4 Million Pain Pills
Listen and subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Podcasts The patients of the nurse practitioner and aspiring reality star Jeffrey Young say he helped them like nobody else could. Federal prosecutors who charged him in a massive opioid bust say he overprescribed painkillers, often for "money, notoriety, and sexual favors." Young's case provides a rare glimpse into the ways patie
52min
Mothers bear the cost of the pandemic shift to remote work
For many parents, the COVID-19 pandemic has made life's everyday juggling act—managing work, school, extracurricular, and household responsibilities—much, much harder. And according to a new study led by Penn sociologists, those extra burdens have fallen disproportionately on mothers.
1h
Steve Jackson and the Moumen Troll
"I take issues of research integrity very seriously and shall of course review the concerns posted on PubPeer to establish whether there are any issues that need to be addressed." Stephen P Jackson.
2h
Why Hong Kongers Are Slow to Get a Vaccine
Hong Kong's fight against the coronavirus pandemic has put it in an enviable position. Bolstered by a public that learned difficult lessons from the 2003 SARS pandemic , and because of a relatively swift government response this time around, this city of roughly 7 million people has suffered fewer than 12,000 cases and only 205 deaths . It never underwent the large-scale, harsh lockdowns implemen
2h
VoF lägger ner verksamheten!
Föreningen behövs inte längre I ett unikt uttalande meddelar Vetenskap och Folkbildnings styrelse idag att man avvecklar sin verksamhet. En del fortfarande skeptiska En AI-förstärkt bild av Bigfoot Inte alla … Continued Inlägget dök först upp på Vetenskap och Folkbildning .
3h
Overinterpreting Computational Models of Decision-Making
Bell (1985) Can a set of equations predict and quantify complex emotions resulting from financial decisions made in an uncertain environment? An influential paper by David E. Bell considered the implications of disappointment, a psychological reaction caused by comparing an actual outcome to a more optimistic expected outcome, as in playing the lottery. Equations for regret, disappointment, elati
3h
Job
Does companies like Google, Amazon, Apple, Netflix, etc take individuals with degree in industrial organizational psychology? submitted by /u/Healthy_Ad2068 [link] [comments]
3h
What is Objective Cognitive Performance?
Context: This review provides a broad overview of the effectiveness of interventions for subjective cognitive decline (SCD) in improving psychological well-being, metacognition and objective cognitive performance. submitted by /u/IgorTtk [link] [comments]
3h
Need help identifying an appropriate Cognitive Science graduate program in the US
Hey channel, I am hoping someone here might be able to help me. I have been really fascinated with the interdisciplinary study that cognitive science represents. I have been interested in figuring out if a career shift to cognitive science later in life is a possibility. Specifically, I have been wanting to figure out if a program exists that would provide training that could be applied to a ther
3h
A statistical solution to processing very large datasets efficiently with memory limit
With the ever-increasing amount of data to process in a limited time-period, the required computational resources and corresponding expenses are likely to go up. To address this issue, scientists from Japan have developed a statistical framework that helps classify tremendously large datasets without requiring a memory boost or total sampling. The technique is widely applicable and can help sustai
3h
UTSA criminology professor studies impact of COVID-19on gender-based violence
The University of Texas at San Antonio criminology and criminal justice professor Kellie Lynch, along with professor TK Logan from the University of Kentucky, worked with the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence on a national survey to investigate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the dynamics of gender-based violence and the experiences of those serving victims of gender-based violen
4h
Should we determine species through DNA? (part two)
In part two of The Age of Extinction takeover of Science Weekly, Patrick Greenfield and Phoebe Weston explore a relatively new and controversial technology called DNA barcoding that is helping scientists to differentiate between species – including fungi, which we heard about in part one. As the catastrophic loss of biodiversity around the world continues, could DNA barcoding at least allow us to
5h
The Trouble with Brain Scans – Issue 98: Mind
One autumn afternoon in the bowels of UC Berkeley's Li Ka Shing Center, I was looking at my brain. I had just spent 10 minutes inside the 3 Tesla MRI scanner, the technical name for a very expensive, very high maintenance, very magnetic brain camera. Lying on my back inside the narrow tube, I had swallowed my claustrophobia and let myself be enveloped in darkness and a cacophony of foghorn-like b
7h
A Quiet Path Out of the Coronavirus Shadow – Issue 98: Mind
Eleven years ago, I sat down across from a man named Edward Espe Brown. I had returned home to Texas from a four-month stay at the Tassajara Zen Mountain Center in California, endured a breakup, and was feeling adrift. I told Ed that I was struggling with powerful feelings of sadness and loss. I didn't know what to do. I've thought often of the conversation we had that afternoon, as the coronavir
7h
I Am Not a Machine. Yes You Are. – Issue 98: Mind
I'm trying to explain to Arthur I. Miller why artworks generated by computers don't quite do it for me. There's no human being behind them. The works aren't a portal into another person's mind, where you can wander in a warren of intention, emotion, and perception, feeling life being shaped into form. What's more, it often seems, people just ain't no good, so it's transcendent to be reminded they
7h
What's next in the search for COVID's origins
Nature, Published online: 01 April 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00877-4 Scientists say that a WHO report was a reasonable start given the available evidence, but there are many questions yet to be answered.
7h
13 films everyone should watch and why—as voted by you
We asked Big Think's readers and staff for their recommendations on films everyone should watch. A collection of fiction and non-fiction works from around the world, these movies will entertain and expand your horizons. The films cover various topics, explore numerous themes, and shed light on several controversial historical events. Ever find yourself unsure of what movie to watch? Have you spen
10h
Houston Methodist among largest providers of monoclonal antibody treatment for COVID-19
Among the nation's largest providers of monoclonal antibodies for Covid-19, Houston Methodist has infused nearly 4,000 patients. The hospital system was able to quickly ramp up its program by leveraging numerous resources through interdisciplinary collaboration. A commentary outlining challenges, resources and benchmarks published online March 29 in the New England Journal of Medicine Catalyst and
11h
Will US public support donating COVID-19 vaccines to low- and middle-income countries?
Not every country has equal access to COVID-19 vaccines. A study by researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University investigates whether people in the United States support donating part of the U.S. COVID-19 vaccine stockpile to less prosperous countries. It finds older respondents are less likely to endorse higher levels of vaccine donations and more likely to want to wait until all in the U.S. w
11h
Chemo for glioblastoma may work better in morning than evening
An aggressive type of brain cancer, glioblastoma has no cure. Patients survive an average of 15 months after diagnosis, with fewer than 10% of patients surviving longer than five years. While researchers are investigating potential new therapies via ongoing clinical trials, a new study from Washington University in St. Louis suggests that a minor adjustment to the current standard treatment — giv
12h
Scientists find genetic link to clogged arteries
High cholesterol is the most commonly understood cause of atherosclerosis, a hardening of the arteries that raises the risk of heart attack and stroke. But now, scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified a gene that likely plays a causal role in coronary artery disease independent of cholesterol levels. The gene also likely has roles in related cardiovascul
12h
New study supports the effectiveness of the ForsythKids school-based dental program for reducing untreated tooth decay
In a longitudinal study published earlier this month in the Journal of the American Dental Association, researchers analyzed untreated decay in a cohort of nearly 7,000 children enrolled in the ForsythKids preventive dentistry program. Over the course of six years, the percentage of children with untreated cavities in the program decreased from 39 to 19 percent, suggesting that school-based preven
12h
Novel pharmacological strategies to treat alcoholism. Focus on epigenetics
This study explores the impact of alcohol on epigenetics, a term that defines chemical modifications of DNA (without changing its nucleotide sequence), proteins and mRNA (messenger RNA), and the action of regulatory non-coding RNAs. Epigenetic changes affect the adequate functioning of cellular events such as protein synthesis, protein trafficking, metabolic control, or energy production. Besides,
12h
Race Replay: Dominator vs. Murder Nova | Street Outlaws
Stream Full Episodes of Street Outlaws: https://discovery.com/tv-shows/street-outlaws/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.facebook.com/StreetOutlaws Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery https://twitter.com/StreetOutlaws We're on Instagram! ht
12h
Crnic Institute discovery may explain high risk of leukemia in children with Down syndrome
Children with Down syndrome are 20-times more likely to develop acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) and 150-times more likely to develop acute myeloid leukemia (AML) compared to their typical peers. According to a new study by researchers at the Linda Crnic Institute for Down Syndrome, the reason could be that children with Down syndrome are more likely to present with clonal hematopoiesis (CH), a pr
13h
National study examines US mammography screening rates during COVID-19 pandemic
A new study looking at US mammography screening rates during the first five months of the pandemic found both a strong rebound in breast cancer screening rates and a concerning cumulative deficit in mammograms due to missed appointments, as well as uncovering disparities when looking at screening according to race. The study was released this week in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.
13h
Scientists: Grizzlies expand turf but still need protection
Grizzly bears are slowly expanding the turf where they roam in parts of the northern Rocky Mountains but need continued protections, according to government scientists who concluded that no other areas of the country would be suitable for reintroducing the fearsome predators.
13h
Phenomenology of quantum turbulence in superfluid helium [Applied Physical Sciences]
Quantum turbulence—the stochastic motion of quantum fluids such as 4He and 3He-B, which display pure superfluidity at zero temperature and two-fluid behavior at finite but low temperatures—has been a subject of intense experimental, theoretical, and numerical studies over the last half a century. Yet, there does not exist a satisfactory…
14h
The nuclear to cytoplasmic ratio directly regulates zygotic transcription in Drosophila through multiple modalities [Developmental Biology]
Early embryos must rapidly generate large numbers of cells to form an organism. Many species accomplish this through a series of rapid, reductive, and transcriptionally silent cleavage divisions. Previous work has demonstrated that the number of divisions before both cell cycle elongation and zygotic genome activation (ZGA) is regulated by…
14h
Self-shaping liquid crystal droplets by balancing bulk elasticity and interfacial tension [Physics]
The shape diversity and controlled reconfigurability of closed surfaces and filamentous structures, universally found in cellular colonies and living tissues, are challenging to reproduce. Here, we demonstrate a method for the self-shaping of liquid crystal (LC) droplets into anisotropic and three-dimensional superstructures, such as LC fibers, LC helices, and differently…
14h
Crystal structure of schizorhodopsin reveals mechanism of inward proton pumping [Biochemistry]
Schizorhodopsins (SzRs), a new rhodopsin family identified in Asgard archaea, are phylogenetically located at an intermediate position between type-1 microbial rhodopsins and heliorhodopsins. SzRs work as light-driven inward H+ pumps as xenorhodopsins in bacteria. Although E81 plays an essential role in inward H+ release, the H+ is not metastably trapped…
14h
Task-specific information outperforms surveillance-style big data in predictive analytics [Social Sciences]
Increasingly, human behavior can be monitored through the collection of data from digital devices revealing information on behaviors and locations. In the context of higher education, a growing number of schools and universities collect data on their students with the purpose of assessing or predicting behaviors and academic performance, and…
14h
c-di-AMP, a likely master regulator of bacterial K+ homeostasis machinery, activates a K+ exporter [Microbiology]
bis-(3′,5′)-cyclic diadenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP) is a second messenger with roles in virulence, cell wall and biofilm formation, and surveillance of DNA integrity in many bacterial species, including pathogens. Strikingly, it has also been proposed to coordinate the activity of the components of K+ homeostasis machinery, inhibiting K+ import, and activating…
14h
Diversity in health care institutions reduces Israeli patients' preȷudice toward Arabs [Political Sciences]
Diversity in the lines of public institutions, such as hospitals, schools, and police forces, is thought to improve provision for minority group members. Nonetheless, whether and how diversity in public institutions shapes majority citizens' prejudice toward minorities are unclear. Building on insights from the intergroup contact literature, I suggest that…
14h
The structure of a minimum amyloid fibril core formed by necroptosis-mediating RHIM of human RIPK3 [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Receptor-interacting protein kinases 3 (RIPK3), a central node in necroptosis, polymerizes in response to the upstream signals and then activates its downstream mediator to induce cell death. The active polymeric form of RIPK3 has been indicated as the form of amyloid fibrils assembled via its RIP homotypic interaction motif (RHIM)….
14h
Twenty-year economic impacts of deworming [Sustainability Science]
Estimating the impact of child health investments on adult living standards entails multiple methodological challenges, including the lack of experimental variation in health status, an inability to track individuals over time, and accurately measuring living standards and productivity in low-income settings. This study exploits a randomized school health intervention that…
14h
Direct single-molecule imaging for diagnostic and blood screening assays [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Every year, over 100 million units of donated blood undergo mandatory screening for HIV, hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and syphilis worldwide. Often, donated blood is also screened for human T cell leukemia–lymphoma virus, Chagas, dengue, Babesia, cytomegalovirus, malaria, and other infections. Several billion diagnostic tests are performed annually around the…
14h
Van der Waals interaction affects wrinkle formation in two-dimensional materials [Physics]
Nonlinear mechanics of solids is an exciting field that encompasses both beautiful mathematics, such as the emergence of instabilities and the formation of complex patterns, as well as multiple applications. Two-dimensional crystals and van der Waals (vdW) heterostructures allow revisiting this field on the atomic level, allowing much finer control…
14h
UNH Research: New Hampshire coastal recreationists support offshore wind
As the Biden administration announces a plan to expand the development of offshore wind energy development (OWD) along the East Coast, research from the University of New Hampshire shows significant support from an unlikely group, coastal recreation visitors. From boat enthusiasts to anglers, researchers found surprisingly widespread support with close to 77% of coastal recreation visitors support
14h
Uranus and Neptune have wonky magnetic fields: Why?
The mystery of Uranus and Neptune's completely skewed magnetic fields remains, according to new research. The two large gas planets' strange magnetic fields are each strongly tilted relative to the planet's rotation axes and are significantly offset from the physical center of the planet. But why? Various theories assume that a unique inner structure of these planets could be responsible for this
14h
10,000-plus medical charts provides comparator for HIV prevention study in pregnant women
A review of more than 10,000 medical records in urban Malawi, South Africa, Uganda and Zimbabwe has yielded important insight about pregnancy and neonatal outcomes in these communities as well as the frequency with which different complications occur. The data provide researchers conducting the DELIVER study a frame of reference for assessing the safety of daily PrEP and the monthly dapivirine rin
14h
Diets high in heat-treated foods increase risk of chronic kidney disease, rat study shows
Revealing a mechanism by which diets rich in ultra-processed foods damage our health, experiments with rats established that certain compounds, which form when food is heat-treated during production, increase the risk of diseases such as chronic kidney disease. The study found that regularly eating foods cooked or processed at high temperatures, including roast meats,
14h
Depolarizing GABAA current in the prefrontal cortex is linked with cognitive impairment in a mouse model relevant for schizophrenia
Cognitive impairment in schizophrenia (CIAS) is the most critical predictor of functional outcome. Limited understanding of the cellular mechanisms of CIAS hampers development of more effective treatments. We found that in subchronic phencyclidine (scPCP)–treated mice, an animal model that mimics CIAS, the reversal potential of GABA A currents in pyramidal neurons of the infralimbic prefrontal co
15h
Increasing brain palmitoylation rescues behavior and neuropathology in Huntington disease mice
Huntington disease (HD) damages the corticostriatal circuitry in large part by impairing transport of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). We hypothesized that improving vesicular transport of BDNF could slow or prevent disease progression. We therefore performed selective proteomic analysis of vesicles transported within corticostriatal projecting neurons followed by in silico screening and
15h
Bone metabolism and evolutionary origin of osteocytes: Novel application of FIB-SEM tomography
Lacunae and canaliculi spaces of osteocytes are remarkably well preserved in fossilized bone and serve as an established proxy for bone cells. The earliest bone in the fossil record is acellular (anosteocytic), followed by cellular (osteocytic) bone in the jawless relatives of jawed vertebrates, the osteostracans, about 400 million years ago. Virtually nothing is known about the physiological pre
15h
A large meteoritic event over Antarctica ca. 430 ka ago inferred from chondritic spherules from the Sor Rondane Mountains
Large airbursts, the most frequent hazardous impact events, are estimated to occur orders of magnitude more frequently than crater-forming impacts. However, finding traces of these events is impeded by the difficulty of identifying them in the recent geological record. Here, we describe condensation spherules found on top of Walnumfjellet in the Sør Rondane Mountains, Antarctica. Affinities with
15h
Receptor-ligand supplementation via a self-cleaving 2A peptide-based gene therapy promotes CNS axonal transport with functional recovery
Gene replacement approaches are leading to a revolution in the treatment of previously debilitating monogenic neurological conditions. However, the application of gene therapy to complex polygenic conditions has been limited. Down-regulation or dysfunction of receptor expression in the disease state or in the presence of excess ligand has been shown to compromise therapeutic efficacy. Here, we of
15h
Ancient Xinjiang mitogenomes reveal intense admixture with high genetic diversity
Xinjiang is a key region in northwestern China, connecting East and West Eurasian populations and cultures for thousands of years. To understand the genetic history of Xinjiang, we sequenced 237 complete ancient human mitochondrial genomes from the Bronze Age through Historical Era (41 archaeological sites). Overall, the Bronze Age Xinjiang populations show high diversity and regional genetic aff
15h
Separable neuronal contributions to covertly attended locations and movement goals in macaque frontal cortex
We investigated the spatial representation of covert attention and movement planning in monkeys performing a task that used symbolic cues to decouple the locus of covert attention from the motor target. In the three frontal areas studied, most spatially tuned neurons reflected either where attention was allocated or the planned saccade. Neurons modulated by both covert attention and the motor pla
15h
Deformation-induced crystalline-to-amorphous phase transformation in a CrMnFeCoNi high-entropy alloy
The Cantor high-entropy alloy (HEA) of CrMnFeCoNi is a solid solution with a face-centered cubic structure. While plastic deformation in this alloy is usually dominated by dislocation slip and deformation twinning, our in situ straining transmission electron microscopy (TEM) experiments reveal a crystalline-to-amorphous phase transformation in an ultrafine-grained Cantor alloy. We find that the c
15h
Processed foods drive intestinal barrier permeability and microvascular diseases
Intake of processed foods has increased markedly over the past decades, coinciding with increased microvascular diseases such as chronic kidney disease (CKD) and diabetes. Here, we show in rodent models that long-term consumption of a processed diet drives intestinal barrier permeability and an increased risk of CKD. Inhibition of the advanced glycation pathway, which generates Maillard reaction
15h
Performing calculus: Asymmetric adaptive stimuli-responsive material for derivative control
Materials (e.g., brick or wood) are generally perceived as unintelligent. Even the highly researched "smart" materials are only capable of extremely primitive analytical functions (e.g., simple logical operations). Here, a material is shown to have the ability to perform (i.e., without a computer), an advanced mathematical operation in calculus: the temporal derivative. It consists of a stimuli-r
15h
Near-atomic structure of an atadenovirus reveals a conserved capsid-binding motif and intergenera variations in cementing proteins
Of five known adenovirus genera, high-resolution structures are available only for mammalian-infecting mastadenoviruses. We present the first high-resolution structure of an adenovirus with nonmammalian host: lizard atadenovirus LAdV-2. We find a large conformational difference in the internal vertex protein IIIa between mast- and atadenoviruses, induced by the presence of an extended polypeptide
15h
The trilobite upper limb branch is a well-developed gill
Whether the upper limb branch of Paleozoic "biramous" arthropods, including trilobites, served a respiratory function has been much debated. Here, new imaging of the trilobite Triarthrus eatoni shows that dumbbell-shaped filaments in the upper limb branch are morphologically comparable with gill structures in crustaceans that aerate the hemolymph. In Olenoides serratus , the upper limb's partial
15h
Observation of others painful heat stimulation involves responses in the spinal cord
Observing others' aversive experiences is central to know what is dangerous for ourselves. Hence, observation often elicits behavioral and physiological responses comparable to first-hand aversive experiences and engages overlapping brain activation. While brain activation to first-hand aversive experiences relies on connections to the spinal cord, it is unresolved whether merely observing aversi
15h
Precise multispecies agricultural gas flux determined using broadband open-path dual-comb spectroscopy
Advances in spectroscopy have the potential to improve our understanding of agricultural processes and associated trace gas emissions. We implement field-deployed, open-path dual-comb spectroscopy (DCS) for precise multispecies emissions estimation from livestock. With broad atmospheric dual-comb spectra, we interrogate upwind and downwind paths from pens containing approximately 300 head of catt
15h
Heavy iron in large gem diamonds traces deep subduction of serpentinized ocean floor
Subducting tectonic plates carry water and other surficial components into Earth's interior. Previous studies suggest that serpentinized peridotite is a key part of deep recycling, but this geochemical pathway has not been directly traced. Here, we report Fe-Ni–rich metallic inclusions in sublithospheric diamonds from a depth of 360 to 750 km with isotopically heavy iron ( 56 Fe = 0.79 to 0.90) a
15h
An unexpected role for p53 in regulating cancer cell-intrinsic PD-1 by acetylation
Cancer cell–intrinsic programmed cell death protein-1 (PD-1) has emerged as a tumor regulator in an immunity-independent manner, but its precise role in modulating tumor behaviors is complex, and how PD-1 is regulated in cancer cells is largely unknown. Here, we identified PD-1 as a direct target of tumor suppressor p53. Notably, p53 acetylation at K120/164 played a critical role in p53-mediated
15h
Deep-sea predator niche segregation revealed by combined cetacean biologging and eDNA analysis of cephalopod prey
Fundamental insight on predator-prey dynamics in the deep sea is hampered by a lack of combined data on hunting behavior and prey spectra. Deep-sea niche segregation may evolve when predators target specific prey communities, but this hypothesis remains untested. We combined environmental DNA (eDNA) metabarcoding with biologging to assess cephalopod community composition in the deep-sea foraging
15h
Smart contact lens and transparent heat patch for remote monitoring and therapy of chronic ocular surface inflammation using mobiles
Wearable electronic devices that can monitor physiological signals of the human body to provide biomedical information have been drawing extensive interests for sustainable personal health management. Here, we report a human pilot trial of a soft, smart contact lens and a skin-attachable therapeutic device for wireless monitoring and therapy of chronic ocular surface inflammation (OSI). As a diag
15h
Observation of cavitation governing fracture in glasses
Crack propagation is the major vehicle for material failure, but the mechanisms by which cracks propagate remain longstanding riddles, especially for glassy materials with a long-range disordered atomic structure. Recently, cavitation was proposed as an underlying mechanism governing the fracture of glasses, but experimental determination of the cavitation behavior of fracture is still lacking. H
15h
Orally administered saccharide-sequestering nanocomplex to manage carbohydrate metabolism disorders
Excessive carbohydrate intake is linked to the growing prevalence of diabetes, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and obesity. α-Glucosidases inhibitor, the only Food and Drug Administration–approved drug for limiting the absorption of polysaccharides and disaccharides, is ineffective for monosaccharides. Here, we develop a boronic acid–containing polymer nanocomplex (Nano-Poly-BA), absorb
15h
Time and space catch up with restoration programs that ignore ecosystem service trade-offs
In response to extreme societal consequences of ecosystem degradation and climate change, attention to ecological restoration is increasing globally. In China, investments in restoration exceeded USD 378.5 billion over the past decade. However, restoration programs are experiments that can cause marked unintended consequences, with trade-offs across space and time that have undergone little empir
15h
The IASLC Molecular Database Project: Objectives, challenges and opportunities
A new Molecular Database Project initiated by the International Association for the Study of Lung (IASLC) will accelerate the understanding of lung cancer biology, clinical care and care delivery on a global scale and will improve the prognosis and optimal treatment of lung cancer across time and space, according to an editorial in the Journal of Thoracic Oncology, an official journal of the IASLC
15h
What are we breeding for, and who decides?
In an article appearing in the Journal of Dairy Science, scientists from the United States Department of Agriculture and the Council on Dairy Cattle Breeding provide an insightful review of how US dairy industry breeding selection objectives are established, as well as detail opportunities and obstacles related to new technologies for documenting animal performance.
16h
Study finds microbial-plant interactions affect the microbial response to climate change
University of California, Irvine, biologists have discovered that plants influence how their bacterial and fungal neighbors react to climate change. This finding contributes crucial new information to a hot topic in environmental science: in what manner will climate change alter the diversity of both plants and microbiomes on the landscape? The paper appears in Elementa: Sciences of the Anthropoce
16h
Tree fungus reduces fertilizer requirement for ketchup tomatoes
Tomatoes are an important and popular crop, but the tasty ketchup, salsa and pasta sauce they yield comes at a price: overuse of chemical fertilizers. Now, researchers report in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry they have recruited a fungus to bolster fertilizer efficiency, meaning tastier tomatoes can be grown with less fertilizer.
16h
Attention and working memory: Two sides of the same neural coin?
A paper published in Nature on March 31 by Matthew Panichello, a postdoctoral research associate at the Princeton Neuroscience Institute, and Timothy Buschman, an assistant professor of psychology and neuroscience at Princeton, found that attention and working memory share the same neural mechanisms. Importantly, their work also reveals how neural representations of memories are transformed as the
16h
Urban growth creates distortions between providers and receivers of ecosystem services
In Brazil, researchers are puzzling over socioeconomic and environmental indicators that do not add up. They are concerned with what they call the São Paulo Macrometropolitan Area, a mega-region comprising five metropolitan areas in the state of São Paulo with a total of 180 municipalities, some of which provide ecosystem services while others receive them. The problem is that the former, which pr
16h
In search of the first bacterium
Roughly five years ago, Institute Head Prof. Dr. William (Bill) Martin and his team introduced the last universal common ancestor of all living organisms and named it 'LUCA.' It lived approximately 3.8 billion years ago in hot deep sea hydrothermal vents.
16h
More activity doesn't mean you burn more calories
Herman Pontzer has spent his career counting calories. Not because he's watching his waistline, exactly. But because, as he sees it, "in the economics of life, calories are the currency." Every minute, everything the body does—growing, moving, fighting infection, even just existing—"all of it takes energy," says Pontzer , a professor at Duke University. In his new book, Burn (Avery, 2021), the ev
16h
Study details how Middle East dust intensifies summer monsoons on Indian subcontinent
New research from the University of Kansas published in Earth-Science Reviews offers insight into one of the world's most powerful monsoon systems: the Indian summer monsoon. The study details how the monsoon, of vital social and economic importance to the people of the region, is supercharged by atmospheric dust particles swept up by winds from deserts in the Middle East.
16h
Study reveals large and unequal health burden from air pollution in California's Bay Area
New research published today in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives from Environmental Defense Fund and the George Washington University shows air pollution takes an enormous toll on health in the San Francisco Bay Area, and the impacts vary dramatically within neighborhoods. The magnitude of the health burden from pollution demonstrates the need for urgent action to cut air pollution an
16h
Sugar not so nice for your child's brain development
New research led by a University of Georgia faculty member in collaboration with a University of Southern California research group has shown in a rodent model that daily consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages during adolescence impairs performance on a learning and memory task during adulthood. The group further showed that changes in the bacteria in the gut may be the key to the sugar-induced
17h
Without context, happy screams sound like fear
People are adept at discerning most emotions that underlie screams, such as anger, frustration, pain, surprise, or fear, according to a new study. The study also finds, however, that without additional context, we more often misinterpret happy screams as screams of fear. The findings in PeerJ offer the first in-depth look at the human ability to decode the range of emotions tied to the acoustic c
17h
Lab! Of! The! Future!
This is a good article at C&E News on the "lab of the future", and I'll go ahead and make the standard comment that this has been the lab of the future for quite a while now. The idea is to have mechanical automation and experiment-evaluating software fitting together to "close the loop" and make experimentation more of a turn-it-loose-and-watch-it-run process. It's a worthy goal, and people have
17h
How chronic stress leads to hair loss
Harvard University researchers have identified the biological mechanism of how chronic stress leads to hair loss. They found that the stress hormone corticosterone causes hair follicle stem cells to stay in an extended resting phase, without regenerating tissue. The stress signal was first received by dermal cells surrounding the hair follicle, preventing them from releasing Gas6, a molecule that
17h
How industrialized life remodels the microbiome
A new study from an MIT-led team has revealed that bacterial populations in the human gut can remake themselves within the lifetime of their host, by passing genes back and forth. The researchers also showed that this kind of gene transfer occurs more frequently in the microbiomes of people living in industrialized societies, possibly in response to their specific diet and lifestyle.
17h
How much are invasive species costing us?
Scientists from the CNRS, the IRD, and the Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle have just released the most comprehensive estimate to date of the financial toll of invasive species: nearly $1.3 trillion over four decades. Published in Nature (31 March 2021), their findings are based on the InvaCost database, which is financed by the BNP Paribas Foundation and the Paris-Saclay University Foundation
17h
Early humans in the Kalahari were as innovative as their coastal neighbours
Archaeological evidence in a rockshelter at the edge of the Kalahari Desert, South Africa, is challenging the idea that the origins of our species were linked to coastal environments. Published in Nature, Dr Jayne Wilkins from Griffith University's Australian Research Centre for Human Evolution led an international collaboration which found evidence far from coastal sites of the complex symbolic a
17h
How the gut microbiota develops in the first five years of life
The human gut microbiota largely reaches an adult-like composition by five years of age, but important differences remain, finds a study published on March 31st in the journal Cell Host & Microbe. Several bacterial taxa that have been associated with human health are acquired late in childhood and have not reached their adult abundance by five years of age.
17h
Is battery recycling environmentally friendly?
The EU will be home to 30 million electric cars by 2030 and the European Commission is preparing tough targets for recycling these and other batteries. Yet the impacts of battery recycling, especially for the sizeable lithium-ion batteries of the electric cars soon filling our streets, has been largely unstudied.
17h
'Designer' pore shows selective traffic to and from the cell nucleus
The nucleus is the headquarters of a cell and molecules constantly move across the nuclear membrane through pores. The transport of these molecules is both selective and fast; some 1,000 molecules per second can move in or out. Scientists from the University of Groningen and Delft University of Technology, both in the Netherlands, and a colleague from the Swedish Chalmers University of Technology,
17h
"Jag försökte i alla fall" – poliser om att möta kvinnor som anmäler våldtäkt
När kvinnor anmäler våldtäkt har polisens bemötande stor betydelse. Men poliserna själva tycker att de saknar utbildning och stöd för att kunna göra det på ett bra sätt. Kvinnor som har blivit våldtagna uppvisar ofta traumatiska reaktioner, såsom depression, ångest och posttraumatiskt stressyndrom (PTSD). De terapeutiska effekterna av att rapportera och berätta om sexuella övergrepp tycks bero på
17h
Advances in tropical cyclone observation may aid in disaster reduction and prevention
Tropical cyclones—known as typhoons in the Pacific and as hurricanes in the Atlantic—are fierce, complex storm systems that cause loss of human life and billions of dollars in damage every year. For decades, scientists have studied each storm, striving to understand the system yet unable to fully measure every intricate variable. Now, the convergence of new observational tools and the launch of an
17h
Laser cooling of antihydrogen atoms
Nature, Published online: 31 March 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03289-6 The successful laser cooling of trapped antihydrogen, the antimatter atom formed by an antiproton and a positron (anti-electron), is reported.
18h
Three-dimensional nanoprinting via charged aerosol jets
Nature, Published online: 31 March 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03353-1 A 3D-printing strategy involving jets of charged aerosol particles guided by electric-field lines allows direct deposition of various metal nanostructures, including helices, letters and vertical split-ring resonator structures.
18h
Corticosterone inhibits GAS6 to govern hair follicle stem-cell quiescence
Nature, Published online: 31 March 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03417-2 Stress inhibits hair growth in mice through the release of the stress hormone corticosterone from the adrenal glands, which inhibits the activation of hair follicle stem cells by suppressing the expression of a secreted factor, GAS6, from the dermal niche.
18h
High and rising economic costs of biological invasions worldwide
Nature, Published online: 31 March 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03405-6 Analysis of the InvaCost database shows that the costs of biological invasions have markedly increased between 1970 and 2017 and show no sign of slowing down, highlighting the importance of evidence-based and cost-effective management actions.
18h
Stabilization of liquid instabilities with ionized gas jets
Nature, Published online: 31 March 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03359-9 A weakly ionized gas jet impinging on a water surface is shown to produce a more stable cavity than does a neutral gas jet, with implications for plasma–liquid interactions.
18h
Atomic structure of a glass imaged at last
Nature, Published online: 31 March 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00794-6 The positions of all the atoms in a sample of a metallic glass have been measured experimentally — fulfilling a decades-old dream for glass scientists, and raising the prospect of fresh insight into the structures of disordered solids.
18h
Relax to grow more hair
Nature, Published online: 31 March 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00656-1 A stress hormone has been found to signal through skin cells to repress the activation of hair-follicle stem cells in mice. When this signalling is blocked, hair growth is stimulated. Stressed humans, watch out.
18h
Early humans far from the South African coast collected unusual objects
Nature, Published online: 31 March 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00795-5 Ostrich eggshells and crystals gathered more than 100,000 years ago shed light on the cultural evolution of early humans. Found in South Africa's interior, they reveal that technological innovations occurred beyond its coast.
18h
Antimatter cooled by laser light
Nature, Published online: 31 March 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00786-6 A laser beam has been used to slow down antihydrogen atoms, the simplest atoms made of pure antimatter. The technique might enable some fundamental symmetries of the Universe to be probed with exceptionally high precision.
18h
Socialt nätverk ökar chansen till jobb bland unga
Unga vuxna med ett starkt socialt nätverk har lättare att få arbete via vänner och direktkontakt med arbetsgivare, än via arbetsförmedlingar. Men för unga med mindre "socialt kapital" är arbetsförmedlingen fortsatt viktig. Forskning visar att den som har ett starkt socialt nätverk enklare får arbete via kontakter och genom direktanställningar hos arbetsgivare, än via arbetsförmedlingar. Studien l
18h
Thermal power nanogenerator created without solid moving parts
As environmental and energy crises become more common, a thermal energy harvester capable of converting abundant thermal energy into mechanical energy appears to be a promising mitigation strategy. The majority of thermal power generation technologies involve solid moving parts, which can reduce reliability and lead to frequent maintenance. This inspired researchers to develop a thermal power nano
18h
The Atlantic Daily: America Suffers From Immigration Amnesia
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox. What exactly is the current border crisis? My colleague Adam Serwer asks: "Is it the recent surge of migrants, or is it the treatment of those migrants in detention facilities?" The answer may dep
18h
A brain signature that predicts vulnerability to addiction
French team has just shown that within a population of rats it can predict which will become cocaine addicts. Scientists observed abnormal activity in a specific region of the brain, the subthalamic nucleus, only in future addicted individuals, and did so before they were exposed to 'punishment' associated with the seeking for the drug. These results also indicate that it is possible to reduce thi
18h
New hydrogel that cuts in half recovery time from muscle injuries
A team from the Universitat Politècnica de València and the CIBER -BBN has designed and tested, at a preclinical level, a new biomaterial for the treatment and recovery of muscle injuries. It is a boron-loaded alginate hydrogel, which would be administered with a subcutaneous injection. According to the tests carried out so far -in animal models-, it is capable of regenerating damaged muscle very
18h
Choose life: Why patients in China refuse standard treatment for a type of heart attack
Clinical guidelines recommend percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) as standard treatment following a type of heart-attack called ST-elevation myocardial infarction but many patients in China refuse to undergo PCI, leading to worse outcomes. Scientists in China have recently identified several factors for treatment refusal, including old age, history of myocardial infarction, and treatment outs
18h
How many countries are ready for nuclear-powered electricity?
A new study in the journal Risk Analysis suggests that countries representing more than 80 percent of potential growth in low-carbon electricity demand–in Asia, the Middle East, and North Africa–may lack the economic or institutional quality to deploy nuclear power to meet their energy needs. The authors suggest that if nuclear power is to safely expand its role in mitigating climate change, cou
18h
Pancake strategy for the win
Skyrmions are considered promising candidates for tomorrow's information memory devices which may be able to achieve enormous data storage and processing capacities. A research team led by HZDR has developed a method to grow a particular magnetic thin-film material that hosts these magnetic vortices. A central aspect of this new method is the abrupt heating of the material with short, very bright
19h
Ancient crater lake bolsters idea of ice on early Mars
Researchers have discovered a previously unknown type of ancient crater lake on Mars. It could reveal clues about the planet's early climate. In the study, the researchers describe an as-yet unnamed crater with some puzzling characteristics. The crater's floor has unmistakable geologic evidence of ancient stream beds and ponds, yet there's no evidence of inlet channels where water could have ente
19h
Överdödligheten i covid-19 störst bland äldre
Fler personer än förväntat dog under 2020. Störst var överdödligheten bland äldre. Samtidigt sjönk medellivslängden med mellan ett halvår och ett år, enligt en ny rapport. Den förväntade medellivslängden sjönk med 0,69 år för män och 0,40 år för kvinnor under 2020 jämfört med 2019, visar en ny rapport som kartlägger vilken påverkan covid-19-pandemin haft på medellivslängd och dödlighet för olika
19h
New approach for the development of a drug treatment for obesity and the resulting diseases
The protein Asc-1 regulates whether fat-burning beige or fat-storing white adipocytes are formed, which can have an impact on the development of metabolic diseases. This is shown by a current study of the Helmholtz Zentrum München and the German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD). The results open up new approaches to prevent the development of metabolic diseases. The study has now been published
19h
Bringing KAIZEN to kid healthcare
Researchers reveal through a systematic review of 158 articles detailing quality improvements in pediatric intensive care units mainly throughout North America and the U.K. that despite having a median score of 11.0 on the Quality Improvement Minimum Quality Criteria Set, only 17% of them were considered high quality by achieving a 14-16 score, and only 5% cited Standards for QUality Improvement R
19h
High thrombotic risk in cancer patients receiving immunotherapy
In a study recently published in the leading journal "Blood", researchers at MedUni Vienna provided preliminary data on the incidence, risk factors and clinical outcomes of thrombotic complications in this new form of cancer treatment. The main finding is that, during the course of treatment, approximately 13% of patients develop a venous thromboembolism, that is to say a deep vein thrombosis or p
19h
Adult support eases effects of bullying at boarding school
Having a school staff member to rely on for support can ease the effects of bullying at boarding schools, but only for male students, a new study shows. The study did not find that support networks helped females in the same way. The study, published in School Psychology Review , is one of few to examine the effects of bullying at boarding schools, which provide a unique environment where most st
19h
Asian Americans top target for threats and harassment during pandemic
Since the very beginning of the pandemic, hate crimes toward Asians and Asian Americans have gotten increased media attention. Our data, from the Understanding Coronavirus in America Study, confirms that these events are happening more often—and are not just appearing more common because of press coverage or public awareness. Asian Americans experienced more threats and harassment than any other r
19h
Sports science
Nature, Published online: 31 March 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00814-5 The importance of science in elite sport — from helping athletes to train safely to protecting sporting integrity.
20h
Could mitochondria help athletes to make gains?
Nature, Published online: 31 March 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00817-2 The muscles of elite endurance athletes boast high numbers of extra-efficient mitochondria. Unlocking the secrets of these cellular components could yield gains for future Olympians.
20h
The science helping athletes to beat the heat
Nature, Published online: 31 March 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00815-4 As global temperatures rise, athletes and sports bodies are following the science to ensure that events can take place safely.
20h
Why clean sport is more than just drug-free
Nature, Published online: 31 March 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00820-7 Doping is just one form of cheating in sport. To protect sporting integrity, all unethical behaviours must be treated equally, says Andrea Petróczi.
20h
How athletes hit a fastball
Nature, Published online: 31 March 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00816-3 To strike a ball moving at lightning speeds in baseball, tennis and cricket, athletes and coaches are increasingly embracing training techniques involving virtual reality.
20h
The future of sex in elite sport
Nature, Published online: 31 March 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00819-0 Sex has long been used to divide sporting competitions in the name of fairness, but are the current rules and enforcement practices fit for purpose?
20h
Do microbes affect athletic performance?
Nature, Published online: 31 March 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00821-6 Some studies suggest that the community of microorganisms that live in the gut are associated with athleticism.
20h
Climate labels might get you to buy different meat
Climate labels about a meat product's carbon footprint cause many people to choose a climate-friendlier option, research suggests. The finding, based on hypothetical purchasing decisions among Swedish consumers, applied to both people who were curious about a product's carbon footprint and those who actively avoided wanting to know more. As such, climate labeling food products can be a good way o
20h
The Origins of SARS-CoV-2
The joint WHO-China investigation report concludes that a lab origin for COVID-19 is "extremely unlikely" but doubts remain. The post first appeared on Science-Based Medicine .
20h
Freemium
Nature, Published online: 31 March 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00882-7 It's no game.
21h
This Premade Survival Kit Makes It Easy To Prepare for the Worst
In a disaster, the difference between desperation and relative comfort often comes down to preparation . But what's the best way to prepare for a worst case scenario like a hurricane or blizzard that can leave you without power or water for days on end? There's certainly nothing wrong with doing all the research yourself, and then stockpiling the various supplies and tools you'll need. But there
21h
NASA Begins Assembling Spacecraft to Study Enormous Metallic Asteroid
NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in California got a package last week, and it's much more important than the smattering of Amazon impulse purchases that show up on most of our doorsteps. JPL has taken delivery of the Psyche spacecraft from Maxar Technologies and is now starting final assembly. Next year, this piece of hardware will ride a SpaceX rocket into orbit, and then it's off to the
21h
Daily briefing: Satellite light pollution is everywhere
Nature, Published online: 30 March 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00874-7 Nowhere left on Earth to view the stars without light pollution from space junk and satellites. Plus, how to make indoors safe again and the US is urged to invest in solar-geoengineering studies.
21h
Study finds ridesharing intensifies urban road congestion
Transport Network Companies (TNCs) or ridesharing companies have gained widespread popularity across much of the world, with more and more cities adopting the phenomenon. While ridesharing has been credited with being more environmentally friendly than taxis and private vehicles, is that really the case today or do they rather contribute to urban congestion?
21h
Stuck stem cells are no good at making blood
The magic of iPS cells is that they can be expanded into large numbers and differentiated into all cell types, so that an initially small number of iPS cells can be used to produce a massive number of cells. However, some cells have proven easier to make than others, which has significant implications on the cost of translating iPS cell research to clinical therapies. A new study by the Koji Eto l
21h
Coldest recorded cloud temperature measured by satellite
A new paper led by Dr. Simon Proud, research fellow at the Department of Physics and the National Centre for Earth Observation, describes an unprecedentedly cold temperature measured atop a severe thunderstorm cloud in the Pacific by an Earth-orbiting satellite. This temperature of -111°C is more than 30°C colder than typical storm clouds and is the coldest known measurement of storm cloud tempera
21h
NASA finds 2021 Arctic winter sea ice tied for seventh-lowest on record
Sea ice in the Arctic appears to have hit its annual maximum extent after growing through the fall and winter. The 2021 wintertime extent reached on March 21 ties with 2007's as the seventh-smallest extent of winter sea ice in the satellite record, according to scientists at the NASA-supported National Snow and Ice Data Center and NASA.
21h
Development of a broadband mid-infrared source for remote sensing
A research team of the National Institutes of Natural Sciences, National Institute for Fusion Science and Akita Prefectural University has successfully demonstrated a broadband mid-infrared (MIR) source with a simple configuration. This light source generates highly-stable broadband MIR beam at 2.5-3.7 μm wavelength range maintaining the brightness owing to its high-beam quality. Such a broadband
21h
Get Better, More Affordable Car Insurance In Minutes With Clearcover
In times like these, looking after your money is essential. According to a recent survey , around half of us are worried about job security and 84% of people are scaling back on spending. One of the best ways to make your paycheck stretch further is by reducing your fixed monthly bills. To achieve this, you usually need to change your provider. When it comes to insurance, many of us consider swit
21h