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Size matters for bee 'superorganism' colonies
Scientists have carefully studied the intricacies of how individual organisms live and act together in groups known as biological collectives. In "superorganisms" such as bee colonies, the interactions of the individual members add up to benefit the entire colony.
26min

LATEST

Getting Back to Normal Is Only Possible Until You Test Positive
When I first received the invitation to the wedding where I would eventually get COVID, I was on the fence about attending at all. My best friend had gone through a tough divorce and was remarrying. I was thrilled for him. His wedding had been put off repeatedly because of COVID, and this was the couple's second try at a real ceremony. As a bonus, the wedding would take place in New Orleans, wher
22h
AR Pioneer Warns That Metaverse Could Make "Reality Disappear"
Dystopian Prediction An innovator in early AR systems has a dire prediction: the metaverse could change the fabric of reality as we know it. Louis Rosenberg, a computer scientist and developer of the first functional AR system at the Air Force Research Laboratory, penned an op-ed in Big Think this weekend that warned the metaverse — an immersive VR and AR world currently being developed by The Co
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40 Percent of American Children Think Hot Dogs Are Vegetables
Many children in the US appear to be extremely hazy on the details about where the food they eat on a daily basis actually comes from, especially when it comes to meat. In shocking new research spotted by Sapien Journal , scientists found that children are surprisingly terrible at identifying where certain kinds of meat come from. Alarmingly, nearly 40 percent of children interviewed for the rese
15h
Genetic component of mountain chickadees' spatial memories identified
For the first time, researchers have shown that there is a genetic component underlying the amazing spatial memories of Mountain Chickadees. These energetic half-ounce birds hide thousands of food items every fall and rely on these hidden stores to get through harsh winters in the mountains of the West. To find these caches, chickadees use highly specialized spatial memory abilities. Although the
15h
Bedtime linked with heart health
Going to sleep between 10:00 and 11:00 pm is associated with a lower risk of developing heart disease compared to earlier or later bedtimes, according to a new study.
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Pentagon Whistleblower Hints That Pilots Who Encountered UFOs Had Radiation Burns
It's been four years since an explosive feature in The New York Times revealed a shadowy program run by the US military and tasked with investigating — yes, seriously — UFO encounters, accompanied by several videos showing the purported encounters. Several pilots have come forward since then to discuss what they saw, which they've often characterized as oddly-shaped objects that appeared to defy
10h
New Brain Implant Lets You "Type" at 90 Words Per Minute Just by Thinking
Stanford scientists have developed a brain implant that allows a man with paralyzed hands to "type" up to 90 words per minute, just by thinking of the words. The researchers published their findings in Nature back in May and presented them at WE Summit, a science teleconference hosted by Tencent, on Saturday, according to the South China Morning Post . Older implant systems often rely on patients
12h
Bitcoin Crushes All-Time Record, With JPMorgan Predicting $146,000
All-Time Records The value of Bitcoin hit all-time highs today, trading above $68,000 Tuesday morning — and investors are predicting that its rise isn't over yet, CNBC reports . The price calmed back down to around $66,700 at the time of writing, but there's still plenty of appetite for Bitcoin, and investors are more enthusiastic about the cryptocurrency's short-term future than ever before. How
14h
The World Is Fed Up With China's Belligerence
I n Chinese-speaking communities beyond the reach of Beijing's censorship regime, the song "Fragile" has been an unexpected hit. With more than 26 million views on YouTube since dropping in mid-October, the satirical love song to Chinese nationalism has topped the site's charts for Taiwan and Hong Kong, its lyrics mocking Chinese Communist Party rhetoric about Taiwan while also taking aim at Xi J
22h
The Man Who Made January 6 Possible
I n late October 2020, Donald Trump's chief of staff, Mark Meadows, was attending the confirmation hearing for Amy Coney Barrett when his cellphone rang. He answered with a whisper and walked out to the hallway to take the call. What was so urgent as to pull the chief of staff out of a Supreme Court confirmation hearing just two weeks before a presidential election? On the line was Andrew Hughes,
22h
The Republicans' Dangerous New Tactic
Updated at 9:34 p.m. ET on November 9, 2021. About six hours after the polls closed on Election Day, the Associated Press made a call in the close race for Virginia governor : Democrat Terry McAuliffe had lost. McAuliffe conceded Wednesday morning, when it became clear he had no realistic path to victory. The same has not happened in New Jersey, where the Democratic incumbent, Phil Murphy, defeat
17h
The Serendipity of 'Let's Go, Brandon'
I know how I am supposed to feel about "Let's go, Brandon": Mocking the president this way is uncivil, a sign of the collapse of once-routine public courtesy, etc., etc. How I really feel about it, though, is that it's fascinatingly serendipitous, seriously funny, and intriguingly fecund. From that one meme, others are being born. Last month, an NBC reporter interviewing the victorious NASCAR dri
21h
'He drives me mad!' Why don't we dump toxic friends?
According to psychologists, 'ambivalent' relationships can cause us more stress than being with people we actively dislike. Is it time to let go – or can these friendships be salvaged? Roger and Jim have been friends for more than 30 years. When they were younger they were in a band together, and their friendship was forged over a shared love of music and beer. Even now, despite family commitment
23h
Astrophysicist Says Scientists Need to Stop Searching for Alien Civilizations
Still Searching It may be time for alien-enthusiastic scientists to call a spade a spade. So says SUNY Stony Brook astrophysicist Paul Sutter, who in a new column for Space.com insists that the search for intelligent life among the stars has run its course — though, he argues, that doesn't mean we're alone in the universe either. "Humans have scanned and searched the heavens for signs of other ad
11h
Jeff Bezos Mad That Girlfriend Is Thirsting for Leonardo DiCaprio
He's Jelly It appears that billionaire Jeff Bezos may have a sense of humor. In response to a now-viral video of the Amazon and Blue Origin founder's girlfriend Lauren Sánchez cozying up to movie star Leonardo DiCaprio, Bezos tweeted a photo of himself standing with a cliffside "danger" sign warning of a "steep cliff" and "fatal drop." Bezos tagged DiCaprio and added, in syntax that's a bizarre m
15h
Shallow Hal and the Never-Ending Fat Joke
In 2001, doing press for Shallow Hal , Gwyneth Paltrow spent a lot of time talking about the fat suit she wore to play Rosemary, the film's romantic lead. She spoke in particular about an experiment that she and the film's makeup-effects designer had undertaken to test the suit's credibility out in the world. At a fancy hotel in New York, Paltrow donned the fake weight. She walked through the lob
21h
Earth's first continents emerged from the ocean 700m years earlier than thought
Ancient rock forms suggest world's first stable cratons rose above sea level more than 3bn years ago Get our free news app ; get our morning email briefing The Earth's first continents rose out of the ocean 700m years earlier than previously thought, a new analysis of ancient rocks suggests. Researchers who have studied rock sediments in eastern India believe the discovery could explain an increa
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White British brain tumour patients 'more likely to die in a year'
Study finds patients from other ethnic backgrounds in England 30% more likely to survive for 12 months White British people diagnosed with brain tumours are more likely to die within 12 months than patients from other ethnic groups, a study suggests. The research is the first of its kind to examine the impact of ethnicity on brain tumour survival. The results are being presented today at the Nati
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China's Building Fake US Ships, Seemingly for Target Practice
Target Practice China's military has built mockups of US Navy aircraft carriers and other warships, Reuters reports , seemingly in order to use them for target practice. It's a worrying discovery — tensions are already high between the two world powers, a result of economic skirmishes and even military kerfuffles , all with the backdrop of two powerful nations in a small globe. Now, according to
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Cory Doctorow Roasts NFTs as "Massive, Fraud-Ridden Speculative Bubble"
Right-Clicker Mentality NFTs may not be as weird as you think. According to journalist and Boing Boing co-owner Cory Doctorow, the grift behind non-fungible tokens (or NFTs for short) is unsurprising given the capitalist hellscape we call home. "In this age of stock markets that boom in response to mass unemployment, supply-chain collapse, monopoly and runaway climate emergencies, NFTs aren't rea
11h
Parental Leave Is American Exceptionalism at Its Bleakest
American exceptionalism can sometimes be quite bleak: The United States is the only wealthy country in the world without a national program for paid parental leave. The U.S.'s best chance yet of giving up this dismal distinction might be slipping away. The $1.8 trillion domestic-policy bill that's making its way through Congress initially was going to include funding for 12 weeks of paid family a
14h
Wanna Be Completely Horrified? Here's an MRI of What Happens When You Rub Your Eyes
Bad news for anyone with allergies: You should should stop rubbing your eyes ASAP. Daniel Gatinel, an ophthalmologist and head of the anterior and refractive surgery department of the Rothschild Foundation, took an MRI of a healthy patient rubbing their eyes to see if it might cause certain eye conditions. The result was horrifying . Take a look at the video, first released in 2019 but which is g
14h
SpaceX Crew Dragon's Parachute Was Slow to Deploy During Splashdown
Slow to Deploy After an eventful 199 days in orbit that included major toilet malfunctions , a space olympics , and not one but two instances of the International Space Station spinning out of control, the Crew-2 astronauts who flew to the Space Station in a SpaceX Crew Dragon spacecraft have finally made it back to Earth with no problems… kind of. During the descent home, one of the Crew Dragon
17h
People Keep Sneaking Onto Simulated Mars Base for Social Media Clout
The Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS) uses the Utah desert to simulate life on the Red Planet . However, the station's director has found that the biggest issue isn't coping with the effects of isolation or the inhospitable environment — instead , it's dealing with annoying tourists. Dr. Shannon Rupert, director of the MDRS, recently penned an op-ed in Space.com deriding the influx of sightseer
12h
Tesla Stock Prices Drops After Musk Asks Twitter Whether He Should Sell Stock
Stock Drop Well, this probably won't surprise anyone. On the heels of Tesla CEO Elon Musk saying that he would sell off billions of dollars of shares in the electric car company based on a Twitter poll , stock prices for Tesla dropped on Monday. In premarket trading to open the week, the stock dropped by 5.2 percent, according to The Wall Street Journal. As of reporting, the stock is currently 4.
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Mathematicians Find Structure in Biased Polynomials
When you deposit a quarter and turn the crank on a gumball machine, the flavor you receive is basically random. In math, sometimes a polynomial, like x2 + y2, works the same way. When you plug in numbers for x and y, the values the polynomial takes might be random. Other polynomials might favor particular outcomes, like a machine stocked with lots of grape gumballs and just a few cherry ones… S
17h
Emerson Didn't Practice the Self-Reliance He Preached
Vedran Štimac I n the lead-up to the bicentennial of American independence in 1976, a graduate student sent a proposal to an editor at a trade publisher in New York. Would he consider taking on a book about the Minutemen and their "shot heard round the world," set painstakingly in a history of Concord, Massachusetts, the town where the North Bridge fight broke out? In 1977, that book—which was al
20h
How a novel radio frequency control system enhances quantum computers
A team of physicists and engineers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) successfully demonstrated the feasibility of low-cost and high-performance radio frequency modules for qubit controls at room temperature. They built a series of compact radio frequency (RF) modules that mix signals to improve the reliability of control systems for superconducting quantum processors. Their t
15h
Extreme Makeover: Human Activities Are Making Some Extreme Events More Frequent or Intense
In Brief: It's not your imagination: Certain extreme events, like heat waves, are happening more often and becoming more intense. But what role are humans playing in Earth's extreme weather and climate event makeover? Scientists are finding clear human fingerprints. The year 2021 has seen a flurry of extreme events around the globe. Among the many that have captured headlines so far this year: De
17h
New Spiking Neuromorphic Chip Could Usher in an Era of Highly Efficient AI
When it comes to brain computing, timing is everything. It's how neurons wire up into circuits. It's how these circuits process highly complex data, leading to actions that can mean life or death. It's how our brains can make split-second decisions, even when faced with entirely new circumstances. And we do so without frying the brain from extensive energy consumption. To rephrase, the brain make
18h
How to Live When You're in Pain
Listen and subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Googl e | Pocket Casts As we wind down this series, a paradox remains in our pursuit of happiness: Joy comes to those who have known pain. In order to overcome struggle—breakups, illness, even death—we must first accept and acknowledge its inevitability. Exploring the darkness of our suffering may seem counterintuitive, but often it's th
20h
An E. coli biocomputer solves a maze by sharing the work
E. coli thrives in our guts, sometimes to unfortunate effect, and it facilitates scientific advances—in DNA, biofuels, and Pfizer's covid vaccine, to name but a few. Now this multitalented bacterium has a new trick: it can solve a classic computational maze problem using distributed computing—dividing up the necessary calculations among different types of genetically engineered cells. This neat f
21h
Animals of the Future
Dani Choi I n June of this year, not long before the midwinter solstice, catastrophic floodwaters draining from the Gippsland Plain, in southeastern Australia, left in their wake an otherworldly phenomenon: Translucent spider silk, extending half a mile in some places, trailed over riverbanks, roadsides, and fields, rising into glistening spires atop highway signs and shrubbery. On once-humdrum s
21h
Converting methane to methanol, with and without water
Chemists have been searching for efficient catalysts to convert methane—a major component of abundant natural gas—into methanol, an easily transported liquid fuel and building block for making other valuable chemicals. Adding water to the reaction can address certain challenges, but it also complicates the process. Now a team at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory has id
20h
Nasa bumps moon landing back to 2025 at the earliest
Agency says funding issues, along with delays tied to Bezos legal challenge, will push back first landing in a half century Nasa has delayed putting astronauts back on the moon until 2025 at the earliest, missing the deadline set by the Trump administration. The space agency had been aiming for 2024 for the first moon landing by astronauts in a half century. Continue reading…
8h
How monitoring a quantum Otto engine affects its performance
Heat engines are devices that use waste heat to perform mechanical work and generate power. The invention of heat engines ushered in an era of the industrial revolution 250 years ago. The Otto engine, which uses distinct heat and work strokes, powers nearly all automobiles and is an industry standard due to its relatively high power and efficiency. In an Otto engine, a working substance is typical
17h
Chinese city offers cash for clues as Covid outbreak declared a 'people's war'
Authorities announced the 100,000 yuan ($15,640) rewards for residents in Heihe, saying illegal hunting or crossing the border should be reported See all our coronavirus coverage Residents of a Chinese city bordering Russia have been offered major cash rewards for tips on the continuing Delta outbreak, with local officials declaring a "people's war" on the virus. Authorities announced the 100,000
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The Journey of Little Amal
For the past several months, Little Amal, an 11-foot-tall puppet depicting a Syrian refugee girl, has been on a 5,000-mile trek across Europe, bringing attention to the plight of millions of refugees and displaced children around the world. The Handspring Puppet Company and Good Chance Theatre worked together to build the character and embark on the months-long project titled "The Walk," beginnin
14h
Fossil elephant cranium reveals key adaptations that enabled its species to spread across Africa
A remarkably well-preserved fossil elephant cranium from Kenya is helping scientists understand how its species became the dominant elephant in eastern Africa several million years ago, a time when a cooler, drier climate allowed grasslands to spread and when habitually bipedal human ancestors first appeared on the landscape.
15h
Siege ramps and breached walls: Ancient warfare and the Assyrian conquest of Lachish
The Assyrians were one of the Near East's biggest superpowers, controlling a land mass that stretched from Iran to Egypt. They accomplished this feat with military technologies that helped them win any open-air battle or penetrate any fortified city. While today, air power and bunker busters help win the war, back in the ninth to the seventh centuries BCE, it was all about the siege ramp, an eleva
17h
Unearthing the cause of slow seismic waves in subduction zones
In modern subduction zones—regions around the world that have one tectonic plate sliding past another—one area can act like molasses for seismic waves. These anomalous areas are called low-velocity zones, or LVZs. In these zones, seismic waves are up to three times slower than waves that whiz through the surrounding rock. Some scientists suggest that the slowdown is because the downgoing plate mai
17h
Large-scale synthesis methods for single-atom catalysts for alkaline fuel cells
Alkaline fuel cells (AFC) convert the chemical energy of hydrogen and oxygen into electrical energy, while only producing water as a by-product. This makes them an extremely attractive next generation, environmentally friendly energy source. Although platinum catalysts are generally employed in alkaline fuel cells, they are expensive and also experience challenges related to stability when used in
17h
Image: Hubble spots dark star-hatching frEGGs
This image shows knots of cold, dense interstellar gas where new stars are forming. These Free-floating Evaporating Gaseous Globules (frEGGs) were first seen in Hubble's famous 1995 image of the Eagle Nebula. Because these lumps of gas are dark, they are rarely seen by telescopes. They can be observed when the newly forming stars ignite, their intense ultraviolet radiation eroding the surrounding
19h
3D printing nanoresonators: Towards miniaturized and multifunctional sensors
Micro-electro-mechanical devices (MEMS) are based on the integration of mechanical and electrical components on a micrometer scale. We all use them continuously in our everyday life: For example, in our mobile phones there are at least a dozen MEMS that regulate different activities ranging from motion, position, and inclination monitoring of the phone; active filters for the different transmissio
12h
An innovative imaging technique for dynamic optical nanothermometry
A new imaging technique developed by the teams of Professors Jinyang Liang and Fiorenzo Vetrone at the Institut national de la recherche scientifique (INRS) can quickly measure temperature in 2D without contact. The results of their research were published in the journal Nature Communications. This accurate, real-time temperature detection could one day improve photothermal therapy and help in the
19h
Randox: how one-man-band operation became a Covid testing giant
Healthcare firm named in Owen Paterson lobbying scandal has won £500m in UK government contracts Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage As the Covid-19 pandemic swept towards the UK, a senior employee of the healthcare firm Randox addressed an audience of horse racing royalty, gathered amid the neoclassical splendour of St George's Hall in Liverpool. Randox, which had garne
22h
Walmart is Using Self-Driving Trucks in a 7 Mile Delivery Loop
(Photo: Gatik) In another big step toward building an autonomous shipping industry, Walmart has begun testing self-driving delivery trucks. The trucks loop around a fixed seven-mile route in Bentonville, Arkansas, where they deliver goods between a Walmart dark store and a Neighborhood Market. The trucks themselves are multi-temperature box vehicles operated by Gatik, a short-haul logistics compa
17h
Meet MIT Technology Review's covid inequality fellows
In the spring of 2021, MIT Technology Review announced a fellowship focused on exploring the different ways in which technology and data were being used to address issues of inequality during the pandemic. With the assistance of the Heising-Simons Foundation—a Los Altos and San Francisco, California-based family foundation that supports projects focused on climate and clean energy, community and
23h
AI skin cancer diagnoses risk being less accurate for dark skin – study
Research finds few image databases available to develop technology contain details on ethnicity or skin type AI systems being developed to diagnose skin cancer run the risk of being less accurate for people with dark skin, research suggests. The potential of AI has led to developments in healthcare, with some studies suggesting image recognition technology based on machine learning algorithms can
9h
Keeping track of rare mountaintop plants with drones
When an endangered plant's favorite place to live is the side of a mountain, keeping track of its numbers typically requires rappelling down cliff faces with specialized gear––no mean feat. Now, a drone-based approach developed by researchers from North Carolina State University is making rare plant monitoring on mountaintops safer and more efficient.
17h
The Atlantic Daily: Biden's Plan to Get His Party Out of This Mess
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox. Democrats are at a turning point. For months, the party has been plagued by fears that it is squandering its control in Washington. Last week's loss in Virginia brought those fears to a fever pitc
18h
AMD's Massive Milan-X CPUs Coming in Q1 2022 With 768MB of L3 Cache, 64 Cores
The Milan-X CPUs and V-Cache equipped Zen 3 CPUs that AMD has been talking up since earlier this year are headed to market in both servers and the wider consumer space. AMD confirmed today that it would ship its Milan-X CPUs with up to 64MB of additional L3 cache per chiplet in Q1 2022. There are up to eight chiplets in a single Milan-X Epyc CPU, which means these new CPUs offer up to 512MB of ad
14h
21st century cities: Asia Pacific's urban transformation
The Asia Pacific region has enjoyed decades of economic growth—from the post-Second World War rise of Japan, to the rapid industrialization of the "Four Asian Tigers" (South Korea, Taiwan, Singapore, and Hong Kong) between the 1960s and 1990s, along with China's meteoric rise through the late 20th century, and today's fast-growing markets in Southeast Asia. At the heart of this transformation is
7h
Researchers reveal sorption process of U(VI) on microbial-clay minerals composites surface
Chinese researchers from the Northwest Institute of Eco-Environmental Resources of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) have systematically studied the enrichment behavior of radioactive element U(VI) on kaolinite- and illite-Aspergillus niger composites, and clarified the regulatory pathways and mechanisms of Aspergillus niger on the sorption behavior of U(VI) on both kaolinite and illite.
21h
Apple Watch 6 review
The Apple Watch 6 might not be the latest timepiece, but with a high-quality display, it's an attractive buy if you can find it in stock.
2min
Climate talks draft agreement expresses 'alarm and concern'
Negotiators at the United Nations climate talks are considering a draft decision that highlights "alarm and concern" about global warming the planet already is experiencing and continues to call on the world to cut about half of its emissions of heat-trapping gases by 2030.
8min
VR i kampen mot sjukdom
Forskare har utvecklat ett verktyg för Virtual reality (VR) för medicinska forskare. Detta hjälper forskare att visualisera data som genereras från de avancerade sekvenseringsteknikerna. – Att kunna gå runt i sin egen data och manipulera den på ett intuitivt och smidigt sätt ger en helt annan förståelse, säger Shamit Soneji vars forskargrupp har utvecklat verktyget
1h
Covid live: France orders those aged over 65 to show proof of booster shot; China reports drop in cases
Macron says over-65s will need proof of booster shot to maintain health pass ; China sees decline in daily cases as it continues zero-Covid policy Emmanuel Macron urges acceleration of France's booster rollout 'Tens of thousands' of NHS and care home staff could quit over jabs AstraZeneca to create dedicated Covid vaccines unit At a glance: Covid vaccine mandates around the world Dr David Nabarro
2h
I Was There When: Facebook put profits over safety
Facebook has been under intense fire following revelations that the social media giant's leadership repeatedly prioritized profits over safety. Now, a second whistleblower is accusing the company of turning a blind eye to disinformation campaigns on the platform. In this episode, we meet Sophie Zhang—a former data scientist at Facebook. Before she was fired, she had become consumed by the task of
4h
¿Estamos listos para chips en nuestros cerebros?
por JC Gorman Anna es una veterana del ejército que sirvió a su país y recientemente perdió su brazo debido a una explosión de un explosivo improvisado. Si bien esta es una desgracia que le cambiaría la vida, la tecnología actual en los EE. UU. le permite obtener un brazo robótico controlado por un chip […]
6h
Travel More With This TravelHacker Premium Pre-Black Friday Deal
While airlines work on their robot avatars and spare us the airport completely, right now for many of us it's a question of finding the best flight for the least money. A TravelHacker Premium Lifetime Subscription helps you find the right flights for the right rates, and for a limited time, you can save an additional 15% in our Pre-Black Friday Sale. Automated Deal Hunting All TravelHacker needs
6h
The meta verse
I just wanted to quickly say I started a subreddit on the meta verse, so if your interested in joining, r/themetaverse_ is the community submitted by /u/alex35351 [link] [comments]
6h
Light Activated Energy Storage (LAES) seems like a promising hydrogen storage solution.
The YouTube channel "Undecided with Matt Ferrel" just released an interesting new video about the company Plasma Kinetics, and their Light Activated Energy Storage product. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U7CCq4oBgw4 https://plasmakinetics.com/ It's essentially a tape drive where the tape absorbs massive amounts of hydrogen, like a typical metal hydride, but then when hit with a laser, the tape r
6h
Syntetisk biologi uppgraderar immunförsvaret
Cellbaserad immunterapi går ut på att programmera om immunceller så att de lär sig känna igen och mer effektivt eliminera cancerceller. Detta har tidigare används för en viss typ av svårbehandlad leukemi. Nu kan forskare programmera om immunceller till att mer effektivt söka upp och eliminera även solida tumörer.
7h
Litar patienten på doktor dator?
Med nyfiken misstro. Så kan patienternas inställning till användandet av artificiell intelligens inom bild­diagnostiken beskrivas. Studierna på området är än så länge få men inom bröstcancerforskningen i Skåne finns idéer på att titta närmare på frågor som rör inställning och behov av information bland patienterna.
7h
Empatiska robotar bara på film?
Christian Balkenius, robotforskare vid Lunds universitet, menar att vi bör ha rimliga förväntningar på vad robotarna med hjälp av artificiell intelligens kommer att kunna lösa i framtiden. I sin forskning undersöker han bland annat hur människa och robot ska kunna samverka på ett naturligt sätt.
7h
Söker mer träffsäkra prognoser för smittspridning
Sedan covid-19-pandemin bröt ut har hundratals modeller tagits fram som simulerar hur olika åtgärder kan begränsa smittspridningen. Forskare vid Malmö universitet har både jämfört befintliga modeller och varit med att utveckla en mer avancerad. Målet är att kunna göra mer träffsäkra prognoser.
7h
AI-hjälp att hitta rätt bland all covidforskning
Sedan mars 2020, då WHO förklarade att sjukdomen nu var en pandemi, har flera hundra tusen vetenskapliga artiklar om covid-19 publicerats. Sonja Aits och hennes forskargrupp vid Lunds universitet utvecklar nu textanalysverktyg som använder artificiell intelligens för att hitta relevant information.
7h
Fler hjärttransplantationer med AI?
Bristen på organ för transplantation är stor och detta gäller inte minst hjärtan, där kvalitet och ålder på det donerade organet är extra viktigt. Endast 30 procent av alla donerade hjärtan uppfyller alla krav och leder till transplantation. Artificiell intelligens skulle kunna användas till att matcha och fördela donerade organ på ett bättre sätt som leder till fler transplantationer och längre ö
7h
Lagen hinner inte alltid med
Precis som annan teknologi måste AI följa de lagar och riktlinjer som finns. Men vad händer när en teknologisk utveckling skapar situationer som lagstiftarna inte kunnat förutsäga?
7h
Skonsammare strålbehandling med hjälp av AI
Strålbehandling ges för att döda eller bromsa cancercellers tillväxt. Behandlingen gör inte ont men kan ge olika biverkningar. Forskare vid Lunds universitet undersöker hur AI vid prostatacancer kan skapa en skonsammare strålbehandling och ge patienter en mer individualiserad cancervård.
7h
AI i kampen mot prostatacancer
Prostatacancer är ett starkt forskningsfält i Region Skåne. Artificiell intelligens kan framöver komma att spela en allt viktigare roll i allt från att identifiera patienter som löper risk att drabbas av sjukdom till diagnostik och att föreslå lämplig behandling.
7h
Ny 3D-teknik upptäcker bröstcancer tidigare
Tack vare undersökning med 3D-teknik kan fler fall av bröstcancer upptäckas tidigare. Men samtidigt blir röntgenbilderna fler ochtar längre tid att granska. Därför har forskare på Skånes universitetssjukhus och Lunds universitet tagit hjälp av artificiell intelligens för att snabbare hitta fler fall av bröstcancer.
7h
Nätverken tränar upp sig själva
Hur artificiell intelligens kan bli bättre och bättre på att ställa diagnoser för att underlätta patologers arbete är något som Ida Arvidsson forskar om. Målsättningen är att algoritmer ska tränas för att göra allt säkrare bedömningar av bilder av vävnadsprover för prostatacancer.
7h
Kan AI göra mammografin effektivare?
Hallå där, Kristina Lång, överläkare på Unilabs mammografienhet i Malmö och docent vid Lunds universitet. Under våren 2021 påbörjades en studie om datorstödd mammografi i screeningen, där totalt 100 000 kvinnor i sydvästra Skåne ska delta. Vad vill ni uppnå?
7h
AI – en ny kollega som aldrig behöver paus
Hon har utsetts till årets cancerforskare, fått miljonanslag till sin forskning och uppmärksammats i internationella medier. Med hjälp av datorer hoppas professor Sophia Zackrisson på nästa stora genombrott – att låta artificiell intelligens granska och upptäcka bröstcancer efter avancerad 3D-screening.
7h
Lärande system hittar dolda mönster
Genom att ta AI och maskininlärning till hjälp kan vården hitta mönster i stora datamängder, och använda kunskapen till att fatta bättre beslut för patienter. Mattias Ohlsson använder metoderna i flera projekt för att göra sjukvården bättre.
7h
Om farorna med superintelligens
Artificiell intelligens används och gör redan nytta inom flera olika områden, det har vi många exempel på i den här tidningen. Samtidigt har flera kända forskare, bland annat fysikern Stephen Hawking, varnat för riskerna med en superintelligent AI som skulle kunna ta över och utplåna mänskligheten.
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Har du koll på artificiell intelligens?
Artificiell intelligens, eller AI, är ett begrepp som många har hört talas om men vad är det egentligen? Pratar vi om människolika robotar som utför alla våra önskningar eller kan AI vara en dator som hjälper läkare att analysera röntgenbilder? Här reder vi ut var i vården AI används redan i dag, vad vi kan förvänta oss inom den närmaste framtiden och vad vi bör se upp med.
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Doktor AI på frammarsch inom vården
När jag inför arbetet med detta temanummer frågade runt bland vänner och bekanta vad de tolkade in i begreppet artificiell intelligens handlade många svar om människolika robotar i science fiction-filmer, självkörande bilar, schack och Go-spelet. Ingen nämnde sjukvården. Därför känns det extra roligt att få välkomna er till ett temanummer om vad AI kan göra för vår hälsa.
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Research finds key advances towards reducing the cost of plant improvement
Crop improvement often involves the transfer of genetic material from one organism to another to produce a valuable trait. Some major examples of crops with these so-called 'transgenes' include disease-resistant cotton and beta-carotene-enhanced golden rice. However, when foreign DNA is introduced into a host organism, a natural defensive response in plants is to repress or silence the expression
8h
Command A Mini Robot Arm With This Pre-Black Friday Deal
Depending on who you ask, 2020 closed on a moment of either hope or terror as Boston Dynamics showed off some dance moves from its advanced robots. Whether you're interested in the science behind robotics, or just want to know the weaknesses of our future robot overlords, the WLKATA Mirobot 6-Axis Mini Robot Arm Professional Kit gives you everything you need to learn how robots work. And for a li
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Retinoid therapy may improve vision in people with rare genetic disorder
Using data generated from patients and mice with genetic mutation for the disorder Usher syndrome, researchers documented the natural history of vision impairment in patients and identified the cell mechanism behind progressive vision loss. Based on these findings, the team was able to test a retinoid therapy that improved vision in mice with Usher syndrome. The researchers said assessing a simila
12h
Best Tablets for Note Taking and Drawing
Say goodbye to paper notebooks for jotting things down and say hello to having the best tablets for note-taking and drawing. These lightweight, portable laptop alternatives can do almost everything a full-size laptop can, but from a much smaller package. They're larger than a mobile phone but usually smaller than a typical laptop. Laptop tablets can also function as both. A tablet's touch screen
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AI behind deepfakes may power materials design innovations
The person staring back from the computer screen may not actually exist, thanks to artificial intelligence (AI) capable of generating convincing but ultimately fake images of human faces. Now this same technology may power the next wave of innovations in materials design, according to scientists.
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Can the western US avoid a future of low or no snow?
A new study analyzes the likely timing of a low-to-no-snow future, what it will mean for water management, and what we can do now to stave off catastrophic consequences. Mountain snowpacks around the world are in decline. And as the planet continues to warm, climate models forecast that snowpacks will shrink dramatically and possibly even disappear altogether on certain mountains, including in th
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Tiny leaks, big impacts: New research points to urban indoor methane leaks
This is a re-post from Yale Climate Connections by Daniel Grossman Methane, the major component of natural gas, punches way above its weight when it comes to damaging the climate. Humans send less than half a billion tons of methane into the air every year, only one percent of the amount of carbon dioxide we spew from our cars, homes and factories. Yet methane is responsible for about 20 percent
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2021 SkS Weekly Climate Change & Global Warming News Roundup #45
Listing of articles linked to on the Skeptical Science Facebook Page during the past week: Sun, October 31, 2021 through Sat, November 6, 2021 The following articles sparked above average interest during the week: The Keeling Curve: Reality Check , IPCC, You've Made Your Point: Humans Are a Primary Cause of Climate Change , Vapor Storms Are Threatening People and Property , Top climate scientists
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Skeptical Science New Research for Week #44, 2021
151 articles by 1,022 contributing authors Physical science of climate change, effects Arctic amplification of precipitation changes – the energy hypothesis Pithan & Jung Geophysical Research Letters 10.1029/2021gl094977 Observations of climate change, effects Evaluation of long-term air temperature, precipitation and flow rate parameters trend change using different approaches: a case study of A
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Discourses of Climate Delay
This blog post combines extracts from articles published by our German language partner website klimafakten.de , one from September 2020 and another from January 2021 . It'll be the start of a series of blog posts looking more closely at the various discourses of climate delay, an insidious way to keep delaying action to combat climate change now that outright climate science denial seems to be w
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Clean energy could save American lives to tune of $700 billion per year
This is a re-post from Yale Climate Connections The case for climate solutions has long been hindered because of the decades it will take for investments made today to yield benefits in the form of less extreme weather impacts. Carbon dioxide pollution remains in the atmosphere for upwards of a millennium, and so efforts to curb carbon emissions will only slowly bend the global warming curve. Cle
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2021 SkS Weekly Climate Change & Global Warming News Roundup #44
Listing of articles linked to on the Skeptical Science Facebook Page during the past week: Sun, October 24, 2021 through Sat, October 30, 2021 The following articles sparked above average interest during the week: SkS Analogy24 – Atmospheric Carbon Loans , Misleading posts claim record Antarctica cold disproves global warming , Fox Weather readies launch, facing questions over how it will cover c
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Skeptical Science New Research for Week #43, 2021
142 articles by 819 contributing authors Physical science of climate change, effects An Energy Budget Framework to Understand Mechanisms of Land–Ocean Warming Contrast Induced by Increasing Greenhouse Gases. Part I: Near-Equilibrium State Toda et al. Journal of Climate 10.1175/jcli-d-21-0302.1 Observations of climate change, effects Increasing large wildfires over the western United States linked
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Obstacles Biden could face in changing approach to climate cost-benefit analysis
This is a re-post from Yale Climate Connections by Lexi Smith ABiden administration shift from cost-benefit analysis to cost-effectiveness analysis could allow President Biden to pursue more aggressive climate action. But any such shift also would face some administrative and legal challenges. While President Biden could act unilaterally to change cost-benefit analysis practices, political resist
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Is cost-benefit analysis the right tool for federal climate policy?
This is a re-post from Yale Climate Connections by Lexi Smith Cost-benefit analysis (CBA) may sound like the realm of wonky bureaucrats tinkering on the edges of major policy initiatives. But CBA can have enormous consequences, especially in the context of climate change. When calculating climate harms, seemingly small assumptions made by economists can make or break a policy intervention. Consid
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2021 SkS Weekly Climate Change & Global Warming News Roundup #43
Listing of articles linked to on the Skeptical Science Facebook Page during the past week: Sun, October 17, 2021 through Sat, October 23, 2021 The following articles sparked above average interest during the week: Forget your carbon footprint. Let's talk about your climate shadow , People Who Jump to Conclusions Show Other Kinds of Thinking Errors , September 2021: Earth's 5th-warmest September o
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Skeptical Science New Research for Week #42, 2021
105 articles by 463 contributing authors Physical science of climate change, effects A simple model of blocking action over a hemisphere Kurgansky Theoretical and Applied Climatology 10.1007/s00704-021-03782-y Mechanisms of European Summer Drying under Climate Change Tuel & Eltahir Alizadeh Journal of Climate Open Access 10.1175/jcli-d-20-0968.1 Observations of climate change, effects Hotter and
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Kids' quality of life will depend on today's climate choices
This is a re-post from Yale Climate Connections It's the moral quandary of human-caused climate change: People least responsible for the problem will bear the brunt of its harmful consequences. As a substantial body of scientific research has established, this reality is true of developing countries. They generally are located in already-hot regions near the equator and lack needed financial reso
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Ben Santer on 'separating' and his 'small part' in understanding of climate science
This is a re-post from Yale Climate Connections Separating is hard. I've spent most of my scientific career trying to separate observed climate records into human-caused signals and the background noise of natural variability. It's been challenging and fascinating work. Challenging because so many different human and natural factors affect Earth's climate. Each factor varies in space and time. We
12h
Geert Jan van Oldenborgh, 1961–2021
This is a re-post from World Weather Attribution With deepest sadness we must share with you the news that Geert Jan van Oldenborgh, dear friend, amazing scientist, co-founder and co-leader of World Weather Attribution, husband and father, and a wonderful human, passed away on 12 October 2021. Geert Jan trained as a physicist and started working on climate in 1996, when he joined KNMI as a postdo
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2021 SkS Weekly Climate Change & Global Warming News Roundup #42
Listing of articles linked to on the Skeptical Science Facebook Page during the past week: Sun, October 10, 2021 through Sat, October 16, 2021 The following articles sparked above average interest during the week: 'This is a story that needs to be told': BBC film tackles Climategate scandal , Why trust science? , Overconfident Idiots: Why Incompetence Breeds Certainty , Ben Santer on 'separating'
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Can't find your keys? You need a chickadee brain
Researchers have shown that there is a genetic component underlying the amazing spatial memories of Mountain Chickadees. Although the genetic basis for spatial memory has been shown for humans and other mammals, direct evidence of that connection has never before been identified in birds.
13h
Just how much do density and green space affect urban energy use? It depends on where you live.
Tree cover, paved surfaces, the spacing of buildings and green spaces all affect how much energy it takes to offset the 'urban heat island effect.' But the relative contribution of these urban form factors has been a matter of debate. Researchers seeking to clarify the matter presented a method for measuring the impact of each of these factors — and revealed that their contribution to building en
13h
How to turn specific genes on and off
Type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and cancer are just some of the disorders associated with specific genes not 'turning on' and 'turning off' as they should. By using new CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing technology researchers have described a new technique that scientists across the world can potentially use to explore novel ways of treating diseases associated with dysregulation in DNA methylatio
13h
Long-term carbon dioxide emissions from cement production can be drastically reduced
Concrete is very versatile, inexpensive, literally hard, and can be cast into almost any shape. It consists, in principle, only of sand, gravel, water, and the binder cement. The latter is made by the calcination of lime, clay, and some other components, and forms stable calcium silicate hydrates during hardening, which are responsible for the properties of concrete. However, the problem lies prec
13h
Preferential and persistent impact of acute HIV-1 infection on CD4+ iNKT cells in colonic mucosa [Immunology and Inflammation]
Acute HIV-1 infection (AHI) results in the widespread depletion of CD4+ T cells in peripheral blood and gut mucosal tissue. However, the impact on the predominantly CD4+ immunoregulatory invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells during AHI remains unknown. Here, iNKT cells from peripheral blood and colonic mucosa were investigated during…
13h
The structure of the Aquifex aeolicus MATE family multidrug resistance transporter and sequence comparisons suggest the existence of a new subfamily [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) transporters are widespread in all domains of life. Bacterial MATE transporters confer multidrug resistance by utilizing an electrochemical gradient of H+ or Na+ to export xenobiotics across the membrane. Despite the availability of X-ray structures of several MATE transporters, a detailed understanding of the…
13h
Functional alterations in cortical processing of speech in glioma-infiltrated cortex [Neuroscience]
Recent developments in the biology of malignant gliomas have demonstrated that glioma cells interact with neurons through both paracrine signaling and electrochemical synapses. Glioma–neuron interactions consequently modulate the excitability of local neuronal circuits, and it is unclear the extent to which glioma-infiltrated cortex can meaningfully participate in neural computations. For…
13h
Societal shifts due to COVID-19 reveal large-scale complexities and feedbacks between atmospheric chemistry and climate change [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
The COVID-19 global pandemic and associated government lockdowns dramatically altered human activity, providing a window into how changes in individual behavior, enacted en masse, impact atmospheric composition. The resulting reductions in anthropogenic activity represent an unprecedented event that yields a glimpse into a future where emissions to the atmosphere are…
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Combining pressure and electrochemistry to synthesize superhydrides [Chemistry]
Recently, superhydrides have been computationally identified and subsequently synthesized with a variety of metals at very high pressures. In this work, we evaluate the possibility of synthesizing superhydrides by uniquely combining electrochemistry and applied pressure. We perform computational searches using density functional theory and particle swarm optimization calculations over a…
13h
Programmable droplet manipulation and wetting with soft magnetic carpets [Applied Physical Sciences]
The ability to regulate interfacial and wetting properties is highly demanded in anti-icing, anti-biofouling, and medical and energy applications. Recent work on liquid-infused systems achieved switching wetting properties, which allow us to turn between slip and pin states. However, patterning the wetting of surfaces in a dynamic fashion still remains…
13h
Within and between classroom transmission patterns of seasonal influenza among primary school students in Matsumoto city, Japan [Social Sciences]
Schools play a central role in the transmission of many respiratory infections. Heterogeneous social contact patterns associated with the social structures of schools (i.e., classes/grades) are likely to influence the within-school transmission dynamics, but data-driven evidence on fine-scale transmission patterns between students has been limited. Using a mathematical model, we…
13h
Mechanisms underlying drug-mediated regulation of membrane protein function [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
The hydrophobic coupling between membrane proteins and their host lipid bilayer provides a mechanism by which bilayer-modifying drugs may alter protein function. Drug regulation of membrane protein function thus may be mediated by both direct interactions with the protein and drug-induced alterations of bilayer properties, in which the latter will…
13h
Correction for Hu et al., COS-derived GPP relationships with temperature and light help explain high-latitude atmospheric CO2 seasonal cycle amplification [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
EARTH, ATMOSPHERIC, AND PLANETARY SCIENCES Correction for "COS-derived GPP relationships with temperature and light help explain high-latitude atmospheric CO2 seasonal cycle amplification," by Lei Hu, Stephen A. Montzka, Aleya Kaushik, Arlyn E. Andrews, Colm Sweeney, John Miller, Ian T. Baker, Scott Denning, Elliott Campbell, Yoichi P. Shiga, Pieter Tans, M….
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Correction to Supporting Information for Choi et al., Identifying an ovarian cancer cell hierarchy regulated by bone morphogenetic protein 2 [Cell Biology]
CELL BIOLOGY Correction to Supporting Information for "Identifying an ovarian cancer cell hierarchy regulated by bone morphogenetic protein 2," by Yun-Jung Choi, Patrick N. Ingram, Kun Yang, Lan Coffman, Mangala Iyengar, Shoumei Bai, Dafydd G. Thomas, Euisik Yoon, and Ronald J. Buckanovich, which was first published November 30, 2015; 10.1073/pnas.1507899112…
13h
Easy and difficult things in life
if someone tells you that something should be easy for you … if someone tells you that something should be easy for you, and then when you try something, something is easy, that was good advice in the end, but if someone tells you that something should be easy for you, and then you try something, and something is difficult for you, it doesn't seem to me that it is easy for someone to judge what
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Plastic waste release caused by COVID-19 and its fate in the global ocean [Environmental Sciences]
The COVID-19 pandemic has led to an increased demand for single-use plastics that intensifies pressure on an already out-of-control global plastic waste problem. While it is suspected to be large, the magnitude and fate of this pandemic-associated mismanaged plastic waste are unknown. Here, we use our MITgcm ocean plastic model…
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