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Why Health-Care Workers Are Quitting in Droves
The moment that broke Cassie Alexander came nine months into the pandemic . As an intensive-care-unit nurse of 14 years, Alexander had seen plenty of " Hellraiser stuff," she told me. But when COVID-19 hit her Bay Area hospital, she witnessed "death on a scale I had never seen before." Last December, at the height of the winter surge , she cared for a patient who had caught the coronavirus after
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Kyle Rittenhouse Is No Hero
As the Kyle Rittenhouse trial comes to a close, two things are becoming clear at once. First, absolutely no one should be surprised if Rittenhouse is acquitted on the most serious charges against him. And second, regardless of the outcome of the trial, the Trumpist right is wrongly creating a folk hero out of Rittenhouse. For millions he's become a positive symbol, a young man of action who stepp
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Grandmothers may be more connected to grandchildren than to own offspring
Study of women's brain function finds more empathy activation when looking at pictures of grandchildren They say that grandchildren are life's greatest joy, and now the first study to examine grandmothers' brain function has suggested grannies may be more emotionally connected to their grandkids than to their own sons and daughters. Since the 1960s, researchers have posited that one reason women
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Potential Alzheimer's Treatment Restores Lost Memories in Mice
A team of researchers might have developed a way to treat — and possibly even vaccinate against — Alzheimer's disease . Scientists from the UK and Germany made the promising discoveries via experiments involving mice, according to a press release from the University of Leicester . The treatment itself targets the amyloid beta protein in the brain, which becomes deformed and "truncated" as the neu
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A Hospital Is About to Start Testing an Anti-Alzheimer's Nasal Spray
Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts, is about to kick off a clinical trial of a new nasal vaccine meant to prevent and slow the progression of Alzheimer's. Research lead Howard Weiner, from the hospital's Ann Romney Center for Neurologic Diseases, called the trial a "remarkable milestone" in a statement . "Over the last two decades, we've amassed preclinical evidence suggesting
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Scientists May Have Accidentally Spotted an Extra Planet in Our Solar System
Scientists may have glimpsed the elusive and mysterious Planet Nine — that is, if it actually exists — back in 1983. That's according to Michael Rowan-Robinson, an astronomer at the Imperial College London, who analyzed observations made by the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) back in 1983. In a new paper , which has yet to be peer reviewed, Rowan-Robinson argues that shots from the telesco
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UN Calls Elon Musk's Bluff, Providing Detailed Plan to Prevent World Hunger
Tesla CEO Elon Musk, the richest person in the world, isn't a fan of taxation. He balked when US lawmakers proposed a new billionaires tax plan last month, which would sap him of around $50 billion over the plan's first five years. "Eventually, they run out of other people's money and then they come for you," he complained on Twitter last month. When Tesla shares soared following the announcement
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IBM announces development of 127-qubit quantum processor
IBM has announced the development of a 127-qubit quantum processor, both on its IBM Quantum page and during IBM Quantum Summit 2021. As part of its announcement, IBM also announced that computers running the new processor will be made available to IBM Quantum Network members and that the company has plans for launching two other, presumably more powerful processors it has named Osprey and Condor o
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Newly-identified state in bacteria has major implications for antibiotic treatment and resistant strains
For almost two years, newsfeeds have kept us updated on the daily battle to annihilate the coronavirus. So, it' s easy to forget that there are also many types of bacteria threatening human health—our survival depends on the constant quest for new antibiotics that can destroy them. Recent research provides an important insight into the complex response of bacteria to antibiotics and opens up the p
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This new startup has built a record-breaking 256-qubit quantum computer
At long last, physicists from Harvard and MIT have found the killer application for quantum computing: a Mario Bros. GIF made from qubits. The qubits (quantum bits) can also be arranged in a Space Invaders design, or Tetris, or any other shape—your geometrical wish is the qubits' command. The GIFs are from QuEra Computing, a Boston startup emerging from stealth, to show off the programmability of
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New material could be two superconductors in one
MIT physicists and colleagues have demonstrated an exotic form of superconductivity in a new material the team synthesized only about a year ago. Although predicted in the 1960s, until now this type of superconductivity has proven difficult to stabilize. Further, the scientists found that the same material can potentially be manipulated to exhibit yet another, equally exotic form of superconductiv
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The next step in understanding the interaction among hadrons
In a recently published article in Physical Review Letters, the ALICE collaboration has used a method called femtoscopy to study the residual interaction between two-quark and three-quark particles. Through this measurement, an interaction between the ɸ meson (strange-antistrange quarks) and a proton (two up and one down quarks) was unveiled for the first time.
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New technique improves conversion of carbon dioxide into liquid fuels
Carbon dioxide (CO2), a product of burning fossil fuels and the most prevalent greenhouse gas, has the potential to be sustainably converted back into useful fuels. A promising route for turning CO2 emissions into a fuel feedstock is a process known as electrochemical reduction. But to be commercially viable, the process needs to be improved, to select for, or to yield, a higher amount of desirabl
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Can I give you a call bark? DogPhone lets pets ring their owners
When dog moves ball containing device it sends a signal to a laptop and launches a video call Whether it is a silent stare or simply a rousing bark, dogs have found myriad ways to communicate with humans. Now researchers have created a hi-tech option for canines left home alone: a ball that allows them to call their owners on the old dog and bone. The device – nicknamed the DogPhone – is a soft b
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Bank Sues Tesla for $160 Million Because of Elon's 420 Tweet
Bad Tweet Tesla CEO Elon Musk is in hot water for his tweets again — and this time, it might cost more than $160 million. Banking giant JPMorgan Chase has sued Tesla for $162.2 million for allegedly breaching a 2014 contract regarding the company's stock options, The Guardian reports . At the heart of the matter is Musk's infamous 2018 tweet in which he said he would take Tesla private once its s
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Researchers Say CO2 "Traps" On Moon Could Be Used to Grow Plants
Carbon Cold Traps Researchers have discovered that the Moon might have frozen pockets of carbon dioxide — and say they could be used to create lunar greenhouses. A team of scientists identified the CO2 "cold traps" in a paper published in the journal Geophysical Research Letter. This is a phenomenon that occurs when gasses like carbon dioxide collect and remain in pockets due to frigid temperatur
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Tea and coffee may be linked to lower risk of stroke and dementia – study
Research looking at 365,000 people aged 50-74 finds moderate consumption could have health benefits Drinking coffee or tea may be linked with a lower risk of stroke and dementia, according to the largest study of its kind. Strokes cause 10% of deaths globally, while dementia is one of the world's biggest health challenges – 130 million are expected to be living with it by 2050. Continue reading..
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New HIV jabs taken two months apart hailed as huge step forward
Safe injectable antiretroviral drugs, approved by health bodies, 'could lift burden of daily oral therapy' Thousands of people living with HIV in Britain are to be freed from the burden of taking daily pills, after health chiefs gave the green light for a revolutionary treatment by injection every two months. Draft guidance from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (Nice) recomme
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Human Brains Are Shrinking, Scientist Warns
A scientist has confirmed what many who watch cable news have suspected for a while: human brains are getting smaller. J.M. Stibel, a brain scientist at the Los Angeles Natural History Museum and author of the study , published in the journal Brain, Behavior and Evolution , says that the size of human brains has greatly decreased in the past 50,000 years. In fact, the study found that brain size
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The Staples Center Will Be Renamed the "Crypto.com Arena" Because We Are Condemned to Eternal Damnation
Crypto.com Arena As if nothing is sacred anymore, the home arena of the Los Angeles Lakers is getting a new name: the Crypto.com Arena. The ugly new moniker will stick for the next 20 years, even if cryptocurrencies will have long disappeared by then — an unfortunate reminder of blockchain's tireless devouring of all that is holy. Just kidding, of course. In reality, we pledge allegiance to our n
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Bill Gates and Warren Buffet Are Building an Experimental Nuclear Plant in a Tiny City
Introducing Natrium Microsoft CEO Bill Gates has decided to fully LARP as Mr. Burns from "The Simpsons" by starting his own nuclear power plant — and he's chosen a tiny Wyoming city to build it in. The Natrium nuclear power plant will be built in Kemmerer, Wyoming, reports The Guardian . The facility will replace an old coal plant that's slated to shut down by 2025, and is expected to create as m
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Facebook Shows Off Gloves That Allow You to "Feel" VR Objects
Facebook is really committed to getting between you and reality, and the gloves are starting to come off — or, rather, on. With its newly announced plans to build out a metaverse, the social network has now announced that it's building a haptic glove , a wearable meant to enable you to "touch" objects in the metaverse. Oh yeah, and it's changing its name to "Meta." "The value of hands to solving
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The Mathematician Who Delights in Building Bridges
For her senior thesis at Princeton University, Ana Caraiani was given a challenging problem from her adviser, the mathematician Andrew Wiles. He'd recently garnered fame for his 1994 proof of Fermat's Last Theorem, but Caraiani had less luck with her assigned problem. Still, although she ended up making no significant headway, she remained undaunted. "The point of the exercise wasn't necessarily.
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The Mystery of Pete Buttigieg
Here's a surprise from President Joe Biden's time in office: One of the most prominent figures in the debate over paid parental leave—a right that 186 other countries give at least to mothers, and that could boost the national birth rate and strengthen the traditional family unit —is the gay, male secretary of transportation. Starting in August, Pete Buttigieg left work for several weeks to care
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What Are the Ethics of an Implant That Delivers Pleasure Directly Into Your Brain?
A growing number of scientists believe that a sort of "feel-good button" — a device that can be implanted into your brain and automatically trigger feelings of pleasure — could become reality in the surprisingly near term future. In fact, some research, largely stemming from clinical or medical experimentation, indicates that the controversial tech is already on its way here. And multiple experts
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The Pedestrian-Death Crisis Came to My Neighborhood
Nina Larson was 24 years old, and she wanted to be an opera singer. On Saturday afternoon, she was crushed by a car on the street outside my apartment building in Washington, D.C. My neighbor heard the sound of the accident from her sixth-floor window, and the driver's horrified screams. Nina was trapped for a while, according to police reports, before emergency workers were able to free her from
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NASA Mars Rover Samples Mars With "Greenish Mineral"
Martian Olivine NASA's Perseverance Mars Rover has scooped up its next Martian soil sample — and this time, its brand new souvenir was shot through with a special geological feature. "My latest sample is from a rock loaded with the greenish mineral olivine," the rover's official Twitter account wrote in an update today , "and there are several ideas among my science team about how it got there. "
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Russia Says Actually It's Fine That It Blew Up a Satellite, Filled Orbit With Deadly Space Junk
Russia blew up an out-of-commission satellite this week, sending over 1,500 pieces of shrapnel hurtling. It was an unexpected test that could have some serious consequences, endangering not only the lives of NASA astronauts but Russian cosmonauts aboard the International Space Station as well . "It is unthinkable that Russia would endanger not only the American and international partner astronaut
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What is culture?
Culture is the characteristics and knowledge of a particular group of people, encompassing language, religion, cuisine, social habits, music and arts.
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Gasp! Scientists Say There Was an Inaccuracy in a Marvel Movie
A nagging, nerdy question from the Marvel Cinematic Universe's mega-hyped 2018 film "Avengers: Infinity War" led to a discovery about the nature of human hand mechanics, because that's apparently how science works now. Biomolecular engineering researchers at George Tech were apparently intrigued enough after watching the pivotal finger snap at the end of "Infinity War" that they decided to begin
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The Double-Whammy COVID-Flu
In late February 2020, only a couple of weeks after the pandemic coronavirus disease had even received a formal name, a man with a terrible cough and fever showed up at one of the ProHealth Urgent Care centers in Queens, New York. At that point, no COVID-19 cases had yet been confirmed in New York City, but numbers were on the rise in spots across the country, and the man had recently been at a c
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Everyone's Condemned Russia Blowing Up a Satellite… Except Elon Musk
The international space community was in shock when Russia tested an anti-satellite missile, blowing up a decommissioned Russian satellite into over 1,5000 trackable pieces of space junk. The reckless move immediately forced astronauts on board the International Space Station to hunker down — having bits of satellites whipping around the Earth at over 17,000 mph is terrifying when you're stranded
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Hear the Moment ISS Crew Scrambles for Safety from Russian Satellite Debris
Talk about a wakeup call. Just a day after it was revealed that the International Space Station (ISS) astronauts had to shelter for their lives in escape vehicles after Russia blew up one of its own satellites , a recording of that dramatic event — spotted by The Daily Mail — was released. In it, you can hear mission control wake up ISS flight engineer Mark Vande Hei and tell him that the crew ne
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The Upside of COVID Hygiene Theater
W e are now more than a year and a half into the coronavirus pandemic, and we are once again hand-wringing about "hygiene theater," the various public displays of sanitation and cleanliness that critics attack as unnecessary, wasteful, and even counterproductive. But if detractors mock these measures—temperature checks before concerts, QR codes instead of paper menus at restaurants, outdoor mask
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The Key to Julia Child's Success Hid in Plain Sight
Julia Child heard many stories about France as a kid growing up in California. They were lies. Her father, an imperious conservative many people called "Big John," liked to tarnish all Europeans as "dark" and "dirty," despite having never been to the continent. He reserved an illogical portion of his ire for France and the intellectualism he thought French people embodied. Every early encounter t
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The Atlantic Daily: Not Everyone Needs to Rush for a Booster
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox. If the booster rollout is a TV show (as my colleague Rachel Gutman once joked), this evening brought a juicy—if not entirely unexpected—plot twist: According to The New York Times , the FDA and CD
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Rejoice! The New York Times Says It's Fine to Eat the Stickers on Vegetables
Good news! You're not going to die if you eat the stickers that come on your grocery store fruits and veggies! This revelation comes from the New York Times ' Ask Well column , in which people bring their burning nutrition questions to the paper's food writers. And in spite of sharing a masthead with the Times ' Editorial Board , they really seem to hit the nail on the head here. "I keep finding
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Killer Storms Drive Deadly Scorpion Swarms Into Home-Invading Fury
Scorpion Kings New plague just dropped. Massive rain, dust, and snowstorms (yes, snow too) in Aswan, Egypt have caused swarms of scorpions to wreak havoc on the city — leaving multiple people dead as a result, Egyptian newspaper Al-Ahram reports . So far, three people have died and more than 450 have been injured in a single night of scorpion-stinging fury. The New York Times reports that the ins
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Record Rainfall Floods British Columbia and Washington State
Historic levels of rainfall across southern British Columbia and western Washington State have caused flooding and landslides that have destroyed roads and forced thousands of residents to flee. An "atmospheric river" carried storms in from the Pacific that dropped as much as 8 inches of rain on some areas over the weekend, causing rivers to overflow and low-lying plains to flood. At least one de
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Glyphosate pesticide does not cause mortality in bumble bees
Glyphosate is the most commonly used pesticide in the world, and is widely used in agriculture. While glyphosate has been deemed 'bee-safe' by regulators, some emerging evidence studies suggest that it has negative effects on bees. For that reason, discovering whether glyphosate alone, or in combination with other stressors, is detrimental to bee health, has become a question of great importance.
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Machine learning IDs mammal species with the potential to spread SARS-CoV-2
Back and forth transmission of SARS-CoV-2 between people and other mammals increases the risk of new variants and threatens efforts to control COVID-19. A new study, published today in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, used a novel modelling approach to predict the zoonotic capacity of 5,400 mammal species, extending predictive capacity by an order of magnitude. Of the high risk species flagged,
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Russia Blows Up Satellite, Forcing Its Own Cosmonauts to Cower in Fear
Yesterday, astronauts aboard the International Space Station (ISS) were forced to suit up and shelter in docked vehicles when the orbital outpost passed through a debris cloud. While the origins of the debris were initially shrouded in speculation, we now know the answer: Russia blew up a satellite to test a new weapon. The US Space Command announced in a statement that Moscow was behind the debr
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How Quantum Computers Will Correct Their Errors
In 1994, Peter Shor, a mathematician then at Bell Labs in New Jersey, proved that a quantum computer would have the power to solve some problems exponentially faster than a classical machine. The question was: Could one be built? Skeptics argued that quantum states were too delicate — the environment would inevitably jumble the information in the quantum computer, making it not quantum at all. So
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Ultrafast charging of batteries using fully new anode material
By using a fully new material, nickel niobate, for the anode of lithium-ion batteries, the charging speed can be improved by ten times, according to researchers of the University of Twente. This is possible without the risk of damaging the anode material, causing battery breakdown or reducing its lifetime. An additional advantage is that the manufacturing process is not complicated. The researcher
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No Bird Wants to Live in a Murder Nest
In the spring of 2019, the biologist Tore Slagsvold headed into the forests outside Oslo to stage a series of tiny crime scenes. He didn't need bullets, or bootprints, or even bodies or blood; only a handful of plush, white feathers. Slagsvold's audience was avian—the region's blue tits and pied flycatchers. And with any luck, his faux, fluffy evidence was going to scare the bejesus out of them.
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Watch Post Malone Buy An NFT While We Slowly Chart Our Descent Into Hell
A new music video from mumbly rapper-slash-crooner Post Malone features a product placement cameo that literally no one asked for. In the beginning of the James Bond-inspired video for Postie's latest single, "One Right Now," the artist is seen purchasing a Bored Ape Non-Fungible Token (NFT), for some reason, just before he and The Weeknd's Abel Tesfaye join a highly choreographed gunfight. In on
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Winners of the 2021 Natural Landscape Photography Awards
The winning images from the first-ever Natural Landscape Photography Awards were recently announced. The competition was started to "promote the very best landscape photography by digital and film photographers who value realism and authenticity in their work," with rules set up to prevent deceptive editing techniques. More than 1,300 photographers entered from 47 countries. The organizers were k
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Scientists monitor the formation of a chemical bond for the first time
A new study has for the first time been able to monitor the different stages of a chemical reaction, as one bond breaks and another forms. The work, involving Nottingham Trent University, the University of Southampton and the University of Warwick, has been successful in 'trapping' the stages in a crystalline state.
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Researchers Create Narc Neural Network to Help Cops Predict New Designer Drugs
Canadian researchers have created a no-fun AI that imagines what designer drugs will hit the streets before they're even invented — in order to help cops crack down on them. This week, medical researchers at the University of British Columbia announced that they'd fed a machine learning algorithm a database worth of information on "known psychoactive substances," with the goal of predicting new d
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Magnetic symmetry is not just like looking in a mirror
When you think about how rapidly computers filled our homes, our cars and even ourselves through watches and earpieces, it might be hard to believe that there is a massive gap between computer's processing power and the speed, capacity and reliability of our brains. But, by 2040, it is predicted that this gap will pose a critical problem for energy consumption, because by one estimate all the ener
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Maybe Don't Blow Up Satellites in Space
The astronauts were still asleep when NASA called the International Space Station . "Hey, Mark, good morning. Sorry for the early call," a mission controller said in the early hours of Monday morning, speaking with Mark Vande Hei, one of four NASA astronauts on board. But the astronauts needed to get up, mission control said calmly, and move to the spacecraft docked to the station. They needed to
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Advanced microscopes help scientists understand how cells break down proteins
Proteins are the building blocks of all living things. A vast amount research takes place on how these proteins are made and what they do, from enzymes that carry out chemical reactions to messengers that transmit signals between cells. In 2004, Aaron Ciechanover, Avram Hershko, and Irwin Rose won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for a different but just as important process of protein machinery: how
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Cosmic dust may be key source of phosphorus for life on Earth
When Earth formed 4.5 billion years ago, any phosphorus that was present likely sank into the molten core because of the element's distinct chemical properties. However, phosphorus is essential for life; it is found in DNA, RNA, and other important biological molecules. So it is probable that the phosphorus that made life possible was delivered to Earth's surface from extraterrestrial origins, and
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An Unlikely Threat to the Western Alliance
A simple analysis about the unfolding crisis in Northern Ireland has established itself as settled wisdom among almost all informed observers across Europe, the United States, and even Britain: It's all London's fault. The story is convincing. It was Britain that voted for Brexit despite warnings about the threat it posed to peace in Northern Ireland; Britain that imposed Brexit on Northern Irela
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Bucket brigades and proton gates: Researchers shed new light on water's role in photosynthesis
Photosystem II is a protein in plants, algae and cyanobacteria that uses sunlight to break water down into its atomic components, unlocking hydrogen and oxygen. A longstanding question about this process is how water molecules are funneled into the center of Photosystem II, where water is split to produce the oxygen we breathe. A better understanding of this process could inform the next generatio
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Dubious Court Case Claims Bitcoin Co-Creator Is Dead
The cryptosphere is abuzz over a Florida court case in which the plaintiffs are claiming that one of the co-creators of Bitcoin is dead — and that his family is entitled to what amounts to a $32 billion estate. The crux of the case lies in the mostly-unsubstantiated claim that Australian programmer Craig Wright was, at least partially, the person behind the pseudonymous "Satoshi Nakamoto" who cre
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US Agencies, Military Rush to Condemn Russia Blowing Up Satellite
US government agencies are in unusual lockstep as they condemn Russia for intentionally exploding its own satellite, creating a dangerous cloud of space junk and forcing astronauts aboard the International Space Station to bunker down in their docked spaceships for safety. US Space Command called the surprise antisatellite (ASAT) test "a reckless and dangerous act." And NASA Administrator Bill Ne
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Oh Great, They're Filming Porn Inside Teslas on Autopilot
This week, we're pleased to bring you a different version of Futurism , containing stories from the horizon of hedonism. Welcome to The Science of Pleasure . In collaboration with our friends over at MEL Magazine , this week, we'll be bringing you stories from both publications about the pleasures of tomorrow, today. To know Tesla is to know its fans: more zealous than Honda drivers, more moralis
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We Live By a Unit of Time That Doesn't Make Sense
Days, months, and years all make sense as units of time—they match up, at least roughly, with the revolutions of Earth, the moon, and the sun. Weeks, however, are much weirder and clunkier. A duration of seven days doesn't align with any natural cycles or fit cleanly into months or years. And though the week has been deeply significant to Jews, Christians, and Muslims for centuries, people in man
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New mission to scour our interstellar neighbourhood for planets that could sustain life
Privately funded Toliman telescope to be launched into low-earth orbit to search Alpha Centauri star system Get our free news app ; get our morning email briefing A new space mission to hunt for potentially habitable planets around Earth's closest neighbouring star system is under way. In a project with echoes of the 2009 film Avatar, an international collaboration of scientists in Australia and
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The Personality Test in Your Closet
As a wearer of novelty T-shirts and lifelong collector of stuff, I've amassed quite a lot of tees over the years. A family road trip to the Ben & Jerry's factory one summer in the 1990s netted a bright, tie-dyed number, while a recent pandemic acquisition, a forest-green long-sleeved tee, came from Mystic Muffin, a Toronto restaurant famous for its apple cake. I've misplaced the former somewhere
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Twin of NASA's Perseverance Mars rover begins terrain tests
On a recent day in November, the car-size rover rolled slowly forward, then stopped, perched on the threshold of a Martian landscape. But this rover, named OPTIMISM, wasn't on the Red Planet. And the landscape was a boulder-strewn mock-up of the real Mars—the Mars Yard at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Southern California.
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The Home Is the Future of Travel
Work and life are undergoing a "Great Convergence." The once-solid boundaries between our jobs and our leisure are getting leakier. Knowledge industries—including media, marketing, and law—have for decades collapsed the distinction between work skills and social skills. The same schmoozy behavior that can win friends and influence people can also win business and influence promotions. Computers,
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In-orbit demonstration of an iodine electric propulsion system
Nature, Published online: 17 November 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-04015-y The successful in-orbit operation of an electric space propulsion system based on iodine, rather than the more expensive and difficult-to-store xenon, is demonstrated.
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A computer algorithm that speeds up experiments on plasma
A team of researchers from Tri Alpha Energy Inc. and Google has developed an algorithm that can be used to speed up experiments conducted with plasma. In their paper published in the journal Scientific Reports, the group describes how they plan to use the algorithm in nuclear fusion research.
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Accelerating development in aerospace for more urban mobility
The next wave of aerospace is just around the corner, and a lot of that innovation is happening thanks to new, faster methods of development. "What's happening now is that companies are trying to understand how they take the lessons from Agile software development and apply those to Agile product development," explains Dale Tutt, vice president of Aerospace and Defense Industry for Siemens. With
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Russia admits to anti-satellite missile test but denies 'dangerous behavior'
US officials accuse Moscow of 'irresponsible' behavior after it conducts test that threatened lives of astronauts onboard the ISS Russia has admitted to destroying one of its satellites during a missile test but rejected US accusations that it had endangered the International Space Station. US officials on Monday accused Moscow of "dangerous and irresponsible behavior" after it conducted an anti-
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You Should Get a Booster Now
As the air gets colder and drier and people in most of the United States move indoors, a winter spike in COVID-19 cases is beginning to materialize. The drop in new infections across the Deep South after a difficult summer raised hopes that the country could get through this winter without another surge. But that no longer seems likely. With less than 60 percent of Americans fully vaccinated , th
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Visualizing temperature transport: An unexpected technique for nanoscale characterization
As devices continue to shrink, new challenges in their measurement and design present themselves. For devices based on molecular junctions, in which single molecules are bound to metals or semiconductors, we have a variety of techniques to study and characterize their electric transport properties. In contrast, probing the thermal transport properties of such junctions at the nanoscale has proven
19h
Using virtual fluid for the description of interfacial effects in metallic materials
Liquids containing ions or polar molecules are ubiquitous in many applications needed for green technologies such as energy storage, electrochemistry or catalysis. When such liquids are brought to an interface such as an electrode—or even confined in a porous material—they exhibit unexpected behavior that goes beyond the effects already known. Recent experiments have shown that the properties of t
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Closer to a simple and efficient method of quantum encryption
Banks and government departments are already investing heavily in quantum encryption that relies on laser beams. However, laser beams often release several photons at once or none at all. A team at Hebrew University developed a system that uses fluorescent crystals. A laser beam shone at these quantum dots causes them to fluoresce and emit a stream of single photons.
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Deciphering the impact of gene loss on biological evolution
A paper in Nature proposes a new evolutionary scenario that helps to better understand the evolution of our phylum and to discover what the ancestor of tunicates—the sister group of vertebrates—were like. Specifically, it reveals that the massive gene losses which deconstructed the gene network in the heart of tunicates eased the transition to a free pelagic lifestyle in appendicularian tunicates
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Research in mice shows how diet alters immune system function through a gut microbe
Research in mice demonstrates how diet alters a gut microbe molecule that, in turn, prompts immune cells to downregulate inflammation. The study elucidates molecular mechanism behind long-standing belief that diet, microbiota, and immunity influence one another in myriad ways. If affirmed in larger animals and humans, the findings could inform the design of small-molecule drugs that regulate immun
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New Drug Class Reverses Paralysis in Mice
(Photo: Josh Riemer/Unsplash) A new study out of Northwestern University has revealed that a novel class of drugs may have the power to reverse paralysis. In the latest issue of the journal Science, researchers shared that the new drug was injected into tissue surrounding the spinal cords of paralyzed mice. The drug then got to work on regenerating parts of neurons within the spinal cord, diminis
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Different kinds of marine phytoplankton respond differently to warming ocean temperatures, say researchers
Tiny marine plants called phytoplankton are the foundation of most food webs in the ocean, and their productivity drives commercial fisheries, carbon sequestration, and healthy marine ecosystems. But little is known about how they will respond to increasing ocean temperatures resulting from the changing climate. Most climate models assume they will all respond in a similar way.
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Study offers new insights into how we comprehend and evaluate pronunciation
Previous study results have suggested that people generally comprehend and evaluate the pronunciation of a speaker less well if they suspect that the speaker is ethnically foreign. However, a new study by Dr. Adriana Hanulíková, junior professor of language and cognition at the German Department of the University of Freiburg, shows that the relationships between language comprehension, pronunciati
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Study explores the origin of clonal dominance in excitable cell networks
Clonal dominance is a phenomenon that occurs when descendants (i.e., clones) of one or more founder cells in an organism contribute disproportionally to the system's final structure as the tissue grows. This phenomenon is associated with numerous biological processes, including bacterial growth and the genesis of tumors. While numerous studies have investigated clonal dominance, its origin is stil
23h
Moonwatch: Nasa resumes work on lunar lander
Agency says human landing will not be possible until 2025 at the earliest after lawsuit delays project Nasa has resumed work on the lunar lander needed to return humans to the moon. The space agency voluntarily paused work on the Human Landing System (HLS) for several months after a lawsuit over the spacecraft's development and manufacture. In April, Nasa awarded the $2.9bn HLS contract solely to
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A glimpse of deformation in helium-8
New TRIUMF research from the Saint Mary's University-led IRIS group has unveiled an unexpected shape deformation in the nucleus of helium-8 (He8), providing further insight into the unique dynamics of how neutron-rich nuclei take shape and maintain stability.
20h
The Atlantic Daily: The New Axis of Autocracy
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox. The bad guys are pulling ahead. In our latest magazine cover story, Anne Applebaum argues that the Vladimir Putins and Nicolás Maduros of the world are besting their democratic foils in the 21st c
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King Richard Is an Unconventional Sports Biopic
The protagonist of Reinaldo Marcus Green's new film, King Richard , is, to put it mildly, an unconventional networker. Driving around Los Angeles in a ramshackle VW bus, Richard Williams (played by Will Smith) is focused on finding a coach for his daughters, whom he is hell-bent on molding into tennis prodigies. But his hiring approach amounts to showing up on the doorstep of locally renowned tra
20h
Rural America's False Sense of Security
Every few months throughout the pandemic, Wesley Thompson, a communications consultant in Washington, D.C., has driven to Indiana with his wife and two kids to visit his parents. He wanted to escape COVID cabin fever and give his 4- and 2-year-old some room to run around, which they could do more easily in his parents' small town. The trips have offered him a glimpse into how Americans who live b
3h
NASA extends Hubble operations contract, provides mission update
The Hubble Space Telescope, a project of international cooperation between NASA and ESA (European Space Agency), has fundamentally changed the way we view our universe time and again. Now in its 32nd year in space, Hubble has delivered unprecedented insights about the cosmos, from the most distant galaxy observed so far to familiar planets in our neighborhood, including Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, an
23h
A way to conduct Birch reductions that does not involve ammonia
A team of chemists at the University of Pittsburgh has developed a new way to conduct Birch reductions that does not require the use of ammonia, thus avoiding a dangerous procedure. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes the new method and the ways it can be used.
2d
Inside Delhi's air pollution crisis
Over the past few weeks, a thick brown smog has enveloped Delhi. The pollution is so bad that the capital and surrounding states have shut schools and imposed work-from-home orders. Toxic air at levels 20 times higher than those deemed healthy by the World Health Organization has become a seasonal occurrence in India, causing about 1.6 million premature deaths every year. Madeleine Finlay speaks
9h
Poorer nations still lack access to world's key antibiotics
Only 54 of 166 assessed treatments have policies aiding use by low-income countries, says non-profit group The world's biggest drugs makers have pressed on in the fight against superbugs despite the pandemic, but millions of people in poorer countries, where the risk of drug-resistant infections is highest, are still missing out on key antibiotics. A report from the Access to Medicine Foundation,
14h
Quit Lying to Yourself
" How to Build a Life " is a weekly column by Arthur Brooks, tackling questions of meaning and happiness. Click here to listen to his new podcast series on all things happiness, How to Build a Happy Life . N o one wants to be seen as a liar. Liars are considered untrustworthy at best and immoral at worst. And yet, we are perfectly content to lie to ourselves all the time. "I'll enjoy this sleeve
3h
Shape-morphing microrobots deliver drugs to cancer cells
Chemotherapy successfully treats many forms of cancer, but the side effects can wreak havoc on the rest of the body. Delivering drugs directly to cancer cells could help reduce these unpleasant symptoms. Now, in a proof-of-concept study, researchers have made fish-shaped microrobots that are guided with magnets to cancer cells, where a pH change triggers them to open their mouths and release their
22h
Plantwatch: why it shouldn't be trees v trains
While many trees were felled to prevent 'leaves on the line', Network Rail is now trying to treat them as assets Trees and railways have never really got on with each other. In the days of steam engines, trees alongside railways were cut down to prevent engines sparking fires. Once steam engines were scrapped, the vegetation grew back and more than 6m trees became established alongside Britain's
1d
The first black hole image: A gravitomagnetic monopole as an alternative explanation
The Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) has recently mapped the central compact object of the galaxy M87 with an unprecedented angular resolution. Though the remarkable breakthrough has been interpreted based on theory that M87 contains a rotating or "Kerr" black hole. New research published in EPJ C by Chandrachur Chakraborty and Qingjuan Yu at the Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking
1d
Researchers develop metrics to quantify information in animal responses to reward feedback
Daily life is full of choices. How humans and other animals decide to allocate tiime and effort across competing priorities has fascinated researchers for decades. Psychologists have found that most animals allocate their time among options in proportion to rewards received from the options, adjusting their behavior accordingly in response to reward feedback, a behavioral law known as "matching."
1d
New yeast biodiversity for brewing
In a new study looking at the fundamentals of biology, scientists at The University of Manchester and the University of Leicester have developed unique fertile hybrid yeast strains that offer novel and exciting options for flavors, aromas, and brewing processes for the beverage industry.
1d
The Sorting Hat: An AI-powered image classifier for cell biologists
Cell division is an important process that underlies biological growth and repair. Cell biologists track this process by observing chromosomes—structures made of DNA that contain the genetic material of an organism. Advances in microscopy along with automation have allowed researchers to snap better images of chromosomes in a short time. However, their analysis is still largely done manually, whic
1d
The Mosquitos "Are Eating My Vajayjay Alive" | Naked and Afraid
Stream Naked and Afraid on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/naked-and-afraid About Naked and Afraid: What happens when you put two complete strangers – sans clothes – in some of the most extreme environments on Earth? Each male-female duo is left with no food, no water, no clothes, and only one survival item. #NakedAndAfraid #Discovery #Survival Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.l
now
No transits of Proxima Centauri planets in high-cadence TESS data
Our closest stellar neighbor is Proxima Centauri, an M-type (red dwarf) star located over 4.24 light-years away (part of the Alpha Centauri trinary system). In 2016, the astronomical community was astounded to learn that an Earth-like planet orbited within this star's circumsolar habitable zone (HZ). In addition to being the closest exoplanet to Earth, Proxima b was also considered the most promis
21min
Iodine successfully tested in satellite ion thrusters
A team of researchers from ThrustMe, working with colleagues from Sorbonne Université, has successfully tested the use of iodine as an ionizing agent in an ion-thrusting spacecraft engine. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group describes their two-year test of the chemical element. The team has also posted a press release describing their work on their site.
21min
Rainfall causes microplastic transport into the atmosphere
Oceans, lakes and rivers often contain a large number of microplastic particles on their surface. Impacting raindrops cause many droplets with an almost equally high concentration of microplastics to be thrown up into the air. When they evaporate in the air, the particles enter the atmosphere. Researchers from the University of Bayreuth describe these processes in a new study published in Micropla
21min
Your holiday trash could be contributing to environmental injustice
The past few weeks have been hectic. Almost every week we had a party at home. Usually, Diwali celebrations continue for a month. Families invite other families for lavish meals, show off their beautiful saris, and kids go to sleep very late—I mean VERY late. Thanksgiving is around the corner, and then we have the December holidays with the New Year. Many more parties are in stock, with lots of ru
26min
Fagprofessionelle kommer med bud på prisen for fremtidens psykiatri: »Alternativet er langt dyrere«
Få uger før det faglige oplæg til den længe ventede psykiatriplan er klar, vurderer en gruppe af fagprofessionelle nu, at de nødvendige forbedringer af området samlet kommer til at koste minimum 4,5 mia. kr. i drift årligt. Dertil foreslår de en engangsinvestering på 3,5 mia. kr. til kapacitetsudvidelser. Forslaget skal bøje behovet for ambitiøse investeringer på området i neon over for politiker
38min
Læger skal undgå skyld og skam
LÆGEDAGE: Når et patientforløb ikke går som ventet og ender med et ulykkeligt udfald, kan læger og andet sundhedspersonale blive 'second victim' og slås med skyld og skam. Det er emnet for et af årets kurser på lægedage. Åben dialog og at turde at være i sårbarheden er vejen til en nødvendig kulturændring, siger underviser på kurset Katja Schrøder, der har beskæftiget sig med området i ti år.
1h
Three Unknowns Will Define This Pandemic Winter
Winter has a way of bringing out the worst of the coronavirus. Last year, the season saw a record surge that left nearly 250,000 Americans dead and hospitals overwhelmed around the country. This year, we are much better prepared, with effective vaccines— and, soon, powerful antivirals —that defang the coronavirus, but cases seem to be on the rise again, prompting fears of another big surge. How b
1h
Spatial-temporal structure of ocean salinity seasonal variation
Salinity is always regarded as a natural water gauge. It plays a vital role in regulating ocean density, stratification and circulation. However, a holistic analysis of subsurface salinity down to 2,000 meters is lacking, and there has been no quantification of the uncertainty in the salinity seasonal variation.
1h
New findings on the link between CRISPR gene-editing and mutated cancer cells
A protein that protects cells from DNA damage, p53, is activated during gene editing using the CRISPR technique. Consequently, cells with mutated p53 have a survival advantage, which can cause cancer. Researchers have found new links between CRISPR, p53 and other cancer genes that could prevent the accumulation of mutated cells without compromising the gene scissors' effectiveness.
1h
Scientist advances prospect of regeneration in humans
In a study that builds on earlier research that identified macrophages as essential to regeneration in the axolotl, a highly regenerative salamander, a scientist has identified the source of these critical white blood cells as the liver. By giving scientists a place to look for pro-regenerative macrophages in humans, the discovery brings science a step closer to the ability to regenerate tissues a
1h
The social cost of nitrous oxide is understated under current estimates, new analysis concludes
The social cost of nitrous oxide, a greenhouse gas that is the largest remaining threat to the ozone layer, is understated, concludes an international team of researchers. In their assessment, the authors write that improving the accuracy of these calculations would not only give a more accurate picture of the impact of climate change, but also spur nations to more aggressively address it.
1h
Nested nanowells speed single cell studies
Researchers tracking the behavior of cancerous tumor cells have a new tool in their arsenal that can process 10 times the number of cells in one day. A new nested nanoPOTS chip, developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), was reported October 29 in the journal Nature Communications.
1h
How Native American plant meds treat pain and diarrhea
New research offers a molecular view of how plants with a long history of use by Native Americans worked to treat pain and diarrhea. The researchers reveal a striking pattern following a functional screen of extracts from plants collected in Muir Woods National Monument in coastal redwood forest land in California The study, published in Frontiers in Physiology , found plants that activated the K
1h
Genes may hold clues to keep broccoli fresh
New research identifies the genes that cause broccoli to age after harvest. The work could lead to ways to keep broccoli fresh longer. "When produce arrives at a supermarket distribution center, for example, there is no objective way to measure how fresh that product is or what its shelf life will be. The people receiving the produce can only judge by how something looks," says Jeff Brecht, coaut
1h
How to attract men into jobs performed predominantly by women
Across OECD countries, historically female-dominated occupations in healthcare, education and social services have been growing and are expected to grow even more in the future. In the US, nurse practitioners, occupational therapy assistants and home health care aides are among the ten occupations with the highest expected percent change of employment between 2019 and 2029.
1h
Dave Chappelle Is Oblivious to His Own Blind Spots
At the midpoint of Dave Chappelle's The Closer —his sixth comedy special for Netflix—he introduces the story of William Ellison, a formerly enslaved Black man who, after purchasing his own freedom, became one of the wealthiest slave owners in South Carolina. "Not only was he a slave owner; he became a slave breeder," Chappelle explains, "and employed tactics that were so cruel, even white slave o
2h
Adopting as academics: what we learnt
Nature, Published online: 18 November 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03482-7 Our quest to bring a child into our family led us to confront academic working practices, say Tony Ly and Nathan W. Bailey.
3h
The Sci-Fi Buddy Comedy That Can't Be Repeated
In his memorable 1984 theme song, the singer Ray Parker Jr. said that he wasn't afraid of ghosts. Now Hollywood doesn't seem to be, either. In the past few years, the film industry has scrambled to resurrect any property with the remotest bit of brand recognition, be it Space Jam or Trainspotting or Blade Runner ; if a movie has ever had a cult following, it's worthy of a long-delayed sequel. Gho
3h
What Rhymes With Breyer?
In 2013, Barack Obama hosted Ruth Bader Ginsburg for lunch in his private dining room, hoping to gingerly raise the possibility of her retirement while he still occupied the White House and Democrats still controlled the Senate. She got the message. She also ignored it. Ginsburg didn't suffer much of a reputational hit for her defiance, at least not at the time. The woman who'd been barred from o
3h
The Boxer Who Killed in the Ring
Photographs by Devin Yalkin I t's the tenth and final round , and Patrick Day is fading. He's still circling the ring in search of an opening, but his punches have lost the switchblade quickness they had in the early rounds. If he doesn't do something dramatic, he is going to lose this fight. He had once looked like a star: No. 1 amateur welterweight, Olympic alternate, undefeated in his first 10
3h
Multispecies and individual gas molecule detection using Stokes solitons in a graphene over-modal microresonator
Nature Communications, Published online: 18 November 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26740-8 The integration of 2D materials on photonic devices provides advanced functionalities in sensing applications. The authors demonstrate a graphene functionalized microcomb sensor by exploiting spectrally trapped Stokes solitons. They obtain both multispecies gas identification and individual molecule sensitiv
3h
Mechanochemical synthesis of magnesium-based carbon nucleophiles in air and their use in organic synthesis
Nature Communications, Published online: 18 November 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26962-w Grignard reagents have widespread utility in organic chemistry, but their preparation is limited by several drawbacks, such as the use of dry organic solvents and long reaction times. Here, the authors report a general mechanochemical synthesis of Grignard reagents in paste form in air, using a ball milling
3h
Evidence for anisotropic spin-triplet Andreev reflection at the 2D van der Waals ferromagnet/superconductor interface
Nature Communications, Published online: 18 November 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-27041-w The interfaces between ferromagnets and superconductors receive many attentions due to emergent relativistic spin-orbit coupling. Here, the authors provide possible evidence for spin triplet Andreev reflection at the interface between a van der Waals ferromagnet Fe0.29TaS2 and a s-wave superconductor NbN.
3h
Proofreading experimentally assigned stereochemistry through Q2MM predictions in Pd-catalyzed allylic aminations
Nature Communications, Published online: 18 November 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-27065-2 A predictive model has been created for a stereoselective palladium-catalysed allylic amination reaction. Derived only from quantum chemical data, the method is accurate enough to reveal multiple erroneous assignments in literature experiments.
3h
Asymmetric radical carboesterification of dienes
Nature Communications, Published online: 18 November 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26843-2 Stereocontrol of C–O bond formation from a carbon-based radical is very difficult due to the rapid inversion of the carbon radical. Here the authors present a method to form chiral esters from conjugated dienes with copper and chiral PyBox ligands, likely proceeding via an allylic radical.
3h
Homecoming: rewinding the reductive evolution of the chloroplast genome for increasing crop yields
Nature Communications, Published online: 18 November 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26975-5 Developing more productive and sustainable crops will be essential to achieving food security in coming decades. A core process in plant evolution has been the transfer of chloroplast-encoded genes to the nuclear genome. We propose reverting this process as a new approach to improve plant disease resistance
3h
Temperature effects on carbon storage are controlled by soil stabilisation capacities
Nature Communications, Published online: 18 November 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-27101-1 The extent to which temperature controls soil carbon storage remains highly uncertain. Here, the authors show that, globally, soil carbon stocks decline strongly with temperature, but the effect is much greater in coarse-textured soils with limited organic matter stabilisation capacities, than in fine-textur
3h
Combination of epigenetic regulation with gene therapy-mediated immune checkpoint blockade induces anti-tumour effects and immune response in vivo
Nature Communications, Published online: 18 November 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-27078-x While immunotherapy is a promising cancer treatment option, durable benefits are often rare due to immune escape. Here, the authors combine epigenetic regulation with gene therapy-mediated immune checkpoint blockade and show efficient anti-tumour effects and immune response in vivo.
3h
Patientforening: Danmark halter bagud på ME
Patientforeningen for ME-ramte er mildt sagt frustrerede over, at Danmark går enegang, når det gælder guidelines til behandling af sygdommen. De britiske sundhedsmyndigheder har netop udsendt nye guidelines, der fastslår, at ME ikke er en funktionel lidelse, men er en særskilt biomedicinsk lidelse.
3h
Var ska vi få all ny el ifrån?
När jag blickar ut från mitt köksfönster ser jag hur det platta taket på hyreshuset mittemot har blivit taggigt. Det är solpaneler som monterats och vinklats upp mot söder. Jag sörjer lite att de räta vinklarna i 60-talsarkitekturen brutits – kvarteret heter till och med Linjalen. Men jag gläds åt att mina eluttag snart kommer att kopplas samman med en förnybar och närliggande energikälla. För mer
4h
The Experiment Podcast: How Passing Upends a Problematic Hollywood History
Listen and subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Podcasts Hollywood has a long history of "passing movies"—films in which Black characters pass for white—usually starring white actors. Even as these films have attempted to depict the devastating effect of racism in America, they have trafficked in tired tropes about Blackness. But a new movie from actor-writer-director Rebecca H
5h
Tre solar
Astronomer har hittat tecken på att trippelstjärnsystemet GW Orionis har minst en oupptäckt planet. Planeten har alltså tre solar. Källa: Science Prenumerera på Forskning & Framsteg! Tidskriften med faktakollade och ögonöppnande reportage och vetenskapsnyheter utkommer med 10 nummer per år.
6h
Online Entrepreneurial Programs
We at The Chalaang offer you online Entrepreneurial Programs on various unconventional careers. If you know of any such careers, please do suggest us. We will be more than happy to add it to the list. ​ For more details visit our website: www.thechalaang.com ​ or ​ You can contact us at: +91 9168400500 submitted by /u/chalaangseo [link] [comments]
7h
Skeptical Science New Research for Week #46, 2021
Housekeeping: New content New Research is primarily focused on reports published in "the academic literature." Thanks to a diversity of publishers, journals, editors, reviewers, researchers and institutional affiliations, such publications are statistically highly successful at approximating and reflecting our best dispassionate understanding of research topics. Any given personal agenda not prim
8h
The "Natural Immunity is Real Act": Real or an act?
Republican legislators have proposed a law requiring federal agencies to acknowledge, accept, truthfully present and incorporate "consideration of natural immunity" in their COVID regulations. It's just political theatrics based on a flawed understanding of infection-induced "natural" immunity. The post first appeared on Science-Based Medicine .
8h
Ledelse koster kræfter – og det er ok at få hjælp
Stigende administrative krav og udviklingen mod større praksisser med flere ansatte kræver mere fokus på ledelse i almen praksis end tidligere. Hver anden praktiserende læge lider i dag af udbrændthed, og netop det vil ledelseskonsulent Mikael Elkan imødekomme ved at klæde lægerne bedre på til ledelsesmæssige og organisatoriske opgaver, der kan koste arbejdsglæde i hverdagen.
9h
Værdifuld hjælp for ny praksis
De havde begge to forladt deres tidligere praksis i jagten på større arbejdsglæde og ville være sikre på et match. Rikke Sund og hendes praksismakker fik hjælp af Mikael Elkan til blandt andet personlighedsprofiler og kortlægning af fælles værdier, før de sprang ud i deres nye kompagniskab.
9h
On the Hardy-Littlewood-Chowla conjecture on average
There has been recent interest in a hybrid form of the celebrated conjectures of Hardy-Littlewood and of Chowla. We prove that for any $k,\ell\ge1$ and distinct integers $h_2,\ldots,h_k,a_1,\ldots,a_\ell$, we have $$\sum_{n\leq X}\mu(n+h_1)\cdots \mu(n+h_k)\Lambda(n+a_1)\cdots\Lambda(n+a_{\ell})=o(X)$$ for all except $o(H)$ values of $h_1\leq H$, so long as $H\geq (\log X)^{\ell+\varepsilon}$. Thi
11h
When older couples are close together, their heart rates synchronize
As couples grow old together, their interdependence heightens. Often, they become each other's primary source of physical and emotional support. Long-term marriages have a profound impact on health and well-being, but benefits depend on relationship quality. A new study examines the dynamics of long-term relationships through spatial proximity. The researchers find that when partners are close to
11h
Genetic changes in Bronze Age southern Iberia
The third millennium BCE brought about substantial transformations that are visible in the cultures of Bronze Age Europeans. A new study documents the arrival of new genetic ancestry to southern Iberia, concomitant with the rise of the Early Bronze Age El Argar culture around 2,200 BCE.
11h
'Volcanic winter' likely contributed to ecological catastrophe 250 million years ago
A team of scientists has identified an additional force that likely contributed to a mass extinction event 250 million years ago. Its analysis of minerals in southern China indicate that volcano eruptions produced a 'volcanic winter' that drastically lowered earth's temperatures — a change that added to the environmental effects resulting from other phenomena at the time.
11h
Researchers reveal structure of itch receptors on cells
Scientists have conducted research showing in precise detail how chemicals bind to mast cells to cause itch, and the scientists figured out the detailed structure of receptor proteins on the surface of these cells when a compound is bound to those proteins.
11h
Bacteria as climate heroes
Acetogens are a group of bacteria that can metabolise formate. For example, they form acetic acid — an important basic chemical. If these bacteria were manipulated to produce ethanol or lactic acid, a comprehensive circular economy for the greenhouse gas CO2 could be realised. To ensure that the process is sustainable, the CO2 is extracted directly from the air and converted to formate using rene
11h
`Oh, snap!' A record-breaking motion at our fingertips
Researchers studied the physics of a finger snap and determined how friction plays a critical role. Using an intermediate amount of friction, not too high and not too low, a snap of the finger produces the highest rotational accelerations observed in humans, even faster than the arm of a professional baseball pitcher.
11h
Who Said Science and Art Were Two Cultures? – Issue 108: Change
On a May evening in 1959, C.P. Snow, a popular novelist and former research scientist, gave a lecture before a gathering of dons and students at the University of Cambridge, his alma mater. He called his talk "The Two Cultures and the Scientific Revolution." Snow declared that a gulf of mutual incomprehension divided literary intellectuals and scientists. "The non-scientists have a rooted impress
12h
Steven Pinker Has His Reasons – Issue 108: Change
A few years ago, at the Princeton Club in Manhattan, I chanced on a memorable chat with the Harvard psychologist Steven Pinker. His spouse, the philosopher Rebecca Goldstein, with whom he was tagging along, had been invited onto a panel to discuss the conflict between religion and science and Einstein's so-called "God letter," which was being auctioned at Christie's. ("The word God is for me," Ei
12h
It's Not Irrational to Party Like It's 1999 – Issue 108: Change
Must we always follow reason? Do I need a rational argument for why I should fall in love, cherish my children, enjoy the pleasures of life? Isn't it sometimes OK to go crazy, to be silly, to stop making sense? If rationality is so great, why do we associate it with a dour joylessness? Was the philosophy professor in Tom Stoppard's play Jumpers right in his response to the claim that "the Church
12h
Ignorance: How It Drives Science, a New Podcast – Issue 108: Change
Science is not the massive structure built of facts that you were taught in school—at least not to scientists. What interests scientists is what they don't know, what remains to be figured out. And there's plenty of that. In this podcast, we give scientists the opportunity to talk about what they don't know, how they come up with questions, why one question is more important than another, and wha
12h
If a tyrannical world government that wanted to develop efficient interstellar travel technologies gained control of all of Earth's resources right now, could we have that technology within our lifetimes?
Think like a tyrannical world government along the lines of Stalinist Soviet Union, but even more politically powerful (controlling the entire world) and micromanaging and bending it to its every whim and will – with brutal force if necessary by way of a highly militarized Secret World Police. Such micromanagement will be godlike in nature with the world state being totally omniscient of every mo
14h
EXPLAINER: Why India has repeated air pollution problems
New Delhi struggles with pollution year-round, but the problem becomes acute during fall and winter months. On Wednesday, the concentration of tiny pollution particles was nearly 30 times above the level deemed safe over a 24-hour period by the World Health Organization.
16h
Motor-independent retraction of type IV pili is governed by an inherent property of the pilus filament [Microbiology]
Type IV pili (T4P) are dynamic surface appendages that promote virulence, biofilm formation, horizontal gene transfer, and motility in diverse bacterial species. Pilus dynamic activity is best characterized in T4P that use distinct ATPase motors for pilus extension and retraction. Many T4P systems, however, lack a dedicated retraction motor, and…
17h
Quantitative assessment reveals the dominance of duplicated sequences in germline-derived extrachromosomal circular DNA [Genetics]
Extrachromosomal circular DNA (eccDNA) originates from linear chromosomal DNA in various human tissues under physiological and disease conditions. The genomic origins of eccDNA have largely been investigated using in vitro–amplified DNA. However, in vitro amplification obscures quantitative information by skewing the total population stoichiometry. In addition, the analyses have focused…
17h
Stochasticity and positive feedback enable enzyme kinetics at the membrane to sense reaction size [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Here, we present detailed kinetic analyses of a panel of soluble lipid kinases and phosphatases, as well as Ras activating proteins, acting on their respective membrane surface substrates. The results reveal that the mean catalytic rate of such interfacial enzymes can exhibit a strong dependence on the size of the…
17h
Band-selective gap opening by a C4-symmetric order in a proximity-coupled heterostructure Sr2VO3FeAs [Physics]
Complex electronic phases in strongly correlated electron systems are manifested by broken symmetries in the low-energy electronic states. Some mysterious phases, however, exhibit intriguing energy gap opening without an apparent signature of symmetry breaking (e.g., high-TC cuprates and heavy fermion superconductors). Here, we report an unconventional gap opening in a…
17h
Regulation of TLR4 signaling through the TRAF6/sNASP axis by reversible phosphorylation mediated by CK2 and PP4 [Immunology and Inflammation]
Recognition of invading pathogens by Toll-like receptors (TLRs) activates innate immunity through signaling pathways that involved multiple protein kinases and phosphatases. We previously demonstrated that somatic nuclear autoantigenic sperm protein (sNASP) binds to TNF receptor–associated factor 6 (TRAF6) in the resting state. Upon TLR4 activation, a signaling complex consisting of…
17h
Broken detailed balance and entropy production in the human brain [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Living systems break detailed balance at small scales, consuming energy and producing entropy in the environment to perform molecular and cellular functions. However, it remains unclear how broken detailed balance manifests at macroscopic scales and how such dynamics support higher-order biological functions. Here we present a framework to quantify broken…
17h
Synergistic regulation of nonbinary molecular switches by protonation and light [Chemistry]
We report a molecular switching ensemble whose states may be regulated in synergistic fashion by both protonation and photoirradiation. This allows hierarchical control in both a kinetic and thermodynamic sense. These pseudorotaxane-based molecular devices exploit the so-called Texas-sized molecular box (cyclo[2]-(2,6-di(1H-imidazol-1-yl)pyridine)[2](1,4-dimethylenebenzene); 14+, studied as its te
17h
Antagonistic cotranscriptional regulation through ARGONAUTE1 and the THO/TREX complex orchestrates FLC transcriptional output [Genetics]
Quantitative transcriptional control is essential for physiological and developmental processes in many organisms. Transcriptional output is influenced by cotranscriptional processes interconnected to chromatin regulation, but how the functions of different cotranscriptional regulators are integrated is poorly understood. The Arabidopsis floral repressor locus FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) is cotranscri
17h
CRISPR-SID: Identifying EZH2 as a druggable target for desmoid tumors via in vivo dependency mapping [Medical Sciences]
Cancer precision medicine implies identification of tumor-specific vulnerabilities associated with defined oncogenic pathways. Desmoid tumors are soft-tissue neoplasms strictly driven by Wnt signaling network hyperactivation. Despite this clearly defined genetic etiology and the strict and unique implication of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway, no specific molecular targets for these tumors have been…
17h
Correction for Chen et al., Pharmacological inhibition of PI5P4K{alpha}/{beta} disrupts cell energy metabolism and selectively kills p53-null tumor cells [Biochemistry]
BIOCHEMISTRY Correction for "Pharmacological inhibition of PI5P4Kα/β disrupts cell energy metabolism and selectively kills p53-null tumor cells," by Song Chen, Caroline Chandra Tjin, Xiang Gao, Yi Xue, Haoyan Jiao, Ruilin Zhang, Mengnan Wu, Zunyu He, Jonathan Ellman, and Ya Ha, which published May 17, 2021; 10.1073/pnas.2002486118 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci….
17h
Correction for Eichstaedt et al., The emotional and mental health impact of the murder of George Floyd on the US population [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
PSYCHOLOGICAL AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES Correction for "The emotional and mental health impact of the murder of George Floyd on the US population," by Johannes C. Eichstaedt, Garrick T. Sherman, Salvatore Giorgi, Steven O. Roberts, Megan E. Reynolds, Lyle H. Ungar, and Sharath Chandra Guntuku, which published September 20, 2021; 10.1073/pnas.2109139118…
17h
Normalizing population receptive fields [Neuroscience]
The visual system is spatially organized. Each neuron responds to stimulation at a specific region in the visual field—its "receptive field"—and is largely unresponsive to stimulation elsewhere. For decades, electrophysiologists have characterized the receptive fields of neurons with invasive recordings (1, 2), providing the foundation for visual neuroscience. More recently,…
17h
Placenta keeps the score of maternal cannabis use and child anxiety [Developmental Biology]
The perception that cannabis can be safely consumed without health risks or that use is safer than alternative recreational drugs is perhaps an unintended consequence of recent marijuana legalization campaigns in the United States and other countries. Often missing in the debates about cannabis legalization is the potential harm caused…
17h
Opinion: Toward inclusive global governance of human genome editing [Social Sciences]
In recent years, many have considered how best to govern increasingly powerful genome editing technologies. Since 2015, more than 60 statements, declarations, and other codes of practice have been published by international organizations and scientific institutions (1). In particular, the 2018 birth of two twins, Lulu and Nana—whose HIV-receptors CCR5…
17h
Core Concept: In the wake of COVID-19, decentralized clinical trials move to center stage [Medical Sciences]
In January 2021, New York's Northwell Health hospital system launched a clinical trial to learn whether the over-the-counter drug famotidine (also known as Pepcid) reduces the severity of COVID-19 in symptomatic patients who do not require hospitalization. The randomized trial began in response to anecdotal reports along with clinical studies…
17h
The Best iPhone Cases to Safeguard Your Cell Phone in 2021
Having the best iPhone case can be both armor and evening dress. So much of our lives and personalities manifest through our phones—they are often an extension of ourselves, making them both invaluable tools and cherished treasures. The case we use is the cherry on top, often reflecting our personal styles. Some of the perks that today's cases feature include antimicrobial silvered surfaces, magn
17h
DIY radiative cooler developed to serve as a research standard
The term "greenhouse effect" became part of public lexicon decades ago, thanks to the ongoing discourse on climate change. A natural phenomenon, the greenhouse effect describes how heat from the sun, in the form of radiation, is trapped by gases in the Earth's atmosphere. But a large amount of radiation is still lost to outer space, because these wavelengths are poorly absorbed by atmospheric gase
17h
Electric vehicle owners could sell power back to the grid
A new model suggests ways to sell surplus energy from electric vehicles to local power grids. American homeowners with solar panels can sell the surplus electricity they generate back to their local grids. Should electric vehicle (EV) owners be able to do the same thing? The researchers show how so-called V2G (vehicle-to-grid) technology can achieve grid stability and renewable energy storage—and
17h
Finger snaps are one of the fastest motions humans can create
Researchers have discovered the finger snap has the highest acceleration the human body produces. The snapping of a finger was first depicted in ancient Greek art around 300 BCE. Today, that same snap initiates evil forces for the villain Thanos in Marvel's latest Avengers movie. Both media inspired a group of researchers from the Georgia Institute of Technology to study the physics of a finger s
18h
Climate challenges mount for California agriculture
This is a re-post from Yale Climate Connections by Jan Ellen Spiegel California agriculture has experienced just about every form of climate change-induced calamity: Heat, drought, fire, floods. None bodes well for the future of farming in this state that is the U.S. king of agriculture. But there are a couple of less headline-worthy factors that may determine what crops will survive if climate c
18h
New method flags false positives in COVID-19 test results
Researchers have developed and tested a process to identify potential false positive COVID-19 test results. They say the method could help prevent unnecessary quarantining and repeated testing of people who are not actually infected. COVID-19 testing is an important tool for managing the virus during the pandemic, and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) testing is the most wi
19h
How long will the supply chain crunch last?
It's common knowledge that holiday shopping is going to be challenging this year due to the broken supply chain. Many favorite items—like game consoles, toys, clothing, and shoes—will be in short supply. And if you're lucky enough to find the hottest toy on your child's wish list, you will likely pay more for it. But what does the new year hold? Will 2022 be better? The answer is maybe, but not r
19h
Lungfish Cocoons Are Alive, Sort Of
Researchers find that the protective outer layer that lungfish make to survive extended dry periods–once thought to be a simple mucus shell–contains immune cells that trap bacteria and protect the animals from infection.
19h
Exploring links between financial knowledge, age and gender in Japan
Analysis of results from a survey conducted in Japan reveals how financial literacy and financial behaviors are associated with age and gender, suggesting potential targets for policies to improve financial health. Shohei Okamoto of the Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology and Kohei Komamura of Keio University in Tokyo, Japan, present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on No
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Best eReaders of 2021 to Conquer Your Book List
The best eReaders help you stay informed and entertained at home or on the go without cluttering up your living space, backpack, or luggage. They also can make the best tech gifts . But before you choose a product for this year's reading goals, it's important to understand just why you'd want one of these devices rather than simply using your tablet to download the latest book. The biggest draw o
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The 35 Innovators Under 35 competition for 2022 is now open for nominations
Our 35 Innovators Under 35 competition for 2022 is now open for nominations. You can nominate great candidates from now until 10 p.m. EST on January 24, 2022. We've been publishing a list of young innovators for more than two decades now . The list always includes fascinating stories of young people working to employ technology to make the world a better place, but beyond that it's a way for us t
19h
Crime thrillers and disembodied voices | Brief letters
Audio description | Boris Johnson | Space missions | Cuckoo clocks | #MeToo We are unashamed septuagenarian members of the alleged subtitle-friendly minority ( Pass notes, 16 November ), utilising the TV facility for everything from British documentaries to US crime thrillers. The only potential hazard we ever encounter is when something called "audio description" is applied by mistake and a dise
20h
Debat: Datadrevne beslutninger erstatter magi
PLUS. Ofte er processer i virksomheder bundet op på enkeltpersoner, men hvis deres kompetencer og viden er grundlag for virksomhedens beslutninger, er der risiko for, at de ender som flaskehalse. Løsningen kan være at gøre beslutningerne datadrevne.
20h
Sådan kom der orden på virvaret i Partikel ZOO
PLUS. Sikkert og Vist 11: Da fysikerne så ind i atomets indre, blev de mødt af et virvar af partikler. De fik styr på det hele med en samlet uovertruffen beskrivelse, hvis eneste problem er, at den ikke kan være den ultimative sandhed.
20h
Insulation using popcorn?
Building insulation has become an increasingly important topic in recent years. Good exterior insulation reduces heating costs, which means lower CO2 emissions. Nowadays, sustainable natural insulation materials are already available for the interiors of buildings. But what does sustainability really mean? It means the material should be environmentally friendly and made from renewable raw materia
20h
Tropical deforestation could boost risk of heat-related deaths
Outdoor workers in the world's lower-latitude tropical forests may face a greater risk of heat-related deaths and unsafe working conditions because of deforestation and climate warming, according to a new study. Researchers found that increased temperatures of 0.95 Celsius (1.7 Fahrenheit) in the deforested areas of Berau Regency, Indonesia, between 2002 and 2018 were linked to roughly 118 additi
20h
The Best Gaming Routers of 2021 for Online Play
Every gamer's been there: You're at the last fifth of your health bar, the other team is down to one unit, you have a perfect game winning headshot in your sights… Then the stutter—you've got lag—suddenly it's you in the sights and the game's over. One of the most frustrating situations in online gaming is a laggy connection. In a first-person shooter or survival game a split-second delay can get
20h
What Ingenuity and Perseverance Have Discovered on Mars So Far
Perseverance deployed Ingenuity earlier this month. Perseverance and Ingenuity landed on Mars almost exactly nine months ago. Over that time, both vehicles have already expanded our understanding of Mars, which will only increase over time as both vehicles will continue to conduct further experiments in the months and years to come. Perseverance is a rover based on Curiosity's general design but
20h
New plants developed that produce and release sex pheromones to fight plant pests
A team of researchers from the Universitat Politècnica de València (UPV) and the Spanish National Research Council (Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, CSIC) has developed genetically modified plants that are capable of producing and releasing insect sex pheromones to deal with pests that affect herbaceous and similar plants, thus reducing the need for using pesticides. These plants h
20h
Friend or foe: Do online recommender tools really improve decision making?
Artificial intelligence (AI) recommender tools are widely used by industries such as e-commerce, media, banking and utilities. The tool's algorithm uses website visitors' past online activity and other data, both implicit and explicit, to predict what that visitor would like to view or buy next, and then presents those options to them. This can be highly beneficial; for example, for customers, the
20h
Boredom kept people smoking more during COVID-19
After years of steady decline, cigarette sales in the US rose last year for the first time in 20 years, in large part because of the pandemic, says Lucy Popova. In a new study in Nicotine and Tobacco Research , Popova , associate professor in the School of Public Health at Georgia State University, examines how the pandemic and related stressors affected tobacco users' habits. Many smokers admitt
20h
The Rise of Climate Anxiety
Climate change is a systemic issue, so it can be difficult for any one person to address the impact it has on their mental health. Experts weigh in on ways you can process climate anxiety.
21h
Perceptual links between sound and shape may unlock origins of spoken words
Most people around the world agree that the made-up word 'bouba' sounds round in shape, and the made-up word 'kiki' sounds pointy — a discovery that may help to explain how spoken languages develop, according to a new study. Language scientists have discovered that this effect exists independently of the language that a person speaks or the writing system that they use, and it could be a clue to
21h
Making the wait less arduous for toddlers
When toddlers have to wait, it often leads to negative affect, as they can't yet regulate their emotions. Psychologists set out to find out how to help them. Is temperament a factor that influences toddler behavior while waiting? Whom can children imitate in order to cope better with long waits? They concluded that, left to their own devices, children prefer activities which correspond to their te
21h
Methane from carbon dioxide
Recycling carbon dioxide, especially through conversion to methane, is compelling while anthropogenic CO2 emissions are still rising. A useful process for this transformation is photothermal methanation, in which CO2 and hydrogen are catalytically converted into CH4 and water upon irradiation with sunlight. A team of researchers has now reported the synthesis of a highly active, stable, nickel–car
21h
Cell-type specialization is encoded by specific chromatin topologies
Nature, Published online: 17 November 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-04081-2 A new technique called immunoGAM, which combines genome architecture mapping (GAM) with immunoselection, enabled the discovery of specialized chromatin conformations linked to gene expression in specific cell populations from mouse brain tissues.
22h
Vr virtual Mall experience
Hello guys, from all the popularity the metaverse is getting, what do people think of changing a physical mall into a whole virtual shopping mall where people can hang out there and at the same time purchase clothes, accessories etc… edit- ok so from all these comments i have come up with a more immersive experience. what would you say if their was a small virtual world where you could buy diff
22h
Sea squirts teach new lessons in evolution
Nature, Published online: 17 November 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03475-6 Spineless sea squirts shed light on vertebrate evolution, and an iodine-fuelled engine powering a satellite in space.
22h
Structure, function and pharmacology of human itch GPCRs
Nature, Published online: 17 November 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-04126-6 Structural studies of the itch receptors MRGPRX2 and MRGPRX4 in complex with endogenous and synthetic ligands provide a basis for the development of therapeutic compounds for pain, itch and mast cell-mediated hypersensitivity.
22h
Isolation and characterization of a californium metallocene
Nature, Published online: 17 November 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-04027-8 Chemical experiments on californium are stymied by isotope availability and radioactivity considerations, but are advanced here with synthesis and characterization of an organometallic complex.
22h
Structure, function and pharmacology of human itch receptor complexes
Nature, Published online: 17 November 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-04077-y Cryo-electron microscopy structures of the MRGPRX2–Gi1 trimer in complex with polycationic compound 48/80 or inflammatory peptides provide insights into the sensing of cationic allergens by MRGPRX2, potentially facilitating the design of therapies to prevent unwanted pseudoallergic reactions.
22h
Exploding and weeping ceramics
Nature, Published online: 17 November 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03975-5 A study demonstrates that a range of different behaviours—from reversible, through weeping, to explosive—can be exhibited by a chemically homogeneous ceramic system by manipulating conditions of compatibility in unusual ways.
22h
Single-cell transcriptomic characterization of a gastrulating human embryo
Nature, Published online: 17 November 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-04158-y The single-cell transcriptional profile of a human embryo between 16 and 19 days after fertilization reveals parallels and differences in gastrulation in humans as compared with mouse and non-human primate models.
22h
Measuring phonon dispersion at an interface
Nature, Published online: 17 November 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03971-9 Four-dimensional electron energy-loss spectroscopy measurements of the vibrational spectra and the phonon dispersion at a heterointerface show localized modes that are predicted to affect the thermal conductance and electron mobility.
22h
Structural insights into Ubr1-mediated N-degron polyubiquitination
Nature, Published online: 17 November 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-04097-8 Structures of Ubr1 in complex with Ubc2, ubiquitin and two N-degron peptides reveal a Ubc2-binding region and an acceptor ubiquitin-binding loop on Ubr1, providing mechanistic insights into the initiation and elongation steps of ubiquitination catalysed by Ubr1.
22h
Californium—carbon bond captured in a complex
Nature, Published online: 17 November 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03385-7 The scarcity and high radioactivity of the heaviest actinide elements, such as californium, make their study a formidable challenge. A landmark report describes the first structural characterization of a californium—carbon bond.
22h
Cerebellar neurons that curb food consumption
Nature, Published online: 17 November 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03383-9 Artificial activation of neurons identified in a brain region called the cerebellum reduces food intake in mice. The findings could have implications for people with appetite disorders.
22h
A peek into the black box of human embryology
Nature, Published online: 17 November 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03381-x The molecular mechanisms involved in human gastrulation, a crucial stage in early embryonic development, have been largely elusive. Gene-expression data from a gastrulating human embryo shed light on this process.
22h
Iodine powers low-cost engines for satellites
Nature, Published online: 17 November 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03384-8 Solid iodine transforms directly into gas when heated — a property that has been used to create cheap, compact engines that could make large networks of small satellites commercially viable.
22h
Helpline data used to monitor population distress in a pandemic
Nature, Published online: 17 November 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03038-9 The initial stages of the COVID-19 pandemic saw an increase in calls to mental-health helplines in 19 countries. Helpline-call data can be used to monitor distress at a population level in near-real time.
22h
New approach could overcome fungal resistance to current treatments
Current medications aren't particularly effective against fungi. The situation is becoming more challenging because these organisms are developing resistance to antimicrobial treatments, just as bacteria are. Now, researchers report that they have identified compounds that tackle these infections in a new way — by interfering with fungal enzymes required for fatty acid synthesis — potentially op
22h
A wild strawberry aroma for foods from a fungus growing on fruit waste
The wild strawberry is even more highly prized than its store-bought cousin because of its intense aroma and uniquely sweet taste. However, they're hard to find in the wild, so some companies make synthetic versions of this flavor. Now, researchers have come up with a naturally derived wild strawberry aroma by having an edible fungus make it from waste from black currant juice production.
22h
Glass as stable as crystal: Homogeneity leads to stability
Researchers have obtained new insights into the process of crystallization in glasses that can lead to a loss of transparency and mechanical strength. The researchers are the first to relate the coordinated atomic dynamics that lead to "devitrification" with a physical mechanism. This research may lead to improvements in the long term stability of industrial glass.
22h
Apple is Sticking Taxpayers With the Bill for Its New Digital ID Service
(Image: Apple) Earlier this year, Apple announced it would be rolling out an option that would allow iPhone users to store a digital version of their driver's licenses on their devices. This week it became clear that Apple is expecting participating states to foot the bill for the costs associated with the service. Known unofficially as "digital ID," the option will add virtual versions of users'
22h
NASA Report Says More Artemis Moon Landing Delays Are Inevitable
We're coming up on fifty years since a human being has walked on the moon, and it's going to be a little longer yet. NASA recently pushed the proposed 2024 Artemis moon landing to 2025, but a report from the agency's inspector general says that won't be the last delay. As things currently stand, the IG expects Artemis will end up being pushed back to 2026 at the earliest. The Artemis Program is a
22h
An ever-evolving map of everything on Earth | Jack Dangermond
What if we had a map of … everything? Jack Dangermond, a visionary behind the geographic information system (GIS) technology used to map and analyze all kinds of complex data, walks us through the interconnected technologies gathering information about every crack and corner of the Earth. Learn how this "living atlas" and "geospatial nervous system" can help us better understand our changing pla
22h
Study points to agricultural and industrial sources as the main cause of increasing atmospheric methane
Climate change is causing rapid warming in the arctic and tropical regions where natural wetland store large pools of carbon and emit methane. As climate continues to warm, there is widespread concern that wetland methane emissions will increase and contribute even more to atmospheric greenhouse gasses and climate change. Since 2007, atmospheric methane concentrations have increased at rapid rates
23h
There may be more bird species in the tropics than we know
Study of a perky little bird suggests there may be far more avian species in the tropics than those identified so far. After a genetic study of the White-crowned Manakin, scientists say it's not just one species and one of the main drivers of its diversity is the South American landscape and its history of change. These results are published in the journal Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution.
23h
What's in a flame? The surprising mystery of how soot forms
Soot is one of the world's worst contributors to climate change. Its impact is similar to global methane emissions and is second only to carbon dioxide in its destructive potential. This is because soot particles absorb solar radiation, which heats the surrounding atmosphere, resulting in warmer global temperatures. Soot also causes several other environmental and health problems including making
23h
Staying green: Genes responsible for leaf browning after pesticide treatment identified
Sorghum, an underrated ancient grain, is slowly becoming well known as a superfood due to its nutrient-dense and gluten-free nature. Sorghum syrup is widely used as a healthy alternative to molasses in the food industry, and this cereal is also used to make gluten-free flour. In addition, sorghum commonly serves as high-quality animal fodder while also being an effective renewable source of biofue
23h
Why drinking water needs monitoring for HIV drugs
Years ago, there was a time that kids from a rural village in South Africa still wanted to swim in the rivers nearby. But when they got out of the water, those with sensitive skin would have the worst rash ever, says Professor Philiswa Nomngongo from the University of Johannesburg's (UJ) campus in the CBD. Nomngongo is the DSI/NRF SARChI Chair: Nanotechnology for Water, within the UJ Department of
23h
Efficient catalyst for the light-driven methanation of CO2
Recycling carbon dioxide (CO2), especially through conversion to methane (CH4), is compelling while anthropogenic CO2 emissions are still rising. A useful process for this transformation is photothermal methanation, in which CO2 and hydrogen are catalytically converted into CH4 and water upon irradiation with sunlight. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, a team of researchers has now reported the sy
23h
Image: Nebula churns out massive stars in new Hubble image
Stars are born from turbulent clouds of gas and dust that collapse under their own gravitational attraction. As the cloud collapses, a dense, hot core forms and begins gathering dust and gas, creating a protostar. This star-forming nebula in the constellation Aquila, G035.20-0.74, is known for producing a particular kind of massive star known as a B-Type star. These stars are hot, young, blue star
23h
NASA study traces decade of ammonia air pollution in Africa
A new NASA-led study is the first to document changing atmospheric ammonia (NH3) concentrations in Africa over an extended period. Ammonia is an air pollutant which can lead to heart and lung related illness. When present in excess in an ecosystem, it can make soil more acidic and hinder plant growth.
23h
New group of antibacterial molecules identified
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet, Umeå University, and the University of Bonn have identified a new group of molecules that have an antibacterial effect against many antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Since the properties of the molecules can easily be altered chemically, the hope is to develop new, effective antibiotics with few side effects. The findings have been published in the scientific jou
23h
NASA's Eyes on the Earth puts the world at your fingertips
NASA's real-time 3D visualization tool Eyes on the Earth got a recent upgrade to include more datasets, putting the world at your fingertips. Using the tool, you can track the planet's vital signs—everything from carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide to sea level and soil moisture levels—as well as follow the fleet of Earth satellites providing those measurements.
23h
Researchers create novel molecules that serve as ziplines for energy
Researchers from the Universities of Bonn and Regensburg move packets of energy along a molecular ladder made of hundreds of benzene rings. Such polymers can potentially be used to design new displays based on organic light-emitting diodes, or for solar cells. The extraordinary material is now described in the journal Nature Communications.
23h
Tech companies underreport CO2 emissions
Companies in the digital technology industry are significantly underreporting the greenhouse gas emissions arising along the value chain of their products. Across a sample of 56 major tech companies surveyed in a study by the Technical University of Munich (TUM), more than half of these emissions were excluded from self-reporting in 2019. At approximately 390 megatons carbon dioxide equivalents, t
23h
Survey shows huge bird population drop in Europe and the UK over past 40 years
A team of researchers affiliated with multiple institutions in the U.K. and one in the Czech Republic has found huge losses in bird numbers in the U.K. and Europe over the past 40 years. In their paper published in the journal Ecology and Evolution, the group describes their analysis of database data on bird survey numbers across Europe and the U.K.
23h
The Fleet Faces a Wave of Injuries | Deadliest Catch
Stream Full Episodes of Deadliest Catch: discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/deadliest-catch Discovery ► https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch/ #DeadliestCatch #Discovery #CorneliaMarie Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: http
23h
Nvidia's New Supercomputer Will Create a 'Digital Twin' of Earth to Fight Climate Change
It's crunch time on climate change, and companies, governments, philanthropists, and NGOs around the world are starting to take action, be it through donating huge sums of money to the cause, building a database for precise tracking of carbon emissions , creating a plan for a clean hydrogen economy , or advocating for solar geoengineering —among many other initiatives. But according to Nvidia, to
23h
This Thanksgiving, thank your past self
Expressing gratitude to your past self can improve your self-perception, say researchers. "Despite the fact that past gratitude is self-focused, it reminds people that they're part of a bigger story and that they have the power to grow," says Matt Baldwin, psychology professor at the University of Florida. "It's possible this promotes a pay-it-forward type of mentality." Gratitude is what psychol
23h
Team solves Darwin's finch yellow beak mystery
Researchers have uncovered the genetic basis for the yellow beak color of some Darwin's finch nestlings. Several species of Darwin's finch nestlings have a beak color that is either yellow or pink. An unusual feature of the Darwin's finch beak color is that it is only visible before birds leave the nest; as adults, the beaks of most Darwin's finches are entirely black due to deposition of melanin
23h
Study sheds light on an important Pacific-to-Atlantic connecting current
On a planet covered mostly with water, ocean currents have far-reaching effects, from refreshing the nutrients that support ocean life to influencing coastal climates. These current networks are not set in stone, however, and any significant current changes have the potential to affect conditions around the globe.
1d
Combining muography with existing technology to improve volcanic eruption predictions
An international team of researchers is proposing that vulcanologists consider using muography with existing technology to improve volcanic eruption predictions. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society A, the group describes ways they believe muography could be combined with existing technology to provide volcanologists with more information about the status of a given volcano
1d
A guide to the Nature Index
Nature, Published online: 17 November 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03065-6 A description of the terminology and methodology used in this supplement, and a guide to the functionality that is available free online at natureindex.com.
1d
A critical mass of learning at Mila, Canada
Nature, Published online: 17 November 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03064-7 Attracted by generous funding and big names, a hub for leading talent in artificial intelligence is thriving in Montreal.
1d
Psykiska problem som ung risk för utanförskap som vuxen
Tonåringar som upplever psykiska problem i högstadiet har större risk att varken vara i arbete eller utbildning som unga vuxna – jämfört med dem som har få eller inga symtom på psykisk ohälsa. Och det är olika sorters psykiska problem som ökar risken för män och kvinnor. Det visar resultaten från en ny studie från forskare vid Institutet för social forskning (SOFI) och Institutionen för folkhälso
1d
[Academic] Body Image (13-17, female identifying)
UCD Body Cognition Lab is conducting research in the area of adolescent body image and requires participants that are female or female-identifying aged 13-17. If you are a parent with a child that fits this criterion, please click the link below to consent and we will provide you with a link for your child to take part. The study is entirely online, anonymous and all participants will receive a c
1d
Testing mini-radar to peer inside asteroid
A specially upgraded radio-frequency chamber in ESA's technical heart is testing what is set to become the smallest radar system to be flown in space, hosted aboard a breadbox-sized spacecraft.
1d
Study suggests face masks do not muddle speech perception
A Department of Modern Languages course sparked an opportunity for four Carnegie Mellon University students to publish and present research at the 2021 Richard Macksey National Undergraduate Humanities Research Symposium at Johns Hopkins University.
1d
Racism isn't rocket science—it's more complicated
As opponents of critical race theory continue to gather at school boards across the country protesting its use in classrooms, it has become evident that the study of racism in America continues to be seen, by some, as trivial.
1d
Scientists improving the 'crystal ball' for better climate predictions
Climate models are used to predict how the climate will likely respond to rising greenhouse gas concentrations in the coming decades, a timescale crucial to meeting the terms of the Paris Agreement. That's why it's necessary to keep developing and refining such models to better support climate policies.
1d
Nya molekyler kan ge antibiotika mot resistenta bakterier
Forskare har identifierat en grupp molekyler – THCz – som har antibakteriell effekt mot många antibiotikaresistenta bakterier. Eftersom molekylernas egenskaper är lätta att förändra kemiskt hoppas forskarna kunna utveckla nya, effektiva antibiotika med få biverkningar. Den ökande antibiotikaresistensen i världen är alarmerande, samtidigt som få nya sorters antibiotika har utvecklats under de sena
1d
How big tech is changing who's in charge of our rights and freedoms
Since the end of the 20th century, daily life for most of us has increasingly moved into the digital sphere. This has led to the rise of the so-called "onlife" dimension, which represents the intimate intertwining of our online and offline lives. One day we may see the creation of the so-called metaverse, a perpetual online environment providing new digital spaces where people can interact, work a
1d
Could engineered gut bacteria guard our mood?
Researchers are working toward genetically engineered bacteria that monitor chemical production from inside a person's gut and fix any imbalances. Some of the trillions of bacteria living in your gut—among viruses, eukaryotes, and archaea—synthesize some of the neurotransmitters that are responsible for your nerves, anxiety, and euphoria. When you don't have enough—or you have too much—of any of
1d
Samiskt självbestämmande utan eget territorium
Det går inte att tala om samiskt självbestämmande så länge man inte har tillgång till, och inflytande över, ett territorium menar statsvetaren Ragnhild Nilsson i en ny avhandling. FN:s urfolksdeklaration är tydlig med att urfolk har rätt till självbestämmande och rätt att besluta om sina egna medlemskriterier. Men i sin forskning har Ragnhild Nilsson ställt frågan om vad det här faktiskt innebär
1d
Welcome home
Nature, Published online: 17 November 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03396-4 The taste of freedom.
1d
Gun violence soared during the COVID-19 pandemic, but the reasons are complex
In a new study, we found that the overall U.S. gun violence rate rose by 30% during the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic compared to the year before. In 28 states, the rates were substantially higher between March 1, 2020, and March 31, 2021, compared to the pre-pandemic period from Feb. 1, 2019, through Feb. 29, 2020. There were 51,063 incidents of gun violence events resulting in injury or de
1d
Shortages and empty shelves: How the supply chain became so fractured
Since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, supply chain issues have rattled consumers and the businesses they frequent. From Clorox wipes to semiconductors to computer chips, inventory of many products at big box stores, dealerships and even grocers is low or out of stock. The problem is creating growing concern as the U.S. inches toward Black Friday and the holiday season, the biggest spending per
1d
A wild strawberry aroma for foods—from a fungus growing on fruit waste
The wild strawberry is even more highly prized than its store-bought cousin because of its intense aroma and uniquely sweet taste. However, they're hard to find in the wild, so some companies make synthetic versions of this flavor. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry have come up with a naturally derived wild strawberry aroma by having an edible fungus mak
1d
Ultra-thin film of magnetite optimized for spintronics
From practical applications such as secure communications to complex scientific questions such as how the brain works, classical computing isn't always up to the task. Now, researchers from Japan have a made a discovery that will improve the electronics technology for such advanced applications.
1d
We can't let markets decide the future of removing carbon from the atmosphere
Net zero emission pledges by countries and companies are everywhere at the moment. Most of these pledges rely on massive amounts of carbon removal, yet details on how this will transpire remain largely absent. The COP26 agreement suggests that markets will play a central role, but there are significant problems with this approach.
1d
Protect nature to avoid future pandemics
Scientists have investigated the links between the COVID-19 pandemic and the deterioration of the world's ecosystems and their biodiversity, discovering feedback loops that suggest a potential increase in future pandemics.
1d
Fishing for solutions to the plastic problem
More than 35 percent of fish caught in the waters off southern Australia contain microplastics, and the problem is most acute in South Australia, with plastic found in 49 percent of fish, according to research from the University of Adelaide.
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A brief history of minimal surfaces and the ants that love them
Consider a soap bubble. The way it contains the minimal possible surface area is surprisingly efficient. This is not a trivial issue. Mathematicians have been looking for better ways to calculate minimal surfaces for hundreds of years. Recently, Computer Science and Engineering Department Assistant Professor Albert Chern, and postdoctoral researcher Stephanie Wang, added a new page to this book wi
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Researchers develop global timber tree barcoding library
China has become a leading exporter of wood products and importer of raw materials. Illegal logging poses a major threat to biodiversity and ecosystem services and drives deforestation. Accurate identification of species from timber is an essential step to help control illegal logging and forest loss.
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Breaking down glycosides in the gut and in nature
Rarely does a tool become more useful when it's broken, but that's just the case with C-glycoside, a molecule found in many plants, foods, and medicines. To be used by the body, C-glycosides must be broken down. Researchers in Japan have uncovered new insights into how this process occurs.
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If we couch scientific misconduct as social misconduct the wider effects can be seen more clearly
We all live and work in a scientific world, even those who perceive their realm to be within the arts and humanities. At no time is this more apparent than at the height of a global pandemic. The impact of science on our lives and the environment are profound given that the technology wrought by our scientific understanding of the world around us can be used in a positive way or abused. As such, s
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Antibiotic-resistant bacteria found by River Cam
Researchers are highlighting the importance of basic personal hygiene, such as hand washing, after finding significant levels of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in wild bird feces at locations close to the River Cam in Cambridgeshire.
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Daily briefing: How some fish can live for centuries
Nature, Published online: 16 November 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03473-8 How some fish can live for more than 200 years, the questions swirling around new Alzheimer's drugs and how one of the world's last COVID-elimination strategies is panning out in China.
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Unassisted selective solar hydrogen peroxide production by an oxidised buckypaper-integrated perovskite photocathode
Nature Communications, Published online: 17 November 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26832-5 It is of high demand yet challenging to boost the efficiency of solar driven hydrogen peroxide synthesis. Herein, the authors intergrade perovskite-based photocathode and oxidised buckypaper for unassisted solar H2O2 production with a solar-to-chemical conversion efficiency of ~1.463 %.
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Sequence logic at enhancers governs a dual mechanism of endodermal organ fate induction by FOXA pioneer factors
Nature Communications, Published online: 17 November 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26950-0 Enhancers for endodermal organs are primed at the chromatin level prior to lineage induction by FOXA pioneer transcription factors; how pervasive this is, is not well known. Here the authors show that only a small subset of organ-specific enhancers are bound and primed by FOXA prior to lineage induction, whe
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Fast non-line-of-sight imaging with high-resolution and wide field of view using synthetic wavelength holography
Nature Communications, Published online: 17 November 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26776-w Here, the authors present Synthetic Wavelength Holography, an approach for Non-Line-of-Sight imaging. By exploiting spectral correlations in scattered light, the authors transform real world surfaces such as walls or scatterers into High-Resolution, Wide-Field-of-View imaging portals that provide holograms o
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Deep learning for the prediction of early on-treatment response in metastatic colorectal cancer from serial medical imaging
Nature Communications, Published online: 17 November 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26990-6 Evaluation of tumor response to antivascular endothelial growth factor therapies in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) is limited because morphological change in tumor may occur earlier or be more critical than tumor size change. Here, the authors present an analysis utilizing a deep learning network to cha
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Survival of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon knockout fragments in the interstellar medium
Nature Communications, Published online: 17 November 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26899-0 Ion storage rings allow reactions to be studied over orders of magnitude in time, bridging the gap between typical experimental and astronomical timescales. Here the authors observe that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon fragments produced upon collision with He atoms at velocities typical of stellar winds and
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Diesel2p mesoscope with dual independent scan engines for flexible capture of dynamics in distributed neural circuitry
Nature Communications, Published online: 17 November 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26736-4 Imaging of neuronal activity across distant brain regions is challenging. Here, the authors introduce a two-photon microscope with two independently controlled scan engines, and demonstrate calcium imaging with subcellular resolution in brain regions up to 7 mm apart simultaneously.
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High-performance lasers for fully integrated silicon nitride photonics
Nature Communications, Published online: 17 November 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26804-9 Achieving high output power and low noise integrated lasers is a major challenge. Here the authors experimentally demonstrate integrated lasers from a Si/SiN heterogeneous platform that shows Hertz-level linewidth, paving the way toward fully integrating low-noise silicon nitride photonics in volume using re
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Spontaneous exciton dissociation enables spin state interconversion in delayed fluorescence organic semiconductors
Nature Communications, Published online: 17 November 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26689-8 A low singlet-triplet energy gap, necessary for delayed fluorescence organic semiconductors, results in a small radiative rate that limits performance in OLEDs. Here, the authors show that it is possible to reconcile these conflicting requirements in materials that can access both high oscillator strength in
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The Seven Lawmakers Who Will Decide the Climate's Fate
It has been bizarre, over the past few weeks, to see the attention lavished on the United Nations climate conference in Glasgow, Scotland. The summit was lauded as the world's " last, best hope " and the place where the " fate of the planet " would be negotiated. And fine, it was very important. But Glasgow was not, last week or now, the world's most important city for staving off climate change.
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Moshe Szyf demands an apology
"We demand that you publicly apologize to our clients and retract all your statements within one week from today. Failure to do so will result in our taking an action in both public and private law, against you and McGill University." – Moshe Szyf and Michael Meaney, via lawyer
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Unge læger satser på egen praksis i Thy
12 læger, der er i gang med hoveduddannelsen i almen medicin, har givet hinanden håndslag på at blive i Thy som praktiserende læger. Et godt uddannelsesmiljø og fagligt fællesskab trækker unge læger til området.
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Climate changed abruptly at tipping points in past
Climate scientists identify abrupt transitions in climate records that may have been caused by the climate system crossing a tipping point. They devised a statistical method to determine whether these transitions are simply noise or evidence of a more significant change. Their method is less error-prone than previous methods, since it doesn't rely on human determination. It also allows comparing d
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Can we tell someone's cultural group from the way they laugh?
Can we infer someone's cultural group from their laugher, even when we do not know what they are laughing at? And what kind of laughter do we find most positive? A new study shows that our laughter gives us away. The study included Dutch and Japanese producers of laughter and listeners. Listeners could detect whether a laughing person is from their own or another cultural group by only hearing a b
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High impact climate events: Better adaptation through earlier prediction
The prediction of high impact climate phenomena can be substantially improved by a new mathematical approach that analyses the connectivity and patterns between geographical locations, scientists say in a new publication. This can potentially save thousands of lives and avoid billions in economic losses. Prediction times for events like El Niño, monsoons, droughts or extreme rainfall could be incr
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Milvexian an effective and safe oral pill for prevention of venous blood clots, says study
Researchers compared milvexian with enoxaparin for prevention of blood clots in 1,242 patients from 18 countries undergoing knee replacement surgery who were enrolled between June 2019 and February 2021. They found that at a total daily dose of 100 mg or more, milvexian resulted in better clot protection but no increase in bleeding compared with enoxaparin, the control drug. Milvexian was evaluate
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Invention lets people pay for purchases with a high-five
Imagine your car starting the moment you get in because it recognizes the jacket you're wearing. Consider the value of a hospital gown that continuously measures and transmits a patient's vital signs. These are just two applications made possible by a new 'body area network'-enabling fabric.
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Artificial intelligence successfully predicts protein interactions
Researchers used artificial intelligence (AI) and evolutionary analysis to produce 3D models of eukaryotic protein interactions. The study identified more than 100 probable protein complexes for the first time and provided structural models for more than 700 previously uncharacterized ones. Insights into the ways pairs or groups of proteins fit together to carry out cellular processes could lead t
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Game theory and economics show how to steer evolution in a better direction
Human behavior drives the evolution of biological organisms in ways that can profoundly adversely impact human welfare. Understanding people's incentives when they do so is essential to identify policies and other strategies to improve evolutionary outcomes. In a new study, researchers bring the tools of economics and game theory to evolution management.
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Sierra Nevada range should celebrate two birthdays
New research reveals that after its initial formation 100 million years ago, the Sierra Nevada 'died' during volcanic eruptions that blasted lava across much of the American West 40 million to 20 million years ago. Then, tens of millions of years later, the Sierra Nevada mountain range as we know it today was 'reborn.'
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Clinician peer networks remove race and gender bias
Network science can be used to remove race and gender bias in clinical settings, according to a new study. The findings suggest an effective new way to ensure safer, more equitable health care for women and minorities through managing clinician peer networks.
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ISS astronauts discuss evacuation after Russian test causes space debris – audio
A recording captured the moments International Space Station astronauts discussed putting on space suits and evacuating the station, after an anti-satellite missile test by Russia against one of its own targets generated a debris cloud. Astronauts talked through various scenarios with mission control – including the possibility of returning to Earth if the capsule they were sheltering in was hit
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Learn Cybersecurity Skills for $20 With This Pre-Black Friday Doorbuster Deal
After the upheaval of the last two years, wouldn't it be great to start 2022 with an exciting new career? Even if you have no tech experience at all, you can train at your own pace to gain the skills required to start and move up in a well-paid cybersecurity career with The A to Z Cyber Security & IT Certification Training Bundle . Complete novices can start with the ethical hacking courses. You'
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Team develops new screening process; could lead to next-generation therapeutics for a broad spectrum of diseases
A new study led by University of California, Irvine researchers developed a high-throughput screen methodology to identify compounds affect a key G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) rhodopsin (Rh). GPCRs mediate many important physiological functions and are considered to be one of the most effective therapeutic targets for a broad spectrum of diseases, ranging from diabetes to immune system disorde
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Studying learner engagement during the COVID-19 pandemic
While massive open online classes (MOOCs) have been a significant trend in higher education for many years now, they have gained a new level of attention during the COVID-19 pandemic. Open online courses became a critical resource for a wide audience of new learners during the first stages of the pandemic—including students whose academic programs had shifted online, teachers seeking online resour
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Best 4K Gaming Monitors of 2021 for Crystal-Clear Gameplay
The difference between winning and losing can come down to the refresh rate and response time of your gaming monitor. That's why it's important to invest in the best 4K gaming monitors, which can keep up with your honed reflexes. A decade ago, 4K resolution for home-gaming setups was almost impossible to achieve. But now these impressive graphics are available to just about any dedicated gamer lo
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New Paper Claims That Yes, You Could Climb Through a Wormhole to a Distant Galaxy
Connecting Black Holes Wormholes are a fascinating concept in physics that postulate passages that connect two different points in spacetime — typically black holes — together. Think "Interstellar" or "Event Horizon." These wormholes could allow a person to jump into one black hole and emerge in a totally different galaxy, in a totally different part of the universe. Unfortunately, most leading h
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A better-fitting molecular 'belt' for making new drugs
The most common pharmaceuticals on the market are made by chaining together rings of molecules to create the drugs that treat conditions including pain, depression and leukemia. But creating those rings and forming them in a way that is tailored to each individual disease has always been a cumbersome and expensive process in medicinal chemistry. New research proposes a way to simplify that transfo
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Vanishing forests tell a tale of rising water
When North Carolina residents Susan McGuirk and her husband bought a holiday house on a large waterfront plot in Wingate, in Maryland's Dorchester County, the stately old home hadn't been occupied for more than a decade. "We pulled into the driveway and it was love at first sight," she said. "Once inside, it was obvious just how well built the house was." This is the third story in "Life on the E
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Researcher works for diversity and inclusion in sciences, one journal at a time
A University of Rhode Island researcher and colleagues who study invasive species have published a series of articles in the journal Biological Invasions aimed at identifying and addressing concerns about diversity, equity and inclusion in the journal, which they believe will lead to a better understanding of invasive species around the world.
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Pathophysiological interplay between O-GlcNAc transferase and the Machado-Joseph disease protein ataxin-3 [Neuroscience]
Aberrant O-GlcNAcylation, a protein posttranslational modification defined by the O-linked attachment of the monosaccharide N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc), has been implicated in neurodegenerative diseases. However, although many neuronal proteins are substrates for O-GlcNAcylation, this process has not been extensively investigated in polyglutamine disorders. We aimed to evaluate the enzyme O-Glc
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Passive coupling of membrane tension and cell volume during active response of cells to osmosis [Cell Biology]
During osmotic changes of their environment, cells actively regulate their volume and plasma membrane tension that can passively change through osmosis. How tension and volume are coupled during osmotic adaptation remains unknown, as their quantitative characterization is lacking. Here, we performed dynamic membrane tension and cell volume measurements during osmotic…
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THCz: Small molecules with antimicrobial activity that block cell wall lipid intermediates [Microbiology]
Emerging antibiotic resistance demands identification of novel antibacterial compound classes. A bacterial whole-cell screen based on pneumococcal autolysin-mediated lysis induction was developed to identify potential bacterial cell wall synthesis inhibitors. A hit class comprising a 1-amino substituted tetrahydrocarbazole (THCz) scaffold, containing two essential amine groups, displayed bacterici
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GRACE Follow-On revealed Bangladesh was flooded early in the 2020 monsoon season due to premature soil saturation [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
The overall size and timing of monsoon floods in Bangladesh are challenging to measure. The inundated area is extensive in low-lying Bangladesh, and observations of water storage are key to understanding floods. Laser-ranging instruments on Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) Follow-On spacecraft detected the peak water storage anomaly of…
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Posttranscriptional modulation of KCNQ2 gene expression by the miR-106b microRNA family [Physiology]
MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have recently emerged as important regulators of ion channel expression. We show here that select miR-106b family members repress the expression of the KCNQ2 K+ channel protein by binding to the 3′-untranslated region of KCNQ2 messenger RNA. During the first few weeks after birth, the expression of miR-106b…
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Handedness and its genetic influences are associated with structural asymmetries of the cerebral cortex in 31,864 individuals [Neuroscience]
Roughly 10% of the human population is left-handed, and this rate is increased in some brain-related disorders. The neuroanatomical correlates of hand preference have remained equivocal. We resampled structural brain image data from 28,802 right-handers and 3,062 left-handers (UK Biobank population dataset) to a symmetrical surface template, and mapped asymmetries…
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Decidual NK cells kill Zika virus-infected trophoblasts [Immunology and Inflammation]
Zika virus (ZIKV) during pregnancy infects fetal trophoblasts and causes placental damage and birth defects including microcephaly. Little is known about the anti-ZIKV cellular immune response at the maternal–fetal interface. Decidual natural killer cells (dNK), which directly contact fetal trophoblasts, are the dominant maternal immune cells in the first-trimester placenta,…
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How thinking like a watershed system can help save Narragansett Bay
The Narragansett Bay, which covers almost 150 square miles along the coast of Rhode Island and Massachusetts, is New England's largest estuary, and it is under threat from both changing patterns of land use in New England and global climate change. Recently, researchers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst published the results of a new study that connects land use, the coast and the climate
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Sports leagues can fight climate change with lockdown-era schedules, research shows
The past two North American pro-sports seasons have been exceptional in many ways: Fewer games played, more regional travel and more same-city "baseball-style" series with consecutive matchups between the same home and visiting teams. It was an unusual experience for everyone involved, but a good one for the environment, writes Concordia researcher Seth Wynes.
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Life experience shapes dogs' interaction with humans
It's an everyday scene. Pooch wants a tasty-looking piece of cake that's sitting on the table. What does he do? He gazes longingly at the titbit, ogles his master or mistress, and glances back at the cake. This "conversation" with humans gets him what he wants.
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Serotonin found to be an important factor in calcium homeostasis in dairy cows
Maternal physiology of dairy cows shifts at the onset of lactation to adapt to the immense nutrient demands by the mammary gland, resulting in altered tissue metabolism. Research over the last decade has focused on understanding the shift in calcium metabolism, with an emphasis on the relationship of serotonin with calcium during the transition period and lactation. In a new review in the December
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Toward 'off-the-shelf' immune cell therapy for cancer
Immunotherapies, which harness the body's natural defenses to combat disease, have revolutionized the treatment of aggressive and deadly cancers. But often, these therapies — especially those based on immune cells — must be tailored to the individual patient, costing valuable time and pushing their price into the hundreds of thousands of dollars.
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Older-looking brains linked to lower birth weight and genes
In brain scans of almost 1500 people throughout Europe, researchers found that people with 'older-looking' brains had both lower birth weight and genes for smaller brains, compared with those with normal aging brains. Both these factors are present early in life, indicating that your 'brain age' is mostly related to early life influences and not so much on events that happen later in life.
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Young American adults report having fewer sexual partners
A number of behaviors in younger adults that increase risk for the transmission of HIV/AIDS have declined or changed between 2010 and 2020, according to a national study. In the ongoing national study of high school graduates 21-30 years old, investigators at the University of Michigan have been tracking risk and protective behaviors related to the transmission of HIV/AIDS. Each year since 2004,
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The prostate cancer cell that got away
Researchers have pioneered a new method to track the progression of prostate cancer in mice, from its birth to its spread into other tissues. This approach allows researchers to study the origins of prostate cancer in a more realistic context than traditional methods allow.
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Protein-RNA droplets act like Silly Putty
Liquid droplets of protein and RNA have traits like those of Silly Putty, say researchers. Scientists have created these droplets in the lab and used tools including laser tweezers to measure the materials' properties. The work could have implications for cell biology, as the lab-made droplets resemble membrane-less organelles (MLOs) that are found in cells and that are also made from protein and
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Watch: Concentrated solar power supports hydrogen fuel production
https://pv-magazine-usa.com/2021/11/16/watch-concentrated-solar-power-supports-hydrogen-fuel-production/ Solar PV is an excellent, low cost source of electricity, but many industrialized processes require more flexible, readily available dispatch of power. Plus, industrial processes are not outfitted for the use of electricity, but are already designed to be powered by fuels. This is where hydrog
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Air pollution hampers how well your brain performs
Researchers have found that even short-term exposure to air pollution affects our brain performance and capacity to work. The data study indicates that air pollution damaged cognitive function in working-age adults, says Andrea La Nauze from the University of Queensland's School of Economics. "Our research used data from Lumosity brain training games to investigate the impact of air pollution on
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Observation of others' actions during limb immobilization prevents the subsequent decay of motor performance [Neuroscience]
There is rich clinical evidence that observing normally executed actions promotes the recovery of the corresponding action execution in patients with motor deficits. In this study, we assessed the ability of action observation to prevent the decay of healthy individuals' motor abilities following upper-limb immobilization. To this end, upper-limb kinematics…
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Desmosterol suppresses macrophage inflammasome activation and protects against vascular inflammation and atherosclerosis [Physiology]
Cholesterol biosynthetic intermediates, such as lanosterol and desmosterol, are emergent immune regulators of macrophages in response to inflammatory stimuli or lipid overloading, respectively. However, the participation of these sterols in regulating macrophage functions in the physiological context of atherosclerosis, an inflammatory disease driven by the accumulation of cholesterol-laden macrop
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