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Gene Simmons to the Unvaccinated: "You Are an Enemy"
It shouldn't be so surprising that Kiss legend Gene Simmons is loudly in support of vaccines, but here we are. In an interview published on celebrity video streaming startup TalkShopLive , the rock star panned "delusional" anti-vaxxers for putting the people around them at risk. "If you're willing to walk among us unvaccinated," Simmons said, "you are an enemy." "I don't care about your political
1h
Illuminating dark matter in human DNA
Researchers at University of California San Diego have produced a single-cell chromatin atlas for the human genome. Chromatin is a complex of DNA and protein found in eukaryotic cells; regions of chromatin at key gene regulatory elements appear in open configurations within certain cell nuclei. Precisely delineating these accessible chromatin regions in cells of different human tissue types would
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LATEST

The Moon Has Enough Oxygen Buried Beneath Its Surface to Sustain Billions of People
It turns out there's plenty of oxygen on the Moon after all — but there's a catch. The Moon's near-vacuum atmosphere doesn't have anywhere near enough oxygen to sustain human life. But as Southern Cross University soil researcher John Grant wrote this week in The Conversation , its top layer of rocky soil, known as "regolith," likely contains enough oxygen for 8 billion people to survive for abou
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Loving Your Job Is a Capitalist Trap
Since the start of the pandemic, Americans have been talking seriously with friends, family, and themselves about the shortcomings of their modern-day work lives. Millions of people have joined the " Great Resignation ," and many, especially the college-educated, have vowed to follow their passion and embark on a different career. But this yearning for more meaningful work isn't new: Over the pas
13h
Astronaut Who Recently Flew in Blue Origin Launch Dies in Plane Crash
Rest in Peace Glen de Vries, an entrepreneur who recently launched to space alongside actor William Shatner on board a Blue Origin New Shepard spacecraft, tragically passed away in a plane crash on Thursday. He was 49. "We are devastated to hear of the sudden passing of Glen de Vries," a statement by Blue Origin posted to Twitter reads. "He brought so much life and energy to the entire Blue Origi
2h
Chinese Scientists Say They've Discovered Cheap New Way to Do Nuclear Fusion
A team of scientists in China say they've discovered a cost-effective method of achieving nuclear fusion that could rival much more expensive counterparts. Researchers at the Chinese Academy of Sciences' Institute of Physics began their experiments into fusion power at the Shenguang II laser facility last summer, according to The South China Morning Post . However, the government gave the team ju
3h
'Thank You, Brandon' Is Just Embarrassing
An underrated joy of modern life is that you don't have to watch live TV to see all of the uncomfortable situations people find themselves in on live TV. I don't even own a television, nor would I ever watch NBC Sports coverage of a NASCAR race, yet I still got the chance to see the October 2 clip of the reporter Kelli Stavast attempting to interview the race-car driver Brandon Brown after an une
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The Year America's Hair Fell Out
When I first suspected that I was losing my hair, I felt like maybe I was also losing my grip on reality. This was the summer of 2020, and although the previous three months had been difficult for virtually everyone, I had managed to escape relatively unscathed. I hadn't gotten sick in New York City's terrifying first wave of the pandemic. My loved ones were safe. I still had a job. I wasn't okay
4h
Cats found to track owner's movements even when they cannot see them
A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in Japan, has found that cats keep track of where people are in their homes even when they cannot see them. In their paper published in PLOS ONE, the group describes experiments they conducted with cats and recordings of voices and what they learned from them.
11h
Using mechanical tools improves our language skills, study finds
Research has revealed a correlation between being particularly proficient in tool use and having good syntactic ability. A new study has now shown that both skills rely on the same neurological resources, which are located in the same brain region. Furthermore, motor training using a tool improves our ability to understand the syntax of complex sentences and — vice-versa — syntactic training imp
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Lawsuit Claims That Subway "Tuna" Contains Extremely Weird DNA
Remember when a lawsuit claimed that DNA testing had failed to find any actual tuna in what the sandwich chain Subway was selling as tuna salad, prompting a furious rebuttal from the company's CEO? Well, now the suit is back — and this time, the Washington Post reports , the plaintiffs are making ominous new claims about what genetic material the alleged tuna really does contain. Originally, the
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SpaceX's Orbital Starship Prototype Just Fired Up All Its Engines
Static Fire SpaceX has successfully completed a static fire test of its first orbital-class Starship spacecraft prototype, with all six engines attached. The massive stainless steel-clad tower lit up in dramatic fashion, as seen on footage broadcast by NASASpaceFlight , lighting up the space company's testing facilities in South Texas. It's the first time the prototype, dubbed Starship 20, lit al
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SpaceX Astronauts Encounter Mystery Object During ISS Docking
Nut November SpaceX successfully launched another capsule of four astronauts to the International Space Station on Thursday evening. While the mission went smoothly, the crew did report something strange: a mysterious object floating past their craft as they approached the station. "We saw an object that looked like a gnarled knob, although it's difficult to tell with distance, in our centerline
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Warning of 'wild west' in depression treatment as UK clinics offer ketamine
Exclusive: Up to six private clinics are offering drug, with health experts fearing a two-tier system of treatment A growing number of private clinics are offering ketamine for depression, according to experts who warn of a potential "wild west" of providers with no national register of patients' treatment being integrated into overall NHS care. At least six private providers in the UK offer the
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Study: Earth Has Another Tiny Moon That Broke Off from the Big One
Quasi-Moon In 2016, scientists discovered that the Earth has a second Moon that — unlike its much more widely-known sibling that's visible in the night sky — circles our planet at 38 to 100 times the distance of our primary Moon. For years, the origin of this "quasi-Moon" has eluded astronomers. But now, they might have an answer. In a new study published in Nature , scientists say they found evi
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How Voters Feel About Josh Hawley's 'Attack on Men'
Senator Josh Hawley of Missouri surprised even some allies when he recently devoted his entire speech at a high-profile national conference of conservatives to an extended analysis of why so many men appear stuck in a cycle of "idleness and pornography and video games," as he put it. Hawley's warnings against what he called liberals' "attack on men" could open a new front in the culture wars that
14h
Blood pressure drugs could prevent type 2 diabetes, study finds
Lowering high blood pressure may slash the risk of the disease in millions of people in future Blood pressure drugs could prevent millions of people worldwide from developing type 2 diabetes, a large study suggests. Lowering high blood pressure is an effective way to slash the risk of the disease in the future, according to the research published in the Lancet. Continue reading…
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Conservative Justices Suddenly Discover Limits to Religious Liberty
John Henry Ramirez is going to die. The state of Texas is going to kill him . The question that came before the Supreme Court this week is whether Dana Moore, his longtime pastor, will be able to lay hands on him as he dies. Given the grand, even alarmed pronouncements about religious liberty made by the right-wing justices recently, you might think this would be an easy decision. But at the oral
8h
Mandatory Covid jabs may do more harm than good | Letters
Chris Talbot is in favour of compulsory vaccinations for frontline NHS staff, but Karen Jacob fears it could exacerbate a recruitment crisis. Plus letters from Brian Lawrence, Ben Ashford and Dr Simon Roberts Frances Ryan is correct in focusing on the potential risks to vulnerable patients from unvaccinated NHS staff ( Mandatory Covid jabs shouldn't be controversial – NHS staff have a duty to do
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Boris Johnson urges people to get Covid boosters as he warns of 'storm clouds'
PM expresses concern over worsening situation in continental Europe, saying: 'We've been here before' Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Elderly and vulnerable people must get their booster jabs if a rise in Covid cases in the UK is to be prevented, the prime minister has said, as he warned of "storm clouds" forming over parts of Europe . Germany, Austria, Slovakia and
10h
Tesla in "Full Self-Driving" Mode "Severely Damaged" in Crash
FSDestruction Derby A Tesla Model Y was "severely damaged" after crashing into an oncoming vehicle while reportedly operating with the controversial Full Self-Driving (FSD) Beta active, The Verge reports . The crash could likely be the first serious incident involving FSD, according to The Verge — but fortunately, nobody was injured during the crash. According to a firsthand report submitted to t
5h
Transform approach to Amazon or it will not survive, warns major report
Panel of 200 scientists tells Cop26 Indigenous people, business, governments and scientists must collaborate Cop26 – latest updates The world's approach to the Amazon rainforest must be transformed to avoid an irreversible, catastrophic tipping point, according to the most comprehensive study of the region ever carried out. More than 200 scientists collaborated on the new report, which finds that
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Nasa makes final steps to launch asteroid deflection test
Dart mission is designed to spot an asteroid on collision course with Earth and deflect its path Nasa is in final preparations to launch the world's first planetary defence mission. The Double Asteroid Redirection Test (Dart) is scheduled to launch on 23 November and is a joint mission with the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory. Dart is designed to collide with the asteroid Dimorphos and c
19h
Elon Musk Is Beefing With Another Electric Carmaker Again
Tough Talk Electric car company Rivian exploded into public markets this week with a monstrous $116 billion IPO — but not everyone is popping the champagne quite yet. Tesla CEO and Jeff Bezos' playground bully Elon Musk took to Twitter to throw some cold water on the rival carmaker's enormous valuation on Thursday. He said that despite the IPO numbers, Rivian will need to ramp up vehicle producti
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Tracking the whole world's carbon emissions — with satellites and AI | Gavin McCormick
What we know today about global greenhouse gas emissions is mostly self-reported by countries, and those numbers (sometimes tallied manually on paper!) are often inaccurate and prone to manipulation. If we really want to get serious about fighting climate change, we need a way to track carbon pollution in real-time and identify the worst culprits, says high-tech environmental activist Gavin McCorm
9h
Inside the Red-State Plot to Take Down a Top Trump Ally
F or many Utahns, the Trump rally was the breaking point. A few days before the 2020 election, Senator Mike Lee paced across a red, white, and blue stage in Goodyear, Arizona, microphone in hand, rhapsodizing about the president's many virtues while he looked on. Lee's talking points were mostly familiar. But then he arrived at a novel line of flattery, pitched to his coreligionists: He compared
9h
Dark molecular isomers lit up using optical cavities
In chemistry, molecules are manipulated by changing the constituent atoms, or their arrangements. Now a group of physicists and chemists from The City College of New York and Spain can demonstrate how the use of an optical cavity (where light is trapped) is also able to change the molecular property of photo-isomerization—a light activated process that modifies the optical response. Entitled "Sele
13h
Amazon birds shrink but grow longer wings in sign of global heating
Some species in Brazil have shrunk by nearly 10% over 40 years of measurements, say researchers Birds in the Amazon are becoming smaller but growing longer wings, a study has found, with scientists saying global heating is the most likely explanation. Several recent papers have reported birds getting smaller, but as their subjects were migratory birds there were many confounding factors that coul
6h
From Cows to Covid: The Spooky Origins of Vaccines
Vaccination arose in the 18th century during a frenzied period of trial and error, in which many didn't survive a trip to the doctor. If you squint a little, writes Brendan Borrell, it looks a lot like the early days of the Covid-19 outbreak. But there's no longer any reason to keep living in the dark ages.
15h
Amazon Rainforest birds' bodies transform due to climate change
The most pristine parts of the Amazon rainforest devoid of direct human contact are being impacted by human-induced climate change, according to new research by LSU scientists. New analyses of data collected over the past four decades show that not only has the number of sensitive resident birds throughout the Amazon rainforest declined, but the body size and wing length have changed for most stud
6h
The optical Stern-Gerlach Deflection and Young's experiment in the reciprocal space
Scientists have, for the first time, demonstrated Young's experiment for photons in the reciprocal space. Spin patterns corresponding to the persistent spin helix and the Stern-Gerlach experiment are realized in an optically anisotropic liquid crystal microcavity. By applying electric voltage across the microcavity, the liquid crystal molecules inside could be rotated in such a way that the light
11h
Human facial expressions communicate complex emotion information
There are more than 7 billion people on the planet, and each of them has their own unique face. The sum of a person's eyes, nose, cheeks and mouth all individual to them. And now, new research shows that the emotion information transmitted by facial expressions appears to be just as diverse, rich, and complex as the faces themselves.
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What It's Like to Truly Be Friends With Your Ex
Each installment of " The Friendship Files " features a conversation between The Atlantic 's Julie Beck and two or more friends, exploring the history and significance of their relationship. This week she talks with two friends who used to be married. They discuss their amicable—really!—divorce, how they reconnected afterward, what it means to be happy for someone else even if their decision hurt
10h
Xist marks the spot: How an RNA molecule silences the X chromosome
In one of the mysteries of mammalian development, every cell in the early female embryo shuts down one of its two copies of the X chromosome, leaving just one functional. For years, the mechanics behind this X chromosome inactivation have been murky, but scientists from the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA have now taken a major step forward in un
7h
This Startup Wants to Throw Satellites into Orbit With a Giant Centrifuge
Getting into space is hard, and one of the reasons is that it takes a lot of energy to break free of Earth's gravity. So far, the only way we've found to do that reliably is with rockets , but a startup called SpinLaunch has something else in mind. Using a giant vacuum chamber and a rotating hypersonic tether, the firm hopes to essentially throw satellites into orbit. SpinLaunch has just complete
4h
Simulations provide clue to missing planets mystery
Forming planets are one possible explanation for the rings and gaps observed in disks of gas and dust around young stars. But this theory has trouble explaining why it is rare to find planets associated with rings. New supercomputer simulations show that after creating a ring, a planet can move away and leave the ring behind. Not only does this bolster the planet theory for ring formation, the sim
9h
Cop26: the final day – have we made any progress on saving the planet? – podcast
The Science Weekly podcast is in Glasgow, where we are bringing listeners daily episodes from Cop26. Each morning you will hear from one of the Guardian's award-winning environment team. Today, Science Weekly host Madeleine Finlay talks to the Guardian's environment correspondent, Fiona Harvey, and environment editor, Damian Carrington, on how the final hours of Cop26 negotiations are going On We
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Climate Hype Might Be the Ticket to Decarbonization
The 26th Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, and the third meeting of the parties under the Paris Agreement, is not going to save the world. You would not know it from the headlines. The rhetoric of climate journalism can sometimes swell with catastrophic overtones, but accounts of COP26, which will come to a close today in Glasgow, Scotland, ha
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Psychologists suggest more humility is needed in the social, behavioral and life sciences
Rink Hoekstra and Simine Vazire, psychologists with the University of Groningen and the University of California, Davis, respectively, have published a Perspective piece in the journal Nature Human Behavior calling for more humility in the social, behavioral and life sciences. In their paper they outline a methodology for imbuing intellectual humility into the paper writing and publishing process.
10h
How close are we to climate tipping points?
As world leaders gather at the United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP26) in Glasgow, Scotland, to take bolder action against climate change, human activity has already warmed the planet 1.1°C above pre-industrial levels.
13h
The Shrink Next Door review – Paul Rudd traps Will Ferrell in a cult of two
Ferrell is a neurotic patient and Rudd a dangerously narcissistic therapist, in this plodding drama about a real-life scam which is saved by the sheer unbelievability of its source material 'I'm not going to let anyone use you … I'm going to help you and everything's going to be all right." There are three types of people in this world. Those who, upon hearing such a pronouncement, cling to it an
14h
The Real Reason Behind Bolsonaro's Climate Promises
As the principal steward of the world's largest rain forest, Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro has been at the center of much of the discussion surrounding the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Glasgow, Scotland. But the headlines are about as close as he got to the international gathering. Like a number of other nationalist leaders, Bolsonaro decided to skip the summit, opting instead
14h
Obesity raises the risk of gum disease by inflating growth of bone-destroying cells
Chronic inflammation caused by obesity may trigger the development of cells that break down bone tissue, including the bone that holds teeth in place, according to new research that sought to improve understanding of the connection between obesity and gum disease. The study, completed in an animal model and published in October in the Journal of Dental Research, found that excessive inflammation r
12min
Amazon deforestation hits monthly record in Brazil
Deforestation of the Amazon rainforest hit a new record in October, a Brazilian government agency said Friday, just days after President Jair Bolsonaro announced ambitious environmental goals at the COP26 climate summit.
1h
Polymer discovery gives 3D-printed sand super strength
Researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory designed a novel polymer to bind and strengthen silica sand for binder jet additive manufacturing, a 3D-printing method used by industries for prototyping and part production.
1h
Florida City Announces Crypto Giveaway to All Residents
CityCoin Miami mayor Francis Suarez has announced on Twitter that he plans to give out cryptocurrency funds to city residents. The funds are earnings the city has made through MiamiCoin, a "CityCoin." In simple terms, the return came from the city investing some of its funds in MiamiCoin, earning over $21 million in the past three months, CoinDesk reports . That's on track to earn roughly one fif
2h
Best Tech Gifts for Everyone on Your List
With the holidays rapidly approaching, it can be easy to feel overwhelmed with finding the best tech gifts for everyone on your list. It's easy to resign yourself to yet another year of sweaters or socks for your friends and family, but the gifts that people really want are most likely in the tech space. After all, we are living in the year 2021! In these times, tech reigns supreme. And fortunate
3h
Are you a parent of a teenager that is female-identifying aged 13-17?
UCD Body Cognition Lab is conducting research in the area of adolescent body image, mental imagery and interoception and requires participants that are female or female-identifying aged 13-17. If you are a parent with a child that fits this criterion, please click the link below to consent and we will provide you with a link for your child to take part. The study is entirely online, anonymous and
4h
A widespread viral entry mechanism: The C-end Rule motif-neuropilin receptor interaction [Microbiology]
Many phylogenetically distant animal viruses, including the new coronavirus severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, have surface proteins with polybasic sites that are cleaved by host furin and furin-like proteases. Other than priming certain viral surface proteins for fusion, cleavage generates a carboxy-terminal RXXR sequence. This C-end Rule (CendR) motif…
4h
Improved RAD51 binders through motif shuffling based on the modularity of BRC repeats [Biochemistry]
Exchanges of protein sequence modules support leaps in function unavailable through point mutations during evolution. Here we study the role of the two RAD51-interacting modules within the eight binding BRC repeats of BRCA2. We created 64 chimeric repeats by shuffling these modules and measured their binding to RAD51. We found…
4h
Drifting assemblies for persistent memory: Neuron transitions and unsupervised compensation [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Change is ubiquitous in living beings. In particular, the connectome and neural representations can change. Nevertheless, behaviors and memories often persist over long times. In a standard model, associative memories are represented by assemblies of strongly interconnected neurons. For faithful storage these assemblies are assumed to consist of the same…
4h
Lessons learned from urgent computing in Europe: Tackling the COVID-19 pandemic [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
PRACE (Partnership for Advanced Computing in Europe), an international not-for-profit association that brings together the five largest European supercomputing centers and involves 26 European countries, has allocated more than half a billion core hours to computer simulations to fight the COVID-19 pandemic. Alongside experiments, these simulations are a pillar of…
4h
Intracellular nanoscale architecture as a master regulator of calcium carbonate crystallization in marine microalgae [Environmental Sciences]
Unicellular marine microalgae are responsible for one of the largest carbon sinks on Earth. This is in part due to intracellular formation of calcium carbonate scales termed coccoliths. Traditionally, the influence of changing environmental conditions on this process has been estimated using poorly constrained analogies to crystallization mechanisms in bulk…
4h
Linked supergenes underlie split sex ratio and social organization in an ant [Evolution]
Sexually reproducing organisms usually invest equally in male and female offspring. Deviations from this pattern have led researchers to new discoveries in the study of parent–offspring conflict, genomic conflict, and cooperative breeding. Some social insect species exhibit the unusual population-level pattern of split sex ratio, wherein some colonies specialize in…
4h
Introns encode dsRNAs undetected by RIG-I/MDA5/interferons and sensed via RNase L [Cell Biology]
Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), a hallmark viral material that activates antiviral interferon (IFN) responses, can appear in human cells also in the absence of viruses. We identify phosphorothioate DNAs (PS DNAs) as triggers of such endogenous dsRNA (endo-dsRNA). PS DNAs inhibit decay of nuclear RNAs and induce endo-dsRNA via accumulation of…
4h
Csi-let-7a-5p delivered by extracellular vesicles from a liver fluke activates M1-like macrophages and exacerbates biliary injuries [Medical Sciences]
Chronic infection with liver flukes (such as Clonorchis sinensis) can induce severe biliary injuries, which can cause cholangitis, biliary fibrosis, and even cholangiocarcinoma. The release of extracellular vesicles by C. sinensis (CsEVs) is of importance in the long-distance communication between the hosts and worms. However, the biological effects of EVs…
4h
iNKT subsets differ in their developmental and functional requirements on Foxo1 [Immunology and Inflammation]
Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells play important roles in regulating immune responses. Based on cytokine profiling and key transcriptional factors, iNKT cells are classified into iNKT1, iNKT2, and iNKT17 subsets. However, whether the development and functions of these subsets are controlled by distinct mechanisms remains unclear. Here, we show…
4h
Coordinated bacterial and plant sulfur metabolism in Enterobacter sp. SA187-induced plant salt stress tolerance [Plant Biology]
Enterobacter sp. SA187 is a root endophytic bacterium that maintains growth and yield of plants under abiotic stress conditions. In this work, we compared the metabolic wirings of Arabidopsis and SA187 in the free-living and endophytic interaction states. The interaction of SA187 with Arabidopsis induced massive changes in bacterial gene…
4h
Taylor's law of fluctuation scaling for semivariances and higher moments of heavy-tailed data [Economic Sciences]
We generalize Taylor's law for the variance of light-tailed distributions to many sample statistics of heavy-tailed distributions with tail index α in (0, 1), which have infinite mean. We show that, as the sample size increases, the sample upper and lower semivariances, the sample higher moments, the skewness, and the…
4h
Vaccine-elicited CD4 T cells prevent the deletion of antiviral B cells in chronic infection [Immunology and Inflammation]
Chronic viral infections subvert protective B cell immunity. An early type I interferon (IFN-I)–driven bias to short-lived plasmablast differentiation leads to clonal deletion, so-called "decimation," of antiviral memory B cells. Therefore, prophylactic countermeasures against decimation remain an unmet need. We show that vaccination-induced CD4 T cells prevented the decimation of…
4h
Divisive normalization unifies disparate response signatures throughout the human visual hierarchy [Neuroscience]
Neural processing is hypothesized to apply the same mathematical operations in a variety of contexts, implementing so-called canonical neural computations. Divisive normalization (DN) is considered a prime candidate for a canonical computation. Here, we propose a population receptive field (pRF) model based on DN and evaluate it using ultra-high-field functional…
4h
Haplotype-aware inference of human chromosome abnormalities [Genetics]
Extra or missing chromosomes—a phenomenon termed aneuploidy—frequently arise during human meiosis and embryonic mitosis and are the leading cause of pregnancy loss, including in the context of in vitro fertilization (IVF). While meiotic aneuploidies affect all cells and are deleterious, mitotic errors generate mosaicism, which may be compatible with healthy…
4h
Biological signal processing filters via engineering allosteric transcription factors [Engineering]
Signal processing is critical to a myriad of biological phenomena (natural and engineered) that involve gene regulation. Biological signal processing can be achieved by way of allosteric transcription factors. In canonical regulatory systems (e.g., the lactose repressor), an INPUT signal results in the induction of a given transcription factor and…
4h
A soft-electronic sensor network tracks neuromotor development in infants [Engineering]
The brain coordinates the body's movements through the central nervous system (CNS). Hence, movement behaviors in infants reveal valuable information regarding their developing CNS (1). In infants, spontaneous movements often referred to as general movements (GMs) are an indicator of later neurological deficits (2). GMs are automatic, are complex, occur…
4h
Correction for Wolfsberger et al., TAp73 represses NF-{kappa}B-mediated recruitment of tumor-associated macrophages in breast cancer [Immunology and Inflammation]
IMMUNOLOGY AND INFLAMMATION Correction for "TAp73 represses NF-κB–mediated recruitment of tumor-associated macrophages in breast cancer," by Johanna Wolfsberger, Habib A. M. Sakil, Leilei Zhou, Niek van Bree, Elena Baldisseri, Sabrina de Souza Ferreira, Veronica Zubillaga, Marina Stantic, Nicolas Fritz, Johan Hartman, Charlotte Rolny, and Margareta T. Wilhelm, which published March…
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Correction to Supporting Information for Blokhuis et al., Universal motifs and the diversity of autocatalytic systems [Applied Physical Sciences]
APPLIED PHYSICAL SCIENCES Correction to Supporting Information for "Universal motifs and the diversity of autocatalytic systems," by Alex Blokhuis, David Lacoste, and Philippe Nghe, which was first published September 28, 2020; 10.1073/pnas.2013527117 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 117, 25230–25236). The authors note that Fig. S4 in the SI Appendix appeared…
4h
Correction for Kolincio et al., Large Hall and Nernst responses from thermally induced spin chirality in a spin-trimer ferromagnet [Physics]
PHYSICS Correction for "Large Hall and Nernst responses from thermally induced spin chirality in a spin-trimer ferromagnet," by Kamil K. Kolincio, Max Hirschberger, Jan Masell, Shang Gao, Akiko Kikkawa, Yasujiro Taguchi, Taka-hisa Arima, Naoto Nagaosa, and Yoshinori Tokura, which published August 13, 2021; 10.1073/pnas.2023588118 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 118,…
4h
Scientists Surprised by Mysterious Barrier at the Core of our Galaxy
Rays Banned A team of Chinese researchers has discovered a mysterious barrier that appears to be stopping cosmic rays from penetrating through to the center of the Milky Way. Even more strangely, the same region seems to be accelerating these rays to blistering speeds. The research underlines just how difficult it is to get a precise reading of what the hell is going on inside the swirling ball o
5h
Unstable housing, homelessness associated with COVID-19 re-infection
New study results demonstrate that unstable housing and homelessness is associated with a two-fold greater chance of being re-infected with SARS-CoV-2 compared to those who are securely housed. The research indicates that unstable housing was the only demographical factor associated with re-infection despite the presence of antibodies from the first infection.
5h
Sea urchins' ballistic escape from predators
New research shows that sea urchins, albeit having a limited and ancestral sensory system, can show a complex behaviour when escaping a predator. These marine invertebrates tend to move slowly and with unpredictable movements, but when they smell a predator, they escape following a ballistic motion — straightforward, quick and directional — to escape the threat.
5h
Tiny chip provides a big boost in precision optics
By merging two or more sources of light, interferometers create interference patterns that can provide remarkably detailed information about everything they illuminate, from a tiny flaw on a mirror, to the dispersion of pollutants in the atmosphere, to gravitational patterns in far reaches of the Universe.
7h
Key concepts, mathematical models, and statistical techniques for testing animal behavior rationality
Testing rationality of decision-making and choice by evaluating the mathematical property of transitivity has a long tradition in biology, economics, psychology, and zoology. However, this paradigm is fraught with conceptual, mathematical, and statistical pitfalls. A new article published in The Quarterly Review of Biology provides a tutorial review for animal scientists in testing whether animal
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The challenge of forest restoration: Where to obtain tens of billions of quality seeds
With commitments to restore more than 47.5 million hectares of degraded land and forests by 2030, the Philippines, Indonesia, Malaysia and India hope to become exemplar land custodians. While commitments ending deforestation are critical to obtaining that image—Indonesia is one of the world's poster children for forest loss—even a full halt to natural landscape destruction is only part of the batt
7h
More than half of surveyed crop varieties are under threat of extinction, according to study in India
Crop and varietal diversity are critically important for global food and nutrition security, as well as the livelihoods of millions of people, especially those living in marginal areas. This diversity includes many different crop species and farmer varieties, many of which have been cultivated and safeguarded by farmers and indigenous peoples for millennia on their farms. Each one contains unique
7h
NASA's Parker Solar Probe Is Being Pelted by Tiny Plasma Explosions
NASA's Parker Solar Probe is built for extremes. It's the fastest spacecraft they've ever built, and it orbits closer to the sun than any other artificial object. As it spirals inward for ever-closer views of our local star, it also encounters specs of space dust. Traveling at such incredible speeds (it reached 244,255 miles per hour on a recent pass) makes these impacts more powerful than the wo
7h
The Atlantic Daily: Three Hints About Our Climate Future
The United Nations' annual summit on climate change is in a frantic push for a final agreement. But no matter the outcome of the high-profile proceedings in Glasgow, the global checkup has already previewed where the conversation goes from here. Nuclear power is having a hot moment. Meltdowns gave the technology a bad rap. This year "it's been invited to the cool kids' table," Robinson Meyer poin
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Police enforcement of New York City COVID-19 mandates reveals racial inequities by zip code
New York City ZIP codes with a higher percentage of Black residents had significantly higher rates of COVID-19-specific criminal court summonses and public health and nuisance arrests in the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a new study by Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health. Pandemic policing also mirrored the discretionary nature of the New York stop-and-frisk p
8h
Western boom cities see spike in harmful ozone
The reduction of harmful ground-level ozone across most of the U.S. over the past several decades has been an air pollution success story. But in some parts of the country, especially in the heavily populated mountain valleys of the West, the odorless, colorless gas has remained stubbornly difficult to reduce to safe levels.
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Following CDC Green Light, Kids Start Getting Vaccinated
Children across the United States received their first Covid-19 vaccine doses this week, days after the federal government authorized the Pfizer-BioNTech shot for 5-to-11-year-olds. By Wednesday, according to the White House, some 900,000 children had received their first dose.
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As nations promise to restore ecosystems at COP26, can they guarantee success?
Grand global commitments to plant trees to fight climate change are welcome. Healthy landscapes that suck planet-heating carbon out of the atmosphere—locking it into forests and soils—are among the best technologies there are yet to bend the Keeling Curve in a new direction. Tree planting is no alternative to ending the burning of fossil fuels, but along with zero deforestation, restoration can dr
8h
Flattening the curve: Nano-film enhanced supercontinuum edition
Providing light with tailored properties through ultrafast supercontinuum generation represents an active field of nonlinear science research. A German-Australian research collaboration has presented a new concept that includes a longitudinally varying thickness nano-films in microstructured exposed core fibers. This offers low input energy, broadband and spectrally flattened spectra in the near i
8h
Svensk lax äter insekter – blir hållbar
Odlad fisk föds ofta upp på importerad, vildfångad fisk. Men nu finns för första gången svensk lax uppfödd på insekter – som i sin tur ätit grönsaksavfall och brödrester. Över 90 procent av världshavens kommersiella fiskbestånd är maximalt nyttjade eller överutnyttjade. Odlad fisk har länge setts som en möjlig lösning för att möta den ökade efterfrågan på fisk och skaldjur utan att öka pressen på
8h
A little caffeine linked to lower gestational diabetes risk
Drinking a low amount of caffeine during pregnancy could help reduce the risk of gestational diabetes, according to a new study. "While we were not able to study the association of consumption above the recommended limit, we now know that low-to-moderate caffeine is not associated with an increased risk of gestational diabetes, preeclampsia, or hypertension for expecting mothers," says Stefanie H
8h
College student voting jumped in 2020 presidential election
Voter turnout among college students jumped to 66% in the 2020 presidential election, building on the momentum swing of the 2018 midterms, according to a new report The record-breaking rates are based on data from nearly 1,200 campuses of all types from the Institute for Democracy & Higher Education's national study of college and university student voting and engagement. The 14 percentage-point
9h
Researchers harness higher order protein catenation for the development of artificial antibodies
Chemical topology is a unique dimension for protein engineering. Over the past few years, the discovery of topological non-trivial proteins in nature has already revealed their many potential functional benefits, such as enhanced thermal/mechanical/chemical stability. Engineering the chemical topology of proteins thus holds the promise of engineering therapeutically relevant proteins and industria
9h
Gut microbiota differences seen in people with autism may be due to dietary preferences
Research suggested that autism spectrum disorder (ASD) may be at least partly caused by differences in the composition of the gut microbiota, based on the observation that certain types of microbes are more common in people with autism. But a new study suggests that the link may actually work the other way around: the diversity in species found in the guts of children with autism may be due to the
9h
Windows Store Will (Finally) Let You Choose Where Games Are Installed
PC gamers using the Windows Store and Xbox Game Pass for PC, rejoice. Your long national nightmare is over. Microsoft has announced in a PC Community Update video that it's bringing some huge and very welcome changes to gaming on the Windows platform. Chief among them is the ability to choose where games downloaded from Xbox Game Pass for PC and the Microsoft Store will be installed, as well as t
9h
Spider of the cross
Nature, Published online: 12 November 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03394-6 A web of deceit.
10h
Kristen Stewart, Diana Spencer, and the Ghost of Anne Boleyn
In the new biopic Spencer , Diana Spencer, Princess of Wales, wanders her decaying childhood home, talking with Anne Boleyn's ghost. The beheaded second wife of King Henry VIII warns Diana of her dispensability as a royal and tells her to assert her power. It is not, strictly speaking, a faithful reproduction of history. The surreal film from the Jackie director Pablo Larraín presents Kristen Ste
10h
A Better Way to Write About Sex
J. H. Kellogg may be best known for his popular cereal brand, but his legacy includes much more than just breakfast. The inventor of corn flakes was also a health activist who lobbied aggressively for controversial practices—including painful and extreme measures to prevent masturbation. As the book Sex in America argues, the breakfast magnate's campaign against self-pleasure cast the normal and
10h
Beeple's New NFT Just Sold for $29 Million, and He'll Update It for the Rest of His Life
Just a few months ago, most of us had never heard of an NFT . Even once we figured out what they were, it seemed like maybe they'd be a short-lived fad, a distraction for the tech-savvy to funnel money into as the pandemic dragged on. But it seems NFTs are here to stay. The internet has exploded with digital artwork that's being bought and sold like crazy; in the third quarter of this year, tradi
10h
Finding El Dorado Ruins in a Dangerous Jungle | Expedition Unknown
Stream Expedition Unknown on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/expedition-unknown #Discovery #ExpeditionUnknown #ElDorado Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/D
10h
Team uses AI to develop the 'ultimate' chickpea
Using artificial intelligence, researchers have developed a genetic model for the "ultimate" chickpea, with the potential to lift crop yields by up to 12%. Researchers genetically mapped thousands of chickpea varieties, and then used this information to identify the most valuable gene combinations using artificial intelligence (AI). Researchers wanted to to develop a "haplotype" genomic predictio
10h
Protect Your Valuables With This Pre-Black Friday Deal On The Biometric TROVA Go
Biometrics are increasingly popular for protecting public spaces and even replacing your wallet . For your valuables, though, they may be the best defense. The TROVA Go uses biometrics to guard what you value most, while making it easy to take with you, and it's even easier to buy at 15% off for a limited time during our Pre-Black Friday sale. Low-Profile Storage As seen in Fast Company, the TROV
10h
New gene-edited barley that could improve beer
After a spell of unexpected rain, before the harvest season, a farmer may be faced with the unpredictable problem of untimely sprouting of barley. Sprouted barley fetches considerably lower market prices and poses an economic burden on farmers and corporations that are at the mercy of nature. The aggravation of climate change has not made this situation any better.
10h
Agriculture and conservation objectives do not have to be at odds
Crop and livestock production are among the main drivers of biodiversity loss globally. Due to the ever-increasing demand of land for food production, reverting global biodiversity decline and feeding the world is one of the greatest challenges of our time. A new study finds that integrating food production and biodiversity conservation within a single spatial planning framework can minimize these
10h
Novel water level regulation approach effectively controls phytoplankton blooms in reservoirs
Global reservoir constructions are still in a period of rapid development. However, building reservoirs tends to cause eutrophication and phytoplankton blooms due to the changes in hydrological conditions, which can reduce the ecosystem service values. Water level regulation has been considered as a promising measure for phytoplankton bloom controlling in reservoirs. So far, most knowledge of the
10h
RadCube extends its magnetometer boom
ESA's latest CubeSat—RadCube, for surveying space weather in low-Earth orbit—has completed its rigorous commissioning phase, culminating in the extension of a magnetometer boom longer than the miniature satellite itself.
10h
Quantum confinement discovered in porous nano-photocatalyst
Green hydrogen production from solar water splitting has attracted a great deal of interest in recent years because hydrogen is a fuel of high energy density. A research team co-led by scholars from City University of Hong Kong (CityU) and Germany discovered the quantum confinement effect in a photocatalyst of a 3D-ordered macroporous structure. The quantum confinement effect was found to enable h
10h
A new era of planetary exploration: What we discovered on the far side of the moon
Seven months after it was launched, the US robotic rover Perseverance successfully landed on Mars on February 18 2021. The landing was part of the mission Mars2020 and was viewed live by millions of people worldwide, reflecting the renewed global interest in space exploration. It was soon followed by China's Tianwen-1, an interplanetary Mars mission consisting of an orbiter, lander and rover calle
11h
Are supply chain disruptions here to stay?
It's common knowledge that holiday shopping is going to be challenging this year due to the broken supply chain. Many favorite items—like game consoles, toys, clothing and shoes—will be in short supply. And if you're lucky enough to find the hottest toy on your child's wish list, you will likely pay more for it. But what does the new year hold? Will 2022 be better?
11h
Theorized mineral formed in earth's mantle found in diamond
A team of researchers affiliated with a host of institutions in the U.S. has found a sample of a mineral previously believed to be unable to exist in nature. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes their study of a diamond found in Orapa, Botswana and the mineral specks they found trapped inside. Yingwei Fei with the Carnegie Institution for Science has published a Per
11h
Mapping our human footprint from space
The world's population is expected to reach 9.7 billion in 2050, according to the UN Department of Economics and Social Affairs. Urban areas are already home to 55% of the world's population and that figure is expected to grow to 68% by 2050. Rapid and unplanned urbanization, combined with the challenges brought by climate change, can lead to an increase in air pollution, higher vulnerability to d
11h
Nanomagnets offer clues to how avalanches work
The behavior of avalanches has generated interest among physicists for the insights that they can provide about many other systems, not least of which is how snow falls down a mountainside. To that end, a team of researchers studied microscopic arrays of nanomagnets that provide the first experimental demonstration of a classic theoretical model, known as the "one-dimensional random field Ising mo
11h
Strategy to optimize sub-nanosecond laser conditioning of DKDP crystal
Researchers from the Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) innovatively proposed a scheme to optimize the laser conditioning effect based on temporal shapes of the pulse, and studied the laser conditioning processes by using sub-nanosecond laser pulses with different combinations of rising and falling edges.
11h
Lead your buyers by using scent marketing for a more emotional purchase
Our sense of smell is an incredibly powerful target for marketing of everything from baked goods to new cars. Research published in the International Journal of Technology Transfer and Commercialisation has looked at how brand recognition is linked to human emotions and behavior in a retail setting when deliberately placed ambient odors are present.
11h
Intracellular temperature sensors: Protein complex exhibits temperature-sensitive activity
Investigators have demonstrated temperature-sensitive regulation of actomyosin, a critical protein complex involved in neuronal development. By applying optically controlled heating, the team demonstrated that the protein drebrin E acts as a switch to inhibit actomyosin motility at physiological temperature, with inhibition occurring above a threshold drebrin E concentration. These findings have i
11h
CO2 separation by special membranes
Worldwide, CO2-emissions must be reduced drastically and one way is separation of CO2 from industrial waste streams. These membranes do not function properly at high pressure conditions however. Chemical engineer Menno Houben found the cause and optimized special membranes that allow separating CO2 at high pressure. Friday November 19th he will defend his Ph.D. thesis at the department of Chemical
11h
Six areas where action must focus to rescue this planet
For some time, the Earth's natural resources have been depleted faster than they can be replaced. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has set a 2030 deadline to reduce heat-trapping emissions by half to avoid climate change that is both irreversible and destructive.
11h
Daily briefing: US and China issue joint climate pledge
Nature, Published online: 11 November 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03426-1 The two biggest greenhouse-gas emitters have issued a surprise joint declaration at COP26. Plus, how Merck and Pfizer's antiviral pills might reshape the pandemic, and the origin story of the arXiv.
11h
AI helps record data on species to monitor biodiversity over time
If a tree falls in the forest, and only artificial intelligence is listening, is a data point recorded? Such questions have become pertinent to a collaborative research project by scientists from the University of Chicago, Argonne National Laboratory and the University of Wisconsin–Madison.
11h
Salt causes surprising reaction deep in the brain
New research in rodents reveals surprising new information about the relationship between neuron activity and blood flow deep in the brain, as well as how consuming salt affects the brain. When neurons are activated, it typically produces a rapid increase of blood flow to the area. This relationship is known as neurovascular coupling, or functional hyperemia, and it occurs via dilation of blood v
11h
Vi vet inte vad som händer om djuren försvinner
Flera av jordens största däggdjur är i dag utrotningshotade. Vad händer om de försvinner? Det vet vi inte, men tidigare förluster har skakat jorden i grunden. Vår kunskap om hur de stora däggdjuren påverkar omgivningen – och hela jorden – har stora luckor. Det menar ett internationellt forskarlag som har kartlagt vetenskapliga studier om de stora växtätares påverkan på ekosystemen. Nu efterlyser
12h
How corals react to climate change
Ph.D. student Fabian Gösser from the Department of Animal Ecology, Evolution and Biodiversity has been studying how corals react to changing environmental conditions and how their stress response could contribute to the survival of the reefs. The RUB biologist's research focuses on the phenomenon of polyp bailout, i.e. the expulsion of small, bud-like individual corals called polyps. Under stress,
12h
PODCAST: Vi kommer i akut mangel på grøn strøm
Vi er flere vindmølleparker bagud, hvis vi skal have strøm nok fra vedvarende energikilder til den kommende elektrificering. I ugens Transformator kan du også høre om, hvilke betingelser der skal på plads for at kolonisere Mars, og om vores univers måske har flere 'sammenfoldede' dimensioner.
12h
Study: Conservative customers are more satisfied than liberal ones
Across industries, conservatives are more satisfied than liberals with the products and services they consume, according to a study of more than 326,000 U.S. consumers by an international research team from Rice University, the Catholic University of Portugal, Boston College, the University of Texas at San Antonio and Korea University.
13h
IEEE retracts plagiarized paper after Retraction Watch inquiries
The Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) has retracted a paper it published in 2006 that was identical to another paper it published that same year. We learned of the two identical papers — both titled "Delay-dependent robust stability of uncertain discrete singular time-delay systems," one published in the Proceedings of the 2006 American … Continue reading
14h
Regio- and enantioselective umpolung gem-difluoroallylation of hydrazones via palladium catalysis enabled by N-heterocyclic carbene ligand
Nature Communications, Published online: 12 November 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26667-0 Installation of difluoroalkyl groups while also imparting stereochemical information is mostly only possible with organocatalytic methods that activate carbonyls. Here the authors show a method to perform an difluoroallylation of hydrazones, forming a masked amine stereocenter, via palladium- and N-heterocyc
14h
A Deep Gravity model for mobility flows generation
Nature Communications, Published online: 12 November 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26752-4 The movements of individuals within and among cities influence critical aspects of our society, such as well-being, the spreading of epidemics, and the quality of the environment. Here, the authors use deep neural networks to discover non-linear relationships between geographical variables and mobility flows
14h
The RNA-binding protein HuR is required for maintenance of the germinal centre response
Nature Communications, Published online: 12 November 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26908-2 Germinal centre (GC) responses may require RNA binding proteins (RBP) for post-transcriptional gene regulation. Here the authors show the RBP HuR supports GCs by promoting Myc and Myc-dependent transcription to enhance antigen-specific GC B cell selection and production of high affinity antibodies.
14h
Zinc finger protein ZNF384 is an adaptor of Ku to DNA during classical non-homologous end-joining
Nature Communications, Published online: 12 November 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26691-0 Classical non-homologous end-joining (cNHEJ) is the dominant pathway used by human cells to repair DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and maintain genome stability. Here the authors show that PARP1-driven chromatin expansion allows the recruitment of ZNF384, which in turn recruits Ku70/Ku80 to facilitate cNHEJ.
14h
Mammalian SWI/SNF chromatin remodeler is essential for reductional meiosis in males
Nature Communications, Published online: 12 November 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26828-1 The mammalian SWI/SNF nucleosome remodeler is required for spermatogenesis. Here, the authors show that PBAF is essential for meiotic cell division in males and required to activate the expression of critical genes involved in spindle assembly and nuclear division in spermatocytes.
14h
Precise visuomotor transformations underlying collective behavior in larval zebrafish
Nature Communications, Published online: 12 November 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26748-0 How visual social information informs movement is unclear. Here, the authors characterise the algorithm zebrafish use to transform visual inputs from neighbours into movement decisions during collective swimming behavior. The authors can also predict the neural circuits involved in transforming the visual in
14h
WRN helicase safeguards deprotected replication forks in BRCA2-mutated cancer cells
Nature Communications, Published online: 12 November 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26811-w The tumor suppressor BRCA2 protects stalled DNA replication forks from unrestrained degradation; however the mechanism whereby unprotected stalled forks are preserved and restarted has remained elusive. Here the authors show that the WRN helicase promotes stalled fork recovery and limits fork hyper-degradati
14h
Nuclear and cytoplasmic huntingtin inclusions exhibit distinct biochemical composition, interactome and ultrastructural properties
Nature Communications, Published online: 12 November 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26684-z The mechanisms underlying Huntingtin protein (Htt) aggregation are not fully understood. Here the authors perform a detailed investigation of the ultrastructural and biochemical properties of huntingtin cytoplasmic and nuclear inclusions, and reveal that they form via distinct mechanisms and exert their toxi
14h
»Spørg mig om hvad som helst, så har jeg et system. Det er en del af den coping mechanism, jeg har opbygget for at kunne håndtere livet«
Cecilie Refsager er ved at uddanne sig som praktiserende læge, hun er mor, teaterentusiast, hustru, og så er hun autist. Hele livet har hun følt sig anderledes, men først i forsommeren blev hun som 38-årig diagnosticeret, og nu vil hun bryde tabuet og stigmatiseringen. Ikke kun for sin egen skyld eller for at rydde vejen for sin søn, der har samme diagnose. Men også for alle dem, der gerne vil væ
14h
Fritt fall för demokratin i Göteborg
Fram till 2008 var siffror över hur nöjda göteborgarna var med både den lokala och den nationella demokratin stabila i förhållande till varandra. – Men mellan åren 2008 och 2016 minskar nöjdheten med lokaldemokratin från 80 till 50 procent. Om det inte kan benämnas som fritt fall så vet jag inte vad man ska använda för ord, säger Henrik Ekengren Oscarsson, professor i statsvetenskap vid Göteborgs
15h
Dyson AM10 Humidifier review
The Dyson AM10 Humidifier uses ultraviolet light to purify water and clear up to 99.9 percent of bacteria before it's vaporized, keeping the air in your home perfectly humid and sanitary.
15h
Forskere vil kurere luftvejsinfektioner med syre
Forskere fra Norge og Danmark samarbejder om udvikling af en ny inhalationsbehandling, som skal gøre kål på alt fra cystisk fibrose til COVID-19. Behandlingen, der virker på både bakterie- og virusinfektioner, bliver i øjeblikket undersøgt i et klinisk studie med mennesker.
15h
Podd: Så resonerar vaccinskeptiker
Varför är det viktigt att förstå hur vaccinsskeptiker resonerar och vad har de för argument? Lyssna på vår podd med Mia-Marie Hammarlin, etnolog och forskare vid Lunds universitet, som har djupintervjuat personer som inte velat vaccinera sig mot covid-19.
18h
Schneider Shorts 12.11.2021 – J Neuroscience vs Elisabeth Bik
Schneider Shorts 12.11.2021: a retraction for Pierre Kory, avoided retractions for various fraudsters, Vojtech Adam negotiating with success, Cassava forges partnership with learned society against Bik, Raoult vs Bill Gates, why asphyxiation is good for you, TCM recipes, Pandora Papers and chemical pollution, and how to save the planet with synthetic nature.
19h
Når jagtsæsonen går ind
Stikpillen: I de to store partiers sundhedsudspil prioriteres det nære sundhedsvæsen, hvilket jo lyder meget godt på papiret. Men kan disse udspil ændre noget, der vil komme borgernes dagligdag til gode? Ifølge Torben Mogensen er forslagene præget af mangler og tvivlsomhed.
20h
Cop26: the final day – have we made any progress on saving the planet?
The Science Weekly podcast is in Glasgow, where we are bringing listeners daily episodes from Cop26. Each morning you will hear from one of the Guardian's award-winning environment team. Today, Science Weekly host Madeleine Finlay talks to the Guardian's environment correspondent, Fiona Harvey, and environment editor, Damian Carrington, on how the final hours of Cop26 negotiations are going. Help
20h
New technique may lead to safer stem cell transplants
Studying mice, researchers have developed a method of stem cell transplantation that does not require radiation or chemotherapy. Instead, the strategy takes an immunotherapeutic approach, combining the targeted elimination of blood-forming stem cells in the bone marrow with immune-modulating drugs to prevent the immune system from rejecting the new donor stem cells.
1d
Shining a light into 'black holes' in the Arabidopsis genome
Scientists have sequenced the genome of the world's most widely used model plant species, Arabidopsis thaliana, at a level of detail never previously achieved. The study reveals the secrets of Arabidopsis chromosome regions called centromeres. The findings shed light on centromere evolution and provides insights into the genomic equivalent of black holes.
1d
Study encourages cautious approach to CRISPR therapeutics
A comprehensive study has shown that gene editing, specifically gene knockout (KO), with CRISPR-Cas9 can favor cells with mutated forms of genes linked to cancer. The findings highlight the need to monitor patients undergoing CRISPR-Cas9-based gene therapy for cancer-related mutations.
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Volcanic eruptions contributed to collapse of China dynasties
Volcanic eruptions contributed to the collapse of dynasties in China in the last 2,000 years by temporarily cooling the climate and affecting agriculture, according to a new study. Large eruptions create a cloud that blocks some sunlight for a year or two. That reduces warming of the land in Asia in the summer and leads to a weaker monsoon and less rainfall, reducing crop harvests.
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When mom and child interact, physiology and behavior coordinate
When mothers and their children play together, they instinctively respond to each other's cues. And positive interactions promote the child's healthy socioemotional development. A new study examines how physiological and behavioral reactions coordinate during mother-child playtime. The findings highlight the importance of responsive communication, and can help provide insights for parents, practit
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