Search Posts

Nyheder2021november02

Tegn abonnement på BioNyt!

Vil du hjælpe med at udpege vigtigste nyheder? DO YOU WANT TO HELP CHOOSE THE MOST IMPORTANT SCIENCE NEWS? Email: bionyt@gmail.com Phone-sms: (45)21729908

The deadliest viruses in history
Humans have been fighting viruses throughout history. Here are the 12 viruses that are the world's worst killers, based on their mortality rates, or the sheer numbers of people they have killed.
3d
If Democrats Can Lose in Virginia, They Can Lose Almost Anywhere
LOUDOUN COUNTY, Va.—The beer was flowing, the handmade potato chips were self-serve, and hope was in the air. Early in the night, the Loudoun County Democrats who gathered at the Döner Bistro in Leesburg were cautiously—anxiously—optimistic: Sure, it had been a rough year. A global pandemic, regular protests at the local school-board meetings, and the contentious governor's race, rife with misinf
2d
What Becoming a Parent Really Does to Your Happiness
Christopher Anderson / Magnum Few choices are more important than whether to have children, and psychologists and other social scientists have worked to figure out what having kids means for happiness. Some of the most prominent scholars in the field have argued that if you want to be happy, it's best to be childless. Others have pushed back, pointing out that a lot depends on who you are and whe
3d
ALMA scientists detect signs of water in a galaxy far, far away
Water has been detected in the most massive galaxy in the early universe, according to new observations from the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). Scientists studying SPT0311-58 found H20, along with carbon monoxide in the galaxy, which is located nearly 12.88 billion light years from Earth. Detection of these two molecules in abundance suggests that the molecular universe was g
2d
UK launches trial of drug to tackle fatigue in long Covid patients
AXA1125 targets cell power plants that may be dysfunctional in long Covid patients with severe fatigue Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The first trial of a drug to target the fatigue and muscle weakness experienced by more than half of people with long Covid has been launched in the UK. It is also the first drug trial in long Covid patients who were not hospitalised
2d
The Sun Just Blasted the Earth With an Enormous Solar Flare
Solar Blast During the days leading up to Halloween, the Sun's surface was roiling with activity, blasting powerful bursts of radiation towards the Earth, according to NASA . While our planet's surface is protected from the cosmic drama by its atmosphere, the flare ups can wreak havoc on GPS and communications satellites. One solar flare was so powerful that it was classified as an X1-class flare
4d
Federal Judge Shoots Down Blue Origin's Lawsuit Against NASA
A federal judge has shot down Blue Origin's lawsuit against NASA for its decision to award SpaceX — rather than both SpaceX and Blue Origin — its coveted Human Landing Systems contract. It's a major hit to Blue Origin's tireless legal actions against NASA's decision to choose its competitor, and a major win for SpaceX. The Elon Musk-led company could soon get back to work toward returning astrona
1d
California Factory Producing 50,000 Lbs of Lab Grown Meat Per Year
Lab Rats A new facility in the Bay Area is producing lab grown meat on a massive scale, capable of producing an astonishing 400,000 pounds a year, the San Francisco Chronicle reports — though for now, production is capped at a still-impressive 50,000 pounds per year. The factory covers 53,000 square feet and is run by food tech company Upside Foods, a Berkeley spin-off. The lab grown meat industr
4h
Physicists discover how particles self-assemble
A team of physicists has discovered how DNA molecules self-organize into adhesive patches between particles in response to assembly instructions. Its findings offer a "proof of concept" for an innovative way to produce materials with a well-defined connectivity between the particles.
4d
Person Furious That Someone Right Click Saved Their Precious NFT
In a mystifying new trend, people are willing to spend an astonishing amount of money on digital pieces of artwork in order to own exclusive rights to them. Non-fungibles tokens, or NFTs, have become a mainstay of the cryptocurrency world, offering those who have plenty of cash or crypto to spare a way to "reinvest" it in what they say is exclusive ownership over what often amounts to not much mo
1h
COVID-Vaccine Mandates for Kids Are Coming
COVID-19 vaccination for 5-to-11-year-olds is finally a go . But even as the emergency-use-authorization process unfolded, so too did arguments over whether kids should (or would soon) be forced into getting shots. School mandates for new vaccines tend to lag behind CDC recommendations by about half a decade, but COVID-19 shots appear to be in the express lane. The Los Angeles Unified School Dist
6h
Pfizer Covid pill 'can cut hospitalisations and deaths by nearly 90%'
Experimental antiviral pill taken at home is highly effective at preventing deaths, trial suggests Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage A large study of Pfizer's experimental antiviral pill, paxlovid, has found that the drug can cut hospitalisations and deaths from Covid by nearly 90%, the company has said. The US firm's encouraging results, which are described in a press
9h
A new dimension in magnetism and superconductivity is launched
An international team of scientists from Austria and Germany has launched a new paradigm in magnetism and superconductivity, putting effects of curvature, topology, and 3D geometry into the spotlight of next-decade research. The results are published in Advanced Materials.
2d
Hackers are stealing data today so quantum computers can crack it in a decade
While they wrestle with the immediate danger posed by hackers today, US government officials are preparing for another, longer-term threat: attackers who are collecting sensitive, encrypted data now in the hope that they'll be able to unlock it at some point in the future. The threat comes from quantum computers, which work very differently from the classical computers we use today. Instead of th
2d
Rocky exoplanets are even stranger than we thought
An astronomer from NSF's NOIRLab has teamed up with a geologist from California State University, Fresno, to make the first estimates of rock types that exist on planets orbiting nearby stars. After studying the chemical composition of "polluted" white dwarfs, they have concluded that most rocky planets orbiting nearby stars are more diverse and exotic than previously thought, with types of rocks
3d
Microbes may have lived in the underground for more than a billion years
A study using the thermal history and biosignatures of the upper few kilometers of some of the oldest rocks on Earth place constraints on the evolutionary history of microbes in the deep biosphere. A new study, published in PNAS, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, show that the rocks were uninhabitable for much of their lifetimes with the longest period of habitability not extending
4d
What is chemistry?
Chemistry is the study of matter, its properties, how and why substances combine or separate to form other substances, and how substances interact with energy.
34min
Electrically switchable nanoantennas could enable holographic video technology
Video conferencing played a key role during the COVID-19 pandemic and is set to dominate many meetings in the future. To realize the true feeling of a face-to-face dialog, three dimensional video is required and yet the holographic technology is still missing. Researchers at the University of Stuttgart in Germany have now introduced a completely new approach to realize such dynamic holographic dis
2d
Ivermectin-COVID-19 study retracted; authors blame file mixup
The authors of a study purportedly showing that ivermectin could treat patients with SARS-CoV-2 have retracted their paper after acknowledging that their data were garbled. The paper, "Effects of a Single Dose of Ivermectin on Viral and Clinical Outcomes in Asymptomatic SARS-CoV-2 Infected Subjects: A Pilot Clinical Trial in Lebanon," appeared in the journal Viruses … Continue reading
3d
A superconducting silicon-photonic chip for quantum communication
Integrated quantum photonics (IQP) is a promising platform for realizing scalable and practical quantum information processing. Up to now, most of the demonstrations with IQP focus on improving the stability, quality, and complexity of experiments for traditional platforms based on bulk and fiber optical elements. A more demanding question is: "Are there experiments possible with IQP that are impo
4d
5D Optical Disc Could Store 500TB for Billions of Years
Hard drives and flash storage have gotten more reliable over the years, but only on a human timescale. What if we need data storage that lasts longer? Decades? Millennia? The key to that vision might be 5D optical storage, which has a data density 10,000 times that of a Blu-ray disc . But it's always been far too slow to write data onto glass plates in this way—until now. A new technique develope
4d
World's largest whales eat more than previously thought, amplifying their role as global ecosystem engineers
New research co-authored by Nicholas Pyenson, curator of fossil marine mammals at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History, shows evidence that the world's largest whales have been sold short. The study, published today in the journal Nature, finds that gigantic baleen whales—such as blue, fin and humpback whales—eat an average of three times more food each year than scientists have pr
2d
Quantum physics in proteins: AI affords unprecedented insights into how biomolecules work
A new analytical technique is able to provide hitherto unattainable insights into the extremely rapid dynamics of biomolecules. The team of developers, led by Abbas Ourmazd from the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee and Robin Santra from DESY, is presenting its clever combination of quantum physics and molecular biology in the scientific journal Nature. The scientists used the technique to track t
2d
A strategy to control the spin polarization of electrons using helium
Spintronics, also known as spin electronics, is a research field that explores how the intrinsic spin of electrons and its magnetic moment can be exploited by devices. Spintronic devices are promising for a wide range of applications, particularly for efficiently storing and transferring data.
3d
US astronomers want a giant telescope to hunt for new Earth-like planets
Every 10 years, US astronomers and astrophysicists release a new report to guide the next decade of astronomy and astrophysics research. Today the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine published the latest, setting a new trajectory for modern space exploration. Dubbed Astro2020 , the decadal survey draws from hundreds of white papers and several years of deliberation from more
1d
The vast little library inside your cells
The human genome can be thought of as a massive library, containing over 20,000 different "instruction manuals": your genes. For example, there are genes which contain information to build a brain cell, a skin cell, a white blood cell, and so on. There are even genes that contain information about regulating the genome itself—like books that explain how to organize a library. The ability to regula
8h
New type of nerve cell discovered in the retina
Scientists have discovered a new type of nerve cell, or neuron, in the retina. In the central nervous system a complex circuitry of neurons communicate with each other to relay sensory and motor information; so-called interneurons serve as intermediaries in the chain of communication.
4d
Not silent yet; the shifting sounds of spring
Natural sounds, and bird song in particular, play a key role in building and maintaining our connection with nature – but a major new study reveals that the sounds of spring are changing, with dawn choruses across North America and Europe becoming quieter and less varied. An international team of researchers led by the University of East Anglia (UEA) developed a new technique, combining world-lead
3d
Men experience more emotional pain during breakups
The stereotype of men being less emotionally invested in relationships than women may not be accurate, say psychologists. A new study of online relationship support finds that men tend to experience emotional pain more than women when their relationship takes a turn for the worse.
2d
Secondary forests restore fresh water sources in degraded landscapes
New research, published in Scientific Reports by Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) postdoctoral fellow Karina Chavarria and colleagues, shows that bacterial communities in streams adjacent to young secondary forests recover to resemble those of mature forest streams in as little as a decade after cattle has been removed from the land, and that these communities are robust throughout t
49min
CDC recommends Pfizer's COVID vaccine for children ages 5 through 11
Kids ages 5 to 11 will soon be able to get Pfizer's low-dose COVID vaccine. CDC director Rochelle Walensky agreed with a unanimous decision of a team of advisers that the benefits outweigh the risks. (Image credit: Paul Hennessy/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty)
3d
The Enormous Hole That Whaling Left Behind
In the 20th century, the largest animals that have ever existed almost stopped existing. Baleen whales—the group that includes blue, fin, and humpback whales—had long been hunted, but as whaling went industrial, hunts became massacres. With explosive-tipped harpoons that were fired from cannons and factory ships that could process carcasses at sea, whalers slaughtered the giants for their oil, wh
2d
NASA Rover Detects Organic Molecules on the Surface of Mars
A team of researchers successfully tested a sample of Martian dirt, first scooped up by NASA's Mars Curiosity rover in March 2017, by directing the rover mix it with chemical reagents inside a cup. This mixture then released organic molecules which NASA has never detected on the surface of Mars ever before, Inverse reports . While it's an exciting discovery, it falls short of demonstrating that c
3d
Tucker Carlson Is Stirring Up Hatred of America
All around you are swirling scenes of violence—explosions in Baghdad, ISIS operatives slitting the throat of an infidel, the chaos around the U.S. Capitol on January 6. You see jarring images of blood and brutality; you hear the grating sound of screaming; you feel the rush of fear and rage. But then a calm, sympathetic man steps forward, dressed in a button-down shirt. He explains all of it. He
3d
Dr Aaron Beck, the father of cognitive behavioural therapy, dies aged 100
Beck's work revolutionised the diagnosis and treatment of depression and other psychological disorders and continues to have a resounding influence Dr Aaron T Beck, a groundbreaking psychotherapist widely regarded as the father of cognitive therapy, died on Monday at his Philadelphia home aged 100. Beck's work revolutionised the diagnosis and treatment of depression and other psychological disord
3d
Astronomers Are Pushing for a Massive Alien-Hunting Telescope
Alien Hunters American astrophysicists are extremely excited about the prospect of launching a groundbreaking space telescope to search for habitable worlds — and, just maybe, life on them. A long-awaited report called Astro2020 was finally released today, detailing what the next two decades in astronomy and astrophysics could hold for us. The report was part of the Decadal Survey, a list of reco
1d
Covid has caused 28m years of life to be lost, study finds
Oxford researchers arrive at virus's toll in 31 countries by looking at deaths and age they occurred Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Covid has caused the loss of 28m years of life, according to the largest-ever survey to assess the scale of the impact of the pandemic. The enormous toll was revealed in research, led by the University of Oxford, which calculated the ye
1d
UK is first to approve oral antiviral pill to treat Covid
Pill can be taken twice daily at home and priority will be given to elderly patients and those with health vulnerabilities Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The UK medicines regulator has become the first in the world to approve an oral antiviral pill for Covid in a move that paves the way for tens of thousands of vulnerable patients to receive the treatment from this
1d
'He was adamant he didn't want it': the pro-vax parents with vaccine-hesitant kids
Among under-18s, vaccine uptake is low, and there is a growing issue with misinformation spread on social media and at school. Is there anything a concerned caregiver can do? Throughout the pandemic, Anna has worked for the NHS. She has seen the effects of Covid-19 first-hand and, although she worked remotely because she was in a vulnerable group, other colleagues – she is a physiotherapist – wer
1d
Scientists Claim to Improve Human Brain Function With Implants and AI
A team of researchers at the University of Minnesota Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital claims to have improved the "specific functions" of the human brain by using artificial intelligence paired with electrical brain stimulation. In a study involving 12 patients who were undergoing brain surgery for epilepsy, the scientists say they were able to improve the patients' mental functi
2d
You Can't Win Elections by Telling Voters Their Concerns Are Imaginary
G lenn Youngkin's victory over Terry McAuliffe for the governorship of Virginia should make Democrats—and anyone else who fears that a Republican Party still beholden to Donald Trump poses a serious threat to American democracy—very worried about what is to come. Republicans are now favored to recapture Congress in 2022. Betting markets indicate that Trump is the most likely victor of the 2024 pr
2d
Famed Scientist Warns That Earth May Rise Up and Kill Humanity
Gaia's Return Influential environmentalist James Lovelock has long believed that the Earth self-regulates like a living organism. His Gaia theory, named after the Greek deity of the same name who represents the personification of the Earth, suggests that our planet's environment adjusts itself in response abuse — such as what humanity is currently throwing at it. And given our horrendous treatmen
2d
It's Time to Contemplate the End of the Crisis
Americans should be asking ourselves what else needs to happen before we can declare an end to the crisis phase of the pandemic. Although the coronavirus's course remains unpredictable—and bad surprises are still possible—the Delta-variant surge that started in early July ushered in what may have been the final major wave of disease in the United States. The 1918 influenza pandemic ended only whe
2d
The Democratic Unraveling Began With Schools
Republican Glenn Youngkin's victory in Tuesday's Virginia gubernatorial election was about schools. It wasn't about Donald Trump, or inflation, or defunding the police, or Medicare for All, or President Joe Biden's infrastructure agenda. It wasn't really about critical race theory or transgender rights—though those issues shaded the situation a bit by highlighting anxieties surrounding the educat
2d
Watch Two Flying Race Cars Compete in a Drag Race
Flying Drag Race Australian startup Alauda Racing has officially started racing its Airspeeder electric flying cars. The company set two teams against each other in a drag race in the Australian desert — the first of many events still to come, it says. The slick, aerodynamic cars, both the Airspeeder Mk3 model that was unveiled back in June , sped along a predetermined path and reached speeds of
1d
Focus on Who Police Are, Not What They Do
Every year, American police officers kill roughly 1,000 people . By comparison, New Zealand police officers kill, on average, about eight people per decade . Even if you adjust for the differences in population size, the gap in police violence is staggering. If American officers killed at the same rate per capita as those in New Zealand, about 50 Americans would die every year at the hands of the
1d
New Technique Turns Plastic Waste Back Into Refinery-Quality Oil
Trash Oil Chemicals and aircraft parts manufacturer Honeywell International announced this week that it's come up with a new way to turn low-grade plastic waste into oil that's high enough quality to be fed into a refinery. The company is now partnering with Spanish infrastructure company Sacyr SA to scale up its process, dubbed the Upcycle Process Technology, in a facility capable of turning 30,
2d
We're Heading Straight for a Demi-Armageddon
The COP26 international climate-change negotiations have just begun in Glasgow, Scotland, and the vibes are … ambivalent. The leaders of Russia and China haven't bothered to attend, but did promise to help end deforestation by 2030—though many observers are skeptical that they will keep their word. In the United States, President Joe Biden's "Build Back Better" plan lost a powerful provision that
2d
The biggest whales can eat the equivalent of 80,000 Big Macs in one day
Scientists have gotten the best estimates yet of exactly how much baleen whales, the largest animals on the planet, can consume in one day. Their caloric intake is mind-boggling. (Image credit: Duke University Marine Robotics and Remote Sensing Lab under NOAA permit 14809-03 and ACA permits 2015-011 and 2020-016)
2d
NASA: SpaceX Toilet Still Broken, Astronauts Will Have to Pee Themselves
Diapers Deployed Despite their best efforts, engineers at SpaceX won't be able to fix the leaky toilet on board the company's Crew Dragon spacecraft in time for the NASA astronauts set to launch on it imminently. Their solution for this week's Crew-3 launch headed to the International Space Station: astronauts will have to resort to peeing their spacesuits, which essentially amount to diapers. NA
3d
Elon Musk's World Hunger Tweet Is Taking the UN Wildly Out of Context
Thanks to a massive deal with a rental car company, Tesla's shares are doing better than ever before — and that has CEO Elon Musk's net worth soaring as well, despite him having already earned the title of richest person in the world more than a month ago . Over the weekend, Musk became the first person to be worth more than $300 billion , an obscene amount of money that some critics say could be
4d
Go with the flow: how period clothing went mainstream
Period underwear is branching out into leak-proof exercise clothes, swimsuits, sleepwear – even blankets. Is this finally the end of tampons and pads? I suppose everyone who has ever got their period has the same nightmare, though for most of us, it's come true. Mine happened a couple of years ago while reporting at a festival on New York's Governors Island. It was August, hot and sticky, and I w
9h
Dual-drug treatment offers hope to children with rare brain cancer
Scientists make 'promising' breakthrough on fast-growing DIPG type of tumour Scientists have successfully combined two existing cancer drugs to create a treatment for children diagnosed with deadly brain tumours. Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG), a rare and fast-growing type of brain tumour in children, can mutate and evolve to resist treatment with a single drug. There is currently no cur
20h
Eruption From the Sun May Affect Power Grid, Scientists Say
Big Storm A massive solar storm is bombarding the Earth with so much radiation that it could interfere with power grids. The Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC), which is run by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), has warned in a Thursday statement that the storm could cause possible "power system voltage irregularities." Spacecraft could also "experience surface chargi
22h
Climate Conference Menu Mocked for Absurdly High Carbon Footprint
Carbon on the Menu The Glasgow Climate Change Conference has been rife with double standards, with many world leaders making the trip to Scotland on board their private jets . Even the food being served at this year's COP26, an event put on by the United Nations, had its own substantial carbon footprint. The catering provided at the event made use of plenty of meat and fish, which is ironic given
1d
Gene common in south Asian people doubles risk of Covid death, study finds
Finding could partly explain excess deaths seen in some communities in the UK and in south Asia Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Scientists have identified a gene that doubles the risks of respiratory failure and death from Covid and could explain why people of south Asian heritage are more vulnerable to the disease. The gene, which changes the way the lungs respond t
1d
Tom Hanks Says He Turned Down Jeff Bezos' Offer to Go to Space
Hollywood actor Tom Hanks declined an offer to go to space on board Jeff Bezos' suborbital rocket. "Well, yah, provided I'd pay," an incredulous Hank recalled in an interview on Jimmy Kimmel Live, when late show host Jimmy Kimmel asked if the Blue Origin CEO offered him a ride. "You know, it costs like 28 million bucks or something like that." Even for an A-grade Hollywood actor, that's a lot of
1d
Oklahoma Tortured John Grant to Death Because He Wouldn't Commit Suicide
B efore the state of Oklahoma put John Marion Grant through the 12-minute ordeal of convulsions, vomiting, and heaving that eventually concluded with the 60-year-old's death, it gave him a choice: How would he like to die? There were a number of options . There was pentobarbital , the barbiturate most recently made infamous by the Trump administration's last-minute federal-execution spree ; sodiu
1d
No, Really, the Right to an Abortion Is Supported by the Text and History of the Constitution
For decades, conservative originalists have denounced Roe v. Wade and Planned Parenthood v. Casey— two Supreme Court cases that held that the right to abortion is a fundamental liberty protected by the Fourteenth Amendment — as egregious rulings unmoored from anything in the Constitution. As Justice Antonin Scalia argued in 1989, the protection of unwritten fundamental rights fell outside the jud
1d
Russia Took Advantage While the West Slept
This month marks the first anniversary of the cease-fire in the war between Armenia and Azerbaijan, the second between the two countries over the disputed region of Nagorno-Karabakh, in the southern Caucasus. The first war ended in 1994, also with a cease-fire. Then the two sides agreed that the United States, France, and Russia would co-chair a negotiating process for a lasting solution. In 2012
1d
Plant in traditional Samoa medicine could be as effective as ibuprofen, study shows
Researchers say leaves of the matalafi plant could also potentially be used to treat cancer, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases Leaves from a plant which can be found "in back yards across Samoa " could be as effective as ibuprofen in lowering inflammation and could even be used to treat illnesses such as Parkinson's and cancer, a new study has found. For centuries, the leaves of the psychotria
1d
Bill Gates call for huge global effort to prepare for future pandemics
Microsoft founder says research and development budgets should focus on weaknesses exposed by rapid spread of Covid Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage A global research effort worth tens of billions of dollars is needed to ensure the world is better prepared for the next pandemic, which could be far worse than Covid, Bill Gates has said. The Microsoft founder said the "
1d
NASA Warns That Climate Change Is About to Start Slashing Crop Yields
Food Disaster NASA is warning that climate change could start affecting the production of maize and wheat as soon as 2030, an agricultural shift that could have disastrous consequences on the global breadbasket. In a study published in the journal Nature Food this week, the scientists found that ever-rising temperatures, levels of greenhouse gas emissions and carbon dioxide, as well as shifts in
1d
Covid-19 virus does not infect human brain cells, study suggests
Exclusive: study raises hopes that Covid-related damage to sense of smell may be more superficial than previously feared Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The virus that causes Covid-19 does not infect human brain cells, according to a study published in the journal Cell. The findings will raise hopes that the damage caused by Sars-CoV-2 might be more superficial and r
2d
The Virginia Results Aren't the Victory Trump Thinks They Are
Last night's elections were fantastic news for the Republican Party, disastrous for the Democratic Party—and a mixed verdict for Donald Trump. In winning the Virginia gubernatorial race, Republican Glenn Youngkin—and other successful GOP candidates in the Old Dominion and elsewhere—nodded toward the kinds of themes that the former president has accentuated. After all, it's his party now. But in w
2d
NASA Astronauts Harvest Space Peppers, Make Zero-G Tacos
Spicy Success Yet another crop that future long-distance space explorers can count on for sustenance. Astronauts on board the International Space Station were treated to a very special meal: space tacos, made with the first peppers to have ever been grown in space. "Ah, the taste of spicey [sic] success!" read a tweet by the official ISS research account. "Friday Feasting!" NASA astronaut Megan M
2d
Elon Musk's Net Worth Is Now Three Times That of Warren Buffett's
Richer, Richest Tesla shares are surging yet again — and that has CEO Elon Musk's net worth blasting past the competition, leaving the likes of Warren Buffet and Amazon's Jeff Bezos in the dust. By Monday, Musk's riches rose to just over $335 billion, just over a third of a trillion dollars. The increase was the result of Tesla shares jumping some 8.5 percent on Monday, Bloomberg reports . In man
3d
When Dissent Is All There Is
B y the time the Supreme Court started its new term on the first Monday of October, a tumultuous summer of midnight orders and unsigned opinions had left no doubt about who was in charge. A five-member conservative bloc, anchored by three Trump-appointed justices, had largely stripped Chief Justice John Roberts of leverage and the three remaining liberals of any hope of striking a meaningful alli
3d
Chaos Ensues as "Squid Game" Crypto Crashes 99.9999 Percent
It's almost too perfect. A cryptocurrency called SQUID, inspired by — but certainly not affiliated with — Netflix's most popular TV show of all time , " Squid Game ," rocketed into existence last week. First it soared by a whopping 44,100 percent in value in just 72 hours, according to CoinMarketCap , then by another 7,500 percent, to a value of over $2,800 per coin — which, needless to say, was
4d
The Guardian view on spooky science: AI needs regulating before it's too late | Editorial
If by 2052 a computer could match the human brain then we need better ways to build it "Progress in AI is something that will take a while to happen, but [that] doesn't make it science fiction." So Stuart Russell, the University of California computing professor, told the Guardian at the weekend. The scientist said researchers had been "spooked" by their own success in the field. Prof Russell, th
4d
Tesla Just Started Opening Up Its Supercharging Stations to Non-Tesla EVs
Supercharged Tesla is kicking off a new pilot allowing ten of its Supercharger locations in the Netherlands to charge non-Tesla EVs — a noteworthy initative given Tesla's existing and extensive charging infrastructure. Competing networks, particularly in North America, have struggled to keep up. Service coverage remains pretty patchy , broadly speaking, in many parts of the country. "Trial progra
4d
World Leaders Mocked for Flying Private Jets to Climate Conference
Jet Worth The United Nations' climate change summit kicked off on Sunday in Glasgow, Scotland. Some of the biggest names in world politics — including president Joe Biden and UK prime minister Boris Johnson — are invited to discuss everything from carbon neutrality commitments to new infrastructure that could allow the world to hit the goals laid out in the Paris Agreement. And to make the long j
4d
Mystery Object Detected Near Chinese Satellite
Last month, China launched a satellite called Shijian-21, designed to test new ways to clean up space debris . And this week, the US Space Force detected and catalogued a new object, suspected to be a rocket body designed to take satellites into a geostationary orbit called an apogee kick motor (AKM), SpaceNews reports . But oddly enough, the object is still in geostationary orbit next to Shijian
3h
Study into gene that affects Covid severity should be treated with caution
Immune defences in lungs can vary with ethnicity – but doubts remain over data quality and socio-economic factors Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The statistics are stark. In the second wave of the pandemic those with Pakistani backgrounds were more than twice as likely to die from Covid-19 than those from white European backgrounds. For those of Bangladeshi heritage
1d
We're Gonna Need Another Space Telescope
For most of us, today is just Thursday. For astronomers, it's practically a holy day. Today is an event that comes only once a decade, and it's of cosmic importance—literally. Today, a special committee has revealed the priorities for the next decade of American astronomy, like a synod giving word from on high. These directives, divined from many deliberations within the astronomy community, have
1d
Celebrating the Day of the Dead, 2021
For the past two days, people in Mexico and other Latin American countries have been celebrating Día de Muertos, or the Day of the Dead, paying homage to departed family members and honoring death as a part of life. After many cancellations last year due to the pandemic, this year parades and processions took place once again in Mexico City and other towns. The parades feature representations of
3d
Why Are We Microdosing Vaccines for Kids?
In the months since Pfizer announced its plans to adapt its COVID-19 vaccine for kids, the nicknames have been rolling in. Lil Pfizer, Pfizer-Mini, Pfizer Jr. (sorry, BioNTech; everyone tends to forget you). Others offer a cheeky play on Comirnaty, the shot's tongue-twisting official title: Comirnito, Baby Comirnaty, or my personal favorite, ComirNatty Light . These monikers not only nod to the s
3d
The Anti-abortion Movement Will Win Even If It Loses
For anti-abortion activists, Texas's recent law, Senate Bill 8, must have seemed like magic—a way to stop abortion immediately, without the grind of constitutional litigation and its attendant legal fees. The law prohibits abortion when fetal cardiac activity can be detected, usually around the sixth week of pregnancy, but outsources enforcement to private citizens, who can collect at least $10,0
3d
The Pandemic Is Still Making Us Feel Terrible
"How we feelin' out there tonight?" Bo Burnham asks an imaginary audience during his comedy special Inside , which he self-filmed from a single room over the course of a year. "Heh, haha, yeahhhhh," he says to himself. "I am not feeling good." Following the special's release this past May , TikTok users pounced on the clip. The sound has been used in more than 71,000 videos, amassing millions and
3d
How About Never?
A few years ago, on the eve of my giving a commencement address at Emma Willard, a girls' boarding school in upstate New York, the mother of one of the graduates approached me with a question: "If you could go back to your younger self—say, six years after you'd graduated from high school—what would you ask?" I thought about it for a second and then said, "I'm not so sure I'd ask my younger self
10h
What Democrats Need to Realize Before 2022
For Democrats, the clearest message from Tuesday's bruising election results is that bad things trickle down when a president from your own party confronts as much discontent as President Joe Biden faces now. The Republican victory in the Virginia gubernatorial race and the unexpectedly close result in New Jersey's—both states Biden won comfortably last year—don't guarantee a midterm wipeout for
1d
Schools Aren't the Republicans' Ticket to Victory
Schools may not be the ticket to victory that a lot of Republicans hope they will be, despite what the top-line results of last night's election seem to suggest. For the past several months, Glenn Youngkin has blanketed Virginia cable networks, mailboxes, and radio airwaves with advertisements about dysfunction in the state's public schools. His Democratic opponent, Terry McAuliffe, did not belie
2d
A Photo Trip to the Faroe Islands
Jonathan Nackstrand, a photographer with Agence France-Presse, recently spent time visiting and photographing the Faroe Islands. Located in the North Atlantic, about halfway between Norway and Iceland, the Faroes are home to more than 53,000 people, with an economy that relies mostly on fishing and sheep farming. The rugged, treeless archipelago is part of the Kingdom of Denmark, and has been inh
2d
You're Boosted! Now What?
Back in the winter, when the COVID-19 vaccines were fresh and his immune system was unenlightened, Mike Ford knew his marching orders: Don't gather in crowds, or socialize unmasked; do stay at home, and get the jab when asked. Then came the end of March, and the first of his two Pfizer shots. Once vaccinated, Ford, a Ph.D. student studying historical musicology at Columbia University, began to ea
2d
Oops: NASA Admits That the Hubble Space Telescope Is Busted Again
Safe Mode Things are not looking good for NASA's groundbreaking Hubble Space Telescope. The orbital observatory has been put into safe mode yet again, according to a NASA update , and halting all science operations. Hubble's science instruments encountered an issue on October 23, related to synchronizing instruments and the commands and data requests sent from Earth. It's yet another unfortunate
3d
Startups Are Rushing to Prescribe a New Weight Loss Drug, But Questions Remain
For Zoe, it started with a news article. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) had approved a new weight loss drug, developed by Novo Nordisk, called Wegovy. Intrigued, she joined a Facebook support group for people trying out the drug. "I was pretty desperate to get it at that point," she told us, "especially because I was seeing so many other people's results and got major FOMO." Wegovy is a n
3d
The Strange Origins of American Birthday Celebrations
The idea that everyone should celebrate their birthday is, weirdly, not very old itself. Not until the 19th century—perhaps around 1860 or 1880—did middle-class Americans commonly do so, and not until the early 20th century were birthday celebrations a tradition nationwide. In fact, the song "Happy Birthday" is not far beyond its own 100th birthday . Throughout history there are scattered example
3d
The American Workplace Isn't Prepared for This Much Grief
The U.S. has some of the most stringent social norms of any country regarding grief. (Photograph by Rachel Cox) The extent of our collective bereavement in the United States today is staggering. With more than 740,000 Americans dead from COVID-19, the country is grappling with an onslaught of grief . Some 72 percent of Americans say they know someone who has been hospitalized or died from COVID-1
3d
NASA Delays SpaceX Launch Due to "Medical Issue"
Minor Medical Issue SpaceX's fourth crewed launch to the International Space Station on board a Crew Dragon spacecraft had to be delayed yet again — this time due to a medical issue. The mission, dubbed Crew-3, was initially slated for Sunday, but has been pushed to no earlier than Saturday. The launch was already pushed to Wednesday due to "unfavorable" weather over the weekend. NASA has yet to
3d
Welsh study shows impact of Covid on 10- and 11-year-olds
Children ate less healthily, took less exercise and had more emotional problems, say researchers Children in the UK ate fewer vegetables, took less exercise and experienced worsening emotional difficulties following the Covid outbreak, according to a research study. A biennial survey conducted by investigators at Cardiff University found that primary school-age children reported a sharp increase
13h
Neutrons take a deep dive into water networks surrounding DNA
Water plays several important roles within the human body, even affecting the DNA in our cells. The entire surface of a DNA double helix is coated in layers of water molecules. This sheath of water attaches to the genetic material through hydrogen bonds, made by sharing hydrogen atoms between molecules. Through hydrogen bonds, water can influence how DNA takes shape and interacts with other molecu
22h
Floating Wind Farms Are About to Transform the Oceans
Photographs by Paccarik Orue A lla Weinstein did not invent the floating wind turbine. This is something she wanted to make clear early in our Zoom call, as if she were worried I'd give her too much credit. "I don't need to invent. There are plenty of inventions," she said. "But a lot of inventions die on the grapevine if they aren't carried through." What Weinstein does is carry them through. Fo
1d
What Winter-Haters Get Wrong
" How to Build a Life " is a weekly column by Arthur Brooks, tackling questions of meaning and happiness. Click here to listen to his new podcast series on all things happiness, How to Build a Happy Life . F or many years, the rate at which Americans move has been falling . But as remote work has gone from a necessity during the early days of the coronavirus pandemic to an unforeseen employment p
1d
A Moderate Proposal
Moderates are suddenly on everyone's mind. Senators Joe Manchin and Kyrsten Sinema have dominated the conversation about the Democratic Party's reconciliation bill. A few years back, moderate Republicans blocked the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. And polls show that a chunk of the American public finds the choice between a populist-nationalist Republican Party and an ever -more progressive De
1d
Aviation's present-day contribution to human-induced global warming is 4% and will increase over the next 30 years
Aviation is responsible for more global warming than implied by its carbon footprint alone. According to new research published today, aviation could consume up one-sixth of the remaining temperature budget required to limit warming to 1.5˚C by 2050. The article, published in Environmental Research Letters, suggests that emissions produced by the aviation industry must be reduced each year if the
1d
Cop26: can capitalism actually go green?
The Science Weekly podcast is in Glasgow, where we are bringing listeners daily episodes from Cop26. Each morning you will hear from one of the Guardian's award-winning environment team. Today, host Madeleine Finlay talks to the Guardian's biodiversity and environment reporter, Patrick Greenfield, and shadow Cop26 president Ed Miliband about the announcements from finance day On Wednesday, hundre
1d
Your fast food wrappers contain toxic chemicals. Why is that allowed? | Norah MacKendrick
Fast food boxes and wrappers contain toxic chemicals known to interfere with our reproductive systems and contribute to attention and learning disorders It's no surprise that fast food is generally bad for your health. But now there's a new reason to worry: according to a new study out of George Washington University, fast-food containers (such as wrappers used for burgers and burritos) contain t
2d
Europe's record summer 'impossible' without global heating
Cop26 countries must take action to stop record heat becoming an annual event, say experts What is Cop26 and why does it matter? The complete guide The heatwaves and wildfires that caused devastation in Europe this summer would not have happened without global heating, new analysis shows. The summer of 2021 was the hottest on record in the continent, with average temperatures about 1C above norma
2d
Her Machine Learning Tools Pull Insights From Cell Images
You can't judge a book by its cover, or so we're taught about people. For cells, however, that's surprisingly less true. Using machine learning methods similar to those that enable computers to recognize faces, biologists can characterize individual cells in stacks of microscopy images. By measuring thousands of visualizable cellular properties — the distribution of a tagged protein… Source
3d
Introducing Nine New Newsletters
Back in the day ("the day" being roughly 2009) The Atlantic' s website was home to a particularly rambunctious set of bloggers. (For those of you unfamiliar with the term bloggers , please ask your AP English teacher for guidance.) The Atlantic has been, since 1857, the home to much of the country's best writing talent, and our blogroll was no exception. (I was a member of this disputatious colle
3d
China locks down Shanghai Disneyland and tests 34,000 visitors after single Covid case
The popular theme park became the site of a suspected Delta outbreak, with authorities mass testing tens of thousands in the pursuit of Covid zero See all our coronavirus coverage As fireworks lit up the sky over Shanghai Disney Resort on Sunday, chatter began to spread through the crowds. Qian, a young Chinese woman who'd decided to spend her Halloween at the theme park, saw a Weibo alert from D
3d
The Singularity Is Here
Paul Spella / The Atlantic This essay has been adapted from a lecture delivered at the Newark Public Library in honor of Philip Roth. Something unnatural is afoot. Our affinities are increasingly no longer our own, but rather are selected for us for the purpose of automated economic gain. The automation of our cognition and the predictive power of technology to monetize our behavior, indeed our v
9h
America Needs a New Scientific Revolution
T wo stories in science are worth cheering right now: the amazing amount of knowledge humanity is gathering about COVID-19 and the quietly revolutionary ways we're accelerating the pace of discovery. First, the knowledge: Last week, a large clinical trial concluded that the cheap antidepressant drug fluvoxamine dramatically lowers the chance that people with COVID-19 will get hospitalized or die.
10h
Cop26: are we finally saying goodbye to coal?
The Science Weekly podcast is in Glasgow, where we are bringing listeners daily episodes from Cop26. Each morning you will hear from one of the Guardian's award-winning environment team. Today, host Madeleine Finlay talks to the Guardian's energy correspondent Jillian Ambrose about plans to end coal use. And as Cop26 week one draws to a close U.S. Special Presidential Envoy for Climate John Kerry
15h
Photos of the Week: Goth Weekend, Dark Moon, Dead Sea
Diwali celebrations in India, autumn colors in Pennsylvania, a walk through a pond in Belgium, a glacier in Argentina, anti-government protests in Bangkok, All Saints' Day in Lithuania, a foggy sunrise over San Francisco, ice skating in British Columbia, and much more
16h
Organizers Defend $500 Pay-Per-View Autopsy
A retired professor of anatomy is under fire for performing an autopsy in front of a live audience, with members paying up to $500 to attend the macabre event, Oregon broadcaster King 5 reports . It's an interesting ethical conundrum. Having a professional perform such a procedure is certainly educational — but the family of the deceased man, 98-year-old David Saunders, is arguing that he never a
23h
GE's New Autonomous Electric Pods Have No Steering Wheel, Pedals, or Cab
Self-driving cars are taking longer to become a reality than many experts predicted. But that doesn't mean there isn't steady progress being made; on the contrary, autonomous driving technology is consistently making incremental advancements in all sorts of vehicles, from cars to trucks to buses. Last week, General Electric (GE) and Swedish freight tech company Einride announced a partnership to
1d
Study: Machine learning a useful tool for quantum control
In the everyday world, we can perform measurements with nearly unlimited precision. But in the quantum world—the realm of atoms, electrons, photons, and other tiny particles—this becomes much harder. Every measurement made disturbs the object and results in measurement errors. In fact, everything from the instruments used to the system's properties might impact the outcome, which scientists call n
1d
When Royal Life Is a Horror Film
Spencer opens with a scene of military-like precision. Jeeps barrel down a country road to the royal residence Sandringham House to unload a haul of massive metal boxes; cooks march single file into the estate's kitchen and crack the crates open to reveal fresh fruit, chilled lobster, and other culinary riches. The head chef (played by Sean Harris) rings a bell and barks at his staff: "Brigade! O
1d
Quantum-enabled gas imaging camera to dramatically cut methane leaks
Methane gas concentrations in the atmosphere have increased by about 150% since 1750, and if released into the atmosphere, methane is approximately 80 times more potent as a greenhouse gas than carbon dioxide (CO2) over a 20-year time frame (IPCC, AR6). The mitigation of methane emissions will play a vital role in enabling climate change strategies.
1d
'It gave me an ability to enjoy life': readers on cognitive behavioural therapy
Two people tell us about their experiences with CBT and how it changed their lives The psychotherapist Aaron Beck, known as the father of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), died on Tuesday aged 100 at his Philadelphia home. CBT is a form of treatment that helps patients to analyse and manage negative thinking patterns rather than focusing on past conflicts. Here, two people tell us about their
1d
New method to predict stress at atomic scale
The amount of stress a material can withstand before it cracks is critical information when designing aircraft, spacecraft, and other structures. Aerospace engineers at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign used machine learning for the first time to predict stress in copper at the atomic scale.
1d
Revising a generalized spin current theory for the magnetoelectric effect in multiferroics
Microscopic aspects of ferroelectricity are canonically related to polar atomic displacements that break inversion symmetry of the crystal, leading to a non-zero net electric dipole moment. However, there is a special class of magnetic materials called multiferroics where inversion symmetry breaking occurs by a magnetic order stabilized in an otherwise crystallographically centrosymmetric lattice.
1d
Coronavirus news live: Ukraine sets new daily cases record; China on high alert at ports to reduce Covid risks
Total number of cases in Ukraine passes three million mark ; China urges citizens not to go abroad for non-urgent or non-essential reasons Covid infections in England double in over-65s over past month Bill Gates calls for huge global effort to prepare for future pandemics Covid has caused 28m years of life to be lost, study finds UK launches trial of drug to tackle fatigue in long Covid patients
1d
Researchers Revise Recipe for Building a Rocky Planet Like Earth
Bob O'Dell wasn't quite sure what he was looking at. It was 1992, and he had just got his hands on new images from the Hubble Space Telescope that zoomed in on young stars in the Orion Nebula. O'Dell had been hoping to study the nebula itself, an interesting region of star formation relatively close to Earth. Yet something else caught his attention. Several of the stars didn't look like stars at.
2d
Where Sex Positivity Falls Short
Since its debut in 2019, Sex Education , Netflix's charming and filthy comedy about teenagers at a bucolic British high school, has been a jewel in a very mixed bag of streaming content. I've loved and appreciated its sweetness, its sex positivity, and its absurd dramatization of school as a place where everyone is willingly and creatively getting it on, no matter the real-world evidence to the c
2d
Steel Is Back
This is an excerpt from The Atlantic 's climate newsletter, The Weekly Planet. Subscribe today . If pith-helmeted archaeologists were to name our era like they name those of our ancestors—the Stone Age, the Bronze Age, etc.—they might very well dub ours the Steel Age. Steel is ubiquitous: It's in cars , appliances, buildings, roads, infrastructure , and weapons, an essential input into virtually
2d
The Lure of Emotionally-Complex Video Games
Many video game players now crave experiences that elicit not just happiness and excitement, but also sadness, guilt, shame, and remorse. Researchers are beginning to understand the draw of a new generation of complex, emotionally-nuanced games, as well as their potential benefits and harms.
2d
University of Sydney's Edward Holmes wins PM's science prize for work on coronavirus genome
Holmes honoured for 'transformative role' in Covid response, while Prof Anthony Weiss takes innovation prize for work on biomaterials to assist wound healing Prof Edward Holmes of the University of Sydney has won the prime minister's prize for science, for his "transformative role in the scientific response to Covid-19". Holmes, an expert on the evolution of viral diseases, publicly shared the ge
2d
Cop26: have we just saved our forests? – podcast
The Science Weekly podcast is in Glasgow where we will be bringing listeners daily episodes from Cop26. Each morning you will hear from one of the Guardian's award-winning environment team. Today, host Madeleine Finlay, talks to Jon Watts about a significant announcement made by global leaders on forest and land use, and we hear from an indigenous leader in Guyana about why it might not be enough
2d
Hybrid cloud adoption demands a holistic cybersecurity posture
This is the second article in a series of three. The first focused on the importance of making businesses more future-ready and how to work through common obstacles on the path to digitization . We also discussed how modernizing on-premises infrastructure as part of a hybrid cloud approach can best be managed via hyperconverged infrastructure (HCI), enabling modernization that blends the best of
3d
Creating an artificial material that can sense, adapt to its environment
Move over, Hollywood—science fiction is getting ready to leap off the big screen and enter the real world. While recent science fiction movies have demonstrated the power of artificially intelligent computer programs, such as the fictional character J.A.R.V.I.S. in the Avenger film series, to make independent decisions to carry out a set of actions, these imagined movie scenarios could now be clos
3d
Tonight Is a Test of What Trumpism Could Be Without Trump
The fundamental question facing the Republican Party, and by extension the nation, is whether there can be a Trumpism without Donald Trump, and if so, what it would look like. Today's gubernatorial election in Virginia will offer one of the most important clues about those questions. The race pits Glenn Youngkin, a Republican businessman, against former Governor Terry McAuliffe, a Democrat. Young
3d
Dismantling three common cloud strategy assumptions
Cloud is ubiquitous: according to Gartner , spending on public cloud services is predicted to reach $396 billion in 2021 and grow 21.7% to $482 billion in 2022. And by 2026, Gartner predicts public cloud spending will exceed 45% of all enterprise IT spending, up from less than 17% in 2021. But how much do companies fully understand the potential benefits of the cloud—and possible limitations—as t
3d
Hubble remains in safe mode, NASA team investigating
NASA is continuing to investigate why the instruments in the Hubble Space Telescope recently went into safe mode configuration, suspending science operations. The instruments are healthy and will remain in safe mode while the mission team continues its investigation.
3d
The Leaderless World
For the past 16 years, we in Europe have witnessed the Merkelization of the continent: Resentments bubble away; crises are managed, not resolved; time is played for; reform is incremental and then, suddenly, unilateral; and, in the end, stasis reigns. After a largely uneventful G20 summit in Rome, and with world leaders settling into their hotels in Scotland for the UN Climate Change Conference k
3d
Virginia's Next Governor and the Threat of a Constitutional Crisis
Gubernatorial races can quickly become proxies for nationwide grievances and allegiances, and Tuesday's neck-and-neck election between the Republican Glenn Youngkin and the Democrat Terry McAuliffe for the governorship of Virginia is no exception. But in addition to the substantive policy disagreements or politics as pastime , people across America should be monitoring the outcome of this race fo
3d
High-performance, low-cost machine learning infrastructure is accelerating innovation in the cloud
Artificial intelligence and machine learning (AI and ML) are key technologies that help organizations develop new ways to increase sales, reduce costs, streamline business processes, and understand their customers better. AWS helps customers accelerate their AI/ML adoption by delivering powerful compute, high-speed networking, and scalable high-performance storage options on demand for any machin
4d
SpaceX Loading Huge Amount of Rocket Fuel at Starship Launch Site
Filling Tanks SpaceX is sending thousands of tons of rocket propellant to its South Texas rocket testing facilities, Teslarati reports , signaling that the company's long-awaited orbital test launch of its Starship spacecraft may be just around the corner. Giant tanks spotted by onlookers started piling up last month near the company's orbital test launch pad. In order to meet the immense propell
18min
Better models of atmospheric 'detergent' can help predict climate change
Earth's atmosphere has a unique ability to cleanse itself by way of invisible molecules in the air that act as minuscule cleanup crews. The most important molecule in that crew is the hydroxyl radical (OH), nicknamed the "detergent of the atmosphere" because of its dominant role in removing pollutants. When the OH molecule chemically interacts with a variety of harmful gases, including the potent
4d
Women under 35 face higher risk of breast cancer spreading – study
Analysis of 400 studies found risk of secondary cancer ranges from 6% to 22% depending on different factors Women diagnosed with breast cancer under the age of 35 face a higher risk of it spreading, according to the first global study of its kind. Breast cancer is the most common form of cancer, with 2.3 million people diagnosed every year. Survival rates are generally good, which is largely beca
2d
The Massive Progressive Dark-Money Group You've Never Heard Of
In a trendy co-working space in Washington, D.C.'s Dupont Circle—where people wear Chucks and fuss about fancy coffee—lies the progressive movement's empire of political cash. Over the past half decade, Democrats have quietly pulled ahead of Republicans in so-called dark-money spending, funneling hundreds of millions from anonymous donors into campaigns around the country. The groups that spend m
3d
Terrawatch: Earth's 'boring' plate tectonics period
Curious report suggests calm thousand millennia of 'Boring Billion' was more lively than thought Today our planet is a lively place: the climate swings from greenhouse to icehouse and back again, while earthquakes, volcanoes, mountain ranges and ocean trenches are all signs of its restless surface. But if you go back far enough, you reach a period where Earth was a very dull place. Nicknamed the
2d
Mountaintop removal worse for endangered species than initially thought
A new study published today by journal PLOS ONE has revealed that mountaintop removal mining poses a more serious and widespread threat to endangered species and people than was previously understood. The researchers from Defenders of Wildlife's Center for Conservation Innovation (CCI) and conservation technology nonprofit SkyTruth, combine water-quality data with satellite imagery of mountaintop
1d
Study reports the ferroelectric switching of spin-to-charge conversion in germanium telluride
Spintronic devices, a class of architectures that can store or transfer information by leveraging the intrinsic spin of electrons, have been found to be highly promising, both in terms of speed and efficiency. So far, however, the development of these devices has been hindered by the poor compatibility between semiconducting materials and ferromagnetic sources of spin, which underpin their operati
1d
NASA's new rovers will be a fleet of mobile robots that work together
NASA is exploring a concept for a new fleet of mini-rovers that can work together to solve problems and make decisions as a unit. If one fails or gets stuck somewhere, the others could carry on without it. As part of the Cooperative Autonomous Distributed Robotic Exploration (CADRE) project, NASA engineers are designing compact, mobile robots the size of a shoebox (for comparison, Perseverance is
3d
Labyrinthine Covid booster system is the real reason for delays | Letters
Guardian readers share their frustrations at trying to obtain a third coronavirus vaccination Having read your report ( No 10 concerned as 4.5 million eligible people fail to get Covid jab boosters , 2 November), I wonder how many people's experience mirrors mine? I received a letter from the NHS advising me to contact my GP about a booster, as I am it seems clinically vulnerable, as well as bein
2d
Fractured artificial rock helps crack a 54-year-old mystery
Princeton researchers have solved a 54-year-old puzzle about why certain fluids strangely slow down under pressure when flowing through porous materials, such as soils and sedimentary rocks. The findings could help improve many important processes in energy, environmental and industrial sectors, from oil recovery to groundwater remediation.
3h
Toward self-restoring electronic devices with long DNA molecules
The potential of DNA structural properties in single-molecule electronics has finally been harnessed by researchers from Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) in a single-molecule junction device that shows spontaneous self-restoring ability. Additionally, the device, based on a "zipper" DNA configuration, shows unconventionally high electrical conductivity, opening doors to the development o
3d
Heart rate synchronization and palm sweat found to be signs of attraction
A small team of researchers from Leiden University and one with the University of Birmingham has found that when two people are attracted to one another, their heart rates tend to synchronize and their palms sweat together. In their paper published in the journal Nature Human Behavior, the group describes experiments they conducted with volunteers in "dating cabins."
3d
Indian astronomers investigate X-ray binary GRS 1915+105
Using the AstroSat spacecraft, astronomers from India have observed an X-ray binary system known as GRS 1915+105. The satellite allowed the researchers to conduct a comprehensive study of this object, yielding essential information regarding its properties. Results of the research were published October 27 on arXiv.org.
2d
You Won't Regret Rewatching The Ring
The 2002 horror film The Ring can be summarized in a delightfully analog fashion: After finding a VHS tape and receiving a phone call, a local newspaper reporter searches library archives to solve a mystery. As John Mulaney would say , that is a very old-fashioned sentence. But while audiences today have little to fear from a ghost that travels by VHS and kills by landline, the terrors in Gore Ve
9h
A cosmic whodunit: ALMA study confirms what's robbing galaxies of their star-forming gas
Astronomers examining the nearby universe with the help of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) have just completed the largest high-resolution survey of star-forming fuel ever conducted in galaxy clusters. But more importantly, they're tackling a long-standing mystery in astrophysics: What's killing galaxies? The research, which provides the clearest evidence to date that extre
3d
A fungus that uses chemicals to trick male flies into mating with infected dead females
A combined team of researchers from the University of Copenhagen and the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences reports that a certain fungus uses chemicals to trick male flies into mating with infected dead females. They have written a paper describing their findings and have posted it on the bioXiv preprint server.
7h
Quantifying spin in WTe2 for future spintronics
A RMIT-led, international collaboration published this week has observed large in-plane anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) in a quantum spin Hall insulator and the spin quantization axis of the edge states can be well-defined.
2d
Researchers explore the extremely metal-poor galaxy DDO 68
By performing hydrodynamical simulations, astronomers have investigated an extremely metal-poor galaxy known as DDO 68. Results of the study, presented in a paper published October 25 on the arXiv pre-print server, shed more light on the origin and nature of this peculiar galaxy.
3d
Diffractive optical networks reconstruct holograms instantaneously without a digital computer
Since its invention by Nobel Laureate Dennis Gabor in the late 1940s, holography has found widespread use in science and engineering applications such as computational imaging, microscopy, sensors, displays and interferometry. In many applications of holography, the reconstruction of holograms to retrieve the object information is generally performed using digital computers and iterative algorithm
3d
The Next Weird Way We're Changing Cats
The first thing to know is that truly allergen-free cats are a myth. Sorry. That's because all cats—longhair, shorthair, no hair—shed a pernicious little protein called Fel d 1, found in the saliva and oil glands, which causes most cat allergies. Some cats shed 80 times more of it than others of the same breed; no one knows why. Some shed more one month and less the next. Certain breeds may indee
8h
How bilingual brains switch languages seamlessly
The brain uses a shared mechanism for combining words from a single language and for combining words from two different languages, a new study of bilingual speakers shows. The findings indicate that language switching is natural for those who are bilingual because the brain has a mechanism that does not detect that the language has switched, allowing for a seamless transition in comprehending mor
1d
Jetpack Sighting May Have Been Something Very Stupid, Cops Say
Ex LAX Last year, pilots flying near Los Angeles International Airport started reporting something strange: a person seemingly flying around using a jetpack — and far too close to the airfield. An investigation by the Federal Aviation Administration and the FBI still hasn't come up with any definitive answers as to what the hell the pilots saw. Even efforts using law enforcement aircraft yielded
2d
Space Titans review – Bezos, Musk and Branson battle to blast their loads
This wildly hagiographic documentary about the billionaires fiddling with their massive rockets will have you cringing all the way into suborbital space For a documentary created with the Washington Post, a newspaper owned by a company controlled by Jeff Bezos, the new Discovery+ special Space Titans has an impressive amount of Elon Musk in it. Maybe the algorithm doesn't dictate everything quite
1d
Creating ultra-diffuse galaxies
Ultra-diffuse galaxies (UDGs) have very low luminosities, comparatively few stars, and little star-formation activity as compared with normal galaxies of similar sizes. Commonly found in galaxy clusters, UDGs come in a wide range of sizes and shapes, many of them being round and smooth like dwarf elliptical galaxies, others showing distorted shapes from having experienced tidal disruptions; some h
5h
How words acquire their meaning
Researchers in EPFL's College of Humanities have used machine learning to reveal how humans bridge the often-significant gaps between signal and meaning in communication.
2d
Farewell, 14nm: Intel Launches Alder Lake
Intel's Alder Lake launches this morning, and it's a momentous occasion for the chip giant. For over six years, Intel's desktop processors have been stuck on the 14nm process. Intel always planned for the first 10nm CPUs to be mobile processors, but the company didn't anticipate how long it would take to build a viable version of a 10nm chip in the first place. Alder Lake is built on an advanced
1d
How particulate matter pollution is increasing infant death rates
The haze that blurs a blue sky or a beautiful skyline is caused by tiny particles known in climate research as PM2.5. PM2.5 describes particulate matter, often made from pollution, less than 2.5 microns wide. Despite its microscopic size, PM2.5 is responsible for more than 4 million premature deaths every year. A new study in Nature Communications led by Japanese researchers shows that the polluti
3d
Scanning a single protein, one amino acid at a time
Using nanopore DNA sequencing technology, researchers from TU Delft and the University of Illinois have managed to scan a single protein. By slowly moving a linearized protein through a tiny nanopore, one amino acid at the time, the researchers were able to read off electric currents that relate to the information content of the protein. The researchers published their proof-of-concept in Science
1d
Healable carbon fiber composite offers path to long-lasting, sustainable materials
Because of their high strength and light weight, carbon-fiber-based composite materials are gradually replacing metals for advancing all kinds of products and applications, from airplanes to wind turbines to golf clubs. But there's a trade-off. Once damaged or compromised, the most commonly-used carbon fiber materials are nearly impossible to repair or recycle.
1d
The Atlantic Daily: Still Stuck in the Pandemic Blues? You're Not Alone.
If you're not feeling 100 percent, you're not alone: In a recent NPR poll , half of households reported that someone in the home was experiencing serious problems with depression, anxiety, stress, or sleep. One biweekly Census Bureau survey estimated that almost one in three Americans was experiencing symptoms of depression or anxiety alone. Even after all this time, after all that supposed adjus
4h
India's 2070 net-zero pledge is achievable, appropriate, and right on time
India has officially joined the net-zero pledge club, and its 2070 target presents a reasonable, if challenging, timeline for the country. The commitment was announced by Prime Minister Narendra Modi on November 1 at the COP26 UN climate conference. While the target date is still decades away, and later than the 2050 goal set by many other countries, experts say it's an ambitious and meaningful c
2d
How to Find the Secret to Meaningful Work
Listen & subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Googl e | Pocket Casts The road to purposeful work is paved with good intentions, but for many, happiness at work can feel like a hopeless cause. What if the secret to happiness at work has less to do with our extrinsic motivations (money, rewards, and personal gain) and more to do with intrinsic motivations—the meaningful relationships we
3d
Ecosystems worldwide are disrupted by lack of large wild herbivores—except in Africa
Biological research has repeatedly demonstrated that the relationship between the producer and the consumer is governed by a scaling law. An international research team has now looked into whether this law of nature can be reproduced in the relationship between the production of plants in an area and the number of large herbivores that graze on them. The study reveals that Africa is the only conti
2d
Geert Jan van Oldenborgh obituary
Dutch physicist who helped to identify the links between human-induced climate change and extreme weather disasters Geert Jan van Oldenborgh, who has died aged 59 of multiple myeloma, was co-founder and member of a team of scientists who identified — at speed and while politically a hot topic — the links between human-induced climate change and forest fires, heatwaves, drought, flood and other spe
3d
Covid study points to UK infection 'peak' attained but rising cases for older adults
Fall for under-18s, logged by Zoe app, may be half-term glitch and older groups still 'dominate' hospital cases say other scientists Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Scientists on the Zoe Covid study believe UK cases of coronavirus might have peaked for the year, a suggestion that prompted some experts to warn that it was too soon to know how the epidemic would play o
1d
Study finds fish rubbing up against their predators—sharks
While rubbing up against a shark sounds like a risky move if you're a fish, a collaborative research team led by the University of Miami (UM) Shark Research and Conservation Program at the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science found that this behavior is frequent, widespread, and could play a previously unappreciated important ecological role for aquatic animals.
1d
Nasa delays SpaceX launch to ISS over 'medical issue' with astronaut
It is the first such delay by Nasa since 1990 when the mission commander of Space Shuttle Atlantis fell ill Nasa has announced a rare health-related delay in its SpaceX rocket launch of four astronauts to the international space station, the second postponement of the mission in a week, citing an unspecified medical issue with one of the crew. The space agency on Monday described it as a "minor m
3d
Here Are the Coolest Space-Themed Halloween Costumes We Could Find
"Ted Lasso" overalls and " Squid Game " masks were the obvious Halloween costumes this year. But the more daring among us ventured skyward for 2021's spookiest occasion. From rockets to space telescopes, space enthusiasts showed up in full force this year. So without much further ado, here are some of the most awesome space-themed outfits we saw. Crew Dragon Twitter user April Santos got out the
3d
The 5:2 diet: A good choice for gestational diabetes
Weight loss after gestational diabetes can prevent the onset of type 2 diabetes. Yet finding the most effective way to lose weight and keep it off can be a challenge, especially for mothers with a new baby. Now, new research suggests that the popular 5:2 or intermittent fasting diet is just as effective as a conventional energy-restricting diet, enabling women greater choice and flexibility when i
4d
Movement of plankton between tropical marine ecosystems drives 'sweet spots' for fishing
A new analysis suggests that the movement of plankton and plankton-eating fish play a central role in driving local spikes of extreme biological productivity in tropical coral reefs, creating "sweet spots" of abundant fish. Renato Morais of James Cook University in Townsville, Australia, and colleagues present these findings in a study publishing November 2nd in the open-access journal PLOS Biolog
3d
Ventilation matters: Engineering airflow to avoid spreading COVID-19
As we approach two full years of the COVID-19 pandemic, we now know it spreads primarily through airborne transmission. The virus rides inside tiny microscopic droplets or aerosol ejected from our mouths when we speak, shout, sing, cough, or sneeze. It then floats within the air, where it can be inhaled by and transmitted.
3d
A brain switch that helps worms keep their cool
How our bodies sense and respond to environmental changes are fundamental biological questions. In particular, understanding how organisms sense and cope with warming temperatures is key for the survival of species and it will become an even more important area of research given the raising trend in the earth's temperature. In research recently published in PLOS Biology, researchers from the Casan
1d
Is the universe fine-tuned for life?
For decades, various physicists have theorized that even the slightest changes in the fundamental laws of nature would make it impossible for life to exist. This idea, also known as the "fine-tuned universe" argument, suggests that the occurrence of life in the universe is very sensitive to the values of certain fundamental physics. Alter any of these values (as the logic goes), and life would not
2d
Cutting ammonia emissions is a cost-effective way to prevent air pollution deaths
Tackling pollution from the emission of nitrogen compounds, particularly ammonia, could reduce many of the 23.3 million years of life that were lost prematurely across the world in 2013 due to nitrogen-related air pollution, an international study led by Chinese scientists has discovered using a modeling framework, including the IIASA GAINS model.
1d
History of insect invasions offers insight into the future
Over the past two centuries, thousands of non-native insects have hitchhiked to the United States in packing material, on live plants, and in passenger baggage. Scientists with two U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) agencies and their partners used the history of live plant imports and invasion by a common group of insects to estimate the rate at which new insects are arriving and how many new
2d
Mongooses give bullies the cold shoulder, scientists find
Management of within-group conflict is a key feature of human lives and those of many social animals, with contestants known to adopt various strategies in the immediate aftermath to minimize costs. The study, published today in the journal eLife by a team at University of Bristol, shows that individuals not involved in the altercations can both track the aggressive behavior of others and act on t
3d
Team demonstrates simultaneous readout of 60 bolometers for far-infrared space telescopes
Light with sub-millimeter and far-infrared wavelengths from deep space can travel long distances, penetrating right through dust clouds, and bring us information about the history of the universe and the origin of galaxies, stars and planets. However, the long journey has weakened these signals, and we require sensitive detectors operating at millikelvin temperatures on a space instrument.
1d
Sponge Genes Hint at the Origins of Neurons and Other Cells
When the first sponge genomes were sequenced in the early 2000s, researchers were surprised to find that sponges not only have roughly as many genes as humans and other complex creatures but also have many of the same genes. Sponges are among the earliest branching lineages on the evolutionary tree of animal life; their simple bodies don't even have a pattern of symmetry or a set number of parts.
1d
Warmer, wetter, wilder: 38 million people in the Great Lakes region are threatened by climate change
The Great Lakes are getting warmer, wetter and wilder. These atypical conditions are amplifying other threats. Harmful algal blooms are increasing inseverity and geographic extent, sewers are overflowing and stormwater is flooding neighborhoods and parks. Many terrestrial organisms are shifting northwards and worsening air quality is disproportionately affecting the most vulnerable people living i
2d
Making aircraft fuel from sunlight and air
Scientists have built a plant that can produce carbon-neutral liquid fuels from sunlight and air. The next goal will be to take this technology to industrial scale and achieve competitiveness. Researchers now describe how this novel solar reactor functions and outline a policy framework that would provide incentives to expand the production of 'solar kerosene'.
1d
Bilingualism comes naturally to our brains
The brain uses a shared mechanism for combining words from a single language and for combining words from two different languages, a team of neuroscientists has discovered. Its findings indicate that language switching is natural for those who are bilingual because the brain has a mechanism that does not detect that the language has switched, allowing for a seamless transition in comprehending mor
1d
5-Day Stimulation Treatment Effective Against Depression
(Photo: Natasha Connell/Unsplash) Researchers at Stanford University appear to have found a way to treat persistent depression using magnetic brain stimulation. In a study published last week, the university's School of Medicine shared that after treating 29 participants using Stanford accelerated intelligent neuromodulation therapy (SAINT), 78.6% of them experienced rapid remission. SAINT is a f
3d
Explore ESA's interactive Climate Change Kit
Arguably, humankind has never been more aware of the jeopardy we and the planet face because of climate change. As world leaders at COP26 work to accelerate action towards reducing greenhouse gas emissions to keep the goal of 1.5°C temperature rise within reach, we bring you a new easy-to-use guide on what ESA is doing to understand and monitor climate change from space—data that are essential for
1d
Hester McFarland Solomon obituary
My friend, Hester McFarland Solomon, who has died aged 78, dedicated her professional life to the treatment of psychological illness, as a noted Jungian psychoanalyst of the developmental school. She rose to the heights of her profession as an analyst, author, teacher and administrator, and in 2007 became only the second female president of the International Association for Analytical Psychology
2d
Light pollution makes crickets chirp in the daytime and may disrupt reproductive processes
A joint study conducted by researchers from Tel Aviv University and the Open University of Israel revealed that exposing male crickets to artificial light at night (ALAN) can impair their activity cycles. According to the researchers, nocturnal chirping is the male's way of calling females to come and mate with him, and its disruption can interfere with reproduction processes and even endanger the
3d
Hubble images colorful planetary nebula ringed by hazy halo
NGC 2438 is a planetary nebula, formed after the death of a Sun-like star. The medium-sized star would have expelled its outer layers of gas into space as it died, leaving behind a white-dwarf core. A halo of glowing gas over 4.5 light-years across surrounds the nebula's brighter inner ring. Many round or nearly round planetary nebulae display these halo structures, and astronomers have been inves
22h
U.S. adolescents are receiving less sex education in key topics than 25 years ago
Only half of young people in the United States are getting sex education that meets minimum standards, according to a Rutgers researcher who found that adolescents are not receiving critical information. Of even greater concern is that a significant percentage of young people do not receive any information about birth control and sexually transmitted disease prevention before they begin to have se
1d
A mission to explore the methane lakes on Titan
Titan has become a center of increasing attention as of late. Discoveries from Cassini have only increased interest in the solar system's second-largest moon. Liquid on its surface has already prompted one upcoming mission—the Dragonfly drone NASA plans to launch in the mid-2030s. Now dozens of scientists have put their names behind a proposal to ESA for a similar mission. This one is called POSEI
2d
For women, greater exposure to estrogen in life may protect brain regions that are vulnerable to Alzheimer's
The drop in estrogen levels that occurs with menopause brings declines in the volumes of 'gray matter,' the cellular matter of the brain, in key brain regions that are also affected in Alzheimer's disease. But a new study suggests that greater cumulative exposure to estrogen in life, for example from having had more children or from having taken menopause hormone therapy, may counter this brain-sh
1d
Earth's orbit affects millennial climate variability
Abundant geological evidence demonstrates that Earth's climate has experienced millennial-scale variability superimposed on glacial–interglacial fluctuations through the Pleistocene. The magnitude of millennial climate variability has been linked to glacial cycles over the past 800 thousand years (kyr).
3d
Ending Disease review – a powerful case for the miracle cure
In focusing on the stories of recovery this documentary, following patients participating in stem cell research trials in the US, allows the optimism to outshine the controversy Here is a film that tugs at the heartstrings as it painstakingly covers the lives of 10 patients participating in stem cell research trials in the US. From a quadriplegic high-school basketball star to a mother with recur
3d
Evolution led to similarities in the melodies of animal vocalizations and human languages
When listening closely, the melodies of human languages and animal vocalizations are very similar. However, it is not yet fully resolved if similar patterns in languages and animal vocalizations also have similar meanings. Researchers of the University of Vienna present a new method to decode the meaning of animal vocalizations: the comparison of their melodies with human languages. The proposal w
5h
Astronomers Now Have a Better Idea Where Planet 9 Isn't
Nobody has found Planet Nine yet, but at least we've almost figured out where to look. Image: NASA There was a time when our solar system had nine planets. Then, in 2006, astronomers decided Pluto didn't count anymore. There might still be nine planets, though. Astronomers Mike Brown and Konstantin Batygin have proposed an undiscovered ninth planet in the outer solar system. Efforts to find the a
1d
When is a 'basin of attraction' like an octopus?
Mathematicians who study dynamical systems often focus on the rules of attraction. Namely, how does the choice of the starting point affect where a system ends up? Some systems are easier to describe than others. A swinging pendulum, for example, will always land at the lowest point no matter where it starts.
1d
Three ways to reduce the carbon footprint of food purchased by US households
Most consumers want to make food purchases that are smart for their wallets, their health and the environment. And while switching to a vegetarian or vegan diet can lower one's impact on greenhouse gas emissions, it may not be realistic or healthful for everyone. Now, researchers report three ways that Americans can reduce the carbon footprint of their food purchases, without requiring drastic die
2d
Beijing school pupils in lockdown after staff tests positive for Covid
Parents alarmed as children held overnight before some sent to centralised quarantine for two weeks Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Children as young as seven were held for hours in a Beijing school before being sent to centralised quarantine for two weeks after a staff member tested positive for Covid-19. The incident, which drew alarm from parents and observers, ca
2d
Potential strategy for fighting obesity
Scientists may have identified a method of safely mimicking the weight-loss benefits of a plant compound that — despite its harmful side effects — hold critical answers to developing therapies for obesity.
3d
Modder Open Sources iPhone USB-C Mod
As humans, we all have basic needs, including food, water, shelter, and a USB-C iPhone. Okay, that last one isn't strictly a need , but a lot of people want a USB-C iPhone so much they're willing to embark on an expensive and complex mod project. Recently, engineering student Ken Pillonel showed off his amazing USB-C mod for the iPhone X. Now, he's decided to open up the mod to all interested par
1d
Harnessing Thor's hammer: How forensic science is unlocking the mysteries of fatal lightning strikes
New research by scientists from South Africa and the U.K. could help forensic teams understand whether people or animals were the victims of fatal lightning strikes based solely upon an analysis of their skeletons. Their study is published in the journal Forensic Science International: Synergy, and titled "Harnessing Thor's Hammer: Experimentally induced lightning trauma to human bone by high impu
2d
Exploring a mechanism that helps plants cope with water shortages
Researchers at Tel Aviv University, under the leadership of Dr. Yuqin Zhang and Prof. Eilon Shani of the School of Plant Sciences and Food Security at the George S. Wise Faculty of Life Sciences, discovered a central mechanism in plants that helps them deal with drought conditions and water shortages. The system is built on proteins that transport a small signal molecule that controls two vital pr
3d
When macrophages let off steam
New data shows how inflammatory reactions can be resolved by changes to the metabolism of macrophages. Danger signals released by damaged cells during inflammation play a role during this process. 'Rewiring' the mitochondria in the macrophages protects them against overloading and can thus improve the way in which parts of damaged cells are eliminated and resolve the inflammatory reaction.
13min
Multispecific targeting of glioblastoma with tumor microenvironment-responsive multifunctional engineered NK cells [Medical Sciences]
Tumor antigen heterogeneity, a severely immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment (TME) and lymphopenia resulting in inadequate immune intratumoral trafficking, have rendered glioblastoma (GBM) highly resistant to therapy. To address these obstacles, here we describe a unique, sophisticated combinatorial platform for GBM: a cooperative multifunctional immunotherapy based on genetically engineered h
25min
Electron family creates previously unknown state of matter
An international research team has demonstrated a completely novel state of matter in a metal. It is created by the combination of four electrons-until now, only electron pairs were known. This discovery could lead to a new type of superconductivity, an entirely new research direction, and revolutionary technologies such as quantum sensors.
41min
How cells correctly choose active genes
It is essential for cells to control precisely which of the many genes of their genetic material they use. This is done in so-called transcription factories, molecular clusters in the nucleus. Researchers have now found that the formation of transcription factories resembles the condensation of liquids. Their findings will improve the understanding of causes of diseases and advance the development
41min
Closed microbial communities self-organize to persistently cycle carbon [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Cycles of nutrients (N, P, etc.) and resources (C) are a defining emergent feature of ecosystems. Cycling plays a critical role in determining ecosystem structure at all scales, from microbial communities to the entire biosphere. Stable cycles are essential for ecosystem persistence because they allow resources and nutrients to be…
1h
A stable proportion of Purkinje cell inputs from parallel fibers are silent during cerebellar maturation [Neuroscience]
Cerebellar Purkinje neurons integrate information transmitted at excitatory synapses formed by granule cells. Although these synapses are considered essential sites for learning, most of them appear not to transmit any detectable electrical information and have been defined as silent. It has been proposed that silent synapses are required to maximize…
1h
Bacterial marginolactones trigger formation of algal gloeocapsoids, protective aggregates on the verge of multicellularity [Microbiology]
Photosynthetic microorganisms including the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii are essential to terrestrial habitats as they start the carbon cycle by conversion of CO2 to energy-rich organic carbohydrates. Terrestrial habitats are densely populated, and hence, microbial interactions mediated by natural products are inevitable. We previously discovered such an interaction between Streptomyces…
1h
Relating cellular signaling timescales to single-molecule kinetics: A first-passage time analysis of Ras activation by SOS [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Son of Sevenless (SOS) is a Ras guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) that plays a central role in numerous cellular signaling pathways. Like many other signaling molecules, SOS is autoinhibited in the cytosol and activates only after recruitment to the membrane. The mean activation time of individual SOS molecules has…
1h
A near-infrared AIE fluorescent probe for myelin imaging: From sciatic nerve to the optically cleared brain tissue in 3D [Neuroscience]
Myelin, the structure that surrounds and insulates neuronal axons, is an important component of the central nervous system. The visualization of the myelinated fibers in brain tissues can largely facilitate the diagnosis of myelin-related diseases and understand how the brain functions. However, the most widely used fluorescent probes for myelin…
1h
Monitoring RNA dynamics in native transcriptional complexes [Biochemistry]
Cotranscriptional RNA folding is crucial for the timely control of biological processes, but because of its transient nature, its study has remained challenging. While single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET) is unique to investigate transient RNA structures, its application to cotranscriptional studies has been limited to nonnative systems lacking RNA…
1h
Activation of PTH1R alleviates epididymitis and orchitis through Gq and {beta}-arrestin-1 pathways [Pharmacology]
Inflammation in the epididymis and testis contributes significantly to male infertility. Alternative therapeutic avenues treating epididymitis and orchitis are expected since current therapies using antibiotics have limitations associated to side effects and are commonly ineffective for inflammation due to nonbacterial causes. Here, we demonstrated that type 1 parathyroid hormone receptor…
1h
A reactive center loop-based prediction platform to enhance the design of therapeutic SERPINs [Biochemistry]
Serine proteases are essential for many physiological processes and require tight regulation by serine protease inhibitors (SERPINs). A disturbed SERPIN–protease balance may result in disease. The reactive center loop (RCL) contains an enzymatic cleavage site between the P1 through P1' residues that controls SERPIN specificity. This RCL can be modified…
1h
Steady agronomic and genetic interventions are essential for sustaining productivity in intensive rice cropping [Agricultural Sciences]
Intensive systems with two or three rice (Oryza sativa L.) crops per year account for about 50% of the harvested area for irrigated rice in Asia. Any reduction in productivity or sustainability of these systems has serious implications for global food security. Rice yield trends in the world's longest-running long-term…
1h
New strategy against treatment-resistant prostate cancer identified
A new study has identified an RNA molecule that suppresses prostate tumors. The scientists found that prostate cancers develop ways to shut down this RNA molecule to allow themselves to grow. According to the new research — conducted in mice implanted with human prostate tumor samples — restoring this so-called long noncoding RNA could be a new strategy to treat prostate cancer that has develope
1h
Experts master defects in semiconductors
Researchers have discovered a novel way to manipulate defects in semiconductors. The study holds promising opportunities for novel forms of precision sensing, or the transfer of quantum information between physically separate qubits, as well as for improving the fundamental understanding of charge transport in semiconductors.
1h
Ember Mug Review: Make Your Cup of Joe Last Longer
For 62 percent of Americans , a cup of coffee is an essential part of their day, according to the NCA. For some, it's all about the ritual of grinding premium beans from a local roaster, carefully brewing a fresh cup, and sharing it with a family member. For others, coffee is all about getting a much-needed hit of caffeine as soon as possible to jump-start a busy day. Whatever your reason for ind
1h
Democrats Are Getting Crushed in the 'Vibes War'
To explain the Democrats' poor performance in state and local elections Tuesday, various commentators have made very specific claims: It was mostly about critical race theory , or mostly about Terry McAuliffe's flaws as a candidate for Virginia governor , or mostly about suburban white women voting like it's 2012 again. But none of these explanations is fully satisfying. The turn against Democrat
1h
Actually, Kristen Stewart Has Always Been a Great Actor
Kristen Stewart hit the height of her fame as the star of the Twilight movies about a decade ago, and to many audiences she will always be a teenage girl falling in love with a vampire. Last month, in an interview with Britain's Sunday Times , the actor said she's probably made "five really good films" at most. The quip immediately inspired blog posts and social-media jokes about how perhaps the
1h
Australia Aims to Launch Water-Hunting Lunar Rover in 2024
The moon is a big deal again. NASA is currently working toward a return to the lunar surface with the Artemis program and the (heavily delayed) Space Launch System rocket. Recently, the Australian Space Agency announced it would cooperate with NASA to send a rover to the moon in 2026, but a private Aussie rover could beat it there by two years . This robot, designed in cooperation with the Univer
2h
5 ways to turn your anxiety into something useful
Neuroscientist Wendy Suzuki has research-backed tips for turning the familiar unpleasant emotion into a "superpower." In an effort to neutralize some of the shame and stigma associated with the condition, Suzuki , a professor of neural science at New York University, likes to begin her talks by citing that as much as 90% of the world's population suffers from what she calls "everyday" anxiety—as
2h
250,000-year-old skull raises questions about human origins
The discovery of a partial skull of a young child believed to have died at least 250,000 years ago in a cave near Johannesburg, South Africa raises critical new questions about the origins of the human species. A new study details the area and circumstances in which researchers discovered the skull—of a type of human ancestor called Homo naledi . The team uncovered parts of the skull and teeth of
2h
How eligible am I for a doctorate in cognition?
Edit: I appreciate your comments very much but just to clarify, I am not asking for opinions on whether I should or shouldn't do a second PhD. I have both academic and personal reasons for considering it, including how great the program is. I am probably going to apply anyway, but I wanted to have a general idea as to how my cv would look to the admissions committee. There is a 4year doctorate pr
2h
What jobs could I pursue with a FACS facial coding certification
I do not have any university degree so I feel that bars me from most jobs that a FACS certification would be of benefit in. Is there any career I could get into without a university education but that would tap into a FACS training Police officer is not an option because I don't want to carry a firearm in my job submitted by /u/CNNrocks [link] [comments]
2h
Copper and drug combo may treat deadly brain tumors in kids
A new therapy that combines copper ions with a drug once heralded as a treatment for alcoholism may help save children from a common but devastating central nervous system cancer known as medulloblastoma. Copper has been clinically improving the lives of people since about 1500 BCE, when an Egyptian physician first recorded its use as a treatment for inflammation. Some 35 centuries later, researc
2h
The Guardian view on Roman Britain: a constantly shifting picture | Editorial
New discoveries are constantly reshaping and enriching the story of our past The novelist and philosopher Iris Murdoch once wrote that the study of early Greek history "sets a special challenge to the disciplined mind. It is a game with very few pieces, where the skill of the player lies in complicating the rules." The same could be said of the study of Britain's Roman period, a long, often overl
2h
COP26 climate pledges: What scientists think so far
Nature, Published online: 05 November 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03034-z Nations have promised to end deforestation, curb methane emissions and stop public investment in coal power. Researchers warn that the real work of COP26 is yet to come.
2h
Employment for people with disabilities reaches historic levels
In October, the major employment indicators for people with disabilities reached their highest recorded levels since September 2008, when reporting for this cohort was begun by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), according to today's National Trends in Disability Employment—Monthly Update (nTIDE), issued by Kessler Foundation and the University of New Hampshire's Institute on Disability (UNH-IOD
2h
Anatomy journal retracts 13 papers
The Anatomical Record is correcting itself in a big way, pulling 13 articles, including several linked to paper mills. The papers, all by authors in China, were published between 2019 and 2021. Some were flagged in a September 2021 report on research misconduct by the Chinese government. They join a slew of articles The Anatomical … Continue reading
3h
Does environmental stress drive migration?
With the United Nations climate conference in Glasgow, the world is focused on the consequences of a climate crisis and how we can still change course. Yet while climate-driven migration has been deemed a major threat in public discourse and academic research, comprehensive studies that take into account both environmental and social factors globally have been scarce. Now, with the help of machine
5h
'Panicked' response to pandemic made for 'shabby' legislation
A new article co-authored by King's academic Professor Andrew Blick argues that—while there is no doubt that the circumstances of the pandemic called for exceptional safeguarding measures—established contingencies legislation would have served as a better framework.
5h
Regeringen vil fordoble eksport af vandteknologi
PLUS. Vandsektoren har længe forgæves forsøgt at få eksporten til at vokse kraftigt, men nu får man regeringen i ryggen – med en række konkrete tiltag. Branchefolk tager behersket positivt imod eksportstrategien: Vand kan blive det nye vind, mener de.
5h
The creative power of your intuition | Bozoma Saint John
Great ideas are like electricity — they snap into sharp focus and sprint from place to place. What's the best way to capture them? Bozoma Saint John, Chief Marketing Officer at Netflix, makes a compelling case to move away from an overreliance on data when making big decisions — and calls on us all to tap into the power of our intuition and become creative trailblazers.
5h
Comet's intense heat turned sand to glass 12,000 years ago
Around 12,000 years ago, something scorched a vast swath of the Atacama Desert in Chile with heat so intense that it turned the sandy soil into widespread slabs of silicate glass. Now, researchers know what caused the inferno. In a study in Geology , researchers show that samples of the desert glass contain tiny fragments with minerals often found in rocks of extraterrestrial origin. Those minera
6h
Polymer-coated nanoparticles to promote drug delivery to the brain
Treating diseases such as Alzheimer's or Parkinson's is a challenge because drugs have to be able to cross the blood–brain barrier. As a result, the doses administered must be high and only a small fraction reaches the brain, which can lead to significant systemic side effects. To solve this issue, the postdoctoral researcher Jean-Michel Rabanel, under the supervison of Professor Charles Ramassamy
6h
Researchers positive about open science, but there are still obstacles
Eighty-seven percent of all researchers have a (very) positive attitude about open science. Young scientists are even more enthusiastic with a percentage of 94 percent. But researchers are still coming across obstacles when it comes to practical implementation. This has emerged from a poll commissioned by NWO among researchers from all disciplines.
6h
Making entropy production work
While Rolf Landauer was working at IBM in the early 1960s, he had a startling insight about how heat, entropy, and information were connected. Landauer realized that manipulating information releases heat and increases entropy, or the disorder of the environment. He used this to calculate a theoretical lower limit for heat released from a computation, such as erasing a bit. At room temperature, th
6h
Learn Circuit Design For A Discount During This Pre-Black Friday Sale
There are so many fascinating things we can do with electronics today. If you like to look at computers beyond your screens and social media feeds , then the worlds of electronics, programming, and simulation might be of some interest to you. Although, it is easy to fall into the trap of believing that studying such fascinating and high-tech industries would be reserved for wealthy college studen
6h
Next-Generation Very Large Array strongly endorsed by Decadal Survey
The Astronomy and Astrophysics Decadal Survey (Astro2020) of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences has published its report and the Next Generation Very Large Array (ngVLA) received high priority for new ground-based observatories to be constructed during the coming decade. The report, in which ngVLA shared second ranking among ground-based projects, was the culmination of a lengthy process aimed
6h
Young people get less sex ed now than 25 years ago
Only half of young people in the United States are getting sex education that meets minimum standards, according to a new study. While the findings show that adolescents are not receiving critical information, of even greater concern is that a significant percentage of young people don't receive any information about birth control and sexually transmitted disease prevention before they begin to h
7h
African Sahelian farmers diversify crops to adapt to climate change
Farming communities in the African Sahel have adapted their crops to the high seasonal variability and rising temperatures caused by climate change over this past century. This is the main conclusion of a study carried out by the Institute of Environmental Science and Technology of the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (ICTA-UAB), which highlights the importance of environmental knowledge of rural
7h
Strengthening the second law of thermodynamics
According to the second law of thermodynamics, the total entropy of a closed process can increase or stay the same, but never decrease. The second law guarantees, for example, that an egg can wobble off a table and leave a mess on the floor but that such a mess will never spontaneously form an egg and leap back on the table. Or that air will escape a balloon but never, on its own accord, inflate i
7h
This Restaurant Robot Fries Your Food to Perfection With No Human Help
Four and a half years ago, a robot named Flippy made its burger-cooking debut at a fast food restaurant called CaliBurger. The bot consisted of a cart on wheels with an extending arm, complete with a pneumatic pump that let the machine swap between tools: tongs, scrapers, and spatulas. Flippy's main jobs were pulling raw patties from a stack and placing them on the grill, tracking each burger's c
7h
The Origin of the El Dorado Legend | Expedition Unknown
Stream Expedition Unknown on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/expedition-unknown #Discovery #ExpeditionUnknown #ElDorado Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/D
7h
A New Way to Look at the Natural World
For the natural-history writer David George Haskell, a mere sound is enough to identify a tree. Each has a different song—a tune that evolves with the seasons. Now we're in the moment when, as he put it to my colleague Ed Yong in 2016 , you can listen as the "soft leaves of early spring change into the dying ones of autumn." During this time of year, the natural world seems to call for our attent
7h
Demonstration of diamond nuclear spin gyroscope
In a new report now published in Science Advances, Andrey Jarmola and an international research team in physics and materials in the U.S. and Germany demonstrated the function of a rotation sensor based on the Nitrogen-14 (14N) nuclear spins intrinsic to nitrogen-vacancy color centers in diamond. Nitrogen vacancy color centers are formed by nitrogen impurities that sit next to a missing carbon in
7h
My first pet
Nature, Published online: 05 November 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02965-x The needle in a haystack.
7h
Daily briefing: Whaling ripped a huge hole in the ocean's food web
Nature, Published online: 04 November 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03073-6 How whaling devastated a once-rich undersea ecosystem — and how to restore the cycle. Plus, evidence for when masks are most useful against COVID-19, and the super-ambitious ten-year plan for US astronomy.
7h
COVID-19 had a surprising effect on 2020 US election
In the US 2020 presidential election, Donald Trump lost more ground to Joe Biden in counties that experienced fewer COVID-19 cases, a new study shows. The findings run counter to prevalent media narratives that Trump lost the election because of the way he handled the COVID-19 pandemic. Several researchers determined that Trump would have won the electoral vote and lost the popular vote, as he di
7h
Video: Melting glaciers
Glaciers across the globe have lost over nine trillion tons of ice in half a century. How will glaciers look over the coming decades? "It all depends on what humans are doing now in terms of greenhouse gas emissions:" this is the message one scientist delivered during an ESA-led expedition to the Gorner Glacier in Switzerland—one of the biggest ice masses in the Alps.
8h
Winter important for cereal yield
The weather conditions in the winter and during the transitional phases from fall to winter and winter to spring have a significant influence on the yield level of key cereal crops, such as winter barley and winter wheat. These were the findings of a research team of scientists at the Chair of Plant Nutrition at the Technical University of Munich (TUM).
8h
Zoo animals teach lessons about a healthy microbiome
For some years now, life science and medical research has focused on the question of how the microorganisms living in and on a body influence central life processes and thus health and disease of their host organisms. Scientists at Kiel University, among others, have been able to gather numerous hints that suggest that the microbial colonization of the body, the so-called microbiome, and the devel
8h
NASA, Intuitive Machines announce landing site location for lunar drill
In late 2022, NASA will send an ice-mining experiment attached to a robotic lander to the lunar South Pole on a ridge not far from Shackleton crater—a location engineers and scientists have assessed for months. NASA and Intuitive Machines, an agency partner for commercial moon deliveries, announced the location selection Nov. 3.
8h
Environmental policy expert explores the promise of forests to alleviate poverty
More than 100 world leaders have promised to halt and reverse deforestation by 2030, in the first major deal of the 26th United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP26) in Glasgow. Deforestation contributes to global climate change because it means forests can no longer absorb carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas. Ending deforestation is necessary to meet global climate targets, but what might this d
8h
Experts draw up roadmap to avert cooling-generated climate catastrophe
A team of experts including researchers from the World Bank Group and University of Birmingham has developed a roadmap to drive the cooling innovations that could help to avoid climate catastrophe, as increasing heat threatens human health and productivity and rising global demand for cooling further raise the planet's temperatures.
8h
Development of the demonstration satellite HIBARI with variable shape attitude control
A research team led by Professor Saburo Matunaga of the Department of Mechanical Engineering, School of Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech), developed a 50-kg-class technology demonstration microsatellite called HIBARI that denotes "skylark" in English. The purpose of this satellite is the on-orbit demonstration of Variable Shape Attitude Control (VSAC) technology where attitud
8h
Scientists cheer India's ambitious carbon-zero climate pledge
Nature, Published online: 05 November 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03044-x India's 2070 goal could help limit global warming to 1.5 °C, say researchers — but it will require the nation to juggle steep emissions cuts with lifting a significant proportion of its population out of poverty.
8h
How sea stars get their symmetry
In a paper published Nov. 4 in the journal Current Biology, Zak Swartz, a postdoctoral researcher at Whitehead Institute, along with researchers in the lab of Whitehead Institute Member Iain Cheeseman and collaborators at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), the University of Miami, and the Marine Biological Laboratory Embryology Course delve into the origins of the initial polarity in
8h
Questioning the ethics of collecting endangered insects for study
"I have developed a real passion for a midge," said Valeria Lencioni in an interview with GlacierHub. The midge in question, Diamesa steinboecki, is a highly endangered insect that she observed in the glacial streams of the Italian Alps where she conducts her research. When she started studying glacial fauna in 1996, little was known about the insects that populated the icy habitats. Lencioni help
8h