Search Posts

Nyheder2021november07

Tegn abonnement på BioNyt!

Vil du hjælpe med at udpege vigtigste nyheder? DO YOU WANT TO HELP CHOOSE THE MOST IMPORTANT SCIENCE NEWS? Email: bionyt@gmail.com Phone-sms: (45)21729908

Why did glacial cycles intensify a million years ago? Researchers find clues on the bed of the Atlantic Ocean
Something big happened to the planet about a million years ago. There was a major shift in the response of Earth's climate system to variations in our orbit around the Sun. The shift is called the Mid-Pleistocene Transition. Before the MPT, cycles between glacial (colder) and interglacial (warmer) periods happened every 41,000 years. After the MPT, glacial periods became more intense—intense enoug
3h
Operando magnetic resonance imaging for mapping of temperature and redox species in thermo-electrochemical cells
Nature Communications, Published online: 08 November 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26813-8 Devices able to harvest heat to generate electricity are intensively studied for sustainable energy production. Here, the authors investigate the mechanism of thermo-electrochemical cells via operando magnetic resonance imaging.
12h

LATEST

Scientists Detect "Tsunami" of Gravitational Waves
When two black holes — or one black hole and a neutron star — get sucked in to each other, they generate one of the most violent and energetic events in the known universe. These events called gravitational waves were famously first predicted by Albert Einstein, who suggested that the energy released would be so large they could disrupt the space-time continuum itself. Since detecting the very fi
2h
Researchers at the brink of fusion ignition at National Ignition Facility
After decades of inertial confinement fusion research, a record yield of more than 1.3 megajoules (MJ) from fusion reactions was achieved in the laboratory for the first time during an experiment at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) National Ignition Facility (NIF) on Aug. 8, 2021. These results mark an 8-fold improvement over experiments conducted in spring 2021 and a 25-fold increa
11h
Micro-scale current sheets unleash macro-scale space weather
While movies show Earth as existing in a calm, pristine corner of the universe, in reality the near-Earth space environment is dangerous and dynamic. On any given day, hot charged particles and blobs of plasma, called the solar wind, travel from the sun and are deflected by the Earth's magnetic field, causing beautiful aurora around north and south poles. During solar storms, however, the solar wi
11h
Weak coupling shows flaw in strange metal model
Planckian metals have the potential to power high-temperature superconductors, quantum computers and a host of other next-generation technologies. However, these "strange" metals—in which electrical resistance increases linearly with temperature—are notoriously difficult to study, let alone comprehend.
6h
Record number of new gravitational waves offers game-changing window into universe
Scientists say 35 novel discoveries included a pair of massive black holes 145 times as heavy as the sun orbiting each other Download the free Guardian app ; get our morning email briefing Astronomers have detected a record number of gravitational waves, in a discovery they say will shed light on the evolution of the universe, and the life and death of stars. An international team of scientists h
22h
NASA Astronaut Says He Almost Drowned During Spacewalk
Former NASA astronaut Garrett Reisman says he feared he was going to drown during a spacewalk, when a malfunction threatened to fill his spacesuit helmet with water. "Astronaut Tip #217: Make sure your bite valve is firmly attached to your water bag straw," he tweeted this week . "When I saw mine float by INSIDE my helmet I was less than thrilled at the thought of becoming the first astronaut to
1d
Saturday Night Live Turns the Big Lie Into a Big Farce
In late October 2020, just before the election that would remove Donald Trump from office and install his Big Lie , Saturday Night Live aired a fake public-service announcement . "Do we want four more years of Donald Trump, or a fresh start with Joe Biden?" the show's cast members asked. "Can we survive four more years of scandal, name-calling, and racial division?" But then the ad took a turn. "
1d
Sutton Hoo of the north: £10.4m visitor centre to celebrate Anglo-Saxon site
Story of Ad Gefrin, a royal complex in Northumberland valley discovered in 1950s, to be told at new attraction "Just here would have been the great hall," says Chris Ferguson to a Guardian reporter and a dozen indifferent sheep chewing grass in a stunning Northumberland valley. "Over there would have been the royal residence and behind that, a grandstand. We are on top of one of the most importan
1d
Will the magic of psychedelics transform psychiatry?
Psychedelics have come a long way since their hallucinogenic hippy heyday. Research shows that they could alleviate PTSD, depression and addiction. So will we all soon be treated with magic mushrooms and MDMA? Imagine a medicine that could help people process disturbing memories, sparking behavioural changes rather than merely burying and suppressing symptoms and trauma. For the millions suffering
1d
Where Biden Goes From Here
A s Air Force One flew home over the Atlantic on Election Night, the televisions scattered throughout the plane were showing a miserable scenario for Joe Biden's party. No White House staffers ventured back to the press cabin, a fairly routine practice on long flights. The president's aides appeared grim . A weary Biden returned to the White House close to 2 a.m. and ignored shouted questions fro
1d
Covid live news: 'Get booster to save Christmas,' UK health secretary urges; sharp rise in German infections
Three million more in England to be invited to get booster next week ; Germany reports 23,543 new cases reported in past 24 hours For returned Australians, open borders bring new dilemmas Those eligible for boosters to be invited a month earlier in England Experts on their worst pandemic predictions Relief and reunions in sight as US finally lifts Covid travel restrictions See all our coronavirus
1d
There's a Reason Elon Musk Is Suddenly Desperate to Sell Tesla Stock
Tax Bomb Tesla CEO Elon Musk made a wildly unexpected splash over the weekend when he announced that he would make a decision on whether or not to sell roughly $21 billion in Tesla stock based on the results of a Twitter poll — which ended with the majority of people voting for him to sell. Despite Musk suggesting that he was selling the stock in order to " pay taxes personally ," his move still
5h
The Brain Can Recall and Reawaken Past Immune Responses
Dogs that habitually hear a bell at chow time become classically conditioned to drool at the mere chime, as the physiologist Ivan Pavlov showed in the 1890s: Their brains learn to associate the bell with food and instruct the salivary glands to respond accordingly. More than a century later, in a paper published today in Cell, the neuroimmunologist Asya Rolls has shown that a similar kind of… S
7h
'Massage breaks the pain cycle': the return of touch – after almost two years without it
For many people, social distancing and lockdowns left them bereft of physical contact. Here, touch experts explain why it is so essential and what we lost in its absence In a pandemic that has meant keeping 2 metres away from one another whenever possible, it appears that physical contact is beginning to return. Even handshakes are making a comeback: one poll found younger people were shaking han
13h
The Soul in Cousin Greg's Linguistic Blunders
This story contains spoilers through the fourth episode of Succession Season 3. It's morning in New York, and Greg Hirsch has been summoned to the home of his great-uncle, Logan Roy. Greg, despite the hour, is having a drink. (Logan had insisted; flustered, Greg had asked for a rum and Coke.) He hadn't expected the breakfast booze to be so potent. Greg deals with this situation as he deals with m
17h
'How long can you maintain it?' Cost of Taiwan's pursuit of Covid zero starts to show
The island, once a pandemic success story, is effectively closed off to the world and despite the toll on tourism, trade and lifestyle there is no plan to reopen See all our coronavirus coverage At a beachside bar at the southern tip of Taiwan, a handful of visitors in swimwear and bare feet mill around the open air deck, enjoying the warm midweek night, cheap beer, lack of crowds, and zero Covid
20h
'Extraordinarily rare': intact 1,200-year-old canoe recovered from Wisconsin lake
The 15-foot dugout canoe was first noticed by a maritime archeologist and her friend while joyriding on underwater scooters A 1,200-year-old, 15-foot (4.5-metre) dugout canoe has been taken from Lake Mendota in Madison, Wisconsin , after two divers stumbled upon it while riding underwater scooters. The vessel was recovered from roughly 27ft of water and brought to shore this week . Continue readi
1d
If the super-rich want to live for ever our planet is truly doomed | John Harris
Instead of investing to cheat death, we should be trying to make old age livable and dignified for all Welcome to the era of immortalists : scientists, dreamers and – crucially – billionaires, who want us to think of age as a curable disease, and our final end as something that could be indefinitely postponed. According to one estimate , the revenues of the global anti-ageing industry will increa
1d
SpaceX Workers Spotted Doing Pullups Near Top of Mechazilla Tower
Reps for Elon Several workers on top of SpaceX's new Mechazilla were spotted doing some pullups — a workout with a spectacular view, from around 400 feet above Texas. As seen in footage captured by SpaceX fan and broadcaster Lab Padre, at least three engineers took turns getting some reps in, perhaps a way to keep up morale, shake off a case of the Mondays, or impress the team lead — though we'll
1h
Ted Cruz Furious at Children's TV Character After Big Bird Promotes COVID Vaccine
Texas Senator Ted Cruz is no stranger to taking Ls on Twitter, but he might have outdone himself this time, when he took aim at none other than Big Bird — yes, of "Sesame Street" fame — for promoting the COVID vaccine. It all started when the beloved character sent out an anodyne tweet announcing that he had gotten the vaccine on Saturday, posting that his "wing is a little sore, but it'll give m
3h
The Infant's Eyes
Now that I too am the terrible witness to the ovum and I have been wrestled to the ground with her fresh bread and dirt breath and have been the laughing maniac of motherhood now I will always rise and go to see what is wrong like a cardinal to the pope. Whenever something sounds from upstairs I'll rush up or out or in to see what is what whether anyone is hurt or in need then I will putter back
1d
America's Most Destructive Habit
Although the United States was born of a revolution, one common view maintains that the Constitution tamed our rebellious impulse and launched a distinctly nonrevolutionary political experiment. But throughout American history, an important strand of conservatism has repeatedly championed rebellions—or what are better understood as counterrevolutions. They emerge like clockwork: Each time politic
1d
E-Bikes Are Absolutely Crushing Electric Cars in Sales
Sales Dominance The best selling electric vehicles aren't electric cars — instead, they're electric bicycles. In fact, a recent report from The New York Times found that Americans bought roughly half a million e-bikes in 2020. For comparison, they bought just 231,000 electric cars during that same time period — and that's a big deal, from an infrastructure point of view, at a moment when policyma
1h
Parents Still Have a Thanksgiving Problem
For many, many months now, 7-year-old Alain Bell has been keeping a very ambitious list of the things he wants to do after he gets his COVID-19 shots : travel (to Disneyworld or Australia, ideally); play more competitive basketball; go to "any restaurants that have french fries, which are my favorite food," he told me over the phone. These are very good kid goals, and they are, at last, in sight.
8h
What the heck happened to The BMJ?
Last week, The BMJ published an "exposé" by Paul Thacker alleging patient unblinding, data falsification, and other wrongdoing by a company running three sites for the massive clinical trial of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine. It was a highly biased story embraced by antivaxxers, with a deceptively framed narrative and claims not placed into proper context, leading me to look into the broader questio
15h
Starwatch: how to see the Leonids meteor shower
They take their name from the constellation Leo and can be spotted from 6 to 30 November This week, Starwatch is some advance warning for next week's peak of the Leonid meteor shower. The shower is under way now as it lasts from 6 to 30 November. The peak activity this year is expected in the early morning of 17 November. The chart shows the view from London at midnight as 16 turns into 17 Novemb
17h
Tesla Self-Driving Update Caused Cars to Behave Dangerously
It's not every day that Tesla decides to contact regulators about a serious issue with its self-driving software. Late last month, Tesla reported an issue with its Full Self-Driving software to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), officially recalling nearly 12,000 affected vehicles. The timing of the recall couldn't be worse for the company, as The Washington Post points o
4h
"A grim outlook": How cyber surveillance is booming on a global scale
The increasing overlap between the world's arms trade and the secretive surveillance industry risks damaging US national security and will create the potential for even more abuse unless more accountability is introduced, according to a new study. The research , from the American think tank the Atlantic Council, offers one of the most thorough accountings ever assembled of a booming, cross-contin
10h
Can 3.5 Percent Save the Planet?
Although world leaders were gathered in Glasgow for the United Nations Climate Change Conference last week, Greta Thunberg said change wouldn't be coming from within the summit's halls. "That is not leadership— this is leadership," Thunberg said of, and to, her fellow activists. "This is what leadership looks like." The way many environmental campaigners, including Thunberg, see it, they are the
11h
Integrating hot cores and cool edges in fusion reactors
Future fusion reactors have a conundrum: maintain a plasma core that is hotter than the surface of the sun without melting the walls that contain the plasma. Fusion scientists refer to this challenge as "core-edge integration." Researchers working at the DIII-D National Fusion Facility at General Atomics have recently tackled this problem in two ways: the first aims to make the fusion core even ho
11h
Visualizing the microscopic world of fast ions in fusion devices
The U.S. scientific community is currently conceptualizing the first nuclear fusion power plants, which will revolutionize energy production. Like the sun and stars, a fusion power plant will produce energy by fusing light elements, like hydrogen, into heavier ones, like helium, at temperatures higher than 25 million F. Fusing hydrogen to produce helium releases about 4 million times more energy t
11h
Enormous cost of relocating US climate refugees from coastal town a stark example for the whole world, researchers warn
The town of Tangier on Tangier Island, Chesapeake Bay, has lost 62% of its original habitable upland area since 1967, a new study has found. It will see further decline within the next 15-30 years, leaving hundreds of people without homes and income. The researchers estimate that fully protecting and restoring the town would cost roughly between $250m and $350m. The case of Tangier is a prime exam
14h
Whole genome sequencing can improve childhood cancer outcomes – study
'Game-changing' research finds unravelling genetic codes in children with cancer could lead to better diagnosis and treatment Reading the full genetic code of childhood cancers can help doctors improve diagnoses, understand how tumours will grow, and find the most effective therapies, according to a pilot study. Doctors in Cambridge used whole-genome sequencing on 36 children with cancer and foun
17h
We can be confident there have been far more than 5 million global Covid deaths | David Spiegelhalter and Anthony Masters
Estimating 'excess' fatalities, a more robust analysis method, puts the pandemic's grim toll between 10m and 19m people • Coronavirus – latest updates • See all our coronavirus coverage On 1 November, news organisations reported the global Covid-19 death toll had exceeded 5 million. But, as these articles highlight, this figure is likely to be a massive underestimate. Johns Hopkins University coll
1d
The dawn of tappigraphy: does your smartphone know how you feel before you do?
Tech companies are seeking to analyse data on the way we tap, scroll, text and call to monitor our mental health – with potential consequences for privacy and healthcare We all fear our smartphones spy on us, and I'm subject to a new type of surveillance. An app called TapCounter records each time I touch my phone's screen. My swipes and jabs are averaging about 1,000 a day, though I notice that'
1d
The Forgotten Secret of Trump's Success
Democrats are still licking their wounds from defeats in last week's elections in Virginia, New Jersey, and elsewhere. Some are calling for the party to refocus on popular moderate policies. Perhaps that's the most realistic path forward; it's the formula that top Republicans settled on following their own stinging electoral defeat in 2012. But instead of following its party leadership's prescrip
9h
Erdoğan's War on Truth
Five years ago, I went to bed a scholar and woke up the perpetrator of a coup. With no evidence, the government of Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan has formally charged and prosecuted me for inciting the failed 2016 coup. A warrant has been issued for my arrest. I am part of a large and expanding group of alleged co-conspirators, the most famous of whom, Osman Kavala, one of Turkey's most p
9h
How Easily Can Vaccinated People Spread COVID?
The fear of breakthrough COVID-19 infections spoiled the summer. In the early days of vaccine bliss, many Americans had thought that the shots were a ticket to normalcy—and at least for a while, that's precisely what public-health experts were telling us: Sure, it was still possible for vaccinated people to get COVID-19, but you wouldn't have to worry much about spreading it to anyone else. Inter
2h
SpaceX delays astronauts' return due to weather – cutting time without a toilet
International Space Station crew completing six-month stay Capsule problems mean astronauts must wear diapers to fly High wind off the Florida coast prompted SpaceX to delay the return of four astronauts who have been in orbit at the International Space Station since spring. The good news for the American, French and Japanese astronauts was that their return is now projected to take eight hours r
1d
Key witness helps scientists detect 'spooky' quantum entanglement in solid materials
Quantum entanglement occurs when two particles appear to communicate without a physical connection, a phenomenon Albert Einstein famously called "spooky action at a distance." Nearly 90 years later, a team led by the U.S. Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory demonstrated the viability of a "quantum entanglement witness" capable of proving the presence of entanglement between magnet
6h
Discovery of segmented Fermi surface induced by Cooper pair momentum on a hybrid material platform
In a new report now published in Science, primary authors Zhen Zhu, Michal Papaj, and an international research team in physics, materials science, and condensed matter at the Jiao Tong University, China, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, U.S., and the Chinese Academy of Sciences discovered the Fermi surface of supercurrent-induced quasiparticles in a superconducting system for the first time
8h
How to photograph the moon on your phone or camera with the right settings
Guardian Australia picture editor Carly Earl explains the dos and don'ts of taking pictures of the moon When a full moon rises, many people will pull out their mobile phones to try and taken an Instagram-worthy picture, but unfortunately the moon is really challenging to get a great photo of. Two reasons: it is very far away and unless you have a telephoto lens (which makes the moon appear closer
17h
Calling all 'fusioneers'! New US fusion energy website launches
The U.S. Fusion Outreach Team, a grassroots organization in the fusion community focused on reducing barriers to outreach efforts, has launched a new centralized website to engage an expanding workforce, media, educators, and the public in the journey toward a world powered by fusion energy.
11h
Nearby galaxy cluster Abell 1569 inspected by researchers
Using data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, Indian astronomers have inspected a nearby galaxy cluster known as Abell 1569. Results of the study, published October 29 on arXiv.org, deliver important insights into the properties of this cluster and its intracluster medium.
7h
Tiny grains, severe damage: Hypervelocity dust impacts on a spacecraft produce plasma explosions and debris clouds
The Parker Solar Probe spacecraft, NASA's newest and most ambitious effort to study the sun, has broken a lot of records: it has gotten closer to the sun than any other spacecraft to date, its instruments have operated at the hottest temperatures, and the probe is the fastest human-made object ever. But those records come at a cost: The spacecraft is moving so fast that running into even a tiny gr
11h
In Colorado, Locals Question a Critical-Mineral Survey
A USGS program called Earth MRI aims to identify U.S. geological formations across the country that could contain critical minerals, useful for everything from cell phones to weapons, and usually sourced overseas. In one small Colorado town, the project is making some residents wary.
12h
How To Fix Email … With Science!
Email isn't broken—it's the people who are the problem. But if you start treating it like old-fashioned snail mail, suddenly it makes sense again.
11h
The pandemic has been challenging for children, but if we stop and listen, we can find out what they need | Saretta Lee
Kids usually have something to say and they need us to hear it. So it's time to start listening – for their future and ours The modern mind is a column where experts discuss mental health issues they are seeing in their work In nearly two years of lockdown interruptions, I've often been asked for my professional opinion about the impact of Covid-19 measures on children. A great many views have be
1d
Scientists' project increased risk to water supplies in South Africa this century
In 2018, Cape Town, South Africa's second most populous city, came very close to running out of water as the multi-year "Day Zero" drought depleted its reservoirs. Since then, researchers from Stanford University determined that climate change had made this extreme drought five to six times more likely, and warned that a lot more Day Zero events could occur in regions with similar climates in the
9h
Netflix's Passing Is an Unusually Gentle Movie About a Brutal Subject
Passing looks like a daydream. Set in Manhattan at the height of the Harlem Renaissance, the film is shot in sumptuous black-and-white. The soft focus of the lens distorts the frame's edges. Hazy imagery—a fluttering curtain here, sunlight peeking through tree branches there—often fills the screen. And the story at the center appears mellow: Two women, Irene (played by Tessa Thompson) and Clare (
2h
Cop26: can our seas save us?
The Science Weekly podcast is in Glasgow, where we are bringing listeners daily episodes from Cop26. Each morning you will hear from one of the Guardian's award-winning environment team. Today, the Guardian's biodiversity reporter, Phoebe Weston, talks to one of the world's leading marine ecologists, Dr Enric Sala, about the role our oceans can play in preventing climate catastrophe Last week, Pa
18h
Fluorescent dot synthesis gets an eco-friendly 'glow up'
Fluorescent "dots"—that is, tiny particles that can emit light—have a multitude of promising biomedical applications, from helping clinicians to better identify tumor margins to delivering a drug deep in the body. However, making such dots is usually a long and tedious process that uses harsh chemicals. Now, NIBIB-funded researchers are developing a fluorescent dot that is not only easier to make,
8h
Planetologists investigate origin of heavy bombardment of the moon 3.9 billion years ago
The moon was exposed to a heavy bombardment of asteroids 3.9 billion years ago. The origin of this bombardment, however, was previously unclear. Planetologists at Münster University have now tested these hypotheses with very precise isotope measurements of lunar rocks. Their conclusion: The bombardment of the moon goes back to continuous impacts of asteroids left over from the main phase of the Ea
2h
Space Station Astronaut Captures Incredible Photo of Solar Flare Hitting Earth
Strongest Auroras European Space Agency astronaut Thomas Pesquet was able to spot this year's super intense solar storm from the International Space Station — and snap at least one beautiful photo. The rare event saw our planet's atmosphere bombarded with the Sun's highly charged particles as enters a particularly active part of its solar cycle. The space weather also triggers some gorgeous natur
37min
Can I increase my intelligence?
So for about two years I have been trying to scrape up the small amounts of information I can on IQ increasing and how to be smarter. At this current moment I don't think there is a firm grasp of how it works and so I realised that I might as well ask some people around and see whether they know anything. Look, I don't want to sound like a dick (which I probably will) but I just want a yes or no
43min
Blood plasma protein fibrinogen interacts directly with nerve cells to cause brain inflammation
Before soluble fibrinogen, a blood plasma protein, is converted into insoluble fibrin molecules that can toxically accumulate outside blood vessels in the brain, fibrinogen connects directly with neurons and can cause a damaging inflammatory reaction, a research team reports. Their discovery may help identify new therapeutic targets for neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and tr
1h
Diet restricted size of hunter-gatherer societies
Short growing seasons limited the possible size of hunter-gatherer societies by forcing people to rely on meat, according to a recent study. After looking at population size for the roughly 300 hunter-gatherer societies which existed until quite recently, the researchers found that many of these groups were much smaller than might have been expected from the local ecosystem productivity. In region
1h
Why older adults have a higher risk of severe COVID-19
A new study uncovers the cellular mechanism and molecular events that explain why some people, including the elderly, have a higher risk of COVID-19 infection as well as of severe side effects and death. Those at higher risk also include patients with preexisting medical conditions including diabetes, hypertension, obesity, metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease, and chronic lung diseases lik
1h
How prolonged radiation exposure damages nuclear reactors
New research from Texas A&M University scientists could help in boosting the efficiency of nuclear power plants in the near future. By using a combination of physics-based modeling and advanced simulations, they found the key underlying factors that cause radiation damage to nuclear reactors, which could then provide insight into designing more radiation-tolerant, high-performance materials.
1h
Hunting for alien planets with a new solar telescope
Thousands of alien worlds are known to orbit stars beyond our solar system. And many more worlds, possibly harboring life, lie waiting to be discovered. A new astronomical instrument called NEID, the NN-explore Exoplanet Investigations with Doppler spectroscopy, has come online in 2021 to help scientists hunt for new alien worlds.
1h
Best 3D Printers for Every Kind of Project
Whether you're a hobbyist or a pro designing large-scale models, the things you can create with the best 3D printers are virtually limitless. 3D printing is an innovative technology that eliminates the need for traditional molding, forging, and sculpting techniques by using a process called additive manufacturing. Instead, 3D models are constructed very similarly to how an inkjet printer works by
1h
Super speed, magnetic levitation and the vision behind the hyperloop | Josh Giegel
What if your hour-long commute was reduced to just minutes? That's the promise of the hyperloop: a transit system designed around a pod that zooms through a vacuum-sealed space (roughly the size of a subway tunnel) at hyper-speed, powered by next-generation batteries and state-of-the-art magnetic levitation. In the visionary talk, Josh Giegel, the hyperloop's very first passenger, shares how this
2h
COVID-19 has a negative influence on prosocial behavior, finds study
COVID-19 has particularly negative effects on people who come from economically weaker and less educated backgrounds, especially when we look at health, job security and education—this is shown by figures and studies from recent months. How the coronavirus pandemic affects prosocial behavior, on the other hand, is still largely unknown. A group of economic researchers led by Matthias Sutter has no
2h
Popular heart failure drug may not work better than cheaper version
A widely used heart failure drug named sacubitril/valsartan is no better than valsartan alone in patients with severe heart failure, according to a new study. The study also provides evidence that the treatment with valsartan may be slightly safer for patients with advanced heart failure. "The findings of the trial were really surprising to us." Heart failure is one of the leading causes of hospi
2h
Researchers discover first dinosaur species that lived on Greenland 214 million years ago
The two-legged dinosaur Issi saaneq lived about 214 million years ago in what is now Greenland. It was a medium-sized, long-necked herbivore and a predecessor of the sauropods, the largest land animals ever to live. It was discovered by an international team of researchers from Portugal, Denmark and Germany, including the Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU). The name of the new dinosau
2h
In a laboratory experiment, researchers simulate alternative hydrocarbon formation through reduction of acetic acid
Hydrocarbons, which are an essential component of crude oil and natural gas, form under pressure and high temperatures in the deep ocean floor. In the Guaymas Basin in the Gulf of California, researchers have detected hydrocarbon gas patterns that could not have been generated by known formation pathways. In their study, which has now been published in the journal Proceedings of the National Acade
2h
Air quality in Eindhoven, Netherlands significantly improves with 'Lungs of the City'
The air quality in many parts of Europe and the Netherlands does not meet the advisory values of the World Health Organization (WHO). However, the smart integration of air purification technology at polluting hotspots in public spaces can substantially reduce fine dust concentrations in cities. This is the conclusion of the Eindhoven University of Technology, ENS Clean Air, Air Liquide, and the mu
2h
New study pinpoints likely path of COVID-related plastic waste in the ocean
Around the world, the COVID-19 pandemic has led to an increased demand for single-use plastics such as face masks, gloves, and face shields. The resulting waste, some of which ends up in rivers and oceans, is intensifying pressure on an already out-of-control global plastic problem. While many researchers suspect there will be a massive influx of COVID-related mismanaged plastic waste, a new study
3h
Politik mot corona drabbar kvinnorna
Ländernas insatser för att hantera covid 19-pandemin har drabbat jämställdheten i Europa. – Vår analys visar att kvinnor missgynnats inom alla områden, säger Sofia Strid, genusvetare vid Örebro universitet. – Politiken under pandemin har lett till att kvinnor har tvingats tillbaka och ta ett oproportionerligt stort obetalt ansvar för att ta hand om barn, gamla och alla andra med behov av omsorg,
3h
Converting methane to methanol — with and without water
Chemists have been searching for efficient catalysts to convert methane into methanol. Adding water to the reaction can address certain challenges, but it also complicates the process. Now a team has identified a new approach using a common industrial catalyst that can complete the conversion effectively both with and without water. The findings suggest strategies for improving catalysts for the w
3h
Warming temperatures increasingly alter structure of atmosphere
Climate change is having an increasing impact on the structure of Earth's atmosphere, a new international study shows. The research draws on decades of observations to quantify that warming temperatures are playing a greater role in pushing up the top of the lowest level of the atmosphere by about 50-60 meters per decade.
3h
Stem cells do not (only) play dice
In just a few weeks a completely new organism develops from a fertilized egg cell. The real miracle is that a bunch of identical stem cells turns into completely different, specialized cell types. A team has now been able to show that the specialization of individual cells during embryonic development is not, as previously assumed, exclusively left to chance but is rather determined by cell commun
3h
Air pollution disproportionally affects people of color, lower-income residents in DC
The rates of death and health burdens associated with air pollution are borne unequally and inequitably by people of color and those with lower household income and educational attainment in Washington, D.C., according to a new study. The study found that while deaths and health burdens associated with PM2.5 halved between 2000 and 2018 in the D.C. area, disparities and geographical segregations i
3h
Storing energy in plants with electronic roots
By watering bean plants (Phaseolus vulgaris) with a solution that contains conjugated oligomers, researchers at the Laboratory of Organic Electronics, Linköping University, Sweden, have shown that the roots of the plant become electrically conducting and can store energy.
3h
Sitting more linked to increased feelings of depression, anxiety
During the initial COVID-19 outbreak in March 2020, a lot of people suddenly became more sedentary as they adhered to stay-at-home orders or opted to self-isolate. Recently published research found people who continued to spend a higher amount of time sitting in the weeks following were likely to have higher symptoms of depression. A closer investigation into this association could play a role in
3h
Humor mot vardagsrasism i äldreomsorgen
"Jag säger det de sitter och tänker, så kan de inte säga det. Och då skrattar alla". Humor är ett viktigt verktyg för att hantera vardagsrasism på jobbet, visar en studie med personal inom äldreomsorgen. – Vardagsrasism är något som pågår varenda dag, hela tiden. Det handlar inte om direkta glåpord och hatuttryck, utan det är små kommentarer eller handlingar som är inbyggda i en vardaglig interak
3h
Galectin-1 linked to increased risk of type 2 diabetes
Researchers now associate elevated levels of the protein galectin-1 with increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes about 18 years later. At the same time, this protein seems to be a protective factor for the kidneys among type 2 diabetes patients at high risk for diabetic nephropathy.
4h
Healing skin ischemia-reperfusion injuries with interleukin-36 receptor antagonists
Skin wounds from ischemia-reperfusion injuries — tissue damage caused by blood returning to tissues after a period of oxygen deprivation — may not heal appropriately in some patients, owing to elusive underlying immunological mechanisms. Scientists from Japan have now succeeded in proposing a means to solve this medical conundrum by understanding the role of interleukin-36 receptor antagonists a
4h
Driving through defense ups risk of ACL tears for NBA players
NBA players who like to drive through the defense line to shoot the basketball are more likely to suffer ACL tears, according to a new study. While that may not be surprising to basketball fans whose favorite players have suffered the injury—including the Golden State Warriors' Klay Thompson in the 2019 National Basketball Association finals—the study also finds that those who return to play afte
4h
The Family Builds a Zipline and Looks for Gold | Alaskan Bush People
Stream Full Episodes of Alaskan Bush People: https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/alaskan-bush-people #Discovery #AlaskanBushPeople #OffGrid Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.co
4h
Peter Pharoah obituary
My father, Peter Pharoah , who has died aged 87 from dementia, was a professor of public health whose work eradicated iodine deficiency in Papua New Guinea and furthered understanding of the causes of cerebral palsy and perinatal death. Peter was son of two teachers, Phyllis (nee Gahan) and Oswald Pharoah. Born in Ranchi, India, he attended schools in Lovedale and Sanawar. After the death of his
5h
How win-win narratives stand in the way of effective progress
The success of a global circular economy is critically dependent on effective cooperation between influential countries. A joint Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) on circular economy, signed by China and the EU in 2018, attracted high hopes—and corresponding optimistic narratives. A research team led by Anran Luo from the Chair of Social Transformation and Circular Economy at the Institute of Envi
5h
Electronic dating violence starts as early as 12
Electronic dating violence, including electronic harassment, coercion, and monitoring, starts increasing in preadolescence but curves as teens reach young adulthood, according to a new study. Researchers looked at the three behaviors in students in two age groups (12-15 and 15-18) to determine how they experienced electronic dating violence. Electronic harassment includes messaging, calling, and
5h
Air-scrubbing machines gain momentum, but long way to go
On a field ringed by rolling green hills in Iceland, fans attached to metal structures that look like an industrial-sized Lego project are spinning. Their mission is to scrub the atmosphere by sucking carbon dioxide from the air and storing it safely underground.
5h
High cell membrane tension constrains the spread of cancer
The membranes of cancer cells are more pliant than the membranes of normal cells. A research collaboration has discovered that cancer invasion and migration can be supressed in mice by manipulating the stiffness of the cell membrane. Hopefully this will contribute towards the development of new treatments that target the physical characteristics of cancer cells.
5h
Nyupptäckt kemi kan användas för avloppsrening
En oväntad kemisk reaktion i aerosoler kan komma till nytta inom industrin, till exempel för avloppsrening. När ammoniumsulfat löses upp på vattenlöslig partikelyta, så kan det skapa en katalytisk effekt. – Det var en överraskning att se reaktionen inträffa, säger Göteborgsforskaren Xiangrui Kong. I atmosfären spelar gaser och aerosolpartiklar betydelsefulla roller för kemin. Deras växelverkan på
6h
Materials advancement accelerates the realization of AI technology
Researchers in Korea succeeded in developing a core material for the next-generation neuromorphic (neural network imitation) semiconductor for the first time in the country. This is a result of a research team led by Dr. Jung-dae Kwon and Yong-hun Kim of the Department of Energy and Electronic Materials of the Korea Institute of Materials Science, together with Professor Byungjin Cho's research te
6h
Oral B Genius X review
The Oral B Genius X is a powerful, Bluetooth-enabled electric toothbrush that allows users to get the most out of every brushing session.
6h
Can emotional support lower veterans' suicide risk?
A greater sense of optimism about life and emotional support from loved ones may lower veterans' risk of developing suicidal thoughts, a new study shows. The suicide rate among US military veterans is nearly twice as high as that of the general population, and numerous studies have tried to explain why. In recent years, for instance, scientists have identified many genes associated with suicidal
7h
Smart focus on Mars
From panoramas to close-ups, from 3D maps to a wheel selfie, the Earth-bound twin of ESA's Rosalind Franklin rover is testing the wide range of photo settings that will deliver the greatest science possible during the ExoMars mission on the Red Planet.
7h
Proton transfer between titania surface and dye observed for photocatalysis evaluation
Photocatalysts are an essential component of hydrogen production through water-splitting. Scientists at Shinshu University and Georgia Institute of Technology worked on improving a titania surface study previously published in 2020. Hydrophilicity of the surface of titania photocatalysts is improved during ultraviolet (UV) light irradiation. It has long been predicted that basic surface hydroxyl g
7h
Guazia, the earliest winged seed without cupule
In a paper published in National Science Review, a Chinese group of palaeobotanists described a new genus and species of Late Devonian ovule (seed before fertilization), Guazia dongzhiensis gen. et sp. nov., which is borne terminally and has folded, wing-like integumentary lobes but no cupule. G. dongzhiensis presents evidence for Devonian acupulate ovules (ovules without a cupule) and specialized
7h
Why the world needs a better LED light bulb
Light bulbs are a big upgrade from fires and candles. Every year, homes in informal settlements burn down in Africa because of fires used for heating and lighting. So electrical light bulbs with filaments brought about a revolution at home and work.
7h
Planetary evolution reveals a volatile history
Just as human beings and all other living things exist in a vast number of forms thanks to their genetic makeup, so different types of planets occur due to the chemical processes at work in the dusty regions surrounding newborn stars.
7h
NASA selects new mission to study storms, impacts on climate models
NASA has selected a new Earth science mission that will study the behavior of tropical storms and thunderstorms, including their impacts on weather and climate models. The mission will be a collection of three SmallSats, flying in tight coordination, called Investigation of Convective Updrafts (INCUS), and is expected to launch in 2027 as part of NASA's Earth Venture Program.
7h
Why teapots always drip
The "teapot effect" has been threatening spotless white tablecloths for ages: if a liquid is poured out of a teapot too slowly, then the flow of liquid sometimes does not detach itself from the teapot, finding its way into the cup, but dribbles down at the outside of the teapot.
7h
How random is stem cell development?
In just a few weeks a completely new organism develops from a fertilized egg cell. The real miracle is that a bunch of identical stem cells turns into completely different, specialized cell types. A team led by Christian Schröter, group leader at the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Physiology in Dortmund, has now been able to show that the specialization of individual cells during embryonic deve
7h
Exploring how antibiotics penetrate Gram-negative bacterial cell walls
Scientists have labored for decades to find antibiotics that work against Gram-negative bacteria, which cause some of the deadliest infections in hospital settings and are most likely to be resistant to treatment with existing antibiotics. In a study reported in the journal Chemical Science, researchers developed a new method to determine how antibiotics with specific chemical properties thread th
7h
Climate benefits from modest dips in oil demand likely underestimated
A decreasing reliance on oil for fuel will inevitably decrease the amount of carbon released into the atmosphere throughout the fuel's lifecycle, from extraction and refining to combustion as it's used by consumers. However, the size of that impact varies depending on market factors that until now have not been fully modeled.
7h
Taxi till hållplatsen kan öka kollektivtrafiken på landet
Ring efter en bil som kör dig till bussen – och det ingår i bussbiljetten. Det kan vara lösningen där det är långt till hållplatserna och många kör egen bil. Modellen kan öka användandet av kollektivtrafiken. Men det finns stora utmaningar. Hur kan så kallat anropsstyrd kollektivtrafik förbättra servicen i områden där det är svårt att bedriva lönsam kollektivtrafik med tätt mellan avgångstidern?
7h
El Niño can leave more children hungry than COVID did
A single bad El Niño weather event can leave nearly 6 million children undernourished, according to a new study. That's at least 70%—and perhaps up to three times—the number of children who have gone hungry because of the COVID-19 pandemic. El Niño events cause weather patterns to shift across the tropics, leading to widespread impacts on agriculture, infectious diseases, and human conflicts and
7h
NASA Still Working to Repair Hubble After Latest Error
Stop me if this sounds familiar; NASA's Hubble Space Telescope is experiencing difficulties that caused it to fall back to safe mode last week. This is, of course, far from the first time Hubble has encountered a glitch. NASA just worked past a similar error earlier this year , and now it is again attempting to repair the aging observatory from the ground. Hubble reported an error on October 23rd
7h
Telehealth during COVID was a mixed bag for some nursing home residents
The use of telehealth at nursing homes during the COVID-19 pandemic not only reduced stress for some residents, but also increased access to convenient care. But there were some downsides. The pandemic caused nursing homes to rapidly change their policies overnight. Telehealth was instantly adopted widely in an effort to reduce stress on the health care system by keeping residents safe and avoidi
8h
COP26: The psychological game behind a successful negotiation
Whether we are consciously aware of it or not, we negotiate in every aspect of our daily lives—whether it be persuading a child to eat its vegetables, haggling over a property price, or discussing the terms of a job offer. Negotiation can be viewed as "back-and-forth communication designed to reach an agreement when you and the other side have some interests that are shared and others that are opp
8h
How Bacteria Could Make Rocket Fuel on Mars for the Return Trip to Earth
While getting humans to Mars is likely to be one of the grandest challenges humanity has ever undertaken , getting them back could be even tougher. Researchers think sending genetically engineered microbes to the Red Planet could be the solution . Both NASA and SpaceX are mulling human missions to Mars in the coming decades. But carrying enough fuel to make sure it's a round trip adds a lot of ex
8h
Why the child tax credit matters
When Congress tasked a group of economists and social scientists in 2015 to study ways to cut child poverty in the U.S. in half, one finding stood out. More than any other policy, a "child allowance" of about $3,000 per year, per child—similar to what most industrialized countries provide—would have the most impact, according to the final National Academy of Sciences report.
8h
Climate words and climate deeds
With the U.N. Council of Parties (COP26) starting in full swing last week, the world was filled with news from the Climate Industry's biggest trade show. These meetings have the value of focusing attention on this critical issue and can motivate corporate and government climate action to demonstrate support of the global climate agenda. Like Earth Day every April, it provides a useful deadline for
8h
Ancestral sequence reconstruction of avian influenza virus transmission in pigs
Researchers at the School of Public Health, LKS Faculty of Medicine of The University of Hong Kong (HKUMed), in collaboration with Duke-NUS Medical School (Duke-NUS) and St. Jude Children's Research Hospital (SJCRH), retraced the natural avian-to-mammalian evolutionary process of the European avian-like H1N1 (EA) swine influenza viruses that jumped species in the late 1970s.
8h
Improving the prospects of at-risk youth
How can mentors and social workers foster the vocational identity of at-risk youth and improve their prospects? This is the subject of Rineke Keijzer-Groot's thesis. She is a dual Ph.D. candidate at ICLON and Dual Ph.D. Centre. Defense scheduled on 18 November.
9h
Skylights are an untapped resource for heating homes
Passive solar heating systems could supply enough heat for a third of the residential space in the United States, research finds. Passive solar heating systems collect natural light via skylights or windows and use it to directly heat spaces, without converting it to electricity. The findings, which appear in Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews , are the first detailed survey of direct solar
9h
Hypervelocity Dust Impacts
Space is an incredibly hostile environment, and we are learning more about the challenges of living and traveling in space the more we study it. Apart from the obvious near vacuum and near absolute zero temperatures, space is full of harmful radiation. We live comfortably beneath a blanket of protective atmosphere and a magnetic shield, but in space we are exposed. Traveling through space adds an
10h
Bacterial chromosomal mobility via lateral transduction exceeds that of classical mobile genetic elements
Nature Communications, Published online: 08 November 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26004-5 It is commonly thought that horizontal transfer of most bacterial chromosomal genes is limited, in comparison with the frequent transfer of mobile genetic elements. Humphrey et al. show that, actually, phage-mediated lateral transduction of core chromosomal genes can be more efficient than the transfer of mo
10h
Historical hyperthermal event sheds light on shallow-marine ecosystem collapse and recovery
Around 56 million years ago, Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM), one of the most famous historical hyperthermal events, led our planet to a super greenhouse condition. It is very important for us to understand how it happened and how it affected the environment, because studying past climatic events of extreme global warmth may be one of the best ways for us to understand and predict future e
10h
Fish and plant research for future food security
The field of aquaponics has recently yielded a new plant-fish combination. For the first time, a salinity-tolerant plant commonly known as glasswort, or sea asparagus, has been grown together with flathead gray mullet (Mugil cephalus), an important food fish species found in coastal waters worldwide. The experiment was carried out by the Institute of Agrifood Research and Technology (IRTA) at its
10h
Benin's groundbreaking new abortion law will save the lives of many women
Benin's parliament has voted to legalize abortion in most circumstances. This is a groundbreaking move by the west African country given that 92% of women of reproductive age on the continent live in countries which have restrictions—some moderate, some severe—on abortions. Moina Spooner, from The Conversation Africa, asked reproductive health expert, Ramatou Ouedraogo, to unpack the significance
10h
Passive-aggressive: New coil stands ready to tame runaway electrons
In the race toward practical fusion energy, tokamaks (donut-shaped plasma devices) are the leading concept—they have achieved better confinement and higher plasma temperatures than any other configuration. Two major magnetic fields are used to contain the plasma: a toroidal field (along the axes of the donut) produced by external coils and the field from a ring current flowing in the plasma itself
11h
Upgraded code reveals a source of damaging fusion disruptions
Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory have uncovered a key process behind a major challenge called thermal quenches, the rapid heat loss in hot plasmas that can occur in doughnut-shaped tokamak fusion devices. Such quenches are sudden drops of electron heat in the plasma that fuels fusion reactions, drops that c
11h
Meter-scale plasma waveguides push the particle accelerator envelope
Charged particle accelerators have been a central tool of basic physics research for almost a hundred years, perhaps most famously as "atom smashers" for understanding the elementary constituents of the universe. As accelerators have progressed to ever higher energies to probe ever smaller constituents, they have grown to enormous size: the Large Hadron Collider is a remarkable 27 kilometers in ci
11h
Neutral particles a drag on disruptive plasma blobs
For decades, scientists have been working to harness clean, renewable fusion energy, which occurs naturally in stars like our sun. Using strong magnetic fields to confine hot plasmas within a donut-shaped device called a tokamak, researchers can generate conditions necessary to induce fusion reactions.
11h
Feeling the heat: Fusion reactors used to test spacecraft heat shields
Spacecraft have long used heat shields for protection during entry into planetary atmospheres. Future missions to the outer solar system will need more sophisticated materials than currently exist. The extreme heating conditions needed to study new shield materials are, however, very difficult to achieve experimentally on Earth. Scientists working at the DIII-D National Fusion Facility at General
11h
Harnessing hot helium ash to drive rotation in fusion reactors
In controlled nuclear fusion, heavy isotopes of hydrogen fuse into helium, releasing a huge amount of energy in the process. A large portion of the energy released by a laboratory fusion reaction goes into hot helium ash (an impurity in the plasma that bears no resemblance to ash from a fire). This ash is around 30 billion degrees Celsius, compared to 200 million degrees for the bulk plasma. For c
11h
Unveiling the steady progress toward fusion energy gain
The march towards fusion energy gain, required for commercial fusion energy, is not always visible. Progress occurs in fits and starts through experiments in national laboratories, universities, and more recently at private companies. Sam Wurzel, a Technology-to-Market Advisor at the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E), details and highlights this progress over the last 60 years by e
11h
Are mothers too easy to blame?
Nature, Published online: 08 November 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03053-w A book critiques the evidence for epigenetic inheritance of trauma.
11h
Nascent chains can form co-translational folding intermediates that promote post-translational folding outcomes in a disease-causing protein
Nature Communications, Published online: 08 November 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26531-1 Alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency results from misfolding-prone AAT variants. Here the authors show that AAT forms co-translational folding intermediates on the ribosome that persist upon release and determine its folding fate. They show too that the ribosome can also modulate misfolding-prone AAT interme
12h
The history and geographic distribution of a KCNQ1 atrial fibrillation risk allele
Nature Communications, Published online: 08 November 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26741-7 Many rare high-impact variants have been associated with disease, but the origins and functional impact are not always explored. Here, the authors trace the ancestry of a rare high impact atrial fibrillation allele in KCNQ1, and use iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes to characterize the effect of the allele.
12h
A sensory memory to preserve visual representations across eye movements
Nature Communications, Published online: 08 November 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26756-0 A late enhancement of the perisaccadic neural response may exist in extrastriate areas. Here the authors show this preserves pre-saccadic information until the post-saccadic information is received, maintaining an integrated representation of the visual scene across saccadic eye movements.
12h
Demethylating therapy increases anti-CD123 CAR T cell cytotoxicity against acute myeloid leukemia
Nature Communications, Published online: 08 November 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26683-0 The success of CAR-T cells for treating acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is hampered by toxicity to normal cells and low CAR-T cell persistence. Here, the authors show that the demethylating compound 5′-Azacitdine increases anti-CD123 CAR-T cell cytotoxicity against AML.
12h
Good COP, bad COP: UN climate meet praised and panned
The COP26 climate talks resuming Monday have so far unfolded on parallel planes, with high-level announcements stage-managed by host country Britain during week one riding roughshod over a laborious UN process built on consensus among nearly 200 countries.
13h
The Cigarette Mob of Palermo
On the gate of Constantinople was written, in a steel plate, the order of the Sultan: "All the males of the Gjomarkaj, generation after generation, from the cradle to the grave, will carry the title of Kapidan"
14h
'Mirror nuclei' to probe fundamental physics of atoms and neutron stars
About 20 years ago, a physicist had an idea to reveal insights about a fundamental but enigmatic force at work in some of the most extreme environments in the universe. These environments include an atom's nucleus and celestial bodies known as neutron stars, both of which are among the densest objects known to humanity. For comparison, matching the density of a neutron star would require squeezing
19h
Pathomechanisms in heart disease discovered
The largest protein in the human body, titin, enables elastic movements of our muscles, including the heart. Mutations in the titin gene (TTN) that impair this function and lead to heart muscle disease. The pathomechanisms behind this — i.e. why TTN mutations trigger disease — were unclear until now. A team of experts has now investigated these pathomechanisms in more detail and has gained groun
19h
Vibration training for multiple sclerosis
Researchers worked to determine whether vibration training — an intervention used to improve physical function for people with multiple sclerosis — could also improve patients' cognitive function and quality of life.
19h
What if the computational theory of mind is wrong?
This may come across as vague so please bare with me. I'm considering applying for a cognitive science Master's program because the field is absolutely fascinating and its interdisciplinary nature appeals to me hugely. However, I keep getting caught up on the idea that what if the foundational ideas cognitive science is predicated on are simply wrong? I could be way off here, but from what I can
22h
Elon Musk Is Letting a Twitter Poll Decide Whether He Sells $21 Billion in Tesla Stock
Tesla and SpaceX CEO Elon Musk waded deep into tax and wealth discourse this weekend, saying that he was open to selling what amounts to $21 billion in Tesla stock — and that he'd actually do it, depending on the results of a Twitter poll. "Much is made lately of unrealized gains being a means of tax avoidance, so I propose selling 10 percent of my Tesla stock," the mercurial billionaire tweeted
1d
Save 15% On A Spade Mini Ear Wax Remover In This Pre-Black Friday Sale
While we're closer to replacement ears than you might think , there's no substitute for caring for the ones you already have. T he SPADE MINI Smart Ear Wax Remover helps you keep your ears clean and monitor your ear health, and for a limited time, you can save an additional 15% in our Pre-Black Friday Sale. Protecting Your Hearing, And The Planet Cotton swabs aren't good for your ears. Instead of
1d
Alphabet Chases Wonder Drugs With DeepMind AI Spinoff Isomorphic Labs
AI research wunderkind, DeepMind, has long been all fun and games. The London-based organization, owned by Google parent company Alphabet, has used deep learning to train algorithms that can take down world champions at the ancient game of Go and top players of the popular strategy video game Starcraft. Then last year, things got serious when DeepMind trounced the competition at a protein folding
1d
Become a beta tester and earn 27 USD
There is a new Neuro-related networking platform coming up. I am hiring beta testers who would join the platform and complete a few surveys to review the platform. You'd also have an opportunity to connect with neuro-related people globally. For your time and participation, we are giving out an incentive of £20/2000INR or equivalent in your currency. Fill in the form below to get the contract to
1d
Så ska skyskrapan kunna stå emot jordbävningar: "Fungerar som skidstavar"
Amerikanska myndigheter varnar för att det kan inträffa ett stort jordskalv i San Francisco-regionen inom de närmsta 30 åren. Det kan få stora konsekvenser, inte minst på grund av alla skyskrapor i staden. För att råda bot på problemet byggdes skyskrapan Fremont 181, som ska kunna stå emot jordbävningar. – De flesta vill inte bara överleva en jordbävning, de vill dessutom kunna flytta tillbaka in
1d
Fågelkvittret blir glesare
Färre fåglar och färre fågelsorter ger ett förenklat ljudlandskap, menar en ny studie. Det här är både en förlust för mångfald och för människan som förlorar sin koppling till naturen. Se hur forskarna skapat ett landskap av fågelkvitter i spelaren.
1d
Is Oliver Sacks reliable?
I was considering including a couple of chapters from Oliver Sacks' work as part of a course in Cognition — I would like to share with students with actual experiences of people rather than just vocabulary terms, and a couple of Oliver Sacks' case studies fit the bill perfectly for some of my units. A colleague with a specialty in neuroscience has informed me that he considers Oliver Sacks to be
1d

 

Leave a Reply