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'You Dropped Something!'
Your Shot photographer Suyash Mehta gained a souvenir from a passing eagle in Satara, India: a long feather. India is home to nearly two dozen eagle species. This photo was submitted to Your Shot, our storytelling community where members can take part in photo assignments, get expert feedback, be published, and more. Join now >>
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LATEST

Robotics CEO Says Goal Is to "Remove" Human Labor From Economy
Domo Arigato In response to the so-called "labor shortage ," companies are looking to finally replace replace workers with machines — and robotics companies couldn't be happier to oblige. David Zapico, the CEO of robotics company Ametek Inc., told Bloomberg News that his company is "firing on all cylinders" because, as he put it, "people want to remove labor." He's not alone in his musings. Execu
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People testing negative for Covid-19 despite exposure may have 'immune memory'
Study says some individuals clear virus rapidly due to a strong immune response from existing T-cells, meaning tests record negative result Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage We all know that person who, despite their entire household catching Covid-19, has never tested positive for the disease. Now scientists have found an explanation, showing that a proportion of peop
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Cats track their owners' movements, research finds
Findings of Japanese study back idea that cats retain a mental representation of their owners If you've ever pondered whether your pet cat gives a whiskers about your whereabouts, research may have an answer: cats appear to track their owners as they move about the house and are surprised if they turn up somewhere they're not expecting them. The finding supports the idea that cats retain a mental
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New Vaccine Kills HIV in Monkeys, Researchers Planning Human Trial
A team of researchers in Japan has created a vaccine that was able to kill a type of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in macaques during an early trial, Japanese newspaper The Asahi Shimbun reports . While becoming infected with HIV isn't exactly great news, with the right treatment, the outlook is far better than it was when the virus first made its way to the US in the early 1980s. But treatm
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Fatty acid found in palm oil linked to spread of cancer
Study on mice found palmitic acid promoted metastasis in mouth and skin cancers Scientists have shown how a fatty acid found in palm oil can encourage the spread of cancer, in work that could pave the way for new treatments. The study, on mice, found that palmitic acid promoted metastasis in mouth and skin cancers. In future, this process could be targeted with drugs or carefully designed eating
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Laser light used to modulate free electrons into qubits
The laws of quantum physics are not only extraordinary—they also offer some far-reaching and unique possibilities for advanced information processing, quantum computing and cryptography. So far, the basic building blocks for such quantum operations are electric circuitry in form of superconducting resonators, light in form of photons or atoms in form of ion chains. However, all these quantum syste
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Metallurgist Who Tested Steel for US Navy Subs Admits Faking Results
(Photo: Darren Halstead/Unsplash) A metallurgist once responsible for testing the steel used on US Navy submarines has pled guilty to falsely representing the steel's integrity for more than three decades. Elaine Marie Thomas, a 67-year-old former director of metallurgy, worked from 1985 to 2017 at a Washington foundry called Bradken that supplied steel submarine hull castings to the US Navy. Dur
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ISS Forced to Dodge Debris From Chinese Anti-Satellite Weapon
Dodging Space Junk The International Space Station is preparing to maneuver out of the way of incoming space junk, which was initially created after China performed an in-orbit missile test of an anti-satellite weapon in 2007. Our space debris problem is a rapidly growing one — and the consequences becoming clearer than ever thanks to our increased presence in space. Around 3 pm Eastern time, the
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Elon Musk Loses $50 Billion in Two Days, But He's Still Richer Than Bezos
Big Drop Even a drop of $50 billion in net worth isn't throwing Elon Musk from the richest-person-in-the-world throne. According to the Bloomberg Billionaires Index, the Tesla CEO's net worth slid some $50 billion since the beginning of the week after Tesla shares plummeted an astonishing 16 percent over the same period, Insider reports . It's a spectacular drop for any billionaire's net worth. I
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Pet dog contracts Covid in first confirmed case in UK
Animal thought to have caught coronavirus from owners, but experts say there is no evidence pets can pass it to humans Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Humans share many things with their dogs, from the sofa to cuddles and quality time. But it seems the list of joint experiences may also include coronavirus infections. Experts say they have detected the first case in
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How your brain invents your "self" | Anil Seth
Who are you, really? Neuroscientist Anil Seth lays out his fascinating new theory of consciousness and self, centered on the notion that we "predict" the world into existence. From sleep to memory and everything in between, Seth explores the reality we experience in our brains — versus the world as it objectively might be. (This talk and conversation, hosted by TED science curator David Biello, w
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NASA Tries to Save Hubble, Again
The space telescope's latest hardware problem has kept it offline for two weeks, raising concerns that the decades-old spacecraft is running out of time.
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Startup Tests Rocket Launched by Super-Powerful Slingshot
Space startup SpinLaunch has a wild idea: instead of launching rockets vertically from the ground, why don't we spin them inside a massive centrifuge and use that built up energy to slingshot them to high altitudes, where they can kick on relatively small rocket engines to cover the final distance into orbit? After years of media coverage and countless renders of sleek rockets, the small company
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Pokémon Go Creator Fears "Dystopian Nightmare" Metaverse
The CEO behind the world's most popular augmented reality game believes that the metaverse is going to be a dystopian nightmare — but wants to help people build a better version of it. John Hanke, CEO of Niantic, helped usher in a new generation of AR gaming with 2016's " Pokémon Go." However, with the rise of Meta , along with discourse surrounding a VR metaverse reaching a fever pitch, Hanke wa
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Laws of Logic Lead to New Restrictions on the Big Bang
For over 20 years, physicists have had reason to feel envious of certain fictional fish: specifically, the fish inhabiting the fantastic space of M.C. Escher's Circle Limit III woodcut, which shrink to points as they approach the circular boundary of their ocean world. If only our universe had the same warped shape, theorists lament, they might have a much easier time understanding it. Escher's..
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The Right's Total Loss of Proportion
You can tell a lot about a group of people by what makes them angry. Consider the furious way many conservatives are reacting to the passage last week of a $1 trillion infrastructure bill backed by President Joe Biden—and then compare it with their reaction to the January 6 insurrection. [ Peter Wehner: Republicans own this insurrection ] After some House progressives refused to vote for the pack
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Origins of 'Transeurasian' languages traced to Neolithic millet farmers
Research finds language family that includes modern Japanese, Korean and Turkish spread largely due to agriculture A study combining linguistic, genetic and archaeological evidence has traced the origins of a family of languages including modern Japanese, Korean, Turkish and Mongolian and the people who speak them to millet farmers who inhabited a region in north-eastern China about 9,000 years a
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US and China Stop Bickering, Announce Surprise Climate Agreement Deal
Big Climate Deal The world's two biggest greenhouse gas emitters have agreed on a framework to fight climate change. Spokesmen for the US and China made the surprise announcement at the UN Climate Change Conference (COP26) on Wednesday, according to Reuters . The two countries reached an agreement that included setting more ambitious emissions-cutting goals, cutting down on deforestation, and dev
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The One Thanksgiving Necessity America Forgot to Stock
A couple weeks ago at my local CVS, I spied them in the wild for the very first time—Abbott BinaxNOWs, currently America's most sought-after rapid, at-home coronavirus test, piled neatly behind the counter. With the fall and winter holidays on the way, I figured it was a good opportunity to stock up. But after I asked for a few tests to cover my multi-person household, the pharmacist plucked just
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The Bleak Lessons of the Astroworld Nightmare
Early in the summer, when so many people felt giddy about getting back together, I was jolted with dread for the gatherings to come. The cause was an HBO documentary about the Woodstock '99 music festival , which resulted in destructive infernos, reported sexual assaults, and three deaths. The film portrayed that catastrophe as both a product of its times—the dreams of the '90s gone rotten—and an
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Nuclear Is Hot, for the Moment
This is an excerpt from The Atlantic 's climate newsletter, The Weekly Planet. Subscribe today . For years, the nuclear-power industry has had a complaint: Why does nobody love us ? Nuclear has been, after all, the Atlas of carbon-free energy production, keeping the world hefted on its shoulders, year after year, with thousands of megawatt-hours of electricity that required burning no fossil fuel
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'The tone of their posts shifted': how the wellness industry turned its back on Covid science
Its gurus increasingly promote vaccine scepticism, conspiracy theories and the myth that ill people have themselves to blame. How did self-care turn so nasty? Ozlem Demirboga Carr is not really into all that woo‑woo stuff. "I'm definitely a full-science kind of person," says the 41-year-old telecoms worker from Reading. She doesn't believe in crystals, affirmations or salt lamps. But she did find
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Startup Criticized for Bitcoin Mine in Impoverished Navajo Community
A Canadian crypto startup is being criticized for opening a bitcoin mine in the impoverished Navajo Nation. The mine is situated on land owned by the Navajo people outside of Shiprock, New Mexico, according to Vice . The operation itself is owned and run by a Alberta-based crypto firm called WestBlock Capital, and mines between 23 and 25 bitcoins per month — the equivalent of between $1.4 and $1.
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Israel to hold world's first drill to test readiness for new Covid variant
War games exercise will help prepare for the possible emergence of a lethal 'Omega' variant Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Israel is to conduct the world's first national Covid drill to test the country's readiness for an outbreak of a new and lethal variant of the virus. The drill, scheduled for Thursday, will take the format of a war games exercise and will be led
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Elizabeth Holmes Blamed Theranos' Problems On Everything But Theranos
Prostate Secrets In spite of running a healthtech company, the now-infamous Theranos founder Elizabeth Holmes was apparently hazy on prostate physiology. This revelation, as pointed out by The Verge , comes during Holmes' federal trial in which she was accused of defrauding investors. During his testimony on Tuesday, former Theranos lab director Kingshuk Das said that when he told Holmes that the
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Hollywood Has Forgotten What a Good Action Movie Looks Like
If you assembled a focus group of frequent moviegoers and asked them to describe the elements of a good action film, they'd probably come up with something along the lines of Red Notice . The star-laden blockbuster, which is dropping on Netflix this week, features three A-list names, all in familiar roles: Dwayne Johnson as a tough FBI agent, Ryan Reynolds as a motormouthed art thief, and Gal Gad
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The Dueling Ideas That Will Define the 21st Century
I t was catnip for policy analysts: Henceforth, the Biden administration signaled recently, the U.S. government would refer to its approach to China and other adversaries by a new name. Out was the Trump-era term, great-power competition . In was strategic competition . The assessments of what it all meant poured forth. But lost in the debate was the fact that the U.S. government appeared to be t
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Autumn Colors and Autumn Chill
As the days become shorter and the nights grow colder, I wanted to take one last look at the colorful beauty of this autumn, seen in cities and countryside vistas across the Northern Hemisphere. For even more autumnal goodness, check out " Fall Is in the Air: Images of the Season " from earlier this year.
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Boris Johnson unmasked as inept and uncaring | Letters
Readers express frustration at the prime minister's recent visit to Hexham hospital, where he failed to wear a face covering With regards to Boris Johnson's trip to Hexham hospital, the website of the Northumbria NHS foundation trust has advice for those wishing to visit ( Boris Johnson seen maskless in hospital as cases among MPs rise, 8 November ). To paraphrase, visiting should be kept to a mi
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Whole genome sequencing could save NHS millions of pounds, study suggests
Genomics England and NHS England findings highlight benefits of using WGS to help detect rare diseases The use of whole genome sequencing could save the NHS millions of pounds, a study suggests, after it found a quarter of people with rare illnesses received a diagnosis for their condition through the technology. In some cases, the findings have provided reassurance for families that they have no
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Meet VMS: The briefcase-sized chemistry lab headed to Venus
Short for Venus Mass Spectrometer, VMS is one of five instruments aboard the DAVINCI descent probe. Launching in 2029, DAVINCI will be the first US probe mission to enter Venus' atmosphere in over 40 years. The goal of the mission is to explore Venus to determine if it was habitable, and to understand how it ended up as inhospitable as it did.
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The Uncomfortable Truths of American Spaceflight
Update your calendars, everyone: NASA isn't going to put people on the moon in 2024. The space agency announced yesterday that it is now aiming to send a crew to orbit the moon, Apollo 8 style, in May 2024, and then land astronauts on the surface, à la Apollo 11, sometime in 2025. If your reaction to this news is something like, Wait a second, what? NASA is trying to land people on the moon again
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Species feared extinct is the only frog with true teeth on its lower jaw
In a new study published in Evolution, biologists laid to rest a century-old debate by confirming that a single species of frog, out of the more than 7,000 living today, has true teeth on its lower jaw. The culprit, a large marsupial frog named Gastrotheca guentheri, has puzzled scientists since its discovery in 1882 for possessing what appeared to be a complete set of jagged, daggerlike teeth on
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The Internet's Unkillable App
C ave paintings. Petroglyphs. Smoke signals. Carrier pigeons. Telegraphs. The Pony Express. Airmail. Blogs. Myspace. Human modes of communication come and go, each replaced by a new technology and a faster method of delivery. But somehow, the humble newsletter survives. In an era with countless ways to reach out and bombard someone, newsletters have not only endured; they're more popular than eve
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Hesitancy, inequity: is the US 'making the same mistakes' with kids' vaccines?
Only half of children aged 12 and above have been vaccinated, despite vaccine being available for months When Nia Heard-Garris's son found out the Covid vaccines were authorized for adults in the US late last year, he was thrilled, then asked, "But what about us? What about kids?" The eight-year-old is finally signed up for his first shot later this week. Even though he's afraid of needles, he ca
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New species of big-nosed dinosaur discovered by retired doctor
Nasal bone distinguishes herbivore Brighstoneus simmondsi, whose skull was found on the Isle of Wight A new species of dinosaur with an extremely large nose has been identified by a retired GP who spent lockdown rummaging through boxes of ancient bones. Jeremy Lockwood, who is studying for a PhD at the University of Portsmouth, set himself the task of cataloguing every iguanodon bone discovered o
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Largest plant genome sequencing effort yields a pan-genome for chickpea
An international team of researchers from 41 organizations has assembled chickpea's pan-genome by sequencing the genomes of 3,366 chickpea lines from 60 countries. Led by the International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), the team identified 29,870 genes that includes 1,582 previously unreported novel genes. The research is the largest effort of its kind for any plant,
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Unraveling the eclipses of millisecond pulsars in a compact binary
A group of scientists working at the National Centre for Radio Astrophysics (NCRA), Pune have for the first time unraveled the eclipse mechanisms for the millisecond pulsars in compact binary systems using the upgraded Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (uGMRT). Eclipses in millisecond pulsars have been known since the 1980's, but the exact cause of these eclipses have not been understood till now. D
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Detectors for a new era of ATLAS physics
The High-Luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) will dramatically increase the rate of collisions in the ATLAS experiment. While offering an opportunity for physicists to explore some of the rarest processes in the universe, the large collision rate brings new challenges—in particular, higher radiation levels and significantly more data. The ATLAS collaboration is adapting to dea
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Using machine learning to derive black hole motion from gravitational waves
The announcement that the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) had detected gravitational waves during the merger of two black holes sent ripples throughout the scientific community in 2016. The earthshaking news not only confirmed one of Albert Einstein's key predictions in his general theory of relativity, but also opened a door to a better understanding of the motion of bl
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Ten Republican-led states sue over vaccine mandate for healthcare workers
Lawsuit follows similar ones challenging new Biden administration rules for federal contractors and large businesses A coalition of 10 states sued the federal government on Wednesday to try to block a Covid-19 vaccine requirement for healthcare workers, marking a new front in the resistance by Republican-led states to the pandemic policies of President Joe Biden's administration. The lawsuit file
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New model will help find Earth-like exoplanets
A new category of planet, known as eggshell planets, which orbit distant stars, have ultra-thin crusts too thin to sustain tectonics and will be hostile to life, according to a new international study involving the University of St Andrews.
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Human trials of vaccine for multiple species of Ebola to begin soon
It is hoped vaccine based on similar technology to Oxford Covid jab can protect against both Zaire and Sudan species of virus The first jab of a new Ebola vaccine that may protect against multiple species of the virus is to be given on Thursday, researchers have said, with the vaccine based on similar technology to the Oxford Covid jab. Ebola haemorrhagic fever is caused by the Ebola virus and ha
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The Atlantic Daily: Here's What We Know About Breakthrough Infections
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox. COVID-19 breakthrough infections are inevitable. The question is how we deal with them. This summer, initial reports on breakthrough infections sent many Americans retreating back into our shells.
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NASA's Roman mission will empower a new era of cosmological discovery
A team of scientists has forecast the scientific impact of the Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope's High Latitude Wide Area Survey on critical questions in cosmology. This observation program will consist of both imaging, which reveals the locations, shapes, sizes, and colors of objects like distant galaxies, and spectroscopy, which involves measuring the intensity of light from those objects at di
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Black Friday Osmo deals 2021
Screen time turns into tactile time with these Osmo kits that help kids learn math, science, literacy and more. And Live Science is scouring retail sites to spot the best Black Friday Osmo deals for 2021.
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Facebook's Climate Misinformation Problem Is Getting Bigger
A report released last week by the Real Facebook Oversight Board, an independent watchdog group, found that among 195 Facebook pages known to distribute climate misinformation, there were an estimated 45,000 posts downplaying or denying the climate crisis, with combined views topping over a million.
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James Webb Space Telescope will reveal new insights into astrochemistry
On Dec. 18, the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will launch from French Guiana to its destination almost a million miles from Earth. The telescope will give scientists unprecedented views of chemistry occurring throughout the universe. This information will provide new insights into how planetary systems form and whether life-sustaining conditions exist elsewhere in the universe, according to a
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Study uncovers mechanisms of drug side effects
Researchers at Weill Cornell Medicine have discovered how drugs can affect various membrane-spanning proteins in addition to their intended target, potentially causing unwanted side effects. The results illuminate one of the central problems of drug discovery and point to new strategies for solving it.
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Skeptical Science New Research for Week #45, 2021
If the forecast says "rain," bring an umbrella One of the more thought-provoking articles in this week's collection is Natural hazards and climate change are not drivers of disasters , by Alik Ismail-Zadeh of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. A provocative title, but it's hard to argue with the article's premise, let alone deny our deep and rich history of unsatisfactory outcomes thanks to not p
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Supreme Court to weigh EPA authority to regulate greenhouse pollutants
This is a re-post from Yale Climate Connections by Lexi Smith The Supreme Court agreed to hear a case, West Virginia v. EPA , challenging the Environmental Protection Agency's authority to regulate greenhouse gases as pollutants. The case presents an opportunity for the Court to overturn key climate precedents and potentially change the relationship between federal agencies and Congress. The deci
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Joy, toys and bumper cars as Manila's children reclaim the city
Malls, restaurants and arcades in the Philippines capital are packed with children as Covid curbs ease See all our coronavirus coverage Ten-year-old Gabriel Estrella beams as he talks about T-shirts he bought on his first day out at a shopping mall after nearly two years of staying away due to coronavirus restrictions in the Philippines. "Before the pandemic, buying T-shirts used to be boring," h
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Neon Nights
With raindrops no longer falling, this street in Beijing, China, hums back to life under the glow of neon signs. Your Shot photographer Caue Ferraz took this photo in the neighborhood around Jingshan Park, a 57-acre green space with views into the Forbidden City. This photo was submitted to Your Shot, our storytelling community where members can take part in photo assignments, get expert feedback
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Sandy Oasis
Anguilla, a British territory in the Caribbean, is a nation of tranquility, but Sandy Island takes it to another level. This speck of sand in the bright blue waters is constantly reshaped by the ocean and weather, and visitors to the cay are encouraged to make reservations. Your Shot photographer Matthew Wade captured this shot using a drone. This photo was submitted to Your Shot, our storytellin
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Golden Hills
Your Shot photographer Hannah Overeem captured this shot of her dog, Badger, an Australian cattle dog, in Chino Hills, California. She writes that the contrast of the golden field and blue-and-white sky give this image a "surreal" look. This photo was submitted to Your Shot, our storytelling community where members can take part in photo assignments, get expert feedback, be published, and more. J
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Hidden Gem
Forged by the wear of water rushing over rocks, Olo Canyon in Arizona is concealed inside the Grand Canyon. Its alluring landscape includes natural springs and rocks shaped like cathedral amphitheaters. See more pictures from the September 2016 story " Are We Losing the Grand Canyon? "
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Behind the Curtain
Circus performers in Hanoi, Vietnam, prepare for the show minutes before it gets under way. Nguyen Thi Thu Hiep, shown here stretching, is a contortionist. For extra money, she also performs at private parties and social events. See more pictures from the September 2016 story " A Life at the Circus: Going in Vietnam ."
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City of Sun Showers
Even in a rainstorm, Paris lives up to its nickname of the City of Light, as sun streaks through storm clouds over the city in this image by Your Shot photographer Raffaele Tuzio. This photo was submitted to Your Shot, our storytelling community where members can take part in photo assignments, get expert feedback, be published, and more. Join now >>
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A Flash in the Distance
Flashes of lightning illuminate the night sky above Lake Ontario, as seen from an overlook in Lyndonville, New York—located about an hour from the Canadian border at Niagara Falls. This photo was submitted to Your Shot, our storytelling community where members can take part in photo assignments, get expert feedback, be published, and more. Join now >>
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Flood of Color
Floods bring a mosaic of color to the rice fields of Y Ty, Vietnam. The wet season typically lasts from May to June in the mountainous village. This photo was submitted to Your Shot, our storytelling community where members can take part in photo assignments, get expert feedback, be published, and more. Join now >>
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A Walk on the Wild Side
Ye Ye, a 16-year-old giant panda, lounges in a wild enclosure at a conservation center in China's Wolong Nature Reserve. China has been creating reserves to restore and protect disappearing panda habitat and is now introducing captive-bred pandas into the wild. See more pictures from the August 2016 feature story " Pandas Get to Know Their Wild Side ."
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A Popular Perch
Birds gather on a rock formation—a popular attraction for both seabirds and people—at Natural Bridges State Beach in Santa Cruz, California. Your Shot photographer Laurence Norah writes that it's "a wonderful place to get the sunset … A long exposure added a slightly surreal element to the shot." This photo was submitted to Your Shot, our storytelling community where members can take part in phot
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High-Rise and Shine
The brightly colored lights of Shinjuku, a ward of Tokyo, Japan, glitter in this double exposure by Masayuki Yamashita. The district is a bustling hub and home to what's known as the world's busiest railway station: Shinjuku Station, through which millions of passengers pass daily. This photo was submitted to Your Shot, our storytelling community where members can take part in photo assignments,
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Whale of a Time
A whale shark—the biggest fish in the sea—swims along, "extremely curious" about his observers. Your Shot photographer David Robinson, who researches whale shark ecology, captured this image in Qatar on a day with "great visibility" in an area with waters that are usually full of plankton. Robinson's shot was recently featured in the Daily Dozen . This photo was submitted to Your Shot, our storyt
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Life on Mars
Your Shot member Bryan Geiger's early morning visit to the summit area of Haleakalā volcano in Hawaii's Haleakalā National Park yielded this extraordinary image of an otherworldly landscape. "I woke up at 3 a.m. and drove to Haleakalā summit," Geiger writes. "As the sun came up it revealed only a white wall of mist. After a couple of hours, disappointed and cold, I decided to leave. While driving
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Western Spirit
Framing an expansive blue sky, desert buttes, and a pair of majestic horses, Your Shot member Nora Feddal captures the essence of the American West in this image made while visiting Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park, which extends into both Arizona and Utah. This photo was submitted to Your Shot, our storytelling community where members can take part in photo assignments, get expert feedback, be
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Night Falls
By day, the water of Arizona's Havasu Falls is a remarkable, bright blue-green. In this image submitted by Jes Stockhausen, it's a milky ribbon, illuminated at night by the light of a camper's headlamps. "While camping in the Havasupai [Indian Reservation], you hear the roar of the falls 24/7. My friend and I went to see if we could see the stars and were blown away [by] the sheer darkness of the
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First Light
Photographer Theerasak Saksritawee submitted this photo of birds taking flight in a golden sky over Taiwan's National Chiang Kai-shek Memorial Hall. The memorial, dedicated to the former president of the Republic of China, includes gardens, ponds, and this sprawling plaza, a popular spot for national celebrations. Saksritawee's shot was recently featured in the Daily Dozen . This photo was submit
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A Walk in the Park
Photographer Graham De Lacy captured this shot of an African elephant taking a sunny-day stroll in South Africa's Madikwe Game Reserve. "[It was] one of the many close encounters … I've had the pleasure of experiencing," De Lacy writes. African elephants are the largest land mammals on Earth. This photo was submitted to Your Shot, our storytelling community where members can take part in photo as
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Pelican Party
Pelicans, seen from above in this aerial shot submitted by Your Shot community member Stas Bartnikas, congregate on the Colorado River in Mexico. The social birds usually travel in flocks and are found on many of the world's coastlines and along lakes and rivers. This photo was submitted to Your Shot, our storytelling community where members can take part in photo assignments, get expert feedback
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Lifting the Veil
A lacy veil of cigarette smoke encircles a man in Sarawak, one of two Malaysian states on the island of Borneo. "I embarked on photography trips to inland Sarawak to seek out the native people [who] preserve their way of life," Your Shot member Jonathan Nyik Fui Tai says. "Many of the tribes have slowly [been] assimilated into modern society." This photo was submitted to Your Shot, our storytelli
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Hot Rock
Spiking from inky storm clouds, a white-hot thunderbolt spears the plateau during a summer storm in Vermilion Cliffs National Monument. The monument comprises 300,000 unspoiled acres that cross both Arizona and Utah and contain steep cliffs, deep canyons, and sandstone formations. Rankin's shot was recently featured in the Daily Dozen . This photo was submitted to Your Shot, our storytelling comm
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Black Water
Seen from above, a small boat travels the Buriganga River, thick and dark with pollution, in Dhaka, the capital city of Bangladesh. Though the water is filled with human and industrial waste, millions depend on it for their livelihood and transportation. "The Buriganga is economically very important to Dhaka," Your Shot photographer Jakir Hossain Rana writes. "Launches and country boats provide a
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Rose-Tinted Spectacle
Sunset splashes a rosy tint over the landscape in this image submitted by Fabrizio Fortuna. The mountain is the 1,500-foot (457-meter) Vestrahorn, a main landmark of southeastern Iceland. This photo was submitted to Your Shot, our storytelling community where members can take part in photo assignments, get expert feedback, be published, and more. Join now >>
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Pushed for Time
"One of the best places [to photograph] in Cairo, Egypt, is the camels market," writes Your Shot member Nader Saadallah. "At this moment, the camels' keepers and sellers [are] trying to push the camel into their vehicle to send it to the local market to be slaughtered to be ready for customers." This photo was submitted to Your Shot, our storytelling community where members can take part in photo
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Old Guard
"Hundreds of old cypresses guard the perimeter of Lake Camécuaro and its turquoise-colored, crystal clear water," Javier Eduardo Alvarez writes of this photo he made of the small Mexican lake, popular for its picturesque beauty. "This place is magical." This photo was submitted to Your Shot, our storytelling community where members can take part in photo assignments, get expert feedback, be publi
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Elon Musk Just Sold $1.1 Billion of His Tesla Stock
Sell! Sell! This past weekend, Tesla and SpaceX CEO Elon Musk polled his Twitter followers on whether he should sell ten percent of his Tesla stock. "Much is made lately of unrealized gains being a means of tax avoidance, so I propose selling 10 percent of my Tesla stock," the billionaire tweeted at the time. "Do you support this?" Ultimately, 57 percent of respondents said that he should — and n
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SpaceX launches four astronauts into orbit, including 600th person to reach space
The flight to the International Space Station had been repeatedly delayed by medical issues and bad weather A SpaceX rocket carried four astronauts toward orbit Wednesday night, including the 600th person to reach space in 60 years. The repeatedly delayed flight occurred just two days after SpaceX brought four other astronauts home from the International Space Station. Continue reading…
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My 3 Greatest Revelations – Issue 108: Change
1 We Are Smothering the Planet with Our Poop The next time you go grocery shopping, look at where your food comes from. Most of it isn't local. Strawberries come from California or Florida, asparagus from Mexico or Chile, bananas from Brazil or Ecuador. Most of the food gets shipped to us, trucked, flown, helicoptered, or whatever. We eat it and excrete it—in the same place, over and over. And th
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This Is Some Good Shit – Issue 108: Change
I'm standing on an observation platform atop 24 colossal pressure cookers that belong to DC Water, the sewage treatment plant of our country's capital. You may think that a sewage plant isn't much to look at, but there's a lot to take in from this observation platform. In front of me there are fields of silvery pipes stretching over massive sewage aeration tanks, where sludge percolates after it
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Did Cars Rescue Our Cities From Horses? – Issue 108: Change
In the annals of transportation history persists a tale of how automobiles in the early 20th century helped cities conquer their waste problems. It's a tidy story, so to speak, about dirty horses and clean cars and technological innovation. As typically told, it's a lesson we can learn from today, now that cars are their own environmental disaster, and one that technology can no doubt solve. The
5h
Zika virus-specific therapy protects the fetal mouse brain
A gene-silencing therapy protected against Zika virus transmission from pregnant mice to the mouse fetuses, finds a new study. The treatment, which harnesses nanoparticles called small extracellular vesicles (sEVs) for drug delivery, crossed the placenta and blood-brain barrier to greatly reduce fetal neurological damage, including virus-induced brain shrinkage.
7h
Adding sound to quantum simulations
Aiming to emulate the quantum characteristics of materials more realistically, researchers have figured out a way to create a lattice of light and atoms that can vibrate — bringing sound to an otherwise silent experiment.
7h
Back-to-back hurricanes expected to increase in the Gulf Coast
By the end of the century, Louisiana and Florida could be twice as likely to experience two tropical storms that make landfall within nine days of each other, according to new model estimates. Being hit by two storms in quick succession gives communities and infrastructure less time to recover between disasters.
7h
Apple chips moisture analysis made easy with near-infrared spectroscopy
Dried snack foods such as apple chips are a convenient alternative to fresh fruit, providing longer shelf life and easier storage. Consumers increasingly demand product variety, so companies coat such snack foods with fruit and vegetable powders to enhance taste and sensory appeal. A new study explores the drying process of coated and uncoated apple chips using near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy to
7h
Tooth fast, tooth curious? New study uncovers novel approach to plant-based diet, unique to long-necked dinosaurs
How did the largest animals to ever walk the Earth dominate their environments? By doing something totally revolutionary: keeping it simple. Published in BMC Ecology and Evolution, a new study led by Postdoctoral Research Scientist and periodic dinosaur dentist Dr. Keegan Melstrom at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County's Dinosaur Institute reveals that colossal sauropod dinosaurs, the
9h
Pay-for-performance incentives may put innovation at risk
Managers looking to create social conditions that lead to open, diversified and large networks—which are known to spur innovation—should avoid implementing pay-for-performance incentives that rest on short-term and quantitative performance metrics. According to new research published in Strategic Management Journal, such pay incentives result in more closed and smaller networks in organizations, s
9h
"Being Human" | Naima Penniman
In this stunning spoken-word performance, poet and "freedom-forging futurist" Naima Penniman celebrates the wonders of the natural world and humanity's connection to it. "I wonder if the sun debates dawn some mornings," she says.
9h
Humans are guilty of breaking an oceanic law of nature: study
A new international study carried out by the Institute of Environmental Science and Technology of the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (ICTA-UAB) has examined the distribution of biomass across all life in the oceans, from bacteria to whales. Their quantification of human impact reveals a fundamental alteration to one of life's largest scale patterns.
10h
'Tug of war' between cells: What happens when crucial connections are missing
The ability of cells to move together in harmony is crucial for numerous biological processes in our body, for example wound healing, or the healthy development of an organism. This movement is made possible by the connections between individual cells. These connections, in turn, are established by various protein molecules which transfer the necessary forces and information between neighboring ce
10h
Methane's short lifespan presents golden opportunity to quickly address climate change
Sébastien Biraud is a Berkeley Lab scientist leading an effort to identify and mitigate some of the largest emitters of methane in California's Southern San Joaquin Valley. Methane is a short-lived air pollutant and greenhouse gas capable of warming the atmosphere about 80 times as fast as the far longer-lived carbon dioxide over 20 years. This month the U.S. and European Union launched the Global
10h
New space telescope to peer back at the universe's first galaxies
On Dec. 18, NASA is set to launch its next flagship mission into space. The spacecraft, called the James Webb Space Telescope, brings a lot of risks: Its roughly 270-square-foot mirror, which will collect light streaming in from the far reaches of space, will launch folded up inside a rocket, then unfurl far from Earth.
10h
Best Science Gifts: Telescopes, Microscopes, and Drones, Oh My!
Discovery relies on the world of science and technology. For those with curious minds, science gifts are more than entertainment. They're a way to understand the physical and natural environment around them. The trick is finding the right gift for the right person. Take note of your favorite science lover's interests because science spans engineering, photography, robotics, and dozens of other fi
10h
Leave only footprints that will wash away | Children of Palau
The people of Palau — a pristine ocean state made up of more than 300 islands in the western Pacific — warmly welcome travelers to their home every year. But the guests don't always know how to protect the country's beautiful beaches and coral atolls. Enter the Palau Pledge: an environmental pledge that's now part of visitors' visas, where they promise to "tread lightly, act kindly and explore m
10h
The mighty power and flavor of plants | Derek Sarno
Vegan chef (and head chef of TED Countdown Summit) Derek Sarno is on a mission to unleash the mighty power of plants, creating nutritious food from mushrooms and vegetables that's full of texture and flavor — and good for the planet. He dishes out some creative cooking inspiration and shares how his personal journey led him to create amazing food that avoids animal suffering.
10h
The powerful women on the front lines of climate action | Farwiza Farhan
When it comes to big problems like climate change, we tend to focus on big solutions — but many of the best ideas come from people on the ground, facing day-to-day conservation battles. Sharing her effort to protect the Leseur ecosystem in Indonesia (the last place on Earth where the Sumatran rhino, tiger, elephant and orangutan still roam together in the wild), TED Fellow and conservationist Far
10h
A bold plan to protect 30 percent of the Earth's surface and ocean floor | Enric Sala
As a diver in the 1970s, marine ecologist Enric Sala saw once-lush oceanscapes reduced to underwater deserts — but later, in marine preserves across the globe, he also witnessed the ocean's power to rejuvenate itself when left to its own natural devices. Could rewilding the planet help us restore biodiversity and reduce the impacts of climate change? Sala presents the 30×30 initiative: a global p
10h
A vision for sustainable energy in Africa | Chibeze Ezekiel
Africa needs new energy sources to fuel its development, but the continent should invest in renewable energy instead of cheap, polluting alternatives like coal, says climate inclusion activist Chibeze Ezekiel. He tells the story of how he worked with local communities in Ghana to halt the construction of the country's first coal power plant — and encouraged the government to prioritize investment
10h
Mechanisms of drug side effects uncovered
Researchers have discovered how drugs can affect various membrane-spanning proteins in addition to their intended target, potentially causing unwanted side effects. The results illuminate one of the central problems of drug discovery and point to new strategies for solving it.
10h
Watch: Solar fuel refinery is 'no science fiction'
Researchers have developed a technology that can produce carbon-neutral transportation fuels from sunlight and air. Now, in a Nature paper, they demonstrate the stable and reliable operation of the solar mini-refinery under real on-sun conditions. And they show a way to introduce solar fuels to the market without additional carbon taxes. For the past two years, researchers led by Aldo Steinfeld,
11h
Radiotherapy may explain heart disease in childhood cancer survivors
Radiotherapy may explain why childhood cancer survivors often develop metabolic disease, according to new research. A spectrum of conditions that includes coronary heart disease and diabetes, cardiometabolic disease typically affects people who are obese, elderly, or insulin resistant. For reasons yet unknown, young, seemingly healthy adults who survived childhood cancer are also at risk. The new
11h
Is COVID-19 Seasonal?
While the weather isn't currently the dominant factor driving SARS-CoV-2 transmission, experts say that in the future COVID-19 may become a disease of winter.
12h
Reversing new-onset type 1 diabetes with pyramid-like DNA: Mouse study
Usually diagnosed in children, teens and young adults, type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease in which the immune system attacks and destroys insulin-secreting beta-cells in the pancreas. As a result, people with type 1 diabetes can't regulate their blood sugar levels and require insulin treatment for survival. Now, researchers have reversed new-onset type 1 diabetes in mice with pyramid-like DN
12h
Spread of Transeurasian languages was due to agriculture
By triangulating data from linguistics, archaeology and genetics, a new study by an international team of researchers proposes a 'Farming Hypothesis' for the spread of Transeurasian languages, tracing the origins of Japonic, Koreanic, Tungusic, Mongolic and Turkic to the movements of Neolithic millet farmers from the region of the West Liao River.
12h
Plant-based gummy candy helps vegans and vegetarians get their vitamins
Worldwide, millions of people follow vegan and vegetarian diets for religious, ethical, environmental or economic reasons. While these diets have purported health benefits, they can also lack essential nutrients, such as vitamins B12 and D3, if not well-planned or supplemented correctly. Now, researchers have packed a strawberry-flavored gummy with these vitamins, formulating it without any animal
12h
Mosaic brain evolution in guppies helps to explain vertebrate cognitive evolution
Researchers at Stockholm University have provided the first experimental evidence that brain regions can evolve independently of each other during cognitive evolution. This so called mosaic brain evolution was verified empirically in an artificial selection experiment with guppies (Poecilia reticulata) where telencephalon size (but no other regions) differed by 10 percent after only four generatio
12h
Uncovering racial disparities in nonfatal police shootings
An analysis of data from four U.S. states suggests that Black people may be more likely than white people to be nonfatally shot and injured by police in these states, and these disparities are greater than seen for fatal police shootings. Justin Nix of the University of Nebraska Omaha and John Shjarback of Rowan University in New Jersey present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on
12h
How does homeschooling affect adolescents' character, health and well-being?
Compared to peers at public schools, adolescents who are homeschooled are more likely to report greater character strengths and fewer risky health behaviors later in life, but are less likely to attain a college degree, according to a new study published this week in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Tyler VanderWeele of Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, US, and colleagues.
12h
Starfish larva inspires drug delivery microrobot
Researchers have developed a tiny robot that mimics the movement of a starfish larva. Among scientists, there is great interest in tiny machines that are set to revolutionize medicine. These microrobots , often only a fraction of the diameter of a hair, are made to swim through the body to deliver medication to specific areas and perform the smallest surgical procedures. Natural microorganisms su
12h
Listiga läkare maxar sjukintyget
Försäkringskassans krav på sjukintyg och vad som krävs för att en person ska beviljas sjukpenning har diskuterats i flera år. I en ny avhandling beskrivs hur läkare använder list och slughet för att maximera chansen att patientens sjukskrivning beviljas. Det kan till exempel handla om att göra patienternas egen berättelse till medicinsk bedömning. − Som läkare vet man att Försäkringskassan gör be
13h
A climate policy framework to deal with existential climate risk
As the impacts of climate change become more severe and limits to adaptation draw near, vulnerable communities will need different kinds of finance to build resilience and transform how they protect themselves. Work by IIASA researchers has culminated in a new policy brief, which lays out a finance framework for such climate risk and provides relevant model insight to inform international debates
13h
Mapping eukaryotic plankton globally in all their diversity
Eukaryotic plankton are an essential and highly diverse component of marine ecosystems. A research team has established their global geographic distribution using DNA data and a probabilistic model. The study highlights large variations in geographic structure between plankton groups depending on their diversity, body size, and ecology, which can be linked to variations in sensitivity to local env
13h
New ways for dynamical prediction of extreme heat waves
Over the past decade, several extreme heat waves and heat domes have had a catastrophic impact on society and the biosphere. In 2021, all regions of the northern hemisphere have been affected. In late June and July, we saw simultaneous extreme heat waves in the Pacific Northwest, persistent heat waves in Siberia that fueled massive wildfires, and temperatures and humidity in Pakistan, northern Ind
13h
The future of face masks
Building better air filters could help head off the next pandemic. At the 74th Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Fluid Dynamics, scientists will present the latest results on how future face masks may work, what happens when masks get wet, and why improper mask usage can sometimes be worse than no mask at all.
13h
How to COVID-proof the grocery line, classroom, and orchestra
Despite effective vaccines, it has become clear that SARS-CoV-2 will not fully disappear anytime soon. At the 74th Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Fluid Dynamics, physicists and engineers will present innovative ways to avoid clouds of coronavirus whether waiting in line, going to class, listening to the opera, or encountering people elsewhere.
13h
Extracting high-quality magnesium sulphate from seawater desalination brine
Given that mining to extract high-grade mineral ores is wastefully energy intensive, exhaustible, and bad for the environment, scientists have been scouting for alternatives. A group of Korean researchers, led by Professor Myoung-Jin Kim, from Korea Maritime and Ocean University, have now succeeded in extracting high-quality minerals from just seawater. Specifically, they have achieved the extract
13h
Image: Hubble surveys a snowman sculpted from gas and dust
The Snowman Nebula is an emission nebula that resides in the constellation Puppis in the southern sky, about 6,000 light-years away from Earth. Emission nebulae are diffuse clouds of gas that have become so charged by the energy of nearby massive stars that they glow with their own light. The radiation from these massive stars strips electrons from the nebula's hydrogen atoms in a process called i
13h
Identifying individual proteins using nanopores and supercomputers
The amount and types of proteins our cells produce tell us important details about our health. Researchers have shown that it is possible to identify individual proteins with single-amino acid resolution and nearly 100% accuracy. Their method uses nanopores — engineered openings that generate an electrical signal when molecules are pulled through by a specific enzyme.
13h
Tread lightly: 'Eggshell planets' possible around other stars
Strange 'eggshell planets' are among the rich variety of exoplanets possible, according to a study. These rocky worlds have an ultra-thin outer brittle layer and little to no topography. Such worlds are unlikely to have plate tectonics, raising questions as to their habitability. Planetary geologists have said at least three such worlds found during previous astronomical surveys may already be kno
13h
Best Pet Cameras to Keep Tabs on Your Four-Legged Pals
The best pet cameras allow you to have a private feed of pet antics on tap whenever you need a break at the office, and even control the action through voice commands, treat catapults, and play features. While these clever devices aren't going to unearth the secrets of a clandestine outdoor adventure with the hand-held art-cinema style of Bill Morrison's A Trip to the Beach , they make checking i
14h
Simultaneous TES readout at level of Athena-like telescopes
Scientists at SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research have simultaneously read out the signal of 37 TES pixels at a resolution of 2.2 eV for X-rays (6 keV). It is the first time that a simultaneous readout fulfills the requirements for future space telescopes at the level of Athena in terms of both number of pixels and energy resolution. In 2020, SRON already set a world record of 1.3 eV ene
15h
The role of animal pheromones in regulating fat burning and longevity
Pheromones are potent molecules that mediate communications between animals and even between humans. Usually, a sender animal synthesizes and excretes pheromones to the environment; pheromones are detected by a receiver animal and elicit dramatic changes in the development, growth, metabolism, and sex behavior of the receiver animal. In a paper published in Science China Life Sciences, scientists
15h
The state of natural capital accounting in Europe
Mapping and Assessment for Integrated Ecosystem Accounting promotes the mainstreaming of natural capital accounting (NCA) in EU member states and Norway. The main methodological basis of the project is the System of Environmental Economic Accounting—Ecosystem Accounting (SEEA-EA).
15h
Preventing data leak with dual-band metahologram
New frontiers have opened in the world of preventing data breaches by using light of two different wavelengths—visible and infrared light. This is achieved by using a new material called a metasurface that makes extreme use of properties of light. Using this technology, security is enhanced by storing information that needs to be concealed separately.
15h
Attaining precise sample alignment under extreme conditions
The exact angular alignment of sample materials for the determination of their physical properties under extreme conditions is often difficult. Engineer Stefan Findeisen and physicist Dr. Hannes Kühne from the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have developed the "Rotax," a filigree two-axis rotator that can do just that. Now, the device is ready to conquer the market.
15h
Bubble casting soft robotics
Nature, Published online: 10 November 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-04029-6 An all-in-one methodology for fabricating soft robotics reported here uses interfacial flows in elastomers that cure to produce actuators that can be tailored to suit applications from artificial muscles to grippers.
15h
Allometric rules for mammalian cortical layer 5 neuron biophysics
Nature, Published online: 10 November 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-04072-3 Analyses of layer 5 cortical pyramidal neurons in 10 mammalian species show that human neurons are distinct in that they do not follow the expected allometric relationship between neuron size and membrane conductance.
15h
In situ formation of ZnOx species for efficient propane dehydrogenation
Nature, Published online: 10 November 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03923-3 Propene is obtained through propane dehydrogenation using catalysts that are toxic, expensive or demanding to regenerate with ecologically harmful compounds, but the ZnO-based alternative reported here is cheap, clean and scalable.
15h
Dietary palmitic acid promotes a prometastatic memory via Schwann cells
Nature, Published online: 10 November 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-04075-0 Palmitic acid induces stable transcriptional and chromatin changes that lead to long-term stimulation of metastasis in orthotopic models of cancer through the secretion by tumour-associated Schwann cells of a specialized proregenerative extracellular matrix, the ablation of which inhibits metastasis initiation.
15h
A chickpea genetic variation map based on the sequencing of 3,366 genomes
Nature, Published online: 10 November 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-04066-1 Whole-genome sequencing of 3,171 cultivated and 195 wild chickpea accessions is used to construct a chickpea pan-genome, providing insight into chickpea evolution and enabling breeding strategies that could improve crop productivity.
15h
An optical lattice with sound
Nature, Published online: 10 November 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03945-x An optical lattice for trapping a Bose–Einstein condensate reported here includes photon-mediated atom–atom interactions that replicate acoustic modes in real crystals.
15h
Temporal transitions in the post-mitotic nervous system of Caenorhabditis elegans
Nature, Published online: 10 November 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-04071-4 In the post-mitotic nervous system of Caenorhabditis elegans, the promotion of a mature neuronal transcription program is controlled by the developmental-stage-specific upregulation of the microRNA LIN-4 and the subsequent repression of its target, the transcription factor lin-14.
15h
Tracking the origin of Transeurasian languages
Nature, Published online: 10 November 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03037-w A triangulation of linguistic, archaeological and genetic data suggests that the Transeurasian language family originated in a population of grain farmers in China around 9,000 years ago, and that agriculture underpinned its spread.
15h
Global temperature changes mapped across the past 24,000 years
Nature, Published online: 10 November 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03011-6 Palaeoclimate data and models have been used to produce a comprehensive report of Earth's temperature changes over the past 24 millennia. The results suggest that modern warming differs from the gradual rise of the past 10,000 years.
15h
Caltech confronted its racist past. Here's what happened
Nature, Published online: 10 November 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03052-x With a push from students and alumni, the university faced up to a legacy of support for eugenics. As it renames buildings and programmes, can its story serve as a model for others?
15h
NASA Head Says Moon Landing Delayed a Year, Blames Jeff Bezos' Lawsuit
It's official: NASA boss Bill Nelson says the mission to return humans to the Moon is delayed by a year — and, he said, it's mostly Jeff Bezos' fault. During a press conference yesterday, Nelson gave an update on the ambitious plan to return astronauts to the lunar surface . Unfortunately, he said that the agency is now pushing a crewed lunar landing to 2025 rather than the originally planned 202
15h
Interdisciplinary research shows the spread of Transeurasian languages was due to agriculture
The origin and early dispersal of Transeurasian languages, including, among others, Japanese, Korean, Tungusic, Mongolic and Turkic, is among the most disputed issues of Asian prehistory. Although many of the commonalities between these languages are due to borrowing, recent studies have shown a reliable core of evidence supporting the classification of Transeurasian as a genealogical group, or a
15h
What's behind the global K-pop and Korean film takeover?
Korean media has reached the pinnacle of global success by providing easy access to content, approachable and likable characters, and high-quality production, says scholar Dafna Zur. South Korea is a country slightly larger than the US state of Indiana. It has a population of 50 million. And yet its popular culture has gone global. In just the past few months, the television series Squid Game sma
15h
Many claims about sex differences lack scientific rigor
Many scientific claims about differences between males and females aren't backed by data, research finds. An analysis of published studies from a range of biological specialties shows that, when researchers report data by sex, critical statistical analyses are often missing and the findings are likely to be reported in misleading ways. The analysis appears in the journal eLife . Neuroscientists a
16h
Opinion: In Defense of Preprints
In response to two November 2021 articles in The Scientist that called out preprints as a source of medical misinformation, the cofounders of bioRxiv and medRxiv say it's not the publishing model that's at fault.
16h
Master Javascript From Scratch With This Pre-Black Friday Sale
Bar the occasional school-system-wide rickroll , it's easy to forget how interconnected the world is. Yet just under the surface, Javascript runs almost everything. The 2022 Javascript Developer Bootcamp Certification Bundle offers you a window into that world and a way to be a part of it, and right now, you can save an additional 15% off for a limited time as part of our Pre-Black Friday sale. T
16h
The Summer Bay's Propeller Gets Tangled | Deadliest Catch
Stream Full Episodes of Deadliest Catch: discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/deadliest-catch Discovery ► https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch/ #DeadliestCatch #Discovery #SummerBay Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://
16h
The First Continents Bobbed to the Surface More Than Three Billion Years Ago, Study Shows
Most people know that the land masses on which we all live represent just 30 percent of Earth's surface, and the rest is covered by oceans. The emergence of the continents was a pivotal moment in the history of life on Earth, not least because they are the humble abode of most humans. But it's still not clear exactly when these continental landmasses first appeared on Earth, and what tectonic pro
16h
Sexproblem vanliga hos kvinnor med diabetes typ 1
Nästan varannan kvinna med diabetes typ 1 har sexproblem. Många lider också av obehandlad depression, visar en av få studier om hur kvinnors sexliv påverkas av diabetes typ 1. Sexproblem är en väldokumenterad komplikation till diabetes hos män. Men forskning om hur kvinnors sexliv påverkas av olika diabetestyper är mycket begränsad. Nu publiceras den första nordiska studien som undersöker sexprob
16h
Tiny droplets offer glimpse of real life inside a living cell
The inside of a cell is a busy, crowded place—full of proteins and other molecules colliding as they swirl through the cytosol, the fluid that fills the cell. The interactions between these molecules drive the cell's activities. But when scientists study these interactions, they use a highly simplified system that doesn't capture the complexity.
16h
Seed-handling ability is pivotal in seed dispersal in tropical rainforests
In a recent study published in Journal of Ecology, researchers have shown that seed-handling ability had the biggest effect on a disperser's importance. It had strong effects on three network metrics (species strength, ecological specialization, capacity to be a module hub) and moderated effects on connectivity between modules.
16h
Remote high-voltage sensor unveiled
Ever since the first human placed a bare hand on an uninsulated electric line, people have refrained from personally testing energetic materials. Even meters made of metal can melt at high voltages.
17h
Astronaut training in the land of volcanoes
A team of astronauts, engineers and geologists is traveling to Spain's Canary Islands, one of Europe's volcanic hot spots, to learn how to best explore the Moon and Mars during ESA's Pangaea geological training course.
17h
Who was the first cyborg?
Fictional cyborgs have appeared in science fiction since the 1920s, but who was the first human to fuse with technology and become a real-life cyborg?
17h
Are global CO2 emissions rebounding to pre-COVID-19 levels?
The Global Carbon Project recently published its 2021 Global Carbon Budget report, providing data on atmospheric carbon concentrations, emissions and trends. University of Illinois Urban-Champaign atmospheric sciences professor Atul Jain was part of an international team of scientists that contributed data to the report. Jain discussed the carbon budget and this year's findings with News Bureau ph
17h
Study of Richard's pipit suggests vagrancy may play an important role in bird migration
A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in France has found that vagrancy may play a more important role in changes to migration patterns in birds than has been thought. In their paper published in the journal Current Biology, the group describes their study of data describing the migration patterns of Richard's pipit, a type of songbird that migrates between parts of northern R
17h
How to get a job in vaccine development
Nature, Published online: 10 November 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03057-6 Robin Shattock advises researchers to follow their scientific instincts, and be flexible and resilient.
17h
Climate change is destroying honey production in Kyrgyzstan
On the second day of COP 26 in Glasgow, Kyrgyz leader Sadyr Japarov made an ambitious statement in the framework of the Paris Agreement on climate change asking for help from international organizations. He also mentioned glacier issues which are the most challenging now in Kyrgyzstan. Meanwhile, small glaciers in the country are in danger of disappearing by 2050. The loss of glaciers is having a
17h
Satellites detect large methane emissions from Madrid landfills
High-resolution satellites have detected substantial quantities of methane leaking from adjacent landfill sites close to the center of Madrid, Spain. Using data from the Copernicus Sentinel-5P mission combined with GHGSat's high-resolution commercial imagery, scientists from the SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research and GHGSat discovered both landfill sites combined emitted 8,800 kg of met
17h
Microwaves and other small noises really stress out your dog
Researchers have found that people may not recognize that their dog is stressed when exposed to common household noises. While it's well established that sudden loud noises, such as fireworks or thunderstorms, commonly trigger a dog's anxiety, the new study finds even common noises, such as a vacuum or microwave, can be a trigger. The research in Frontiers in Veterinary Science shows that high-fr
17h
Team links sitting during COVID to depression symptoms
People who spent more time sitting during early months of the COVID-19 pandemic from April to June 2020 were likely to have higher depression symptoms, a new study shows. A closer investigation into this association could play a role in helping people improve their mental health. As people adhered to stay-at-home orders or self-isolated during the early months of the COVID-19 outbreak, daily comm
17h
Barnmorskornas arbetsmiljö ohållbar
Hårt arbetstempo, höga känslomässiga krav och lågt inflytande – så upplever barnmorskor i Sverige sin arbetsmiljö. – Det verkar inte röra sig om brist på barnmorskor i Sverige utan en brist på hållbara arbetsförhållanden och ett hållbart arbetsliv, säger Malin Hansson, doktorand på institutionen för vårdvetenskap och hälsa vid Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborgs universitet. Arbetsmiljön sämre än hos
18h
Fossil elephant cranium reveals its competitive edge
A fossil elephant cranium from Kenya weighs roughly two tons and reveals adaptations that let its species, Loxodonta adaurora, outcompete others. It lived in eastern Africa several million years ago, a time when a cooler, drier climate allowed grasslands to spread and when habitually bipedal human ancestors first appeared on the landscape. Dated to 4.5 million years ago and recovered from a site
18h
Is technology neutral?
I hear again and again that technology is neutral and can be used positively or negatively, depending on human decision. If we understand how the genetic code consists of only four letters, encodes the whole biological world, evolved into mathematical code that now encodes the virtual world, and more than we see how the virtual integrates the biological, it is quite possible that technology does
18h
Goldbergian physics
Nature, Published online: 10 November 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02967-9 Keeping things neat and tidy.
18h
Depression screening at school ups odds of treatment
Students who participated in universal school-based depression screening were twice as likely to begin treatment compared to their peers who did not receive this screening, according to a new study The study provides important insights on how to tackle depression in youth, says principal investigator Deepa Sekhar, associate professor of pediatrics at the Penn State College of Medicine. The next s
18h
Bedre arbejdsmiljø gavner også patienterne
Hvis lægerne overlader konsultationsrummet i almen praksis til sygeplejerskerne, kan det være til gavn for både patienter og arbejdsmiljø, mener praksislæge Søren Olsson. Hos Lægerne Sløjfen i Aalborg er det derfor sygeplejerskerne, der står for de fleste konsultationer, mens lægerne superviserer.
19h
Business model innovation is key to beating COVID-19 debt
As the UK and other countries face some of the worst days of the COVID-19 health crisis, the economic crisis may seem far off or even averted. But the measures taken to support economies battered by lockdown and other restrictions will eventually have to be paid for.
19h
Pandemic's plastic waste is choking the seas
Nature, Published online: 08 November 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03078-1 The onslaught of COVID-19 has generated millions of tonnes of plastic waste in the form of gloves, face masks and other items.
19h
'Clear evidence of theft' brings down meningitis paper with dodgy images
A group of neurosurgery researchers in Tunisia have lost a 2021 case study on childhood meningitis after the editors discovered evidence of plagiarism and image manipulation. The article, "A case of meningitis due to Achromobacter xylosoxidans in a child with a polymalformative syndrome: a case report," appeared in the Pan African Medical Journal and was … Continue reading
20h
Rapid oxygen exchange between hematite and water vapor
Nature Communications, Published online: 10 November 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26601-4 Knowing how individual water molecules interact with surfaces is crucial for understanding surface and interface phenomena. Here, the authors show how local water-water interactions enable an unforeseen and surprisingly rapid mechanism of atom exchange between a common mineral and its surroundings.
21h
Uncertainty in El Niño-like warming and California precipitation changes linked by the Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation
Nature Communications, Published online: 10 November 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26797-5 There is a strong disagreement between climate models on how precipitation in California will change. Here, the authors show that much of this uncertainty originates from internal variability with the Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation linking the precipitation changes with the El Niño-like warming pattern thr
21h
Elevated circulating follistatin associates with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes
Nature Communications, Published online: 10 November 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26536-w Follistatin promotes in type 2 diabetes (T2D) pathogenesis in model animals and is elevated in patients with T2D. Here the authors report that plasma follistatin associates with increased risk of incident T2D in two longitudinal cohorts, and show that follistatin regulates insulin-induced suppression lipolys
21h
2-Oxoglutarate derivatives can selectively enhance or inhibit the activity of human oxygenases
Nature Communications, Published online: 10 November 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26673-2 The human 2-oxoglutarate (2OG) oxygenases FIH and AspH are relevant drug targets. Here, the authors show that synthetic and naturally occurring 2OG derivatives can selectively modulate FIH and AspH activities, suggesting that these compounds may serve as a basis to develop 2OG oxygenase-targeting probes and
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Autonomous extraction of millimeter-scale deformation in InSAR time series using deep learning
Nature Communications, Published online: 10 November 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26254-3 A deep neural network is developed to automatically extract ground deformation from Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar time series. Applied to data over the North Anatolian Fault, the method can detect 2 mm deformation transients and reveals a slow earthquake twice as extensive as previously recognized
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A Fabry-Pérot cavity coupled surface plasmon photodiode for electrical biomolecular sensing
Nature Communications, Published online: 10 November 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26652-7 Surface plasmon resonance is well established for biosensing applications, but commonly limited by complex optical detection. Here, the authors present a plasmonic sensor integrated in a photovoltaic cell, which generates an electronic signal sensitive to the solution refractive index via plasmon interaction
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Aggregation-induced emission luminogens for image-guided surgery in non-human primates
Nature Communications, Published online: 10 November 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26417-2 Most applications of aggregation-induced emission luminogens (AIEgens) have been limited in small animal models. Here, the authors show the versatility of AIEgens-based imaging-guided surgical operation from small animals to rhesus macaque, in support of the clinical translation of AIEgens.
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COVID is disrupting scientific careers around the world
Nature, Published online: 10 November 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03049-6 Earlier generations faced fallout from the global financial crisis and a boost from emerging economies. Today, COVID-19 and concerns about diversity dominate.
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Scientists count the career costs of COVID
Nature, Published online: 10 November 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03040-1 As the pandemic continues, researchers are coming to terms with what they've learnt and lost so far, finds Nature's global survey.
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