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A Solar Farm the Size of 1,000 Football Stadiums Is Going Up in Indiana
The transition away from fossil fuels and towards renewable energy sources is underway, with solar and wind farms popping up everywhere from the UK to China . A new project in the central US will pile on some significant green energy capacity, as the country's biggest solar farm starts construction. The Mammoth Solar farm, as it's been appropriately dubbed, will be built in a rural area of Indian
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I Made the World's Blandest Facebook Profile, Just to See What Happens
In 2019, a researcher at Facebook conducted an experiment to see whether the platform really has a tendency to send users down a rabbit hole of extreme and conspiratorial content. The employee set up a pair of fake profiles —for Trump-supporting "Carol Smith" and Bernie-loving "Karen Jones"—and then led each one down the path of least resistance, liking whichever groups and pages Facebook's recom
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Netflix's Cowboy Bebop Fails
The live-action adaptation is an overwrought performance of the beloved anime rather than a bold reimagining.
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Evidence found of genetic evolution in Europeans over past several thousand years
A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in China has found evidence of natural selection based evolutionary changes to people living in Europe over the past two to three thousand years. In their paper published in the journal Nature Human Behavior, the group describes their comparative study of people living in the U.K. today, with those living across Europe over the past severa
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Scientists use machine learning to predict smells based on brain activity in worms
It sounds like a party trick: scientists can now look at the brain activity of a tiny worm and tell you which chemical the animal smelled a few seconds before. But the findings of a new study, led by Salk Associate Professor Sreekanth Chalasani, are more than just a novelty; they help the scientists better understand how the brain functions and integrates information.
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When was Jesus born?
Although millions of people celebrate the birth of Jesus Christ on Dec. 25, most scholars agree that he wasn't born on that day, or even in the year 1 A.D.
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First known Covid case was Wuhan market vendor, says scientist
Claim will reignite debate about origins of pandemic, a continuing source of tension between US and China The first known Covid-19 case was a vendor at the live-animal market in Wuhan, according to a scientist who has scrutinised public accounts of the earliest cases in China. The chronology is at odds with a timeline laid out in an influential World Health Organization (WHO) report, which sugges
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Woman Freaks Out After Discovering an Apple Tracking Device on Her Car
An Arkansas woman found herself in a consumer tech nightmare scenario recently when she discovered that someone had put an Apple tracking device on her car — a grim example of how high tech gadgets are often coopted for surveillance and harassment . As Jonesboro, Arkansas' KAIT News reported , the unidentified woman was shocked when she turned on her iPhone in her car on the way to work and got a
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Good or bad? Top cardiologist gives verdict on chocolate, coffee and wine
Exclusive: Prof Thomas Lüscher assesses the heart healthiness of some of our favourite treats Dark chocolate is a "joy" when it comes to keeping your heart healthy, coffee is likely protective, but wine is at best "neutral", according to one of the world's leading cardiologists. As editor of the European Heart Journal for more than a decade, Prof Thomas Lüscher led a team that sifted through 3,20
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Elon Musk: We Have to Get to Mars Because of "Nuclear Armageddon" on Earth
SpaceX CEO Elon Musk is extremely keen on getting humanity off this planet. And that's more important than ever given the fact that humanity is staring down the barrel of climate change, comet strikes, and dropping birth rates — not to mention, in his words, "good ol' nuclear Armageddon." During an appearance at the National Academies' joint meeting of the Space Studies Board and Board on Physics
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The Rittenhouse Trial Could Never Have Been What Americans Wanted
Updated at 3:34 p.m. ET on November 19, 2021. A jury has found Kyle Rittenhouse, the teenager who shot three men during protests in Kenosha, Wisconsin, in the summer of 2020, not guilty of the charges against him. Jurors deliberated for more than three days before delivering the verdict this afternoon, accepting his attorneys' argument that Rittenhouse was acting in self-defense. The trial was in
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Kamala Harris Becomes First Acting Woman President While Biden Gets Colonoscopy
Vice President Kamala Harris broke yet another barrier when she became the first woman to serve as acting president when President Joe Biden temporarily transferred power to her on Friday. The reason: Biden was having a colonoscopy. During a routine checkup at Walter Reed National Military Medical Centre, Biden had a colonoscopy during which he needed to go under anesthesia, according to White Ho
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Welcome to the Age of Lawless Masculinity
In 2006, Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi was getting into his car after a meeting when he spied a female traffic cop nearby. He grabbed her from behind and simulated copulation, smiling for the cameras. The Italian press routinely dismissed such predatory acts by the prime minister as "gaffes," treating them as little more than social faux pas. Yet they were much more than that. Mimicking the ra
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The Terrifying Future of the American Right
R achel Bovard is one of the thousands of smart young Americans who flock to Washington each year to make a difference. She's worked in the House and Senate for Republicans Rand Paul, Pat Toomey, and Mike Lee, was listed among the "Most Influential Women in Washington Under 35" by National Journal , did a stint at the Heritage Foundation, and is now policy director of the Conservative Partnership
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UK's warmer, wetter weather sparks bumper year for mushrooms
Kew Gardens and RHS reporting glut of fungi as public sends in 'weird and wonderful' samples The UK is having a bumper year for mushrooms due to the warm, damp weather, says scientists, with an increase in the number of rare and unusual species identified. Members of the public have been sending in unusual samples from their gardens to experts at Kew Gardens and the Royal Horticultural Society af
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Elon Musk Brags That He Is the "Best at Humility"
Humblebrag Tesla CEO Elon Musk says he's the best — at being humble. "Don't want to brag but… I'm the best at humility," Musk tweeted today, in what most likely amounted to a cheesy dad joke — though at the same time, it may carry a shade of self-awareness. To his credit, the billionaire hasn't shied away from admitting when he was wrong, despite only doing so on the rarest of occasions. For inst
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Surprise! The ISS Is Still at Risk From Russian Weapon Test
In a twist absolutely no one could have seen coming, NASA says the International Space Station (ISS) is still at a heightened risk of colliding with space debris after Russia blew up a satellite with a missile earlier in the week. NASA said in a statement to the Associated Press that although "the highest threat to the station and its seven residents was in the first 24 hours" after Russia 's sur
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Six Theories of Joe Biden's Crumbling Popularity
The biggest mystery in American politics right now—and perhaps the most consequential one—is how Joe Biden became so unpopular. Biden began his presidency moderately popular: At the start, Quinnipiac University's polling found that 53 percent of Americans approved of him and 36 percent did not. Today's numbers are the mirror image: In a Quinnipiac poll released yesterday , 36 percent approve, whi
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The Decline and Fall of the Galactic Empire
This article contains spoilers through the first season of Foundation . Isaac Asimov's Foundation series is perhaps the definitive expression of mid-century American liberalism. Certainly nothing from the academy can approach its popular influence. When David S. Goyer—the mastermind behind Apple's extravagant TV adaptation, which wraps up its first season today—declared Foundation "the greatest s
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New Website Shows How Silly NFTs Are by Pirating Them
The NFT Bay A growing number of " right-clickers " are downloading NFTs left and right to demonstrate that "owning" a digital piece of art online is basically meaningless. And now they're getting a brand new home, thanks to Australian artist and programmer Geoffrey Huntley, Vice reports . Huntley created a new torrent website called The NFT Bay, an homage to The Pirate Bay, one of the biggest and
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Newly Released Court Documents Obliterate Blue Origin's Lawsuit Against NASA
The US Court of Federal Claims has released a 47 page document detailing its decision to drop Blue Origin's legal challenge against NASA — and it's a scathing rebuttal, full of damning details. In the documents, shared by New York Times space reporter Joey Roulette on Twitter today, the court expanded on its decision. "The Court finds that Blue Origin does not have standing because it did not hav
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Scientists Invent Camera That Can See Through Almost Anything
Holographic Camera Engineers at Northwestern University have created a powerful camera that can see through solid and opaque objects such as fog, corners, and even human flesh and bone — a device seemingly ripped from sci-fi. The camera relies on a light capture system called "synthetic wavelength holography," according to a press release from Northwestern Engineering . It works by scattering las
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'Beaver moon' will feature longest partial lunar eclipse in centuries
Stargazers across all of North America can witness the phenomenon from Thursday night into Friday morning Stargazers across North America can expect to be dazzled by a red-hued "beaver" full moon on Thursday night and into Friday morning, during the longest partial lunar eclipse in almost six centuries . Lunar eclipses happen when Earth blocks the sun's light, which usually illuminates the moon.
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COVID Sure Looks Seasonal Now
The first part of what may be the first epidemiologic text ever written begins like so: "Whoever wishes to investigate medicine properly, should proceed thus: in the first place to consider the seasons of the year." The book is On Airs, Waters, and Places , written by Hippocrates around 400 B.C. Two and a half millennia later, the Northern Hemisphere is staring down its coming season of the year
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Let the Record Show Is an Essential Story of the AIDS Movement
For an outstanding chronicle of the early years of AIDS activism, look no further than Sarah Schulman's Let the Record Show: A Political History of ACT UP New York, 1987–1993 , which is also an exemplary model for telling a more complete story of a political movement. In writing Let the Record Show , published earlier this year, Schulman has orchestrated a people's history of ACT UP New York. Her
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Tick, Tick … Boom Is Lin-Manuel Miranda's Best Work Since Hamilton
Jonathan Larson is someone who writes like he is running out of time. That's the underlying message of "30/90," the first song in his original musical Tick, Tick … Boom and an energized ballad about the theatrical composer's worries that he hasn't accomplished enough—at the age of 30. As he hammers away at a piano, Larson notes that his idol, the composer Stephen Sondheim, contributed to his firs
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This scientist now believes covid started in Wuhan's wet market. Here's why.
Michael Worobey hasn't always been certain about where covid originated. During the pandemic, the University of Arizona professor has studied how the virus changes over time, and was among a group of 18 influential scientists who signed a letter in May calling for further investigation to help prove or disprove the theory that SARS-CoV-2 emerged through a possible lab accident. Now he's published
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How the Democratic Child-Care Proposal Hurts Families
The Democratic child-care proposal now working its way through Congress combines bad ideas from the Affordable Care Act with even worse ideas from the 1990s' welfare reform. Despite worthy intentions, it will drive up costs for many middle-class families while providing no benefit at all to the poorest and most vulnerable children. If lawmakers do not fix these design problems, they could wreak h
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Elon Musk Concedes That First Orbital Starship Launch May Explode
SpaceX and Tesla CEO Elon Musk made an eyebrow raising concession on Wednesday, implying that the first orbital Starship may very well explode on the launchpad. The prolific memethief spoke at the National Academies' joint meeting of the Space Studies Board and Board on Physics and Astronomy, in a n appearance with the very creative title "SpaceX Starship Discussion." During the talk, he outlined
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'Gas station in space': new plan to make rocket fuel from junk in Earth's orbit
Australian company joins global effort to recycle dangerous space debris Get our free news app ; get our morning email briefing An Australian company is part of an international effort to recycle dangerous space junk into rocket fuel – in space. The orbit our planet depends on is getting clogged with debris from old spacecraft. Dead satellites and spent rocket parts are whizzing around at speeds
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Cryptographers Furious That "Crypto" Now Means Something Else
Oh That Crypto Not everybody was thrilled when the Staples Center in Los Angeles was renamed the "Crypto.com Arena." And that's especially true for a group of people who have had a deep connection with the term "crypto" for eons — cryptographers. "'Crypto' for decades has been used as shorthand and as a prefix for things related to cryptography," Amie Stepanovich, executive director of Silicon Fl
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Teen Hacker Arrested for Stealing $36 Million in Cryptocurrency
Big Heist A Canadian teenager was arrested this week after allegedly stealing roughly $36.5 million worth of cryptocurrency from just one individual based in the US. It's yet another instance of a cryptocurrency-related theft, showing that owning a fortune in crypto can make you a surprisingly easy target. According to police, it's "currently the biggest cryptocurrency theft reported from one per
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An Ode to Barbecue Potato Chips
H ow they call to you , call to you. At the gas station, at the supermarket, at the 7-Eleven: Barbecue potato chips. Delicately bristling in their half-inflated bags. Grating, one against another, in their syllables of trapped air. Do you want to eat them? No, it's more frenzied than that—this desire has the flavor of addiction. You want them all at once, immediately, stuffed into your mouth and
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Scientists Scan Grandmas' Brains, Confirm They REALLY Love Their Grandchildren
Researchers have confirmed what many of us already knew: Grandmas love the heck out of their grandchildren. A new study published in the journal Royal Society B reveals that grandmothers seem to typically have an instinctual and neurological urge to care for their grandchildren. As if grandma's baking hadn't already proved that! Methodologically, the researchers scanned the brains of 50 grandmoth
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Politicians Push for "UFO Office" to Study Tech From "Adversaries or Any Other Entity"
Office of UFOs Who knew that one of the few things that can bring Republicans and Democrats together are UFOs? At least, that's what seems to be happening in Congress as a bipartisan effort is being made to develop a program to study "unidentified aerial phenomena" (UAP), which is the government's less-tin-foil-hat term for UFOs. The program would be an amendment to the National Defense Authoriza
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We Need to Talk About Gay Sex in Space
There's no sex in space. At least according to NASA. When the first married couple, both NASA astronauts, flew into orbit together in 1992, the media became obsessed with whether they'd be the first couple to have sex in space. The event launched a minor scandal for the space agency, along with plenty of fodder for newspapers and magazines. Throughout the years, the agency has denied multiple tim
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Tens of thousands protest in Vienna against Austria's Covid restrictions
Demonstrations come after announcement of new lockdown and plan for compulsory vaccines Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Tens of thousands of people protested in Vienna on Saturday against coronavirus restrictions a day after Austria's government announced a new lockdown and said vaccines would be made compulsory next year. Whistling, clapping, blowing horns and bangi
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Cargo Ship Spent Months With Captain's Corpse in Walk-in Freezer
Supply Chain Issues It's a macabre affair: in April, the captain of a cargo ship, 68-year-old Dan Sandu from Romania, passed away. Crewmates had to resort to stuffing his body into the ship's walk-in freezer, The Wall Street Journal reports , but what they didn't expect was that Sandu's body would remain in there for the next six months — with an astonishing 13 countries refusing to take care of
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Women Accuses Tesla of Disgusting Sexual Harassment
Daily Harassment A woman is suing Tesla after she allegedly received near daily sexual harassment while working at the company, but got no help despite reporting her issues to her supervisors and human resources. Jessica Barraza, a production associate on the Tesla Model 3, sued the electric car company on Thursday, according to The Washington Post . In her filing, she alleged disgusting and outr
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Your self-driving robotaxi is almost here | Aicha Evans
We've been hearing about self-driving cars for years, but autonomous vehicle entrepreneur Aicha Evans thinks we need to dream more daringly. In this exciting talk, she introduces us to robotaxis: fully autonomous, eco-friendly shuttles that would take you from place to place and take up less space on the streets than personal cars. Learn how this new technology works — and what a future where we
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Real Men Drive Electric Trucks
Photographs by Giancarlo D'Agostaro "W e brought the car to the American people. Then we built them a truck," a male voice boomed during the launch event for the Ford F-150 Lightning . As the streetlights of Dearborn, Michigan, flickered lazily behind the stage set up outside company headquarters, a giant screen showed black-and-white footage of workers at an early-20th-century Ford assembly plan
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Could We Gene Hack Ourselves to Be Blissed Out Sex Maniacs, Like Our Distant Cousins the Bonobos?
This week, we're pleased to bring you a different version of Futurism, containing stories from the horizon of hedonism. Welcome to The Science of Pleasure . In collaboration with our friends over at MEL Magazine , this week, we'll be bringing you stories from both publications about the pleasures of tomorrow, today. Bonobos are a species of primate believed to be humankind's second-closest living
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How the Build Back Better Act Could Backfire on Democrats
H ouse Democrats have passed landmark legislation to give an enormous tax cut to some of the nation's wealthiest Americans. The bill they approved—President Joe Biden's Build Back Better Act—also makes dramatic investments to tackle climate change, establishes universal pre-K, reduces the cost of prescription drugs, and substantially expands federal assistance for health and child care. But if Re
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The Martial Art I Can't Live Without
Illustration by Oliver Munday. Sources: Miljan Živković / Getty; Vm / Getty O n November 12, 1993 , in a sports arena in Denver, a lean Brazilian man in an outfit resembling a pair of pajamas stepped into an octagon to fight . There were no weight classes or judges, and very few rules. His opponent, a dead-eyed Dutch karate champion named Gerard Gordeau, had already beaten two other men that nigh
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Rodents could be asymptomatic carriers of SARS-like coronaviruses, study suggests
Some ancestral rodents likely had repeated infections with SARS-like coronaviruses, leading them to acquire tolerance or resistance to the pathogens, according to new research publishing November 18th in PLOS Computational Biology by Sean King and Mona Singh of Princeton University, US. This raises the possibility that modern rodents may be reservoirs of SARS-like viruses, the researchers say.
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When Bipartisanship Risks Undermining Democracy
L ooking like a human grease fire , and burning nearly as hot, the right-wing provocateur Steve Bannon spat vitriol as he emerged from federal court on Monday afternoon. "This is the misdemeanor from hell for Merrick Garland and Nancy Pelosi and Joe Biden," Bannon, a former adviser to former President Donald Trump, insisted after appearing for the first time on contempt-of-Congress charges for hi
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What Hot Dogs Can Teach Us About Number Theory
If you've ever had to buy hot dogs for a cookout, you might have found yourself solving a math problem involving least common multiples. Setting aside the age-old question of why hot dogs usually come in packs of 10 while buns come in packs of eight (you can read what the National Hot Dog and Sausage Council has to say about it here), let's stick to the math that gets our hot dogs to match our…
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Revolution in imaging with neutrons
An international research team at the Research Neutron Source Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM II) of the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have developed a new imaging technology. In the future this technology could not only improve the resolution of neutron measurements by many times but could also reduce radiation exposure during X-ray imaging.
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2024 NASA Landing to Explore Mysterious Magnetic "Swirl" on Moon
Enigmatic Features NASA is sending a spacecraft to the lunar surface to explore "one of the most distinctive and enigmatic natural features on the Moon." The agency has awarded Intuitive Machines a new contract to send its Nova-C lander to the Moon, as part of its IM0-3 mission, which is tentatively scheduled for 2024. The lander will be attempting to land in the Reiner Gamma, a mysterious lunar
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Modeling quantum spin liquids using machine learning
The properties of a complex and exotic state of a quantum material can be predicted using a machine learning method created by a RIKEN researcher and a collaborator. This advance could aid the development of future quantum computers.
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UK ministers were unprepared for impact of Covid, says watchdog
Report says detailed plans on shielding, job support schemes and school disruption were lacking Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Ministers were not "fully prepared" for the "wide-ranging impacts" that Covid-19 had on society, the economy and essential public services in the UK, and lacked detailed plans on shielding, job support schemes and school disruption, a report
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The Anachronistic Joy of Dickinson
Emily Dickinson's life, according to the show Dickinson , had a lot more gay sex and twerking than your middle-school English class would have had you believe. And, from what we now know of the reclusive poet's life, at least half of that is true. The Apple TV+ cult hit—now in its third and final season—retells Dickinson's life by pairing a modern knowledge of her lifelong relationships with a mo
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COVID May Have Messed Up One Million Americans' Sense of Smell
One of the most well-known symptoms of COVID-19 is anosmia, or the loss of the sense of smell . Now, a new study says that more than one million Americans might have permanently lost the ability to smell due to the pandemic — suggesting that the symptom could be much more widespread than previously thought. The study, published Thursday in the journal JAMA Otolaryngology – Head & Neck Surgery , e
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Man's severe migraines 'completely eliminated' on plant-based diet
Migraines disappeared after man started diet that included lots of dark-green leafy vegetables, study shows Health experts are calling for more research into diet and migraines after doctors revealed a patient who had suffered severe and debilitating headaches for more than a decade completely eliminated them after adopting a plant-based diet. He had tried prescribed medication, yoga and meditati
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NASA's Moon Orbiter Almost Crashed Into India's Moon Orbiter
Collision Avoided Even the Moon's orbit is becoming increasingly cluttered with human-made objects. Back in October, NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter had to adjust its orbit to dodge out of the way of India's Chandrayaan-2 Orbiter, according to a recent statement by the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO). On October 20, the two orbiters got too close for comfort near the Moon's north po
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Mapping where carbon needs to remain in its natural place to avoid climate catastrophe
An international team of researchers has created a map that highlights parts of the world that hold very high concentrations of carbon. In their paper published in the journal Nature Sustainability, the group describes their map and how it was created, noting that if the carbon in such areas is released, it would likely set off a climatic catastrophe. Peter Thornton with Oak Ridge National Laborat
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Energizer atoms: Physicists find new way to keep atoms excited
JILA researchers have tricked nature by tuning a dense quantum gas of atoms to make a congested "Fermi sea," thus keeping atoms in a high-energy state, or excited, for about 10% longer than usual by delaying their normal return to the lowest-energy state. The technique might be used to improve quantum communication networks and atomic clocks.
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How ultracold, superdense atoms become invisible
An atom's electrons are arranged in energy shells. Like concertgoers in an arena, each electron occupies a single chair and cannot drop to a lower tier if all its chairs are occupied. This fundamental property of atomic physics is known as the Pauli exclusion principle, and it explains the shell structure of atoms, the diversity of the periodic table of elements, and the stability of the material
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Archeologists discover salt workers' residences at underwater Maya site
The ancient Maya had stone temples and palaces in the rainforest of Central America, along with dynastic records of royal leaders carved in stone, but they lacked a basic commodity essential to daily life: Salt. The sources of salt are mainly along the coast, including salt flats on the Yucatan coast and brine-boiling along the coast of Belize, where it rains a lot. But how did the inland Maya mai
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Winged Gods and walking griffons: A plate with a depiction of Scythian Gods has been found in Middle Don
Expedition members of IA RAS have found a unique plate depicting winged Scythian gods surrounded by griffons during their excavations of the burial ground Devitsa V in Ostrogozhsky District of Voronezh region. This is the first case of such a finding in the Scythian barrows on Middle Don. No other items depictions of gods from the Scythian pantheon have been found in this area.
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Host immunity drives viral evolution of dengue
New research by a team of University of Florida investigators, and others, provides evidence that host immunity drives evolution of the dengue virus. The work, published today in Science, retrospectively analyzes two decades of dengue virus genetic variation from Thailand, alongside population-level measures of infection and immunity.
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Mosquitoes have a mutual symbiotic relationship with malaria-causing pathogen
Cornelius Vanderbilt Professor of Biological Sciences Laurence J. Zwiebel is part of a team of researchers at Vanderbilt and the Johns Hopkins Malaria Research Institute who are working to understand how Plasmodium falciparium—the pathogen that causes malaria in humans—affects the mosquitoes that spread the disease. The research was spearheaded by Ann Carr, a current visiting scholar and former po
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Can defects turn inert materials into useful, active ones?
Demonstrating that a material thought to be always chemically inert, hexagonal boron nitride (hBN), can be turned chemically active holds potential for a new class of catalysts with a wide range of applications, according to an international team of researchers.
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How Antarctic Bacteria Live on Air and Use Hydrogen as Fuel to Make Water
Humans have only recently begun to think about using hydrogen as a source of energy, but bacteria in Antarctica have been doing it for a billion years. We studied 451 different kinds of bacteria from frozen soils in East Antarctica and found most of them live by using hydrogen from the air as a fuel. Through genetic analysis, we also found these bacteria diverged from their cousins in other conti
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November lunar eclipse 2021: how to photograph the full flower moon on your phone or camera with the right settings
Guardian Australia picture editor Carly Earl explains the dos and don'ts of photographing the celestial spectacle With the November 2021 full moon rising, also known as a flower or beaver moon, many people will pull out their mobile phones to try and take an Instagram-worthy picture of the partial lunar eclipse on Friday night, but unfortunately the moon is really challenging to get a great photo
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Covid is surging in Europe. What does it mean for the UK?
As the days get shorter and we huddle indoors, memories of 2020's catastrophic winter are close at hand. Now a new surge of coronavirus cases is spreading across Europe. But as well as notes of caution, there are good reasons to hope that the UK will avoid the lows of last year – from lower hospitalisation rates to exciting treatments on the verge of approval. How optimistic should we be – and ca
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Antarctic ice sheet destabilized within a decade
After the natural warming that followed the last Ice Age, there were repeated periods when masses of icebergs broke off from Antarctica into the Southern Ocean. A new data-model study led by the University of Bonn (Germany) now shows that it took only a decade to initiate this tipping point in the climate system, and that ice mass loss then continued for many centuries. Accompanying modeling studi
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How a viral RNA changes shape to hijack host cells
University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus researchers have observed how an RNA molecule from a virus forms a complex, three-dimensional structure, and is able to change its shape to hijack host proteins. The details of this process, elusive to scientists for decades, were revealed by using cryogenic electron microscopy (cryo-EM).
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Hubble takes a grand tour of the solar system
The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has completed its annual grand tour of the outer Solar System. This is the realm of the giant planets—Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune—extending as far as 30 times the distance between Earth and the Sun. Unlike the rocky terrestrial planets like Earth and Mars that huddle close to the Sun's warmth, these far-flung worlds are mostly composed of chilly gaseous
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Efficient protein incorporation and release by a jigsaw-shaped self-assembling peptide hydrogel for injured brain regeneration
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 November 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26896-3 The extracellular matrix contributes to tissue regeneration by binding and releasing growth factors. Here the authors present the jigsaw-shaped self-assembling peptide JigSAP as an artificial ECM and show that VEGF-JigSAP has therapeutic effects on the subacute-chronic phase of brain stroke.
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The Literary Politician
Since leaving office, Barack Obama has channeled his energy into an unexpected pursuit: building an infotainment empire. He's started a production company, made playlists for his followers, and recently published Renegades , a coffee-table book featuring a series of his conversations with Bruce Springsteen. In it, the two make the case that art can wield political power, but also reveal the tensi
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Laser cooling for quantum gases
What does it mean when we say that something is extremely cold? A physicist's answer would be: this means that atoms and molecules barely move. For several decades now, physicists have been developing techniques to create such ultracold states of matter, using lasers to bring gasses into the regime where quantum mechanics reigns. In a new 'Insight' issue of Nature Physics, UvA-physicists describe
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Cancer cells use 'tiny tentacles' to suppress the immune system
To grow and spread, cancer cells must evade the immune system. Investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital and MIT used the power of nanotechnology to discover a new way that cancer can disarm its would-be cellular attackers by extending out nanoscale tentacles that can reach into an immune cell and pull out its powerpack. Slurping out the immune cell's mitochondria powers up the cancer cell a
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Hong Kong authorises Sinovac Covid vaccine for children aged 3 to 17
Benefits of approving age extension outweigh the risks, says secretary for food and health Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Hong Kong has approved lowering the age limit for the Covid-19 vaccine from China's Sinovac Biotech to three, down from 18 years of age. Hong Kong's secretary for food and health, Sophia Chan, said in a statement published on Saturday: "Adolescen
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By keeping ferroelectric 'bubbles' intact, researchers pave way for new devices
When a magician suddenly pulls a tablecloth off a table laden with plates and glasses, there is a moment of suspense as the audience wonders if the stage will soon be littered with broken glass. Until now, an analogous dilemma had faced scientists working with special electrical bubbles to create the next generation of flexible microelectronic and energy storage devices.
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Advances in simple crystals for thermoelectric technology
Space probes, gas pipelines, and other applications require an ongoing source of thermoelectric power without direct human maintenance, but current technologies for the corresponding energy conversion are inefficient. Now, researchers from Japan and Denmark have provided a greater understanding of the basis of ultralow thermal conductivity in an especially intriguing class of simple crystals, whic
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A network of body monitoring devices using our own tissue as the basis for the internet of bodies
Human body communication (HBC) that takes advantage of the mostly conductive features of body tissues can provide highly secure and power-efficient data transmission among wearable, implanted and ingested medical devices, KAUST researchers have shown. The findings open the way for the interconnection of long-lasting wireless devices as the foundation for the internet of bodies (IoB).
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'Triple Leidenfrost effect' seen in dissimilar drops in a hot pan
A small team of researchers from Benemérita Universidad and Universidad de las Américas Puebla, in Mexico and Université de Poitiers, in France, has found a "triple Leidenfrost effect" in dissimilar drops in a hot pan. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the group describes a type of "bouncing" they observed with different types of drops hovering over a hot surface.
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Book Review: How Vermin Helped Shape the Modern World
Part history of public health and natural science and part sociological study, Lisa T. Sarasohn's "Getting Under Our Skin" explores the fraught social, political, and cultural significance of our relationship to bed bugs, lice, fleas, and rats — and how that relationship ushered us into the modern era.
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Models show how global climate change will affect marine crustaceans in the future
Senckenberg scientists from Frankfurt and Müncheberg, together with a US-American colleague, have modeled the future distribution patterns of marine crustaceans for the years 2050 and 2100. In their study, published in the journal Climatic Change, they conclude that animals living in water depths above 500 meters will move northward as a result of climate change. In contrast, crustaceans found at
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Novel artificial genomic DNA can replicate and evolve outside the cell
Scientists successfully induced gene expression from a DNA and evolution through continuous replication extracellularly using cell-free materials alone for the first time. By adding the genes necessary for transcription and translation to the artificial genomic DNA, it could be possible to develop artificial cells that can grow autonomously, and it will be expected to produce efficient useful subs
20h
Two is better than one: Single-atom dimer electrocatalyst for green hydrogen production
The limited reservoir of fossils fuels and the ever-increasing threats of climate change have encouraged researchers to develop alternative technologies to produce eco-friendly fuels. Green hydrogen generated from the electrolysis of water using renewable electricity is considered a next-generation renewable energy source for the future. But in reality, the overwhelming majority of hydrogen fuel i
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A genetic change for achieving a long and healthy life
Living a long, healthy life is everyone's wish, but it is not an easy one to achieve. Many aging studies are developing strategies to increase health spans, the period of life spent with good health, without chronic diseases and disabilities. Researchers at KAIST presented new insights for improving the health span by just regulating the activity of a protein.
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Shaping a sustainable future for a common plastic
Polyurethane is one of the world's most widely used plastic materials, but it's often overlooked in our daily lives. Yet whether you're at home, at work or in your vehicle, it is usually not far away, with common end uses ranging from mattresses and furniture cushioning to building insulation, car parts and even the soles of shoes.
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Brazil Amazon deforestation up 22% in a year, 15-yr record
Deforestation in Brazil's Amazon rainforest rose by almost 22 percent in one year, the highest level in 15 years, according to figures Thursday that cast doubt on promises by President Jair Bolsonaro's government to reverse the trend with "forceful" action.
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The Atlantic Daily: The Unanswered Questions of the Rittenhouse Verdict
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox. A jury found Kyle Rittenhouse, the teenager who shot three people, two fatally, amid the protests over the killing of Jacob Blake in Kenosha, Wisconsin, not guilty on all counts. Given the narrow
21min
Net Zero/Not Zero
At the COP26 gathering last week much of the discussion related to "Net-Zero" goals. This concept derives from important physical science results highlighted in the Special Report on 1.5ºC and more thoroughly in the last IPCC report that future warming is tied to future emissions, and that warming will effectively cease only once anthropogenic CO2 emissions are balanced by anthropogenic CO2 remov
48min
Big Red Finally Brings In over $400K of Gold for Parker | Gold Rush
Stream Gold Rush on discovery+: https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/gold-rush #Discovery #GoldRush #ParkerSchnabel Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery From: Discove
3h
This Week's Awesome Tech Stories From Around the Web (Through November 20)
COMPUTING This New Startup Has Created a Record-Breaking 256-Qubit Quantum Computer Siobhan Roberts | MIT Technology Review "The QuEra machine is the latest leap in scaling up quantum computing to make it more powerful and capable of tackling practical problems. More qubits mean more information can be stored and processed, and researchers developing the technology have been racing to continually
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Weekend reads: An error in a PLOS journal leads to angry calls to Fauci; Jonathan Pruitt placed on leave; Cassava Sciences under SEC investigation
Before we present this week's Weekend Reads, a question: Do you enjoy our weekly roundup? If so, we could really use your help. Would you consider a tax-deductible donation to support Weekend Reads, and our daily work? Thanks in advance. The week at Retraction Watch featured: Publisher retracts nearly 80 articles over three days PNAS retracts … Continue reading
5h
Snowbirds
Photographs by Naomi Harris I n December 1999 , Naomi Harris turned down a job offer, left her apartment in New York, and checked into the Haddon Hall Hotel, in Miami Beach. She was 26. She wanted to be a photographer. The hotel was a year-round home for some and a seasonal residence for others—snowbirds, mostly in their 80s and 90s, who came down from New England or Canada and stayed all winter.
6h
Pope Francis Is Right About My Profession
L ast weekend, Pope Francis gave my profession a gift: a thoughtful outsider's perspective on the proper role of journalists. "Your mission is to explain the world, to make it less obscure, to make those who live in it less afraid of it and look at others with greater awareness, and also with more confidence," he said, adding that, to succeed, journalists must first listen . By this, he meant far
7h
The New Pandemic Division Tearing Europe Apart
For a while, during the worst of the pandemic last year, European governments largely seemed to reach a consensus. Barring a few exceptions (such as Sweden), countries in the region locked down their economies, keeping people at home in a bid to slow the pace of infection. In time, bolstered by plentiful vaccines, the continent has seen a resumption of near-normalcy: Public-health restrictions ha
7h
Vetenskapliga livsöden och anekdoter
Den allra första Nobelprismedaljen som delades ut togs emot av Wilhelm Röntgen 1901. Han hade publicerat sin upptäckt av röntgenstrålningen i slutet av 1895, och den kom genast till användning. Bara omkring ett år efter upptäckten gjordes den första röntgenundersökningen i Sverige, vilket ledde till att läkarna kunde rädda livet på en man som blivit skjuten i huvudet. Här kan vi verkligen tala om
11h
Scientists capture humor's earliest emergence
Young children's ability to laugh and make jokes has been mapped by age for the first time using data from a new study involving nearly 700 children from birth to 4 years of age, from around the world. The findings identify the earliest age humor emerges and how it typically builds in the first years of life.
18h
Breeding plants with genes from one parent
Scientists are a step closer to breeding plants with genes from only one parent. New research led by plant biologists at UC Davis shows the underlying mechanism behind eliminating half the genome and could make for easier and more rapid breeding of crop plants with desirable traits such as disease resistance.
19h
Archaeologists discover salt workers' residences at underwater Maya site
Maya archaeologists have excavated salt kitchens where brine was boiled in clay pots over fires in pole and thatch buildings preserved in oxygen-free sediment below the sea floor in Belize. But where these salt workers lived has been elusive, leaving possible interpretations of daily or seasonal workers from the coast or even inland. This gap left nagging questions about the organization of produc
20h
A genetic change for achieving a long and healthy life?
Researchers presented new insights for improving the health span by just regulating the activity of a protein. A research group has identified a single amino acid change in the tumor suppressor protein phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) that dramatically extends healthy periods while maintaining longevity.
20h
The brain uses bodily signals to regulate fear
Fear is essential for survival, but must be well regulated to avoid harmful behaviors such as panic attacks or exaggerated risk taking. Scientists have now demonstrated in mice that the brain relies on the body's feedback to regulate fear. The brain's insular cortex strongly reacts to stimuli signaling danger. However, when the body freezes in response to fear, the heartbeat slows down leading to
20h
New imaging technology may reduce need for skin biopsies
A new 'virtual histology' technology shows promise by analyzing images of suspicious-looking lesions and quickly producing a detailed, microscopic image of the skin, bypassing several standard steps typically used for diagnosis — including skin biopsy, tissue fixation, processing, sectioning and histochemical staining.
21h
Study links stress to Crohn's disease flare-ups
Researchers using mouse models found that stress hormones suppressed the innate immune system that normally protects the gut from invasive Enterobacteriaceae, a group of bacteria including E. coli which has been linked to Crohn's disease.
21h
Plumbing the depths: Defect distribution in ion-implanted SiC diodes
Introducing a vertical arrangement of n and p layers into the drift layer of semiconductors to enable bipolar operation is a way around the 'unipolar limit' problem in semiconductors. But defect generation during the fabrication of such devices is a matter of concern. Researchers have examined the depth and distribution of defects formed by aluminum ion implantation in silicon carbide bipolar diod
21h
Different kinds of marine phytoplankton respond differently to warming ocean temperatures
A team of researchers has concluded that different types of phytoplankton will react differently to increasing ocean temperatures resulting from the changing climate. An examination of how four key groups of phytoplankton will respond to ocean temperatures forecast to occur between 2080 and 2100 suggests that their growth rates and distribution patterns will likely be dissimilar, resulting in sign
21h
Food scientists create zinc index for human body
Zinc deficiency is prevalent around the world, and among children, these mineral shortfalls can lead to stunting, embryonic malformations and neurobehavioral abnormalities. Over several decades, science has improved understanding of zinc metabolism, but an accurate, comprehensive assessment tool for its physiological status within a human body has remained elusive. Until now.
21h
Study: COVID tech took a toll on work-from-home moms
It's no secret that being a work-from-home mom during the dawn of the COVID-19 pandemic was a drag. And those tech tools—video meetings and texting—designed to make remote work easier? They just added to the stress and exacerbated the mental health toll on burnt out moms trying to hold everything together.
21h
Phages kill dystentery-causing bacteria and reduce virulence in surviving bacteria
Phages are viruses that infect bacteria and can also be used to treat human infections. However, as with antibiotics, bacteria can readily evolve resistance to phage attack, highlighting a key limitation to the use of phages as therapeutics. Now, researchers from Yale University have shown that the naturally occurring phage A1-1 kills Shigella flexneri, a major cause of dysentery in sub-Saharan Af
21h
The Millennium Project: How can everyone have sufficient clean water without conflict?
As this is a futurology subreddit, I suppose many of you have heard of The Millennium Project. It's a participatory think thank (est. 1996) with the purpose of improving humanity's prospect for building better futures. They are working on a bunch of global challenges and I would like to pose the question that is their global challenge #2: How can everyone have sufficient clean water without confl
21h
Has there been much discussion or speculation around technology reaching a point where class and wealth gaps are made larger essentially by choice?
It seems as if as things like virtual reality grow and things like cybernetics become more of a reality, we are quickly heading towards a scenario where everything from jobs to social interaction are influenced by whether or not someone is willing to use such technologies… Based on some people's current reactions to everything from 5G to vaccines, it seems extremely likely that a decent sized g
21h
Olfaction: Emotional Processing & Memory Consolidation
Please correct me if I'm wrong, but my understanding of the olfactory system is that: Olfaction is closely linked to emotion and memory consolidation. Apart from the fact that the olfactory system directly projects to the limbic system, though with anosmia (loss of smell) are highly susceptible to mental disorders such as depression. Nasal breathing appears to improve memory consolidation. Olfact
21h
The Best iPads of 2021 to Stoke Your Creativity
When Steve Jobs famously said "We want to put an incredibly great computer in a book that you can carry around with you," it's hard to believe the iPad wasn't what he had in mind. Containing the processing power of a laptop in the folio-like footprint of a small book or magazine, Apple's decade-long list of iPads offers something for everyone. The gamut of available iPads includes multiple produc
21h
New Sex Toy Aims to Emulate the Experience of Having a Penis
This week, we're pleased to bring you a different version of Futurism, containing stories from the horizon of hedonism. Welcome to The Science of Pleasure . In collaboration with our friends over at MEL Magazine , this week, we'll be bringing you stories from both publications about the pleasures of tomorrow, today. Earlier this year, UK-based dominatrix and model Adreena Angela became a beta tes
21h
MediaTek Unveils Fully Loaded Flagship Mobile Processor
In most western nations, MediaTek plays second banana to Qualcomm. The best, and most powerful phones all run on Qualcomm ARM chips, but that might change soon. MediaTek has just announced its first true flagship system-on-a-chip (SoC) in years , which it's calling Dimensity 9000. It's the world's first 4nm chip from TSMC, and it has all the latest technology. Still, this isn't MediaTek's first a
21h
Powerful gene-based testing by integrating long-range chromatin interactions and knockoff genotypes [Statistics]
Gene-based tests are valuable techniques for identifying genetic factors in complex traits. Here, we propose a gene-based testing framework that incorporates data on long-range chromatin interactions, several recent technical advances for region-based tests, and leverages the knockoff framework for synthetic genotype generation for improved gene discovery. Through simulations and applications…
22h
Opening of a cryptic pocket in {beta}-lactamase increases penicillinase activity [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Understanding the functional role of protein-excited states has important implications in protein design and drug discovery. However, because these states are difficult to find and study, it is still unclear if excited states simply result from thermal fluctuations and generally detract from function or if these states can actually enhance…
22h
Raf-like kinases and receptor-like (pseudo)kinase GHR1 are required for stomatal vapor pressure difference response [Plant Biology]
Stomatal pores close rapidly in response to low-air-humidity-induced leaf-to-air vapor pressure difference (VPD) increases, thereby reducing excessive water loss. The hydroactive signal-transduction mechanisms mediating high VPD–induced stomatal closure remain largely unknown. The kinetics of stomatal high-VPD responses were investigated by using time-resolved gas-exchange analyses of higher-order
22h
The genetic basis of the root economics spectrum in a perennial grass [Ecology]
Construction economics of plant roots exhibit predictable relationships with root growth, death, and nutrient uptake strategies. Plant taxa with inexpensively constructed roots tend to more precisely explore nutrient hotspots than do those with costly constructed roots but at the price of more frequent tissue turnover. This trade-off underlies an acquisitive…
22h
Energetic scaling in microbial growth [Environmental Sciences]
Microbial growth is a clear example of organization and structure arising in nonequilibrium conditions. Due to the complexity of the microbial metabolic network, elucidating the fundamental principles governing microbial growth remains a challenge. Here, we present a systematic analysis of microbial growth thermodynamics, leveraging an extensive dataset on energy-limited monoculture…
22h
Microbiome stability and structure is governed by host phylogeny over diet and geography in woodrats (Neotoma spp.) [Microbiology]
The microbiome is critical for host survival and fitness, but gaps remain in our understanding of how this symbiotic community is structured. Despite evidence that related hosts often harbor similar bacterial communities, it is unclear whether this pattern is due to genetic similarities between hosts or to common ecological selection…
22h
Homeostatic regulation of axonal Kv1.1 channels accounts for both synaptic and intrinsic modifications in the hippocampal CA3 circuit [Neuroscience]
Homeostatic plasticity of intrinsic excitability goes hand in hand with homeostatic plasticity of synaptic transmission. However, the mechanisms linking the two forms of homeostatic regulation have not been identified so far. Using electrophysiological, imaging, and immunohistochemical techniques, we show here that blockade of excitatory synaptic receptors for 2 to 3…
22h
The E3 ubiquitin ligase adaptor Tango10 links the core circadian clock to neuropeptide and behavioral rhythms [Neuroscience]
Circadian transcriptional timekeepers in pacemaker neurons drive profound daily rhythms in sleep and wake. Here we reveal a molecular pathway that links core transcriptional oscillators to neuronal and behavioral rhythms. Using two independent genetic screens, we identified mutants of Transport and Golgi organization 10 (Tango10) with poor behavioral rhythmicity. Tango10…
22h
High 3He/4He in central Panama reveals a distal connection to the Galapagos plume [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
It is well established that mantle plumes are the main conduits for upwelling geochemically enriched material from Earth's deep interior. The fashion and extent to which lateral flow processes at shallow depths may disperse enriched mantle material far (>1,000 km) from vertical plume conduits, however, remain poorly constrained. Here, we…
22h
A tripartite cytolytic toxin formed by Vibrio cholerae proteins with flagellum-facilitated secretion [Microbiology]
The protein MakA was discovered as a motility-associated secreted toxin from Vibrio cholerae. Here, we show that MakA is part of a gene cluster encoding four additional proteins: MakB, MakC, MakD, and MakE. MakA, MakB, and MakE were readily detected in culture supernatants of wild-type V. cholerae, whereas secretion was…
22h
Individual vulnerability to industrial robot adoption increases support for the radical right [Political Sciences]
The increasing success of populist and radical-right parties is one of the most remarkable developments in the politics of advanced democracies. We investigate the impact of industrial robot adoption on individual voting behavior in 13 western European countries between 1999 and 2015. We argue for the importance of the distributional…
22h
PD-L1 sustains chronic, cancer cell-intrinsic responses to type I interferon, enhancing resistance to DNA damage [Cell Biology]
Programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1), an immune-checkpoint protein expressed on cancer cells, also functions independently of the immune system. We found that PD-L1 inhibits the killing of cancer cells in response to DNA damage in an immune-independent manner by suppressing their acute response to type I interferon (IFN; IFN-I). In…
22h
Multisubstrate DNA stable isotope probing reveals guild structure of bacteria that mediate soil carbon cycling [Microbiology]
Soil microorganisms determine the fate of soil organic matter (SOM), and their activities compose a major component of the global carbon (C) cycle. We employed a multisubstrate, DNA-stable isotope probing experiment to track bacterial assimilation of C derived from distinct sources that varied in bioavailability. This approach allowed us to…
22h
The small molecule Zaractin activates ZAR1-mediated immunity in Arabidopsis [Plant Biology]
Pathogenic effector proteins use a variety of enzymatic activities to manipulate host cellular proteins and favor the infection process. However, these perturbations can be sensed by nucleotide-binding leucine-rich-repeat (NLR) proteins to activate effector-triggered immunity (ETI). Here we have identified a small molecule (Zaractin) that mimics the immune eliciting activity of…
22h
Photoisomerization transition state manipulation by entangled two-photon absorption [Chemistry]
We demonstrate how two-photon excitation with quantum light can influence elementary photochemical events. The azobenzene trans → cis isomerization following entangled two-photon excitation is simulated using quantum nuclear wave packet dynamics. Photon entanglement modulates the nuclear wave packets by coherently controlling the transition pathways. The photochemical transition state during passa
22h
Correction to Supporting Information for Ghose et al., Chemotactic movement of a polarity site enables yeast cells to find their mates [Cell Biology]
CELL BIOLOGY Correction to Supporting Information for "Chemotactic movement of a polarity site enables yeast cells to find their mates," by Debraj Ghose, Katherine Jacobs, Samuel Ramirez, Timothy Elston, and Daniel Lew, which published May 28, 2021; 10.1073/pnas.2025445118 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 118, e2025445118). The authors note that in…
22h
Loss of tree species has cumulative impact on biodiversity
Diseases affecting different UK tree species have been shown to have a multiplying effect on the loss of associated biodiversity, according to new research published in the Journal of Ecology by James Hutton Institute scientists and partners in the UK and Portugal. The research team reveals that the decline of ash and oak trees may affect more species than just the ones that only use oak and ash a
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'Deepfaking the mind' could improve brain-computer interfaces for people with disabilities
Researchers are using generative adversarial networks (GANs) — technology best known for creating deepfake videos and photorealistic human faces — to improve brain-computer interfaces for people with disabilities. The team successfully taught an AI to generate synthetic brain activity data. The data, specifically neural signals called spike trains, can be fed into machine-learning algorithms to
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Seeing grandkids lights up grandmother brains
Looking at pictures of their young grandchildren activates the parts of grandmothers' brains associated with emotional empathy, a new study shows. The findings provide a neural snapshot of this special, intergenerational bond. "What really jumps out in the data is the activation in areas of the brain associated with emotional empathy," says James Rilling, professor in the anthropology department
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You might be underestimating strangers' interest in your life
People benefit from deep conversations, but we often stick to small talk with strangers because we underestimate how much they're interested in our lives, according to new research. The findings have important practical implications, especially as the pandemic wanes and people become more social again. "People care about what we have to say, just as we care about what they have to say." "We wrong
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Warning over antibiotic-resistant bacteria
Significant levels of antibiotic-resistant bacteria have been found at locations in and around Cambridge, England. The researchers found potentially dangerous Pseudomonas bacteria in over a fifth of samples collected close to the River Cam.
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Advanced microscopes help scientists understand how cells break down proteins
Researchers have used advanced electron microscopes to delve deeper into the process of protein degradation. They described the structure of a key enzyme that helps mediate ubiquitination in yeast, part of a cellular process called the N-degron pathway that may be responsible for determining the rate of degradation for up to 80% of equivalent proteins in humans.
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The Atlantic Daily: Three Unknowns Will Define This Pandemic Winter
This time last year, experts were all but certain that we were headed for an ugly surge of COVID-19 cases—which proved true. A year later, the future is much foggier. U.S. cases are once again on the rise , but it's hard to know what lies ahead. Three as-yet unanswered questions will inform COVID-19's trajectory in the country this winter, my colleague Sarah Zhang explains in her latest story . H
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Best White Elephant Gifts to Wrap Up 2021
Regardless of if you're new to the White Elephant world (hint: it's an anonymous present exchange where stealing is encouraged) or you're a seasoned pro, you'll need to put some solid effort into ensuring your gift adds the right amount of pizazz to the pot. Think about what you want to bring to the table. Is it a ridiculous gag gift? An elegant accessory? Something actually useful? Once you've d
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Researchers prepare dual stimulus responsive alginate hydrogel
Stimuli-responsive hydrogels not only express excellent biocompatibility, but also can respond when exposed to external stimulation, enabling a wider range of applications in biomedicine. However, at present, stimuli-responsive hydrogel shows poor mechanical properties and limited response to a single stimulus. There is a great need for stimuli-responsive hydrogels with excellent mechanical proper
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Surveys show horseweed is a persistent and unpredictable foe in soybean crops
Horseweed is one of the most common and most troublesome weeds in soybean production—shown to cause yield losses of up to 39 percent in the Midwest growing region. A single horseweed plant can produce up to 200,000 seeds that can be easily spread across vast distances. In addition, herbicide resistance has made horseweed increasingly difficult to control.
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Livsmedel från avfall kan bli vardagsmat
Vi kommer att äta allt mer mat tillverkad av det vi idag slänger bort. Hela broccolin till exempel. Det menar matetnologen Håkan Jönsson vid Lunds universitet. I takt med att människorna på jorden blir fler och odlingsytan krymper tilltar uppfinningsrikedomen. Och enligt matetnologen Håkan Jönsson kommer det vi äter allt oftare att vara tillverkat av sådant som vi idag kastar bort. När det gäller
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Don't wash your turkey this Thanksgiving
Lisa Shelley , a food safety researcher from North Carolina State University, has tips on how you can keep yourself and your dinner guests safe from foodborne illnesses this Thanksgiving: The holidays are just around the corner and this year might feel at least a little more normal than our first pandemic holiday season. People are more likely to gather with friends and family, and to celebrate w
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Comparing 17.5 million options shows CDC got COVID vaccine rollout right
A new model of 17.5 million possible strategies generally validates the US Center for Disease Control and Prevention's recommendations to state, territorial, tribal, and local governments for last winter's rollout of COVID-19 vaccines. The research also highlights some minor improvements. The work could help inform the design of future vaccination strategies in the US and abroad. "The CDC strateg
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Små elhybridplan i luften 2030
Små elhybridflygplan för regional trafik ska vara i drift senast 2030, uppger de forskare vid Mälardalens högskola som tar fram teknik för de elektrifierade flygplanen. En utmaning som finns kvar är att beräkna den exakta mängd motorkraft som behövs under en flygtur. De små elhybridflygplan med plats för upp till 19 passagerare kommer att förändra det regionala resandet i framtiden, menar forskar
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Alien organisms – hitchhikers of the galaxy?
Scientists warn, without good biosecurity measures 'alien organisms' on Earth may become a reality stranger than fiction. Scientists are calling for greater recognition of the biosecurity risks ahead of the space industry.
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How herpes checks into the nervous system for life
More than half of U.S. adults are carriers of HSV1 (herpes simplex virus type 1) which hibernates in the peripheral nervous system and can never be eradicated. A new study has uncovered herpes' sneaky strategy for infecting the nervous system, opening a door to long-needed vaccine development for both HSV1 and its close sibling HSV2.
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Unvaccinated: The kids aren't alright
Close to 10 million children in lower-income countries have never been vaccinated against any infectious disease. These 'zero-dose' kids hold a lesson for all of us, says a public-health expert.
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Nanoscale 'computer' controls function of protein, influences cell behavior
The creation of nanoscale computers for use in precision health care has long been a dream of many scientists and health care providers. Now, for the first time, researchers have produced a nanocomputing agent that can control the function of a particular protein that is involved in cell movement and cancer metastasis. The research paves the way for the construction of complex nanoscale computers
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Algae blooms, which can threaten drinking water and human health, pop up regularly and may increase
Barges carrying mounds of coal toward St. Louis passed by Starved Rock at a snail's pace, inching past yellow-orange trees and sandstone canyons. A bald eagle hovered above a path leading hikers toward Lover's Leap. Near the Starved Rock Lock and Dam, a pinch point along the Illinois River, the water was dull and unremarkable.
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Are your kids keeping up at school?
How a child learns is as individual as the child themselves. Yet with the pressures of large class sizes, decreases in school funding and, most recently, home-schooling, many teachers are struggling to keep track of their students' performance.
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Canada's flood havoc after summer heatwave shows how climate disasters combine to do extra damage
People living in British Columbia will feel like they have had more than their fair share of climate disasters in 2021. After a record-breaking heatwave in June, the state in western Canada has been inundated by intense rain storms in November. It's also likely the long-lasting effects of the heatwave made the results of the recent rainfall worse, causing more landslides—which have destroyed highw
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Finding $100,000 Worth of Gold Coins | Expedition Unknown
Stream Expedition Unknown on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/expedition-unknown #Discovery #ExpeditionUnknown #JoshGates Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/
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Refugees in the media: How the most commonly used images make viewers dehumanise them
When the Syrian refugee crisis began in 2011, the journeys of thousands of people fleeing their home country to cross the Mediterranean were widely documented in the media. But the public response was tepid until 2015, when a photograph of drowned Syrian toddler Alan Kurdi on a Turkish beach was printed in media around the world. The photo prompted international responses, a change of EU policy on
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Biden mulls reversing Trump rules on western grouse species
The Biden administration on Friday said it will consider new measures to protect greater sage grouse, a bird species once found across much of the U.S. West that has suffered drastic declines in recent decades due to oil and gas drilling, grazing, wildfires and other pressures.
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Tracing mechanisms of large exon splicing during vertebrate evolution
In vertebrates, large exons often skip splicing events and are evolutionarily conserved. Scientists from Nagoya University, Japan, led by Associate Professor Akio Masuda, have recently identified the mechanism behind regulated splicing of large constitutive exons which are rich in disordered regions, and their potential involvement in the assembly of transcription factors. They also explained how
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Study: Climate-driven forest fires are on the rise
An upside of the increase in forest fires in the West is that they reduce the amount of fuel available for other burns. That might provide a buffering effect on western fires for the next few decades, but the threat of climate-driven forest fires is not diminishing, a new study shows.
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What African countries got out of COP26
The 26th United Nations climate change conference, COP26, recently came to an end, having aimed to get countries united in the fight against climate change. Climate change issues are likely to hit African countries the hardest though the continent is the least responsible for driving climate change. We asked Mouhamadou Bamba Sylla the AIMS-Canada Research Chair in Climate Change Science at AIMS-Rw
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Low-voltage magnetoelectric coupling in membrane heterostructures
Strain-mediated magnetic coupling in ferroelectric and ferromagnetic heterostructures can offer a unique opportunity for scientific research in low-power multifunctional devices. Ferroelectrics are materials that can maintain spontaneous and reversible electric polarization. Relaxor-ferroelectrics that exhibit high electrostriction are ideal candidates for ferroelectric layer constructs due to the
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Long-lasting economic growth may start downward slide
We've been living in a time of unprecedented global economic growth. But the heady days of rapidly rising prosperity may be coming to an end, scientists argue in a new paper. Depressions, recessions, and other dips in the economy notwithstanding, the last century has been unlike any other before in terms of overall Gross Domestic Product (GDP) per capita growth. It's the result of a potent combin
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New design may boost potency of monoclonal antibodies against COVID
Monoclonal antibody drugs are among the few treatments available for COVID, providing a lifeline for those at high risk of severe illness and hospitalization. However, the usefulness of these drugs is limited because they are effective only when they can be administered early in the disease process.
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Study: Gay men earn undergraduate and graduate degrees at the highest rate in the US
Recent news about the significant shift of women outpacing men in attending college—now a 60/40 ratio—overlooks one of the highest-achieving groups of all: gay men. In addition, lesbian women's level of education is not accounted for in the new figures. A new study from a University of Notre Dame researcher reveals how, without including sexuality, broad statements about gender and education are i
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When debris disaster strikes
In 2021 so far, some 2467 new objects large enough to be tracked have been added to world catalogs of orbital objects, out of which 1493 are new satellites and the rest are debris. While new objects are added, others are dragged down to Earth by the atmosphere where they safely burn up, resulting in a net increase of at least 1387 trackable objects between 2020 and 2021.
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Assessment of carbon capture and storage in natural systems within the English North Sea
Three quarters of the UK is in the sea. Among the diversity of marine wildlife found within UK seas lies a reservoir of carbon stored in natural habitats like sand, mud, saltmarsh and seagrass. Unlike land-based sources of carbon such as forests and peatlands, marine carbon stores are less well understood. This report begins to fill in the gaps in our knowledge of where carbon can be found within
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Researchers of ancient DNA set guidelines for their work
Fueled by technological advancements, ancient DNA research has grown by leaps and bounds over the last decade. From the first full ancient genome published in 2010 to the more than 4,000 analyzed today, the DNA collected from ancient human remains has advanced researchers' understanding of the origins and history of human populations around the world.
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How can cities accelerate climate action to meet COP26 goals?
Last weekend, international negotiators approved the United Nations Glasgow Climate Pact at the 26th Conference of the Parties. Ashish Sharma, the Illinois research climatologist at the Illinois State Water Survey, spoke with News Bureau physical sciences editor Lois Yoksoulian about the takeaways from the COP26 and how the goals set at the global-level conference can be translated to the local le
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Svenska baljväxter bra för hälsa och klimat
Det är fullt möjligt att använda proteinet från svenskodlade baljväxter för att producera växtbaserade livsmedel, som till exempelvis kött och ost. Att använda baljväxter till vegetariska alternativ skulle vara positivt både för klimatet och folkhälsan. Ferawati Ferawati, doktor i kemi påLinnéuniversitetet, har undersökt egenskaper och näringsinnehåll hos flera typer av baljväxter som gula ärtor,
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Electrochemical C–N bond activation for deaminative reductive coupling of Katritzky salts
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 November 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-27060-7 Electrochemical transformations use electrons and electron holes instead of chemical oxidants and reductants as reagents. Here, the authors report an electrochemical reductive deaminative cross-coupling of Katrizky salts with various radical acceptors, including examples of fluoroalkenylation, alkynylation a
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BST1 regulates nicotinamide riboside metabolism via its glycohydrolase and base-exchange activities
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 November 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-27080-3 Nicotinamide riboside (NR) is a NAD + precursor exhibiting beneficial effects against aging. Here the authors demonstrate that orally administered NR increases NAD + levels in a diphasic manner and that bone marrow stromal cell antigen 1 plays a crucial role for NAD + synthesis from NR.
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Site-controlled telecom-wavelength single-photon emitters in atomically-thin MoTe2
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 November 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-27033-w Single-photon emitters in 2D semiconductors hold promise for quantum applications, but usually operate in the 500-800 nm wavelength range. Here, the authors report site-controlled creation of quantum emitters in the telecommunication wavelength window by coupling 2D MoTe2 to strain inducing nano-pillar array
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Resurgent Na+ currents promote ultrafast spiking in projection neurons that drive fine motor control
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 November 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26521-3 The zebra finch robust nucleus of the arcopallium (RA) directs singing by providing descending projections to brainstem motor neurons. The authors show that electrophysiological characteristics of RA neurons rely on resurgent Na+ currents that emerge early during song development only in males.
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Large scale discovery of coronavirus-host factor protein interaction motifs reveals SARS-CoV-2 specific mechanisms and vulnerabilities
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 November 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26498-z Many interactions between viral and host proteins are mediated by short peptide motifs. Here, using a phage-based viral peptide library, the authors identify 269 peptide-based interactions for 18 coronaviruses, including an interaction between SARS-CoV-2 N and G3BP1/2 that affects stress granules.
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Plasmodium sporozoite phospholipid scramblase interacts with mammalian carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase 1 to infect hepatocytes
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 November 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-27109-7 After transmission of Plasmodium sporozoites from infected mosquitoes, parasites first infect hepatocytes. Here, Cha et al. identify a sporozoite ligand (phospholipid scramblase) and the hepatocytic receptor (carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase 1) as relevant for hepatocyte invasion and show that an antibody to h
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Water cluster in hydrophobic crystalline porous covalent organic frameworks
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 November 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-27128-4 Research on water confinement in small hydrophobic pores remains scarce because of a preconception that small hydrophobic pores repulse water molecules. Here, the authors demonstrate water confinement across hydrophobic microporous channels in crystalline covalent organic frameworks.
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Dødsangst kan ikke vente til sidste øjeblik
LÆGEDAGE: Mens læger er vant til at tale med patienter om både livet og døden, bliver behandlingen af dødsangst måske forbigået. Det har fået praktiserende læge til at sætte lige netop dødsangsten på dagsordenen på ét af Lægedages kurser for praktiserende læger og praksispersonale. En af underviserne på kurset opfordrer til, at vi taler mere om døden, så vi kan leve livet.
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We are being controlled and nobody is talking about it…
Is it just me or is Social media controling most people and influencing their everyday lives to a point were their passions and drive for existing is being slowly stripped from themselves unwillingly. Leaving them with an unfilfilling feeling each day that can only be temporarly satisfied by pulling up your phone and clicking around social media apps. Who do we have to blame for this? The platfor
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Lovende resultater med AstraZeneca-middel til personer med COVID-19
AstraZeneca har fremlagt resultater fra to fase 3-studier med medicinalvirksomhedens eksperimentelle lægemiddel som behandling til personer med COVID-19. Behandlingen var profylaktisk i stand til at fjerne risikoen for alvorlig sygdom og død. »Utroligt spændende, at vi får et alternativ til vaccinerne,« siger dansk overlæge.
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Hovsaforskeren i hepatitis på Hvidovre
Professor og overlæge Jens Bukh har indskrevet sig i virusforskningens historie med en række opdagelser, der har gjort det muligt at kurere en af verdens mest hårdnakkede virussygdomme, hepatitis C, som kan føre til både skrumpelever og leverkræft. Men at han overhovedet blev forsker, var et rent tilfælde, fortæller Jens Bukh bl.a. i dette portræt i serien Dansk klinisk forskning i verdensklasse.
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Derfor er Jens Bukh i verdensklasse
Skal det lykkes Danmark at lokke forskere tilbage, der som overlæge og professor Jens Bukh allerede har skabt sig et navn i udlandet, er det ikke nogen dårlig ide at kigge på integration af klinik og forskning, mener Novo Nordisk Fondens senior vice president.
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In the year 2000, I heard about nano devices that would travel in our veins, cleaning our arteries. Any progress in 21 years?
This post is a Reality Check for all you future enthusiasts. I love to dream about the future as much as the next guy, but if you think the Singularity is coming next Tuesday, I've got news for you. 99.9 percent of the time, these radical inventions that people are talking about, rarely come to fruition, in our actual lifetime. I'm sure, in the year 2087, people will actually have small nano devi
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Schneider Shorts 19.11.2021 – Garbage and Unprofessional
Schneider Shorts 19.11.2021 – Alina Chan's book is out, Irish Moss as COVID-19 crusher, long covid all in your head, Cassava affair exposes idiocy of stock market capitalism, featuring a short-fused bully editor and his antivax successor, Wiley defending upmarket research fraud, Cheshire taking on the Indian Ministry of Defence, with Frontiers in insectofascism, mental deficiencies of vegans, radi
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Moonrise magic: why Friday's lunar eclipse offers an unusual twilight show for most of Australia
This will be the longest partial eclipse of the 21st century, lasting three hours and 28 minutes November lunar eclipse 2021: how to photograph the full flower moon on your phone or camera with the right settings Get our free news app ; get our morning email briefing As the full moon rises on Friday night it won't be as lovely and bright as usual – but it will be fascinating. Across most of Austr
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Organiskt batteri lagrar energi effektivt
En säker, billig och hållbar teknik för energilagning har tagits fram vid Laboratoriet för organisk elektronik, Linköpings universitet. Tekniken bakom det organiska batteriet prisades vid den nyligen avslutade klimatkonferensen COP26 i Glasgow. Behovet av el ökar i samhället. Dessutom ökar andel förnybara energikällor som sol-, vind- och vattenkraft. Tillsammans leder detta till stora utmaningar
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Who are the most famous neuroscientists?
I was reading some articles written by Joseph E. LeDoux and just wondered how accurate and respected he is in the neuroscience field, so I searched him on here and seen this thread from some years back " Who are the modern most famous neuroscientists? " and seen that no one mentioned him hence my question? Thread below… https://www.reddit.com/r/neuroscience/comments/3x4kad/who_are_the_modern_mo
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Original Survey Research- Substance Use and Spirituality
The purpose of this study is to provide evidence for spirituality as a treatment for substance abuse disorder. You do not need to have a diagnosis of substance use disorder to participate. You have been invited to participate because you can provide valuable data related to substance abuse and spirituality, whether you have experienced substance-dependancy or not. You must be 18 years of age or o
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Frailty is more common in kids getting heart surgery than previously known
A third of patients who underwent a complex procedure for a severe congenital heart condition were identified as frail at a routine clinic visit, with providers inconsistently recognizing it, according to a new study. Children with congenital heart disease who are considered frail may particularly have an increased risk of poor health outcomes after heart surgery. However, little is known about h
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Research shows B cells can help fight infection, speed skin wound healing, and protect brain after injury
Until recently, B cells—present in the blood stream—were mainly thought to produce antibodies and present antigens to help with the immune response to pathogens. A research team at the Vaccine and Immunotherapy Center (VIC) at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) led by Ruxandra Sîrbulescu Ph.D., and Mark Poznansky, MD, Ph.D., is exploring the novel protective roles that B cells may play in the co
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Scientists create insights into one of the most extreme states of matter produced on Earth
Exotic laser-produced high-energy-density (HED) plasmas akin to those found in stars and nuclear explosions could provide insight into events throughout the universe. Physicists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have discovered a new way to measure and understand these plasmas, among the most extreme states of matter ever produced on Earth. Improve
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One year from launch: US-European satellite to track world's water
An international team of engineers and technicians has finished assembling a next-generation satellite that will make the first global survey of Earth's surface water and study fine-scale ocean currents. The Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission is just a year out from launch, and the final set of tests on the spacecraft have started.
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Letting teens consent on their own may boost HPV vaccine rates
Allowing teens to consent to getting the human papillomavirus vaccine without parental involvement could be an important strategy for improving vaccination rates, a new study shows. The strategy is already a policy in a handful of US states. The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, which is recommended for children between ages 11 and 12, is highly effective at preventing cervical cancer. But in t
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Best Black Friday Deals of 2021
Despite rumors that Black Friday 2021 deals might not be as deep as they have in the past, the numbers are saying otherwise. If you haven't already noticed, many of those deals are taking place well in advance of the big day. Discounts are popping up everywhere, from laptops and TVs to mattresses, video games, and the best tablets. Many of the top-of-the-line products like Apple AirPods Pro (whic
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COVID-19 on the brain
As the world has struggled with the COVID-19 pandemic over the past nearly two years, scientists and doctors have worked in absolute overdrive to provide patients with safe and effective treatments and preventative vaccines in record time. However, providing treatment options for patients infected with the novel SARS-CoV-2 virus has been a challenge due to […]
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Single-neuron firing cascades underlie global spontaneous brain events [Neuroscience]
The resting brain consumes enormous energy and shows highly organized spontaneous activity. To investigate how this activity is manifest among single neurons, we analyzed spiking discharges of ∼10,000 isolated cells recorded from multiple cortical and subcortical regions of the mouse brain during immobile rest. We found that firing of a…
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Cone photoreceptor dysfunction in retinitis pigmentosa revealed by optoretinography [Medical Sciences]
Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is the most common group of inherited retinal degenerative diseases, whose most debilitating phase is cone photoreceptor death. Perimetric and electroretinographic methods are the gold standards for diagnosing and monitoring RP and assessing cone function. However, these methods lack the spatial resolution and sensitivity to assess disease…
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Regulation of interference-sensitive crossover distribution ensures crossover assurance in Arabidopsis [Genetics]
During meiosis, crossovers (COs) are typically required to ensure faithful chromosomal segregation. Despite the requirement for at least one CO between each pair of chromosomes, closely spaced double COs are usually underrepresented due to a phenomenon called CO interference. Like Mus musculus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Arabidopsis thaliana has both interference-sensitive…
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Herbivore feeding preference corroborates optimal defense theory for specialized metabolites within plants [Plant Biology]
Numerous plants protect themselves from attackers by using specialized metabolites. The biosynthesis of these deterrent, often toxic metabolites is costly, as their synthesis diverts energy and resources on account of growth and development. How plants diversify investments into growth and defense is explained by the optimal defense theory. The central…
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The ubiquitin E3 ligase FBXO22 degrades PD-L1 and sensitizes cancer cells to DNA damage [Cell Biology]
High expression of programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) in cancer cells drives immune-independent, cell-intrinsic functions, leading to resistance to DNA-damaging therapies. We find that high expression of the ubiquitin E3 ligase FBXO22 sensitizes nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells to ionizing radiation (IR) and cisplatin, and that activation of FBXO22 by…
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Molecular characterization of Barrett's esophagus at single-cell resolution [Cell Biology]
Barrett's esophagus (BE) is categorized, based on morphological appearance, into different stages, which correlate with the risk of developing esophageal adenocarcinoma. More advanced stages are more likely to acquire chromosomal instabilities, but stage-specific markers remain elusive. Here, we performed single-cell DNA-sequencing experiments (scDNAseq) with fresh BE biopsies. Dysplastic BE cells
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Altered cell and RNA isoform diversity in aging Down syndrome brains [Neuroscience]
Down syndrome (DS), trisomy of human chromosome 21 (HSA21), is characterized by lifelong cognitive impairments and the development of the neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The cellular and molecular modifications responsible for these effects are not understood. Here we performed single-nucleus RNA sequencing (snRNA-seq) employing both short- (Illumina) and…
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Vectorial channeling as a mechanism for translational control by functional prions and condensates [Chemistry]
Translation of messenger RNA (mRNA) is regulated through a diverse set of RNA-binding proteins. A significant fraction of RNA-binding proteins contains prion-like domains which form functional prions. This raises the question of how prions can play a role in translational control. Local control of translation in dendritic spines by prions…
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Correction to Supporting Information for Grunert et al., Evolutionarily stable strategies in stable and periodically fluctuating populations: The Rosenzweig-MacArthur predator-prey model [Applied Mathematics]
POPULATION BIOLOGY, APPLIED MATHEMATICS Correction to Supporting Information for "Evolutionarily stable strategies in stable and periodically fluctuating populations: The Rosenzweig–MacArthur predator–prey model," by Katrin Grunert, Helge Holden, Espen R. Jakobsen, and Nils Chr. Stenseth, which published January 21, 2021; 10.1073/pnas.2017463118 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 118, e2017463118). Th
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Correction for Van Doesum et al., Social mindfulness and prosociality vary across the globe [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
PSYCHOLOGICAL AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES Correction for "Social mindfulness and prosociality vary across the globe," by Niels J. Van Doesum, Ryan O. Murphy, Marcello Gallucci, Efrat Aharonov-Majar, Ursula Athenstaedt, Wing Tung Au, Liying Bai, Robert Böhm, Inna Bovina, Nancy R. Buchan, Xiao-Ping Chen, Kitty B. Dumont, Jan B. Engelmann, Kimmo Eriksson,…
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Correction for Hammond et al., The rotational and divergent components of atmospheric circulation on tidally locked planets [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
EARTH, ATMOSPHERIC, AND PLANETARY SCIENCES Correction for "The rotational and divergent components of atmospheric circulation on tidally locked planets," by Mark Hammond and Neil T. Lewis, which published March 22, 2021; 10.1073/pnas.2022705118 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 118, e2022705118). The authors wish to note the following: "There is an error…
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Religious identity cues increase vaccination intentions and trust in medical experts among American Christians [Social Sciences]
Containing the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States requires mobilizing a large majority of the mass public to vaccinate, but many Americans are hesitant or opposed to vaccination. A significant predictor of vaccine attitudes in the United States is religiosity, with more-religious individuals expressing more distrust in science and being…
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Natural enemy of invasive, berry-eating fly found in U.S.
A parasitoid wasp that is the natural enemy of a fly known as the spotted-wing drosophila could be a good friend to growers. Washington State University researchers recently confirmed the discovery of the potentially beneficial wasp in the United States for the first time.
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How Galápagos giant tortoises live cancer-free for 100 years
Galápagos giant tortoises evolved to have extra copies of genes—called duplications—that may protect against the ravages of aging, including cancer, researchers report. The tortoises can weigh well over 300 pounds and often live over 100 years. Laboratory tests on Galápagos giant tortoise cells corroborate the idea that the animals have developed such defenses, says Vincent Lynch, associate profe
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Simulation reveals molecular footprint of organic air pollutants
Joining the global effort to curb air pollution, researchers at Texas A&M University have developed computational tools to accurately assess the footprint of certain organic atmospheric pollutants. Their simulation, described in the journal Environmental Science and Technology, could help government agencies keep a closer check on human-made sources of carbon-based pollutants.
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Bubbling up: Previously hidden environmental impact of bursting bubbles exposed in new study
Bubbles are common in nature and can form when ocean waves break and when raindrops impact surfaces. When bubbles burst, they send tiny jets of water and other materials into the air. A new study from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign examines how the interplay between bubble surfaces and water that contains organic materials contributes to the transport of aerosolized organic materials—
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Researchers caution global economic growth could slide into stagnation
We've been living in a time of unprecedented global economic growth. Depressions, recessions and other dips in the economy notwithstanding, the last century has been unlike any other before in terms of overall Gross Domestic Product (GDP) per capita growth. It's the result of a potent combination of technology, via the Industrial Revolutions, and economic and political freedom and stability, thank
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Stalagmites as key witnesses of the monsoon
The ice sheets of Greenland are melting at an alarming rate. This causes large amounts of freshwater to flow into the North Atlantic, thereby slowing the Gulf Stream. Researchers fear that this will have noticeable effects on the climate worldwide. Densely populated tropical areas that depend on monsoon rains for their freshwater supply are particularly at risk. In order to make reliable predictio
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FBI, CDC Investigating Vials Labeled 'Smallpox'
A modern smallpox vaccination kit. (Photo: CDC) The FBI is investigating a handful of newly-discovered frozen vials labeled "smallpox," according to the Center for Disease Control. The vials were found in a vaccine research facility in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania when a lab worker was cleaning out a freezer. Of the 15 vials located, five were labeled as "smallpox" while the other ten were lab
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Augmented reality game raises awareness of harmful algae blooms
Eco Resilience Games from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute has released the first augmented reality (AR) game focusing on the growing issue of harmful algae blooms. Algae Bloom Dynamics uses AR technology to create a stylized photo-realistic, lake-island aquatic ecosystem where users walk around the immersive habitat to discover information that can help find solutions to the human behaviors and e
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CRISPR screens unveil signal hubs for nutrient licensing of T cell immunity
Nature, Published online: 18 November 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-04109-7 CRISPR screening and protein–protein interaction networks identify components and mechanisms of nutrient-dependent mTORC1 signalling in regulatory T cells and reveal how mTORC1 integrates immunological cues and nutrient signals for adaptive immunity.
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A program to empower Black teachers in the US | Larry Irvin
TED Fellow and education innovator Larry Irvin envisions a world where every child can see themselves reflected in their teachers. With his team at Brothers Empowered to Teach, Irvin is providing pathways to careers in education for Black men, who currently make up less than three percent of all teachers in the US — offering training, personal and professional development and job placement. He sh
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Mechanism that allows cells to sense the curvature of tissue around them
Cells in your body cannot see, but they can sense their surroundings and their own shape. Scientists at the University of Mons and the Institute of Science and Technology (IST) Austria now showed via both—experiments and theory—how cells can sense the curvature of tissue around them and how this influences their inner workings. The study was published in Nature Physics.
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How do we know we're tired? PARP1 protein acts as antenna, signaling the brain that it's time to sleep and repair DNA
Why do humans spend a third of their lives sleeping? Why do animals sleep? Throughout evolution sleep has remained universal and essential to all organisms with a nervous system, including invertebrates such as flies, worms, and even jellyfish. Why animals sleep despite the continuous threat of predators, and how sleep benefits the brain and single cells still remains a mystery.
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Efficient photon upconversion at an organic semiconductor interface
Researchers at Institute for Molecular Science in Japan report that novel photon upconversion (UC) system with heterojunctions of organic semiconductors. The solid-state UC system is achieved with an external quantum efficiency of two orders of magnitude higher than those of the conventional systems. Using this result, efficient UC, from near-infrared to visible light, can be realized on flexible
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Engineering the future of mobility
From cars to planes, the future of transportation is already here—and is changing rapidly. Software engineering is increasingly central to both the development and maintenance of all kinds of vehicles. That means more people need to start thinking like systems engineers. Dale Tutt, vice president of aerospace and defense industry for Siemens Software, says this means companies must offer more tra
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Är vi immuna nu?
Covid-19 ökar i Europa trots hög vaccinationsgrad. – Ingen blir fullständigt immun, säger forskare. Men bäst skydd ger det som kallas hybridimmunitet, kombinationen av "naturlig" immunitet och en eller två vaccindoser. Blir man immun om man har haft covid-19? Eller efter en dubbel vaccindos? Och hur länge? Det här är frågor som nu, efter snart två års pandemi och intensiva forskningsinsatser, bör
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Climate change: How elephants help pump planet-warming carbon underground
Imagine you're in a hot air balloon flying over an African savanna in the late growing season. Below, herds of elephants, zebras, wildebeests and rhinos roam a mosaic landscape dotted with lonesome trees and daubs of woodland on a canvas of yellow-brown grass. The hungry and rowdy herbivores are eating and trampling the vegetation that stores carbon and keeps it from heating the atmosphere.
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A first biodegradable version of Velcro has been created, drawing inspiration from climbing plants
A research group coordinated by Barbara Mazzolai at the IIT—Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (Italian Institute of Technology) has created the first ever prototype of a soft, biodegradable and soluble velcro inspired by the micro-hook structure of leaves on the "catchweed" plant (Galium aparine), for use in devices for the monitoring and safeguarding of the environment and in precision farming. The
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Orion Bar region investigated in detail by Russian astronomers
Using spacecraft and ground-based facilities, Russian astronomers have inspected the Orion Bar photodissociation region, focusing on the mid-infrared emission from this source. Results of the study could help astronomers to better understand the evolution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in space. The research was published November 10 on arXiv.org.
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Do childhood colds help the body respond to COVID?
Nature, Published online: 18 November 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03087-0 A mechanism known as 'original antigenic sin' protects some people from flu; whether it helps immune reactions to coronaviruses is still unclear.
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Researchers develop method for early detection of bacterial infection in crops
Researchers of Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART) and their local collaborators from Temasek Life Sciences Laboratory (TLL) have developed a rapid Raman spectroscopy-based method for the detection and quantification of early bacterial infection in crops. The Raman spectral biomarkers and diagnostic algorithm enable the non-invasive and early diagnosis of bacterial infection
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'The end of coal is nigh': Expert assesses the results of the World Climate Summit in Glasgow
At the COP26 world climate conference in Glasgow, the signatory states were able to reach an agreement after lengthy discussions. We spoke with Jochem Marotzke, Director at the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, about the results of the conference in Glasgow, the importance of such climate summits and agreements, and the sense of hopelessness and despair that climate change causes in some young
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Researchers observe localized phonon modes at a heterointerface
Phonons—the quasiparticle describing lattice vibrations in solids—directly dictates various properties of solid state systems, such as the thermal conductivity, electron mobility, structural stability and conventional superconductivity. Since in real low-dimensional crystals the phonon structures depends on both real space and reciprocal space, it is very chanlleging to experimentally measure them
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New stress test model quantifies climate risks for banks
European banks will soon be required to incorporate climate change risks into the stress testing of their equity. Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have now developed a new approach in cooperation with the Frankfurt Institute for Risk Management and Regulation (FIRM). In a case study they applied their stress testing method in several CO2 pricing scenarios. Due to sharp rises
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Developing high-performance MXene electrodes for next-generation powerful battery
Two-dimensional MXene has been a rising star in the energy world as this material can store energy fast. But their unstable voltage output limits their applications. A collaborative research team led by scientists from City University of Hong Kong (CityU) has recently developed battery-like electrochemical Nb2CTx MXene electrodes with stable voltage output and high energy density by using a high-v
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Estimating the quality of sound spaces from observed speech
In the future, smartphones, which almost everyone has, and smart speakers, 3.7 million installed in Japanese households, might save your life. Apart from daily-use features, these devices can read emergency messages aloud to inform us of the current situation of an earthquake and how to evacuate. However, we might lose such crucial information due to difficulty listening in some circumstances. The
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Speeding up the energy transition reduces climate risks
The World Climate Conference in Glasgow has just ended, and the question is whether the goal of maximum global heating of 1.5 degrees Celsius can still be achieved. In a model calculation, Empa researchers show how the energy transition could lead to the lowest possible cumulative emissions: Instead of slowly cutting back emissions, we should quickly push ahead with the conversion to solar energy
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What Americans hear about social justice at church, and what they do about it
On June 5, 2020, it had been just over a week since a white Minnesota police officer, Derek Chauvin, killed George Floyd, an unarmed, African American man. Protests were underway outside Central United Methodist Church, an interracial church in downtown Detroit with a long history of activism on civil rights, peace, immigrant rights and poverty issues.
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Scientists solve 50-year-old mystery behind plant growth
A team of researchers led by UC Riverside has demonstrated for the first time one way that a small molecule turns a single cell into something as large as a tree. For half a century, scientists have known that all plants depend on this molecule, auxin, to grow. Until now, they didn't understand exactly how auxin sets growth in motion.
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Five ways to cut down on food waste, and why it matters
When people think about ways to help the environment, encourage biodiversity and decrease greenhouse gases, they don't usually think about the impact of food waste. And yet food waste is responsible for up to 10% of global greenhouse gas emissions. Producing food for a growing global population is a complex challenge with a lot of negative environmental consequences, so food waste creates unnecess
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Fires in the Sierra Nevada likely to grow in frequency
Naturalist John Muir called the Sierra Nevada "the Range of Light." But a more ominous nickname, "the Range of Fire," may lie ahead, according to new research from the University of California, Irvine. By 2040, as humans continue to change the climate, fire-conducive heat waves will become so common that the number of blazes throughout the Sierra stands to increase about 50 percent, researchers fo
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Natural seed bank drives diversity
Each year, poppies disperse seeds that grow into a new generation of flowers. Sometimes, some of the seeds postpone their germination for a few years, for example when they're covered by a layer of sand. Only when the sand disappears, do they start to sprout. Margriet Oomen did mathematical research into the influence of this phenomenon on the genetic diversity of a population.
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The financial dangers of echo chambers
As ongoing revelations about Facebook's algorithm are showing, social media's ability to shape our attitudes by steering users into echo chambers is raising questions about our national discourse and drawing increasing attention from regulators.
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Researchers fabricate complex optical components from fluids
Researchers have developed a way to create freeform optical components by shaping a volume of curable liquid polymer. The new method is poised to enable faster prototyping of customized optical components for a variety of applications including corrective lenses, augmented and virtual reality, autonomous vehicles, medical imaging and astronomy.
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Lemurs confirm benefits of 'poop soup' for ailing gut
Research with lemurs confirms that fecal transplants can get an off-kilter gut microbiome back on track. Veterinarian Cathy Williams knew something wasn't right. The veterinarian had felt off for weeks after her 2014 trip to Madagascar. At first she just felt bloated and uncomfortable and wasn't interested in eating much. But eventually she developed a fever and chills that sent her to the emerge
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'Volcanic winter' contributed to mass extinction 250 million years ago
Scientists have identified an additional force that likely contributed to a mass extinction event 250 million years ago: a "volcanic winter." An analysis of minerals in southern China indicate that volcano eruptions produced the volcanic winter that drastically lowered Earth's temperatures—a change that added to the environmental effects resulting from other phenomena at the time. For the study,
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Online anonymity: 'Stable pseudonyms' create a more civil environment than real user names
The ability to remain anonymous when commenting online is a double-edged sword. It is valuable because it enables people to speak without fear of social and legal discrimination. But this is also what makes it dangerous. Someone from a repressive religious community can use anonymity to talk about their sexuality, for example. But someone else can use anonymity to hurl abuse at them with impunity.
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Solar Orbiter returns to Earth before starting its main science mission
Solar Orbiter is returning to Earth for a flyby before starting its main science mission to explore the sun and its connection to 'space weather." During the flyby Solar Orbiter must pass through the clouds of space debris that surround our planet, making this maneuver the riskiest flyby yet for a science mission.
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Swedish pulses have great potential to become novel foods
Can you produce new, plant-based foods from Swedish-grown pulses? This has been studied by Ferawati Ferawati in her dissertation in chemistry from Linnaeus University, in which she has studied the properties and nutrient content of several different types of pulses, like yellow peas, faba beans and white beans. The results show that it is fully possible to use the protein from locally-cultivated p
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Jobba och konsumera mindre – så vill svenskar leva hållbart
Hur långt är vi beredda att gå för att leva socialt och ekologiskt hållbart och skruva ner på takten i konsumtionssamhället? Inte särskilt långt, visar en studie från Lunds universitet. Tillsammans med andra forskare har han ställt frågor till 1500 svenskar om vad de anser om olika policyåtgärder som skulle kunna leda till minskad konsumtion, samt social utjämning. Fem olika ekosociala policys fö
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Are we the first humans that won't have to say goodbye to our past? What will it do to our mental health.
With unprecedented ability to immediately access vast archives of media from the early 20th century to modern day (including digitized personal photos, movies, documents) current day humans for the first time have the capacity to "return" to the past at will. Nostalgia has exploded, especially during the last two challenging years. It is not uncommon to hear or see people watching movies, cartoon
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