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Researchers describe new tardigrade fossil found in 16 million year old Domincan amber
Tardigrades, also known as water bears, are a diverse group of charismatic microscopic invertebrates that are best known for their ability to survive extreme conditions. A famous example was a 2007 trip to space where tardigrades were exposed to the space vacuum and harmful ionizing solar radiation, and still managed to survive and reproduce after returning to Earth. Tardigrades are found in all t
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LATEST

The Facebook whistleblower says its algorithms are dangerous. Here's why.
On Sunday night, the primary source for the Wall Street Journal's Facebook Files , an investigative series based on internal Facebook documents, revealed her identity in an episode of 60 Minutes . Frances Haugen, a former product manager at the company, says she came forward after she saw Facebook's leadership repeatedly prioritize profit over safety. Before quitting in May of this year, she comb
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Hospital Says It Won't Do Organ Transplants on Unvaccinated People
The Colorado healthcare system UCHealth is under fire for a new policy in which it will only give organ transplants to patients who have been vaccinated against COVID-19. Colorado State Representative Tim Geitner criticized the new rules when he said that an unvaccinated woman reached out to him after being told she would be denied a kidney transplant unless she got vaccinated within 30 days, The
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New mathematical tools to study opinion dynamics
Research published in the SIAM Journal on Applied Mathematics describes a new mathematical model for studying influence across social networks. Using tools from the field of topology, Robert Ghrist and Ph.D. graduate Jakob Hansen developed a framework to track how opinions change over time in a wide range of scenarios, including ones where individuals can use deceptive behaviors and propaganda age
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Scientist looks to AI, lensing to find masses of free-floating planets
Exoplanet hunters have found thousands of planets, most orbiting close to their host stars, but relatively few alien worlds have been detected that float freely through the galaxy as so-called rogue planets, not bound to any star. Many astronomers believe that these planets are more common than we know, but that our planet-finding techniques haven't been up to the task of locating them.
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Light Show Goes Wrong When Drones Start Plummeting Out of the Sky
Raining Drones In an eerie bit of imagery, drones literally started raining from the sky in Zhengzhou, a city of 10 million people in the Chinese province of Henan. Videos shared on social media show a constellation of drones starting to quickly lose altitude before clattering down on the ground. Onlookers can be seen jumping out of the way to avoid getting struck by the small drones. The inciden
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Scientists discover Welsh 'dragon' dinosaur – the size of a chicken
Pendraig milnerae was related to T rex and likely to have been apex predator despite its size, say experts A dinosaur distantly related to Tyrannosaurus rex – but with a body the size of a chicken – that would probably have ruled the roost about 200m years ago has been discovered. The diminutive but fearsome creature, whose fossilised remains were found in a quarry in south Wales, is the oldest t
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'Genius dogs' can learn names of more than 100 toys, study finds
Six canines, all border collies, have proved some possess a remarkable grasp of human language Your dog might follow commands such as "sit", or become uncontrollably excited at the mention of the word "walkies", but when it comes to remembering the names of toys and other everyday items, most seem pretty absent-minded. Now a study of six "genius dogs" has advanced our understanding of dogs' memor
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New Genetic Discovery Could Finally Explain Balding
A team of researchers have made an astonishing discovery that could redefine how we understand aging, The New York Times reports — and maybe even prevent baldness in humans. By studying the hair of aging animals, the team was able to identify two genes involved in the aging of hair, potentially setting the foundation for new anti-hair loss treatments in human patients. Until now, scientists belie
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New Facility Creates Jet Fuel Out of Water
Hydrofuel The German government just performed a ribbon-cutting ceremony at a new facility designed to manufacture jet fuel using just water, carbon dioxide, and electricity. The new facility is part of a governmental push to cut back on greenhouse gas emissions by trying to make the aviation industry cleaner, The Associated Press reports . The synthetic kerosene is created by mixing hydrogen fro
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What Happened When Facebook Became Boomerbook
Sometimes it's hard to remember that Facebook is only 17 years old: If it were a person, it could drive but not drink. If Facebook were a person, it would also be fabulously wealthy, incredibly successful, and exhaustingly argumentative. And it probably wouldn't use Facebook. The disclosures in The Wall Street Journal 's " Facebook Files ," leaked by a whistleblower named Frances Haugen, are ince
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WHO endorses use of world's first malaria vaccine in Africa
World Health Organization's director general hails 'historic day' in fight against parasitic disease The World Health Organization has recommended the widespread rollout of the first malaria vaccine, in a move experts hope could save tens of thousands of children's lives each year across Africa. Hailing "an historic day", the WHO's director general, Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, said that after
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'Covid toe' may be side-effect of immune response, says study
Chilblain-like inflammation causes redness on hands and feet and can last for months Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The skin condition known as Covid toe may be a side-effect of the immune system's response to fighting off the virus, according to a study. The symptom results in chilblain-like inflammation and redness on the hands and feet, with the condition sometim
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Man Attempting to Trade Derelict USSR Space Shuttle for Human Skull
Forgotten Treasure In 1988, the Soviet Union's first Buran-class space shuttle — its equivalent of NASA's Space Shuttle — made its maiden voyage , circling the Earth twice with no crew on board. Five years later, the shuttle program was cancelled and the spacecraft never took to the skies ever again, destined to live out the rest of its life in a hangar near the Baikonur cosmodrone in Kazakhstan.
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Americans Had It Easy During the Facebook Outage
Before WhatsApp went dark yesterday, the last messages I sent were to my editor in London, my doctor here in Mexico City, and to the family group chat, asking whether my father—recovering from COVID-19 back home in Pakistan—had finally tested negative. For me, WhatsApp is as much a verb as Google , and the platform is the engine that fuels my personal and professional lives. Sometimes, despite be
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Russian Actress Boards Space Station, Says She Feels Like She's Dreaming
Dream State Russian actress Yulia Peresild arrived at the International Space Station yesterday to film "The Challenge," the first feature length movie to be filmed in space — and it sounds like she's already having the time of her life. "Everything was new to us today, every 30 seconds brought something entirely new," she said during a video conference on Tuesday through an interpreter, as quote
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Pair win Nobel prize in chemistry for work on organic catalysts
Benjamin List and David MacMillan's findings revolutionised development of drugs and hi-tech materials Two scientists have won the 2021 Nobel prize in chemistry for the discovery of a new class of catalyst that has revolutionised the development of drugs and hi-tech materials. The winners, Scottish-born David MacMillan, and Benjamin List from Germany, will share the award, presented by the Royal
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NFT Developer Absconds With $2.7 Million Dollars
Crypto heads still haven't learned their lesson. In case you haven't heard, non-fungible tokens (NFTs) are still very much a thing — and more people hoping to cash in are instead getting scammed left and right. The developer of "Evolved Apes," which ironically describes itself as "a collection of 10,000 unique NFTs trapped inside a lawless land," just called it quits and absconded with 798 ether
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Why everything you've heard about panic buying might be wrong
With queues outside petrol stations and claims that selfish punters are using jerry cans to stockpile fuel, one word has become synonymous with the supply chain crisis that has hit the UK in recent weeks: panic. But the social psychologist Clifford Stott says something different is going on The fuel crisis that began last month was precipitated by a shortage of HGV drivers – but in newspaper head
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People Are Flooding to Cryptocurrency Rehab Clinics
Trading cryptocurrencies can be just as addicting as drugs. a fact that is especially evident to therapist Tony Marini, who works at Castle Craig in Scotland, the world's first rehabilitation clinic to treat cryptocurrency addiction. The trend has been getting worse, with inquiries increasing tenfold over the last year, Marini told Decrypt . There are also those who lost out big by losing passwor
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Rivian Wants to Be the Apple of Electric Pickup Trucks
This is an excerpt from The Atlantic 's climate newsletter, The Weekly Planet. Subscribe today . Many fights about climate policy have been raging, basically unbroken, for the past 40 years. But something that sets this moment apart is that a subset of people who care about climate change, and who have founded companies to fight it, is becoming extremely wealthy. On Friday, the electric-car start
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Creating a better human experience at work starts with trust
What if managers and leaders at companies focused on a new goal: to elevate the human experience? This paradigm shift is something Amelia Dunlop, chief experience officer at Deloitte Digital, advocates for. She and her team have worked hard to measure the amount of humanity in the workplace—a measurement that often depends on how much trust exists between workers and leaders. Dunlop's team focuse
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Terrawatch: how climate change alters impact of volcanic eruptions
Cooling impact of very explosive eruptions could be amplified while moderate eruptions have less effect It's well known that volcanic eruptions alter the climate but can human-made climate change alter volcanic eruptions? Curiously, the answer appears to be yes. When the Philippine volcano Mount Pinatubo erupted in 1991, the resulting sulphuric acid haze suppressed global temperatures by 0.5C for
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Kamala Harris Might Have to Stop the Steal
F or a few hours inside the ransacked Capitol on January 6, then–Vice President Mike Pence helped to preserve the democratic order by insisting that he was powerless to change the outcome of the election. On January 6, 2025, that responsibility could fall to Vice President Kamala Harris, but the task of preventing a stolen presidential election won't be that simple. The nightmare scenarios that m
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Shooting stars: Russians beating US in race for first film shot in space
Actor and director on International Space Station push ahead of Hollywood project led by Tom Cruise The list of "firsts" in orbit under the Soviet space programme is legendary: first satellite, first dog, first man, first woman. Now another looms after Russia sent an actor and a director to the International Space Station (ISS) as part of plans to make the first film in orbit – and once again put
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Animals in the News
It's time once more for a look at the animal kingdom and our interactions with the countless species that share our planet. Today's photos include pink sheep in England, a hyena in Nigeria, salmon in California, a whale shark in Thailand, Shetland ponies in Scotland, a wild boar in Rome, animals rescued from wildfires in Greece, and much more. These images are part of a roundup of animals in the
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What I Learned While Hunting Humans
H unting wasn't a part of my childhood. The closest I got was the time my uncle taught my brother and me to shoot a .22 at the windows of some decrepit building on his land in Georgia. He showed us how to put the stock in the crook of our shoulder so the kick wouldn't surprise us (though it still did; I'd have sworn my shoulder was dislocated); how to focus on the front sight, not the target; and
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People in Singapore Furious About Robot Cops That Lecture People on Social Distancing
RoboNarc Singapore has rolled out robot cops meant to catch residents in the act of not following social distancing guidelines or engaging in "undesirable social behavior" such as smoking, Agence France-Presse reports — and Singaporeans are fed up. Two robots were tasked with patrolling a housing estate and shopping mall for three weeks in September, making sure residents were parking their bicyc
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A Peer-Reviewed Portrait of Suffering
Photographs by Alec Soth T he last words that Liviana Sulzer spoke, 18 months ago, were very much in character: "Now it's time for a song." This was often how she felt, living as she did inside a toddler movie-musical, where even just a spilled cup of milk could get her up onto a chair, twirling with her arms out wide and singing as loud as she could manage: We just spilled our milk … It was mess
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England urged to step up vaccinations to avoid winter Covid surge
Prof Neil Ferguson calls for booster rollout and teenagers' second jabs to be accelerated to ease NHS pressure Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The distribution of Covid boosters for the most vulnerable people and second shots of vaccine for teenagers should be accelerated to help prevent a winter surge of coronavirus overburdening the NHS, a senior scientist has said
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How the Smug Politics of COVID-19 Empowers the Far Right
Getty ; The Atlantic A few weeks ago, the center-left government of the Australian state of Victoria announced new restrictions to combat COVID-19. Victoria has already had, by some measures, the longest lockdown of anywhere in the world, employing curfews, curbs on outdoor activities, and the closure of children's playgrounds. The latest rules targeted the construction industry, closing down bui
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A step toward making GPS more resilient to space weather
Societies around the world now depend on satellite-based navigation systems, such as GPS, for a multitude of applications, including transportation, agriculture, military munitions, emergency services, and social networking, among others. However, natural hazards such as space weather can disrupt signals from these Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS).
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Physicists report promising approach to harnessing exotic electronic behavior
For some 50 years scientists have worked to harness Bloch oscillations, an exotic kind of behavior by electrons that could introduce a new field of physics—and important new technologies—much like more conventional electronic behavior has led to everything from smart watches to computers powerful enough to get us to the Moon.
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Chemistry Nobel Prize Honors Technique for Building Molecules
Chemists are constantly tasked not just with designing useful new molecules — ones for novel drugs, energy-storing materials and countless other jobs — but with designing better ways to make those molecules. One big hurdle is that desirable chemical reactions are often slow or inefficient, and can only become practical with the addition of catalysts, substances that can accelerate reaction rates.
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New Zealand Mongrel Mob leader given essential worker exemption to help boost Covid tests
Head of the Waikato Mongrel Mob chapter Sonny Fatupaito was asked to encourage gang members and their families to get tested See all our coronavirus coverage New Zealand's prime minister Jacinda Ardern has endorsed granting a Mongrel Mob leader special exemption to cross Auckland's border so he could help minimise Covid-19 spread in hard to reach communities. The head of the Waikato Mongrel Mob c
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A Better Way to Think About Your Risk for COVID
On the surface, the September 24 announcement from the head of the CDC outlining who, exactly, would be eligible for COVID-19 booster shots seemed like a clarifying moment. But even as the agency's leader, Rochelle Walensky, declared the need to make " concrete recommendations that optimize health ," the new guidance was hard to parse. It said, for instance, that people as young as age 18 who rec
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Cancer chemotherapy drug reverses Alzheimer's symptoms in mice
A drug commonly used to treat cancer can restore memory and cognitive function in mice that display symptoms of Alzheimer's disease, new research has found. The drug, Axitinib, inhibits growth of new blood vessels in the brain — a feature shared by both cancer tumors and Alzheimer's disease. This hallmark represents a new target for Alzheimer's therapies. Mice that underwent the therapy not only
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Process leading to supernova explosions and cosmic radio bursts unearthed at PPPL
A promising method for producing and observing on Earth a process important to black holes, supernova explosions and other extreme cosmic events has been proposed by scientists at Princeton University's Department of Astrophysical Sciences, SLAC National Acceleraor Laboratory, and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). The process, called quantum electrod
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Microsoft Windows 11: It's Windows, But Elevener
Microsoft Windows 11 has officially launched and reviews of the new OS have rolled in across the internet. The collective opinion lands somewhere between a yawn, a shrug, and an approving nod. Windows 11 is something of an odd duck compared to previous releases. Microsoft announced the OS in late June and shipped it in early October. That's a three-month window compared to the typical 12-14 month
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A French company is using enzymes to recycle one of the most common single-use plastics
Plastic is an environmental scourge, and most isn't recycled. Enzymes, nature's catalysts, may be able to help. In late September, Carbios, a French startup, opened a demonstration plant in central France to test this idea. The facility will use enzymes to recycle PET, one of the most common single-use plastics and the material used to make most beverage bottles. While we've had mechanical method
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The Atlantic Daily: Four Pandemic Mistakes America Can't Quit
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox. In the film Groundhog Day , Bill Murray's character can't escape his nightmarish time loop until he realizes some serious personal growth. America likewise needs to shed its bad pandemic habits in
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Spotify Has Made All Music Into Background Music
I spent much of my youth in sprawling record stores, drifting through aisles marked by signs that said things like rock , R&B , hip-hop , and—it was the '90s— alternative . Anyone who grew up in or near a city in the later decades of the 20th century probably remembers the dial locations of classic rock, country, modern rock, "urban." (Of course, there were also the catchall behemoths of Top 40 a
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Skyrmion research: Braids of nanovortices discovered
A team of scientists from Germany, Sweden and China has discovered a new physical phenomenon: complex braided structures made of tiny magnetic vortices known as skyrmions. Skyrmions were first detected experimentally a little over a decade ago and have since been the subject of numerous studies, as well as providing a possible basis for innovative concepts in information processing that offer bett
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The many mentoring types explained
Nature, Published online: 06 October 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02730-0 Reverse mentoring, peer-to-peer, group sessions. Choose one or more to tackle a tough career transition.
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Role of bile acids and gut bacteria in healthy ageing of centenarians
Nature, Published online: 06 October 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02196-0 A study in humans indicates that certain bile acids that are produced by bacteria and commonly found in people over 100 boost gut health and protect against infection. These findings shed light on the contributors to healthy ageing.
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Multiple individuals are buried in the Tomb of Nestor's Cup
The Tomb of Nestor's Cup, a famous burial in Italy, contains not one deceased individual, but several, according to a study published October 6, 2021 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Melania Gigante of the University of Padua, Italy and colleagues.
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Line and hook fishing techniques in Epipaleolithic Israel
Humans in the Middle East were using complex fishing tools and techniques by 12,000 years ago, according to a study published October 6, 2021 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Antonella Pedergnana of the Archaeological Research Centre and Museum for Human Behavioural Evolution in Mainz, Germany and colleagues.
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Just how big was the 2020 Beirut explosion?
On Aug. 4, 2020, one of the largest non-nuclear explosions in history pulverized a Beirut port and damaged more than half the city. The explosion resulted from the detonation of tons of ammonium nitrate, a combustible chemical compound commonly used in agriculture as a high-nitrate fertilizer, but which can also be used to manufacture explosives.
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Can YouTube's vaccine misinformation ban work?
YouTube has announced it will no longer allow content containing misinformation about any vaccines that health authorities have approved and confirmed to be safe and effective. The new guidelines include some notable exceptions, allowing for publishers to post "content about vaccine policies, new vaccine trials, and historical vaccine successes or failures," and "personal testimonies relating to
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New catalyst helps combine fuel cell, battery into one device
A single device that both generates fuel and oxidant from water and, when a switch is flipped, converts the fuel and oxygen into electricity and water, has a host of benefits for terrestrial, space and military applications. From low environmental impact to high energy density, developing efficient unitized regenerative fuel cells, or URFCs as they are called, has been in researchers' sights for y
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Climate change adaptation requires Indigenous knowledge
In rural and Indigenous communities with limited access to weather data, generations of farmers, fishers, herders, hunters and orchardists have relied on indicators such as the first snowfall, emergence of a certain plant or arrival of a bird species to guide when to plant, harvest or perform other tasks. But because of climate change, many of these ecological patterns have shifted.
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Svenskar vill ha strängare åtgärder mot plasten
En ny opinionsundersökning visar att svenskar är positiva till hårdare regler för plastanvändning för att komma åt problemen med plast. Ett guldläge för beslutsfattare att driva igenom en mer långtgående plastpolitik, menar statsvetare från Lund. – Vår undersökning visar att svenskar tycker att nuvarande plasthantering innebär stora miljöproblem, och att man gärna ser hårdare tag från politiskt h
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The Gender Researcher's Guide to an Equal Marriage
Over the years, as I've interviewed many sociologists about gender divisions in how couples handle chores and child care, I've often wondered what happened after we got off the phone. When these researchers returned to their life, how were they splitting up the tasks in their own home? Because gender scholars—they're just like us: They too have floors to sweep, kids to feed, toilets to clean. But
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Why do we still have offshore oil wells? How do they work?
The oil spill that's fouling Southern California beaches has many Californians wondering why the state still has offshore oil wells more than 50 years after the state declared an end to new drilling, and more than 35 years after the federal government stopped issuing new leases.
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GPs caution against telehealth websites promising consultation for vaping scripts 'in minutes'
New laws require prescriptions for nicotine vaping products; sellers are offering links to doctors they say can prescribe their products Get our free news app ; get our morning email briefing The peak body representing general practitioners has warned against using "pop up", telehealth websites that promise to deliver consultations for "vaping scripts in minutes" because they can disrupt continui
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Book: Cuba-US relations today are tied to the past
A new book chronicles the complex and intimate ties between Cuba and the United States. For Ada Ferrer , professor of history and Latin American and Caribbean history at New York University, who has written three books about Cuba, the island nation is much more than the focal point of her scholarship. It is also deeply personal. Born in Havana, between the Bay of Pigs Invasion and the Cuban Missi
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Boosting the cell's power house
Severe fatigue, muscle weakness, even blindness — mitochondrial diseases have various symptoms. In fact, the majority of genetic diseases are caused by defects of the mitochondria. Hence, understanding these 'power houses' of our cells is crucial for the developments of new treatments. Researchers now show the structure of a protein complex essential for their work.
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Very potent antiviral against dengue
Researchers have developed an ultrapotent inhibitor of the dengue virus, which causes the tropical disease known as dengue. The antiviral molecule is exceptionally effective against all known dengue variants and could be used for therapeutic and prevention purposes.
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Rik eller medelklass? Fem sätt att göra skillnad för klimatet
Det finns fem områden där rika och medelinkomsttagare har oproportionerligt stor påverkan på de globala utsläppen – och därmed ett större ansvar och mer möjligheter att driva på klimatomställningen, menar klimatforskare. – Vi uppmuntras att minska vår klimatpåverkan, men sanningen är att vissa människors handlingar har större effekt än andras. De som är rika har bättre möjligheter, och ett större
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More microplastics are entering the ocean from disposable masks
The enormous surge of face-mask use since the beginning of the global lockdown in March 2020 has saved countless human lives, a crucial component to limiting the transmission of the novel coronavirus. But with 129 billion masks being consumed globally every month, disposal has become a major issue with implications on human, animal and ecological health.
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Networking vital to help teachers through lockdown
Fewer than a fifth of UK primary school teachers had received any formal training in remote learning before the COVID-19 pandemic sent pupils home from schools – but consulting online networks helped them to rise to the challenge, according to new research.
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'Autonomous help-seeking' on the job pays dividends for workers
In the modern workplace, the mechanics of seeking help on the job aren't clearly understood by managers or employees, especially regarding its interpersonal benefits and costs. A new paper co-written by a team of University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign experts who study occupational well-being says distinct types of help-seeking can be activated by different work demands and work-related character
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Researchers find re-wetting of peat bogs does not restore them to their natural state very quickly
A large team of researchers affiliated with institutions in Germany, The Netherlands, Poland, Belgium and Denmark has found that re-wetting peat bogs does not restore them to their natural state very quickly. In their paper published in the journal Nature Communications, the group describes their comparison of hundreds of re-wetted peat bogs in several parts of Europe with relatively undisturbed p
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Early human activities impacted Earth's atmosphere more than previously known
An international team of scientists used data from Antarctic ice cores to trace a 700-year old increase in black carbon to an unlikely source: ancient Maori land-burning practices in New Zealand, conducted at a scale that impacted the atmosphere across much of the Southern Hemisphere and dwarfed other preindustrial emissions in the region during the past 2,000 years. Their results make it clear th
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Climate-fueled disasters are increasing, FEMA chief warns
With climate change fueling ever more weather-related disasters, the country needs to move away from basing its emergency preparedness plans on historical precedent and seek new models for future threats, Federal Emergency Management Agency Administrator Deanne Criswell told lawmakers Tuesday.
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First description of the protein complex essential for proper cell function
Severe fatigue, muscle weakness, even blindness—mitochondrial diseases have various symptoms. In fact, the majority of genetic diseases are caused by defects of the mitochondria. Hence, understanding these "power houses" of our cells is crucial for the developments of new treatments. In a study published in the journal Nature, researchers at the Institute of Science and Technology (IST) Austria no
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NASA spacecraft takes a picture of Jupiter … from the Moon
You may know the feeling of seeing Jupiter through your own telescope. If it gives you the chills—like it does for me—then you'll know how the team for the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter felt when they turned their spacecraft around—yes, the orbiter that's been faithfully circling and looking down at the Moon since 2008—and saw the giant planet Jupiter with their camera. If you zoom in on the pictur
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Prize winning topics found to deliver more science papers and citations than non-prize-winning topics
A trio of researchers from Northwestern University and Southern University of Science and Technology, has found that topics related to more prize-winning in the science field tend to lead to more papers being written about them than non-winning topics. In their paper published in the journal Nature Communications, Ching Jin, Yifang Ma and Brian Uzzi, note that they also found that prize-winning to
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Extreme heat affects 2 billion people living in cities
Extreme heat already affects almost two billion urban residents around the world, according to a new study. The new research is the first to examine in fine detail global trends in extreme heat exposure across urban areas. The study spanned more than 13,000 settlements over nearly three and a half decades. The authors found that exposure to dangerous temperatures increased by 200% since the mid 1
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Spatiotemporal origin of soil water taken up by vegetation
Nature, Published online: 06 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03958-6 Global inverse modelling of plant water acquisition depth and isotope-based plant water use estimates demonstrate globally prevalent use of precipitation from distant sources, and that water-stressed ecosystems are well suited to using past and remote precipitation.
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Topological complex-energy braiding of non-Hermitian bands
Nature, Published online: 06 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03848-x Experiments using two coupled optical ring resonators and based on the concept of synthetic dimension reveal non-Hermitian energy band structures exhibiting topologically non-trivial knots and links.
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Genetic dissection of the glutamatergic neuron system in cerebral cortex
Nature, Published online: 06 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03955-9 A combination of genetic strategies and tools is used to define and fate-map different subtypes of glutamatergic pyramidal neurons according to their developmental and molecular programs, providing insight into the assembly of cortical processing networks.
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Comparative cellular analysis of motor cortex in human, marmoset and mouse
Nature, Published online: 06 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03465-8 An examination of motor cortex in humans, marmosets and mice reveals a generally conserved cellular makeup that is likely to extend to many mammalian species, but also differences in gene expression, DNA methylation and chromatin state that lead to species-dependent specializations.
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Mechanical computing
Nature, Published online: 06 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03623-y Computing approaches based on mechanical mechanisms are discussed, with a view towards a framework in which adaptable materials and structures act as a distributed information processing network.
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Whole-cell organelle segmentation in volume electron microscopy
Nature, Published online: 06 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03977-3 Focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) combined with deep-learning-based segmentation is used to produce three-dimensional reconstructions of complete cells and tissues, in which up to 35 different organelle classes are annotated.
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Neurotoxic reactive astrocytes induce cell death via saturated lipids
Nature, Published online: 06 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03960-y Astrocytes can respond to diseases and injuries of the central nervous system by driving the death of neurons and mature oligodendrocytes through the delivery of long-chain saturated fatty acids contained in lipoparticles.
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DNA methylation atlas of the mouse brain at single-cell resolution
Nature, Published online: 06 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03182-8 A comprehensive survey of the epigenome from 45 regions of the mouse cortex, hippocampus, striatum, pallidum and olfactory areas using single-nucleus DNA methylation sequencing enables identification of 161 cell clusters with distinct locations and projection targets and provides insights into the regulatory landscape under
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Epigenomic diversity of cortical projection neurons in the mouse brain
Nature, Published online: 06 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03223-w Quantitative analysis of the methylation of mouse cortical neurons that project to different cortical and subcortical target regions provides insight into genetic mechanisms that contribute to differences in cell function.
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Cellular anatomy of the mouse primary motor cortex
Nature, Published online: 06 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03970-w Multi-modal analysis is used to generate a 3D atlas of the upper limb area of the mouse primary motor cortex, providing a framework for future studies of motor control circuitry.
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5-HT modulation of a medial septal circuit tunes social memory stability
Nature, Published online: 06 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03956-8 Experiments in mice identify the medial septum as an extrahippocampal input region that is critical for social memory formation, and show that modulation of the medial septum by serotonin regulates the stability of social memories.
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Human neocortical expansion involves glutamatergic neuron diversification
Nature, Published online: 06 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03813-8 Combined patch clamp recording, biocytin staining and single-cell RNA-sequencing of human neurocortical neurons shows an expansion of glutamatergic neuron types relative to mouse that characterizes the greater complexity of the human neocortex.
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A multimodal cell census and atlas of the mammalian primary motor cortex
Nature, Published online: 06 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03950-0 The BRAIN Initiative Cell Census Network has constructed a multimodal cell census and atlas of the mammalian primary motor cortex in a landmark effort towards understanding brain cell-type diversity, neural circuit organization and brain function.
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A census of cell types in the brain's motor cortex
Nature, Published online: 06 October 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02493-8 An atlas of the cell types found in the motor cortex of the brain has been built using various types of data. Two neuroscientists explain the technological feats involved in the project, as well as the utility of the resource for future research.
2h
Platinum catalysts strained controllably by size-changing nanocubes
Nature, Published online: 06 October 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02640-1 The distance between the surface atoms of noble metals, such as platinum, affects the catalytic activity of these elements. An experimental approach using nanoparticles enables this effect to be systematically controlled and measured.
2h
A step towards therapeutics for dengue
Nature, Published online: 06 October 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02638-9 Finding a treatment for dengue, the most prevalent mosquito-borne viral disease in humans, has been difficult. A compound called JNJ-A07 displays promising activity against dengue virus in mouse models of infection.
2h
Bacteria recycle tumour waste to fuel immune cells
Nature, Published online: 06 October 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02639-8 Key nutrients that are needed by immune cells are scarce in tumours. Engineered cancer-invading bacteria can recycle tumour waste into metabolic fuel to boost anticancer immune responses in mice.
2h
Team of scientists warns against acetaminophen in pregnancy
A team of 13 scientists caution against the use of pain relievers with acetaminophen (also known as paracetamol) during pregnancy. They cite a growing body of research that suggests the drug might alter fetal development. The consensus statement, which appears in the journal Nature Reviews Endocrinology , was supported by signatories from 91 researchers, clinicians, and public health experts arou
3h
Early human activities impacted Earth's atmosphere more than previously known
Several years ago, while analyzing ice core samples from Antarctica's James Ross Island, scientists Joe McConnell, Ph.D., and Nathan Chellman, Ph.D., from DRI, and Robert Mulvaney, Ph.D., from the British Antarctic Survey noticed something unusual: a substantial increase in levels of black carbon that began around the year 1300 and continued to the modern day.
3h
BRAIN Initiative unveils detailed atlas of the mammalian primary motor cortex
The NIH Brain Research Through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) Initiative Cell Census Network (BICCN) has unveiled an atlas of cell types and an anatomical neuronal wiring diagram for the mammalian primary motor cortex, derived from detailed studies of mice, monkeys, and humans. This publicly available resource represents the culmination of an international collaborative effort by m
3h
The brain science of obesity | Mads Tang-Christensen
Your belly and your brain speak to each other, says obesity researcher Mads Tang-Christensen. Offering scientific proof that obesity is a disease influenced by genetics and the environment, he introduces a molecule discovered in both the brain and gut that helps control appetite — and which could be engineered to promote healthy weight loss for those living with obesity.
3h
'Living medicine' created to treat drug-resistant infections
Researchers at the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG) and Pulmobiotics S.L have created the first 'living medicine' to treat antibiotic-resistant bacteria growing on the surfaces of medical implants. The researchers created the treatment by removing a common bacteria's ability to cause disease and repurposing it to attack harmful microbes instead.
3h
In One Place, for One Fish, Climate Change May Be a Boon
This story was produced in collaboration with the Food & Environment Reporting Network , a nonprofit investigative-news organization. O n a mid-July afternoon , when the tide was starting to come in on the Naknek River, the Bandle family's commercial fishing nets lay stretched across the beach, waiting for the water to rise. With the fishing crew on break, Sharon Bandle emerged from a tar-paper-s
3h
Parker's New Crew Hits an Early Snag | Gold Rush
Stream Gold Rush on discovery+: https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/gold-rush #Discovery #GoldRush #ParkerSchnabel Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery From: Discove
4h
NASA's Mission to Crash a Spacecraft Into an Asteroid Launches Next Month
In March of this year, a quarter-mile-wide asteroid flew through space at a speed of 77,000 miles per hour. It was five times farther from Earth than the moon, but that's actually considered pretty close when the context is the whole solar system. There's not a huge risk of an asteroid hitting Earth anytime in the foreseeable future. But NASA wants to be ready, just in case. In April the space ag
4h
Scientists can switch on plants' response to light
Scientists have figured out how plants respond to light and can flip this genetic switch to encourage food growth, even in shade. The discovery could help increase food supply for an expanding population with shrinking opportunities for farming.
4h
This Stock Picking Service Is Averaging Insane 614%* Returns
You probably already know this, but there are a variety of ways to invest in the stock marke t. However, not all of them will benefit you in the long run, especially if you're not looking to waste a good portion of your capital on a money manager. That's because money managers can be extremely costly. Some financial advisors simply charge a flat, hourly, or annual fee to manage your money. Others
4h
Kræftens Bekæmpelse: Lovgivning kan ændre unges drukkultur
Regeringen og Folketinget har med den lovede forebyggelsesplan en oplagt mulighed for at reducere danske børn og unges skadelige alkoholforbrug og vise, at de tager kommende generationers trivsel og sundhed alvorligt. Men skal det lykkes, må de mest effektive værktøjer tages i brug – ikke mindst er det nødvendigt med en 18 års aldersgrænse for køb af alle slags alkohol.
4h
Virtual reality may help us develop empathy for oceans and marine life
Hundreds of kilometres from shore, and covering two-thirds of the Earth's surface, the high seas are a world that few of us will ever see. After more than a year in the field, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Ian Urbina concluded: "There are few remaining frontiers on our planet. Perhaps the wildest, and the least understood, are the world's oceans."
4h
Intelligence emerging from random polymer networks
Reservoir computing (RC) tackles complex problems by mimicking the way information is processed in animal brains. It relies on a randomly connected network that serves as a reservoir for information and ultimately leads to more efficient outputs. For realizing RC directly in matter (instead of simulating it in a digital computer), numerous reservoir materials have been investigated to date. Now a
4h
How the Large Hadron Collider trains its magnets
When training for a marathon, runners must gradually ramp up the distance of their runs. They know that their runs in the early days of training do not define what they will one day be capable of; they're building a strong foundation that will help them reach their full potential.
4h
How plants ensure that their kids make it far in life
If you're going apple picking this fall, you may find yourself being drawn to the biggest, brightest, and most aromatic apples you can find. Apple trees and other fruit-bearing plants have evolved to produce such appetizing fruit for a reason: to entice people and wild animals to eat their fruit and disperse their seeds.
4h
The Rot of Democracies
Sitting on a shelf in my sunlit study are two massive works of history by the late, great scholar Zara Steiner, each dealing with the international politics of the 1920s and '30s. The first volume is The Lights That Failed ; the second is The Triumph of the Dark . They came particularly to mind when I learned of the latest poll results from the University of Virginia Center for Politics, in which
4h
Uncovering the past 300 years of the Sugadaira Kogen biome
In recent years, there has been a decrease in grasslands both globally and within Japan on a scale heretofore unprecedented. There is apprehension that a great number of the flora and fauna that live in these grasslands may go extinct. In order for us to take measures to conserve grasslands and their biodiversity, we need to understand when, where, and how rapidly grasslands are decreasing, and ho
4h
"Mystery plant" from the Amazon declared a new species after nearly 50 years
In 1973, a scientist stumbled upon a strange tree in the Amazon rainforest, unlike anything he'd ever seen. It was about 20 feet tall, with tiny orange fruits shaped like paper lanterns. He collected samples of the plant's leaves and fruits, but all the scientists he showed them to wound up scratching their heads—not only were they unable to identify the plant as a species that had previously been
4h
Large scale solar parks cool surrounding land
Researchers studying two solar parks, situated in arid locations, found they produced 'cool islands' extending around 700 meters from the solar park boundaries. The temperature of surrounding land surface was reduced by up to 2.3 degrees at 100 meters away from the solar park, with the cooling effects reducing exponentially to 700 meters. This new discovery is important as it shows the solar park
4h
Research shows exercise-related proteins can suppress tumor growth
New research shows bed and rest might not be the best treatment for people suffering from cancer — in fact, the opposite may be true. Researchers have discovered the proteins created by the body when exercising – called myokines — can suppress tumor growth and even help actively fight cancerous cells.
4h
Making self-driving cars human-friendly
Automated vehicles could be made more pedestrian-friendly thanks to new research which could help them predict when people will cross the road. Scientists investigating how to better understand human behavior in traffic say that neuroscientific theories of how the brain makes decisions can be used in automated vehicle technology to improve safety and make them more human-friendly.
4h
As a Remote Freelancer, This Is The Site I Use To Find Jobs
While it's obvious that the world's employment landscape is vastly different from what it was like just two years ago, the new normal hasn't really set in yet. With employment benefits having lapsed in most of the U.S., the pool of job applicants is bigger. But a lot of workers don't want to go back to the same rigid and highly unbalanced schedules they had before. While some employers and employ
5h
Seams
Nature, Published online: 06 October 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02698-x Making connections.
5h
Writing Should Be a Visual Art
The first books I read in my childhood contained images: five kids talking to a large policeman (Enid Blyton); a child looking in horror at a man who has escaped from prison, in the light of a fire (an abridged Charles Dickens); a tiger and a snake (Rudyard Kipling). Those dark pictures held so much drama; they lingered in my mind even after the pages had been turned. But I rarely find pictures i
6h
Is There Another Reason Biden Likes Boosters?
Scientists don't agree on whether approving COVID-19 boosters for certain non-elderly Americans, as the CDC did recently , was the right move. The president, the CDC, and the FDA have issued a series of conflicting statements on the issue. Some experts have indignantly resigned . Others have published frustrated op-eds . President Joe Biden, who got a booster shot this week and called on other el
6h
A proteomics sample metadata representation for multiomics integration and big data analysis
Nature Communications, Published online: 06 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26111-3 The number of publicly available proteomics datasets is growing rapidly, but a standardized approach for describing the associated metadata is lacking. Here, the authors propose a format and a software pipeline to present and validate metadata, and integrate them into ProteomeXchange repositories.
8h
SARS-CoV-2 antibody seroprevalence and associated risk factors in an urban district in Cameroon
Nature Communications, Published online: 06 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25946-0 Many African countries have reported relatively low numbers of COVID-19 cases but the true scale of the epidemic is unclear. Here, the authors conduct a population-based survey in a province of Cameroon and estimate 29% seroprevlance, >300 fold higher than the nationwide attack rate implied by case counts.
8h
Tcf1 and Lef1 provide constant supervision to mature CD8+ T cell identity and function by organizing genomic architecture
Nature Communications, Published online: 06 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26159-1 How CD8+ T cell identity is maintained after exit from the thymus is not fully established. Here the authors use multiomics approaches including Hi-C to show that Tcf1 and Lef1 prevent aberrant expression of lineage-inappropriate genes by organizing three-dimensional genomic architecture in CD8+ T cells.
8h
CD127+ CD94+ innate lymphoid cells expressing granulysin and perforin are expanded in patients with Crohn's disease
Nature Communications, Published online: 06 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26187-x Phenotypic markers that overlap between ILC1 and NK populations have impacted the robust and specific analysis of these immune cell populations. Employing scRNA sequencing here the authors identify CD127+ CD94+ innate lymphoid cells that express granulysin and perforin and are expanded in patients with Crohn'
8h
Calibrated rare variant genetic risk scores for complex disease prediction using large exome sequence repositories
Nature Communications, Published online: 06 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26114-0 Identifying associations of rare variants with disease is challenging due to small effect sizes, technical artefacts and population structure heterogeneity. Here, the authors present RV-EXCALIBER, a method that uses large summary-level exome data to robustly calibrate rare variant burden.
8h
Recycling lead and transparent conductors from perovskite solar modules
Nature Communications, Published online: 06 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26121-1 Perovskite photovoltaics has become more competitive against silicon counterpart in reducing cost of solar energy, yet the management of toxic lead hampers it application. Here, the authors propose a cost-effective environmental-friendly approach to recycle lead and transparent conductors.
8h
Daily briefing: NIH director Francis Collins to step down
Nature, Published online: 05 October 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02728-8 US National Institutes of Health director Francis Collins will step down from the agency by the end of the year. Plus, climate and complex systems share the physics Nobel Prize and the estate of Henrietta Lacks is suing Thermo Fisher Scientific.
8h
Russia sends actor and director to ISS to make film in space – video
Russia has sent an actor and a director to the International Space Station (ISS) as part of plans to make the first film in orbit. Actor Yulia Peresild and director Klim Shipenko joined cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov on a flight to the ISS where they will spend 12 days filming The Challenge. The film crew spent four months training for the mission and will complete the final scenes back on earth. The
16h
New way to image whole organisms in 3D brings key skin color pigment into focus
To understand the biological underpinnings of skin and hair pigmentation and related diseases such as albinism or melanoma, scientists and doctors need quantitative, three-dimensional information about the architecture, content and location of pigment cells. Researchers have developed a new technique that allows scientists to visualize every cell containing melanin pigment in 3D, in whole zebrafis
16h
One in three kids with food allergies say they've been bullied because of their condition
Living with a food allergy can greatly impact a child's everyday life — from limiting participation in social activities to being treated differently by peers. While previous research indicates many kids experience food allergy-related bullying, a new study found that offering kids with food allergies a multi-question assessment gives a more accurate picture of the size and scope of the problem.
17h
Weed goes off script to resist herbicides
Cementing waterhemp's reputation as a hard-to-kill weed in corn and soybean production systems, researchers have now documented the weed deviating from standard detoxification strategies to resist an herbicide that has never been commercialized.
17h
Gene linked to evolution of limb development identified
A new study gives insight into how limb development evolved in vertebrates. The findings identify a gene that plays a central role in the evolution of limb development in vertebrates. By manipulating this gene in mice, researchers were able to activate an ancestral form of limb development seen in early tetrapods (four-legged vertebrates).
17h
Smuggling light through opaque materials
Electrical engineers have discovered that changing the physical shape of a class of materials commonly used in electronics can extend their use into the visible and ultraviolet parts of the electromagnetic spectrum. Already commercially used in detectors, lenses and optical fibers, chalcogenide glasses may now find a home in applications such as underwater communications, environmental monitoring
18h
Simultaneous optical and electrical tracking of heart activity
It is still elusive to what extent interactions between different cell types of the heart influence the normal heart rhythm and possibly trigger life-threatening arrhythmias. A new measurement method combines optical and electrical recording of cardiac ventricular activation which, in conjunction with optogenetics, will permit finding comprehensive answers to these questions.
18h
"Three-Body Problem" Author No Longer Sure Humankind Would Unite Against Hostile Aliens
Failing Optimism In his 2008 novel "The Three-Body Problem," Liu Cixin wrote about nations banding together to deal with a looming alien invasion that would likely result in the end of humanity. Now he's not so sure about that unity, Cixin said in an interview with The Wall Street Journal . If anything, he said, the coronavirus pandemic shows that we might do the opposite. "In the past, we used t
18h
Increase in fatal opioid overdoses after hospital discharge
The period after hospital discharge is a high-risk time for people who use illicit opioids such as heroin, according to new research. Fatal opioid overdoses are four times more likely in the first two days after hospital discharge than at other times, and people who use illicit drugs need extra support when being discharged from hospital.
18h
Exceptional learning capacities revealed in some gifted dogs
Does your dog understand you? All dogs are smart but some are uniquely gifted at learning words. According to a new study, just published in Royal Society Open Science, these gifted dogs can learn up to 12 new toy names in one week. Not only that, but they can also remember the new toy names for at least two months. The dogs presented their exceptional skills as part of the Genius Dog Challenge, a
19h
Spider silk's supposed 'healing properties' might have no basis in science
As far back as ancient Rome, spider silk has been used as a remedy to treat everything from skin lesions to warts. In the past, doctors have covered open wounds in cobwebs or advised patients to place cocoons on infected teeth. In modern times, however, the literature contains conflicting reports of whether or not spider silk has antimicrobial properties. Researchers have now revisited these old e
19h
Scientists Create Material Made Entirely Out of Electrons
Wigner Crystals For the first time, scientists have managed to create and take images of a Wigner crystal: a bizarre material, made entirely out of electrons, that was first theorized 90 years ago. Scientists managed to arrange the electrons into a honeycomb-like lattice by sandwiching them in an electric field between two atom-thin layers of tungsten compounds, according to research published in
19h
Super-enhancers: The villain fueling certain cancers
Researchers identified a small RNA molecule called miR-766-5p that reduces expression of MYC, a critical cancer-promoting gene. This microRNA reduces levels of proteins CBP and BRD4, which are both involved in super-enhancer (SE) formation. SEs form in areas of DNA that can fuel MYC expression and tumor progression. This study provides strong evidence for developing miR-766-5p as a novel therapeut
20h
Improving the evidence: Scientists review quantitative climate migration literature
Quantitative empirical studies exploring how climatic and other environmental drivers influence migration are increasing year by year. PIK scientists have now reviewed methodological approaches used in the quantitative climate migration literature. Their review plays an important role when it comes to assessing how climatic factors influence human migration, and provides guidance to researchers st
20h
Ultra-short flashes of light illuminate a possible path to future beyond-CMOS electronics
Researchers have demonstrated that ultra-short pulses of light, down to 34 millionths of a billionth of a second, elicit the same response as continuous illumination. The experiment harnessed interactions between real and virtual states to 'switch' the electronic state of an atomically-thin (2D) material, tungsten-disulfide, aiding the search for future low-energy electronics based on exotic topol
21h
How the expanded child tax credit is helping families
American households making less than $50,000 are more likely than higher-earning families to spend the expanded child tax credit on essential expenses and tutors for their children, found a survey from the Social Policy Institute (SPI) at Washington University in St. Louis.
22h
Förskolebarn får lära sig kemi och fysik
Vart försvinner vattnet när man kokar det i en kastrull? Varför dunstar vattenpölen på gården? Visst kan femåringar förstå fysikaliska begrepp – särskilt när experimenten kan utföras med lera och lego. Kemi och fysik är ämnen som ofta förknippas med lektioner på högstadiet eller gymnasiet. Men enligt förskolans styrdokument ska även förskolebarn kunna ta del av kemiska processer och fysikaliska f
22h
Berätta för forskarna om din drömvärld
Hur ser ett gott liv ut där du och planeten mår bra och där sådant du tycker är viktigt finns? Hjälp forskarna genom att dela din berättelse och dina tankar om framtiden med dem. I ett nystartat forskningsprojekt uppmanas allmänheten och skolelever att dela med sig av sina erfarenheter från pandemiåret 2020 samt att beskriva sin vision av framtiden ( läs mer om hur du kan delta längst ner i den h
22h
New measurement method promises spectacular insights into the interior of planets
At the heart of planets, extreme states are to be found: temperatures of thousands of degrees, pressures a million times greater than atmospheric pressure. They can therefore only be explored directly to a limited extent — which is why the expert community is trying to use sophisticated experiments to recreate equivalent extreme conditions. Researchers have adapted an established measurement meth
22h
California Declares State of Emergency, Opens Criminal Investigation Over Horrific Oil Spill
High Alert Officials in California are mobilizing to address the horrific oil pipeline leak off the coast of Huntington Beach in Orange County, which authorities now say dumped up to 144,000 gallons of crude oil into the ocean. Governor Gavin Newsom declared a state of emergency in the area on Monday, and now both state and federal authorities are pursuing a criminal investigation, The Washington
22h
Growing potential for toxic algal blooms in the Alaskan Arctic
Changes in the northern Alaskan Arctic ocean environment have reached a point at which a previously rare phenomenon — widespread blooms of toxic algae — could become more commonplace, potentially threatening a wide range of marine wildlife and the people who rely on local marine resources for food. That is the conclusion of a new study about harmful algal blooms (HABs) of the toxic algae Alexand
23h
A robot that finds lost items
Researchers developed a fully-integrated robotic arm that fuses visual data from a camera and radio frequency (RF) information from an antenna to find and retrieve object, even when they are buried under a pile and fully out of view.
23h
Nobelpriset i fysik till trio som hjälpt oss förstå klimatet
Tre forskare har fått Nobelpriset i fysik 2021 för sitt arbete med att förstå komplexa system. Trion har gjort viktiga upptäckter för att förstå jordens klimat och hur vi människor bidrar till klimatförändringar. Komplexa system kännetecknas av slump och oordning och är svåra att förstå. Nobelpriset 2021 i fysik går till forskning om nya metoder för att beskriva dem och kunna förutsäga deras lång
23h
No evidence for colonization of oral bacteria in the distal gut in healthy adults [Microbiology]
The microbial communities in the mouth and colon are anatomically connected via the saliva. However, the extent to which oral microbes reach and successfully colonize the distal gut has been debated. To resolve this long-standing controversy, we used exact amplicon sequence variants generated from concurrently collected saliva/stool microbiota in 66…
23h
Human islet T cells are highly reactive to preproinsulin in type 1 diabetes [Immunology and Inflammation]
Cytotoxic CD8 T lymphocytes play a central role in the tissue destruction of many autoimmune disorders. In type 1 diabetes (T1D), insulin and its precursor preproinsulin are major self-antigens targeted by T cells. We comprehensively examined preproinsulin specificity of CD8 T cells obtained from pancreatic islets of organ donors with…
23h
Hurricane annual cycle controlled by both seeds and genesis probability [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Understanding tropical cyclone (TC) climatology is a problem of profound societal significance and deep scientific interest. The annual cycle is the biggest radiatively forced signal in TC variability, presenting a key test of our understanding and modeling of TC activity. TCs over the North Atlantic (NA) basin, which are usually…
23h
Understanding cytoskeletal avalanches using mechanical stability analysis [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Eukaryotic cells are mechanically supported by a polymer network called the cytoskeleton, which consumes chemical energy to dynamically remodel its structure. Recent experiments in vivo have revealed that this remodeling occasionally happens through anomalously large displacements, reminiscent of earthquakes or avalanches. These cytoskeletal avalanches might indicate that the cytoskeleton's struct
23h
Interventional real-time optical imaging guidance for complete tumor ablation [Medical Sciences]
The aim of this study was to develop an interventional optical imaging (OI) technique for intraprocedural guidance of complete tumor ablation. Our study employed four strategies: 1) optimizing experimental protocol of various indocyanine green (ICG) concentrations/detection time windows for ICG-based OI of tumor cells (ICG cells); 2) using the optimized…
23h
The Strategic Council for Research Excellence, Integrity, and Trust [Social Sciences]
We announce the creation of a new body within the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine called the Strategic Council for Research Excellence, Integrity, and Trust, charged with advancing the overall health, quality, and effectiveness of the research enterprise across all domains that fund, execute, disseminate, and apply scientific…
23h
'Second brain' discovery could lead to IBS treatments
Researchers have made a surprising discovery about the human gut's enteric nervous system that itself is filled with surprising facts. For starters, the fact that this "second brain" exists at all. "Most people don't even know that they have this in their guts," says Brian Gulbransen, professor in the College of Natural Science's physiology department at Michigan State University. Beyond that, th
23h
'Flash' method could get precious metals from e-waste
A "flash Joule" process to extract valuable metals from electronic waste would use up to 500 times less energy than current lab methods and produce a byproduct clean enough for agricultural land. Researchers have adapted the flash Joule heating method introduced last year to produce graphene from carbon sources like waste food and plastic to recover rhodium, palladium, gold, and silver for reuse.
23h
Regional approach may get farmers to protect bees
New research looks at ways to incentivize almond growers to adopt bee-friendly practices, such as planting cover crops, adopting permanent pollinator habitat, and adopting best management practices for bees. Almonds are big business in California, which grows 80% of the world's crop with a value of $5.62 billion. To get those almonds to grow, farmers need bees to pollinate their crop. And bee pop
23h

 

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