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Phys.org

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Italian sailors knew of America 150 years before Christopher Columbus, new analysis of ancient documents suggests

New analysis of ancient writings suggests that sailors from the Italian hometown of Christopher Columbus knew of America 150 years before its renowned 'discovery'.

4h

Wired

400+

Shots for Kids Get Closer, US Strategy Evolves, and More News

Catch up on the most important updates from this week.

2h

ScienceDaily

Screen time linked to risk of myopia in young people

A new study has revealed a link between screen time and higher risk and severity of myopia, or short-sightedness, in children and young adults.

7h

LATEST

Futurism

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Scientists Find That "Class Clowns" Are Actually the Smartest People in Class

Clown School According to scientists, that class clown from seventh grade may have been the brightest kid in the room. It turns out that humor ability and overall intelligence are tightly linked in middle-school-aged children, according to research published in the International Journal of Humor Research . "We were particularly interested in the quality of humor made by children but evaluated by

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Livescience.com

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Strange solar system object is part-asteroid, part-comet

Scientists have identified a rare solar system object with traits of both an asteroid and a comet.

9h

Wired

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Americans Need a Bill of Rights for an AI-Powered World

The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy is developing principles to guard against powerful technologies—with input from the public.

10h

Wired

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What Can Convince People to Just Get Vaccinated Already?

Researchers are struggling to figure out why people don't get their Covid shots, and what language might persuade them. Saying "You gotta" seems to work.

10h

Phys.org

200+

Latest results from cosmic microwave background measurements

The universe was created about 13.8 billion years ago in a blaze of light: the big bang. Roughly 380,000 years later, after matter (mostly hydrogen) had cooled enough for neutral atoms to form, light was able to traverse space freely. That light, the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation, comes to us from every direction in the sky uniformly … or so it first seemed. In the last decades ast

4h

NYT > Science

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Biden to Restore Three National Monuments in Utah and New England

Biden Utah National Trump

President Biden is restoring Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante in Utah and a marine monument off the New England coast, all severely reduced by former President Donald J. Trump.

23h

BBC News – Science & Environment

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UK public now eating significantly less meat

Britons are cutting their meat consumption, but not quickly enough, according to scientists.

21h

ScienceAlert – Latest

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NASA Confirms What They Suspected About Jezero Crater on Mars All Along

Thanks to new images from Perseverance!

21h

NPR

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Researchers found a new species of water bear fossilized in a hunk of ancient amber

Research into the evolution of tardigrades has been severely hindered by a lack of fossils. This new discovery could offer researchers insight into how the creatures lived millions of years ago. (Image credit: Holly Sullivan/Harvard/NJIT)

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ScienceAlert – Latest

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Scientists Finally Know Why Wisdom Teeth Only Emerge When We're Basically Adults

The mysteries of being human.

17h

ScienceAlert – Latest

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Archaeologists Find a Rare 2,700-Year-Old 'Luxury' Toilet in Jerusalem

They don't make 'em like they used to.

20h

The Atlantic

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A Mars Rover Explored a Wasteland and Found an Oasis

Mars NASA Perseverance

Millions of miles away, on the surface of Mars, inside an enormous crater, a little NASA rover is taking some pictures. The view is quite stunning there—miles of undisturbed cinnamon terrain scattered with pebbles and boulders, with silky dunes where the craggy bedrock doesn't peek through. But when the rover, named Perseverance, sent the photos back home from the crater, known as Jezero, scienti

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Science | The Guardian

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Historic England to offer virtual flights over ancient landscapes

Aerial Archaeological Mapping Explorer will allow users to see landscapes from England's past A digital aerial archaeology tool will allow people to discover previously unknown details about local landscapes, including prehistoric hill forts, Roman settlements and cold war military installations, through virtual flights over England. The virtual map is like a "huge archaeological jigsaw puzzle,"

16h

Futurism

1K

Lil Nas X Says He Wants to Clone Himself and Have Sex With the Copy

Montero Lamar Hill, much better known as "Old Town Road" musician Lil Nas X, sure likes to look at himself in the mirror. In fact, according to a recent tweet , the highly successful musician would love to go all the way with himself. "I'm so sick of it," Lil Nas X wrote in the tweet. "I'm sick of pretending I don't wanna clone myself and then make love to my hot sexy body." It's almost certainly

23h

Futurism

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Scientists: Hell Planet Where It Rains Molten Iron Is Actually Worse Than We Thought

Hell World Ever since astronomers discovered the exoplanet WASP-76b about 640 light years from Earth, they've known it was a hellish world with temperatures so extreme that it rains molten iron every day. But new research shows that conditions on the distant planet are even more extreme than researchers imagined. Scientists led by a team from Cornell University probed the atmosphere of WASP-76b a

5h

Science | The Guardian

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Could the global Covid death toll be millions higher than thought?

A data scientist and economics student joined forces in search of the real pandemic death toll – and the results are startling Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage For the past 18 months, hunkered down in his Tel Aviv apartment, Ariel Karlinsky has scoured the web for data that could help him calculate the true death toll of Covid-19. Continue reading…

10h

ScienceAlert – Latest

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A Grim 'Huge Extinction Event' Happened 30 Million Years Ago, And We Only Just Noticed

We very nearly didn't make it.

15h

ScienceAlert – Latest

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Mummified Birds in The Atacama Desert Reveal a Truly Dark Side of History

The harshest desert on Earth.

16h

Science | The Guardian

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Britons cut meat-eating by 17%, but must double that to hit target

People have been advised to reduce consumption by 30% for health and environmental reasons Britons have cut their meat consumption by 17% over the past decade but will need to double these efforts if they are to meet targets for healthy diets and sustainable food production set out in the national food strategy earlier this year. Meat production is a major contributor to global heating and land d

16h

Futurism

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Fauci Says People Are Threatening His Wife and Daughters With Violence

Abuse and Harassment A new National Geographic documentary sheds light on the abuse top US infectious diseases specialist Anthony Fauci has had to endure since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic. "These fucking dark web people are really, really getting bad," he told AIDS activist Peter Staley last year in the documentary, as quoted by Insider . "I mean, they're really, really harassing Chris

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Science | The Guardian

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New images from Mars will guide search for evidence of ancient life, says study

Pictures taken by Perseverance rover show how water helped shape planet's landscape billions of years ago Images from Mars reveal how water helped shape the red planet's landscape billions of years ago, and provide clues that will guide the search for evidence of ancient life, according to a new study. In February, Nasa's Perseverance rover landed in Jezero crater , where scientists suspected a l

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Futurism

500+

The World's First Malaria Vaccine Is Finally Ready for Rollout

WHO Malaria Africa

At long last, the World Health Organization has declared that the world's first malaria vaccine is ready for widespread use. Doctors and researchers have been trying and failing to develop a vaccine for malaria — one of the deadliest diseases in human history — for over a century, the BBC reports . Finally having one that's safe and effective enough for use represents an astonishing achievement i

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NYT > Science

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Sometimes Life Imitates Art. William Shatner Is Headed To Space With Blue Origin.

Next week, in a thoroughly modern blurring of reality and fiction, William Shatner will soar to space with Blue Origin. Do you care?

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Wired

300+

What No Time to Die's Box Office Could Mean for Moviegoing

No Time to Die James Bond

The latest 007 flick was the first major theatrical release pushed back during lockdowns. Now it might be the biggest opening since the pandemic hit.

8h

Wired

300+

Very Little Is Keeping Doctors From Using Racist Formulas

If nothing in medicine changes, it's just a matter of time before yet another race-based risk calculator harms people of color.

8h

The Atlantic

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How Is a Catholic Supposed to Think About the COVID Vaccine?

T he Dutch molecular biologist Alex van der Eb had been studying viruses and vaccines for nearly two decades when, in 1973, he was met with what he took to be an exhilarating opportunity. Three years into their studies, van der Eb and his research partner Frank L. Graham had succeeded in isolating the genes in adenovirus 5 responsible for turning mammalian cells into tumor cells, and they were cu

10h

Science | The Guardian

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Covid jabs for 12- to 15-year-olds: how the scheme in England works

We look at where to get the jab, parental consent and the impact of natural infection Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage As concerns grow about the slow deployment of Covid jabs to older children in England we take a look at who is eligible and where the vaccinations can be given. Which children are now eligible for vaccination? Continue reading…

16h

ScienceAlert – Latest

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This Unusual Plant From The Amazon Rainforest Has Baffled Scientists For 50 Years

The mystery of Manu.

19h

NYT > Science

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Africans Welcome New Malaria Vaccine. But Is It a 'Game Changer'?

WHO Malaria Africa

The arsenal of weapons to use against malaria, which kills hundreds of thousands of people annually, just grew bigger.

23h

Phys.org

300+

'Double' galaxy mystifies Hubble astronomers

Gazing into the universe is like looking into a funhouse mirror. That's because gravity warps the fabric of space, creating optical illusions.

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Futurism

200+

Elon Musk Says He's "Dying" to Develop a Supersonic Electric Jet

Elon Musk Supersonic Jet

Electric Jet SpaceX CEO Elon Musk admitted that he is "so dying to do a supersonic, electric VTOL jet" in a recent tweet . But there's one big problem: "adding more work will make my brain explode," Musk added, including emojis of a brain and a firecracker to illustrate his point. After all, he is the CEO of a space, electric car, and brain interface company — plenty to keep himself busy around t

1h

Futurism

200+

Rejoice! China Is Powering Ballistic Missile Silos With Environmentally-Friendly Wind Turbines

Eco-Warriors China is in the process of building at least 119 silos for intercontinental ballistic missiles in the northwest area of the country — an alarming display of militarization that could lead to increased tensions around the world. But fret not! In an astonishingly bold act of greenwashing, China seems to be building the facilities with the environment in mind, SpaceNews reports . So if

4h

NYT > Science

200+

When You Go to the Loo, a Bat Might Go Boo

Among roosting bats in parts of Africa, the inside of a drop toilet can be a lovely place to hang.

12h

BBC News – Science & Environment

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Artificial lightning zaps farm stink

Tests in the UK have shown that artificial lightning can strip pollutants from animal manure.

21h

Futurism

200+

Bitcoin Miners Open Secret Power Plant, Get Busted

A Bitcoin mining operation in the Canadian province of Alberta tried to tap a nearby unused natural gas well for power — and got busted after neighbors started complaining about the noise it was producing, CBC News reported in August. But in an email to Gizmodo , the CEO of the company called Link Global is now trying to downplay the incident. "We run on abandoned gas sites and have been working

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Wired

100+

'Snow Crash' Is a Cyberpunk Classic

Alongside William Gibson's 'Neuromancer' it is a foundational text for the genre.

5h

The Atlantic

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The Great Novel of the Internet Was Published in 1925

Adam Maida / The Atlantic In September, The Wall Street Journal published a report, based on leaked documents, describing Facebook's awareness of the harmful effects one of its platforms was having on young people. "Thirty-two percent of teen girls said that when they felt bad about their bodies, Instagram made them feel worse," the company's internal research revealed. "Comparisons on Instagram

6h

Phys.org

100+

Stress in Earth's crust determined without earthquake data

Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory have developed a method to determine the orientation of mechanical stress in the earth's crust without relying on data from earthquakes or drilling. This method is less expensive that current approaches, could have broad applicability in geophysics and provide insight into continental regions lacking historical geologic information.

6h

The Atlantic

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The U.S. Is Politically Bankrupt

At least for the moment , the U.S. Senate has averted a crisis over the federal debt ceiling , after some Republicans in the chamber grudgingly agreed yesterday to help Democrats put off a reckoning until December. That the United States has endured confrontation after confrontation in Congress over the issue—and will almost certainly do so again mere weeks from now—is, as many other commentators

8h

Livescience.com

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This trilobite was equipped with a 'hyper-eye' never seen before in the animal kingdom

Trilobite with "hyper compound eyes" could see through hundreds of lenses, new X-ray study reveals.

9h

Phys.org

100+

Scientists pinpoint evolutionary genes that allow lizards to give birth like mammals

Scientists studying the evolution of birth in lizards, from egg-laying to live births, have pinpointed the evolutionary genes from which the species is evolving to 'build' a new mode of reproduction.

10h

Phys.org

100+

Deep roots of Australia's geology revealed

A new study has shown for the first time how Australia's rich geological history is reflected deep below the Earth's surface.

10h

Phys.org

100+

New biomarker for severe COVID-19

During the pandemic, it has become evident that people with cardiovascular disease and obesity are at much higher risk of developing very severe, even fatal COVID-19 disease. Researchers at Karolinska Institutet have identified some metabolic processes that SARS-CoV-2 uses to attack lung tissue. The results, which are published in Molecular & Cellular Proteomics, could one day be used to treat COV

10h

ScienceAlert – Latest

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This Ancient And Ginormous Sloth Had an Unexpected Supplement in Its Diet

Food for thought.

15h

BBC News – Science & Environment

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How the semiconductor shortage could be a problem for you

Intel is making an effort to combat the global semiconductor shortage at their new site in Arizona.

21h

Phys.org

100+

Microbiology researchers further understanding of ocean's role in carbon cycling

Microbiology researchers at Oregon State University have shed new light on the mechanisms of carbon cycling in the ocean, using a novel approach to track which microbes are consuming different types of organic carbon produced by common phytoplankton species.

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Scientific American Content

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Facebook Whistleblower Testified That Company's Algorithms Are Dangerous: Here's Why

Frances Haugen confirmed the negative effects caused by attempts to maximize engagement — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Livescience.com

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Michigan boy finds 'dragon's tooth' that belonged to a mastodon

A boy stumbled upon a mastodon molar while on a nature walk in Michigan.

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NYT > Science

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Paula J. Clayton Dies at 86; Helped Destigmatize Depression and Suicide

A clinical psychiatrist, she showed that suicide was often a result of mental illness, and that it could be avoided with the right treatment and public education.

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Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

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The climate-driven mass extinction no one had seen before now

Sixty-three percent. That's the proportion of mammal species that vanished from Africa and the Arabian Peninsula around 30 million years ago, after Earth's climate shifted from swampy to icy. But we are only finding out about it now.

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Scientific American News

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Why the Physics Nobel Honored Climate Science and Complex Systems

The prestigious award finally recognizes work that helped scientists understand climate change and, more broadly, find order in disorder — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Livescience.com

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A rare 2,700-year-old luxury toilet found in Jerusalem

Archaeologists recently discovered a 2,700-year-old private toilet inside the remains of an ancient royal estate in Jerusalem.

1d

The Atlantic

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Views From (and of) Summit at One Vanderbilt

One of New York City's newest skyscrapers, One Vanderbilt, stands 1,401 feet (427 meters) above the streets of midtown Manhattan. The top four floors consist of an immersive experience and observation deck named "Summit," with mirrored walls and floors, an outdoor terrace, a glass elevator on the exterior of the building, glass-floored booths overlooking Madison Avenue, and more. Summit is set to

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Phys.org

100+

Climate change tipping points may be too simple a concept

We regularly hear warnings that climate change may lead to 'tipping points': irreversible situations where savanna can quickly change into desert, or the warm gulf stream current can simply stop flowing. These cautions often refer to spatial patterns as early-warning signals of tipping points. An international team of ecologists and mathematicians has studied these patterns and come to a surprisin

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MIT Technology Review

100+

The moon didn't die as early as we thought

The moon may have been more volcanically active than we realized. Lunar samples that China's Chang'e 5 spacecraft brought to Earth are revealing new clues about volcanoes and lava plains on the moon's surface. In a study published today in Science, researchers describe the youngest lava samples ever collected on the moon. The samples were taken from Oceanus Procellarum, a region known for having

1d

The Atlantic

97

Flatworms Are Metal

When planarian flatworms want to reproduce, some have sex. Others, more straightforwardly, tear themselves in two. The latter option is fast and violent. The planarian begins as a small, flattened, sluglike creature with a spade-shaped head and two googly eyes. After a few minutes of stretching and ripping, it separates into two halves—a head and a tail. Within days, the head piece grows a tail.

9h

The Atlantic

91

Ted Lasso Is No Superhero

Ted Lasso Season Nate

This article contains spoilers through the Season 2 finale of Ted Lasso . In an episode halfway through the new season of Ted Lasso , Apple's sweet and strange series about an optimistic American coach thrown into the cesspool of British soccer, the three AFC Richmond fans who compose the show's dim-witted Greek chorus get ready to watch the FA Cup quarterfinal in a pub. "I swear, if we actually

4h

The Atlantic

78

The People Who Make Your Favorite Movies and Shows Are Fed Up

Eighteen-hour workdays with no lunch breaks. Car accidents caused by sleep deprivation. A crew member who returned to set the day after a miscarriage. For months, members of a union representing more than 150,000 behind-the-scenes workers in the entertainment industry have shared hundreds of these stories on social media —anonymous testimonies about the grueling conditions on TV and film sets. Th

3h

Phys.org

73

Sweet corn yield gain over 80 years leaves room for improvement, according to study

New research from the University of Illinois shows sweet corn, when planted at high densities, has steadily increased in yield since the 1930s. The historical view underscores the importance of planting modern density-tolerant hybrids at their optimal densities, and suggests an opportunity to improve density tolerance even more.

1d

Phys.org

71

Astrophysicists explain the origin of unusually heavy neutron star binaries

A new study showing how the explosion of a stripped massive star in a supernova can lead to the formation of a heavy neutron star or a light black hole resolves one of the most challenging puzzles to emerge from the detection of neutron star mergers by the gravitational wave observatories LIGO and Virgo.

5h

The Atlantic

71

Photos of the Week: Muddy Ride, Silent Disco, Podium Pup

An immersive Goya exhibit in Madrid, Comic Con 2021 in New York City, a robot block party in Boston, rally racing in Finland, oil-spill cleanup in California, kite flying in Rio de Janeiro, a massive pumpkin in Belgium, a COVID-19 memorial in São Paulo, and much more

16h

Phys.org

70

Elastic polymer that is both stiff and tough, resolves long-standing quandary

Polymer science has made possible rubber tires, Teflon and Kevlar, plastic water bottles, nylon jackets among many other ubiquitous features of daily life. Elastic polymers, known as elastomers, can be stretched and released repeatedly and are used in applications such as gloves and heart valves, where they need to last a long time without tearing. But a conundrum has long stumped polymer scientis

1d

Phys.org

65

A novel neural network to understand symmetry, speed materials research

Understanding structure-property relations is a key goal of materials research, according to Joshua Agar, a faculty member in Lehigh University's Department of Materials Science and Engineering. And yet currently no metric exists to understand the structure of materials because of the complexity and multidimensional nature of structure.

12h

Scientific American News

65

NASA's Perseverance Rover Finds Signs of Epic Ancient Floods on Mars

New results from the mission reveal that its landing site of Jezero Crater has a surprisingly dynamic and complex hydrologic history — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

Phys.org

62

Mathematical model offers new insights into spread of epidemics

Mathematical models have been widely used to guide government decisions on the COVID-19 pandemic, from forecasting outcomes to even testing potential interventions.

10h

Phys.org

56

New, environmentally friendly method to extract and separate rare earth elements

A new method improves the extraction and separation of rare earth elements—a group of 17 elements critical for technologies such as smart phones and electric car batteries—from unconventional sources. New research led by scientists at Penn State and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) demonstrates how a protein isolated from bacteria can provide a more environmentally friendly way to

5h

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

56

Understanding how a crab's complex life cycle will respond to climate change

For many marine animals, like the Dungeness crab, seasonality and timing are components of complex life cycles, where disruptions can have serious implications for the population. Understanding how climate change will impact each life stage is no small undertaking when considering all variables and moving parts in a changing environment. Despite these challenges, this information is vital for sust

7h

The Atlantic

53

What Slack Does for Women

Years ago, for a story and in an attempt to be more successful, I read a bunch of "how to be a woman at work" books. Because women face backlash for behaving assertively in the workplace, these books mostly advise pretending to be nicer while subtly trying to get what you want. (This being the innocent springtime of the pre-Trump era, "what you want" was typically imagined to be a promotion.) "Wh

10h

Phys.org

51

The discovery of red blood cells acting as micro-electrodes opens new doors in medical research

In a paper published in Scientific Reports, academics at the University of Surrey have discovered that biological cells generate an electric field voltage that appears outside and not just within, meaning each cell acts as a tiny electrode. Since this voltage impacts how cells interact with their environment, including the way cells stick to one another, this has significant potential implications

8h

Science | The Guardian

50

Covid trial participants in England to be offered Pfizer jabs to end 'limbo'

UK Novavax Two Covid

Participants in trials of unapproved vaccines such as Novavax have had ability to travel abroad restricted Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Thousands of Britons who took part in Covid-19 vaccine trials are to be offered approved vaccines so they can travel abroad, the government has announced. Trial participants have described being "trapped" and "in limbo" because th

8h

Wired

49

These Virtual Obstacle Courses Help Real Robots Learn to Walk

Researchers used specialized chips and simulation software to teach a four-legged robot to navigate stairs and blocks.

10h

Wired

49

Twitch Streamers' Earnings Were Exposed. Now, It's a Meme

Twitch 2019 Streamer

"I'd never want to hide how much I make, so I'm down to make a meme out of it," one top streamer told WIRED.

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Phys.org

48

Refuting a 70-year approach to predicting material microstructure

A 70-year-old model used to predict the microstructure of materials doesn't work for today's materials, say Carnegie Mellon University researchers in Science. A microscopy technique developed by Carnegie Mellon and Argonne National Laboratory yields evidence that contradicts the conventional model and points the way towards the use of new types of characterizations to predict properties—and theref

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Phys.org

47

Levi­tating particles in a vacuum

Levitation of both large objects and of single atoms has become a widely used technique in science and engineering. In the last years, many researchers have started to explore a new horizon: the levitation of nano- and micro-particles—still smaller than the diameter of a single hair, but composed of billions of atoms—in vacuum.

5h

Wired

46

Short Battery Life Sinks the Otherwise Great Surface Pro 8

This 2-in-1 from Microsoft is a powerful workhorse for all your office tasks—if you sit near an outlet.

10h

The Atlantic

45

An Ode to Being Yelled At

Tim Lahan T o start with , you probably deserve it. Not for this —not for whatever it is you're being yelled at about—but for the other stuff. You know what I'm talking about. The innumerable tiny offenses. All the evasions, hedgings, dodgings, half-assings, bloodless ill-doings, accumulated in darkness. In the present moment, the present state of yelled-at-ness, you may be the victim of a misund

10h

Phys.org

44

Study traces the evolution of the hepatitis B virus from prehistory to the present

In a new paper in the journal Science, researchers uncover the evolution of the hepatitis B virus since the Early Holocene by analyzing the largest dataset of ancient viral genomes produced to date.

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Science | The Guardian

43

The moon was volcanically active for longer than we thought, analysis of lunar rocks suggests

Material retrieved by China's Chang'e-5 spacecraft sheds new light on the moon at a time when it was thought to be cooling down Get our free news app ; get our morning email briefing Analysis of the youngest lunar material ever retrieved suggests that the moon was volcanically active for longer than previously expected. China's Chang'e-5 spacecraft retrieved 1.7kg of lunar material when it landed

1d

Phys.org

42

What makes us human? The answer may be found in overlooked DNA

Our DNA is very similar to that of the chimpanzee, which in evolutionary terms is our closest living relative. Stem cell researchers at Lund University in Sweden have now found a previously overlooked part of our DNA, so-called non-coded DNA, that appears to contribute to a difference which, despite all our similarities, may explain why our brains work differently. The study is published in the jo

10h

MIT Technology Review

42

Video: How cheap renewables and rising activism are shifting climate politics

The plummeting costs of renewables, the growing strength of the clean energy sector, and the rising influence of activists have begun to shift the politics of climate action in the US, panelists argued during MIT Technology Review's annual EmTech conference last week. Those forces allowed President Joe Biden to put climate change at the center of his campaign and helped build momentum behind the

12h

Wired

41

How to Actually Remember People's Names

These tips can keep you from greeting someone with "Hey … you!" ever again.

10h

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

39

Deep-learning algorithm aims to accelerate protein engineering

Proteins are the molecular machines of all living cells and have been exploited for use in many applications, including therapeutics and industrial catalysts. To overcome the limitations of naturally occurring proteins, protein engineering is used to improve protein characteristics such as stability and functionality. In a new study, researchers demonstrate a machine learning algorithm that accele

13h

Phys.org

37

Unambiguous experimental demonstration of magnon transfer torque effect

Spin torque provides convenient electric means to efficiently control magnetizations. It can usually be produced by spin-polarized current or pure spin current via spin Hall effect. The former and the latter are named as spin transfer torque (STT) and spin orbit torque (SOT), respectively. Utilizing these tools, people have developed the second generation STT-MRAM (Magnetic Random-Access Memory) w

5h

The Atlantic

37

The Books Briefing: Comics Can Push—And Draw—Boundaries

Six quarters were all you needed, in the 1990s, to laugh until your belly hurt at a series of slapstick shenanigans, or to escape, for a few seconds, from your quiet Illinois town and travel the world with a glamorous ace reporter. I can't count how many mornings I spent with my stomach on the floor, feet in the air, balancing my weight on my arms as I pored over the vibrant colors of the Chicago

6h

Wired

35

You Can Measure This Fundamental Quantum Constant Using LEDs

Planck's constant helps us understand atomic-sized things. One of the best ways to grok it is through this experiment involving different colors of light.

9h

Science | The Guardian

33

Sharri Markson's book on Covid's Wuhan lab leak theory raises more questions than it answers

Details are deficient, scientific analysis contentious and expert voices missing in Markson's thesis about 'what really happened' in China, which establishes a crime scene around the Wuhan Institute of Virology With 4.55 million deaths from the Covid-19 pandemic so far, the hunt for its origins has turned into something akin to an inquest on a mass scale. Are we dealing essentially with a terribl

2h

The Scientist RSS

33

Cleaner Fish Alter Behavior if Partners Can See Them "Cheating"

A study of feeding behavior suggests the fish feed differently in front of their partners — a behavioral feature also found in primates.

1d

The Atlantic

32

A Movie That Makes You Sympathize With a Monster

Julia Ducournau does not make movies that audiences are likely to see themselves in. Her knockout debut feature, Raw , follows a veterinary student who develops a craving for uncooked flesh , mostly of the human variety. Like so many horror films, the work is suffused with metaphors about hard-to-discuss topics—in this case, sexual maturity and peer pressure. But compared with Ducournau's follow-

1d

Phys.org

26

Researchers announce photon-phonon breakthrough

New research by a City College of New York team has uncovered a novel way to combine two different states of matter. For one of the first times, topological photons—light—has been combined with lattice vibrations, also known as phonons, to manipulate their propagation in a robust and controllable way.

1h

The Atlantic

26

The Atlantic Daily: American Democracy Is Still in Danger

Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox. Drew Angerer / Getty Exactly nine months ago today, the U.S. Capitol building experienced an unprecedented siege, spurred by an outgoing president's antidemocratic attempts to cling to power. This

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Phys.org

25

Climate change literacy lessons from Africa: Knowledge is key

Addressing the climate crisis will require cooperation on a massive scale, but to accomplish this, people need to know what specific challenges lie ahead and how to best move forward. Across the globe, people are facing the effects of the climate crisis, yet many are still unsure how and even if they can address it.

1d

Phys.org

23

An electrolyte design strategy for making divalent metal batteries

A team of researchers working at the University of Maryland has developed an electrolyte design strategy for making divalent metal batteries. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes solving problems associated with divalent rechargeable metal batteries and the strategy they developed to overcome them. Pengjian Zuo and Geping Yin with the Harbin Institute of Technology

7h

Phys.org

23

Total synthesis of the sesquiterpene agarozizanol B

Starting from available chemicals, a German team of researchers successfully completed the total synthesis of agarozizanol B, an interesting natural substance found in agarwood. As described in the journal Angewandte Chemie, the key sequence in the relatively short synthetic pathway is a photochemical reaction cascade that involves a series of complex rearrangements of polycyclic intermediates.

10h

The Atlantic

21

The Atlantic Daily: The Big Wait

It's not just toilet paper anymore. Pandemic pressure on the global supply chain is causing disruptions and shortages of a diverse assortment of items, such as books, furniture, wood, and COVID tests. "Americans are settling into a new phase of the pandemic economy," my colleague Derek Thompson writes. "This is the Everything Shortage." The global supply chain is a disaster. And not just one part

6h

Scientific American Content

21

2021 Medicine Nobel Prize Winner Explains the Importance of Sensing Touch

Ardem Patapoutian shared the physiology or medicine prize for work on mechanisms crucial to everything from bladder control to knowing where our limbs are — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

ScienceDaily

21

Clean air matters for a healthy brain

Researchers say their studies on air pollution and cognitive decline — one involving humans and one with mice — provide evidence that cleaner air may reduce risk for Alzheimer's and other dementias.

1d

Livescience.com

20

Lone beluga whale spotted 1,500 miles from home, and nobody knows why

It's a mystery why a beluga, normally an Arctic and subarctic whale, is swimming near Seattle.

3h

Futurism

Lockheed Delivers Laser Weapon for Mounting to Military Gunship

Plane Laser Aerospace and defense contractor Lockheed Martin has made a special delivery. The company just sent a laser weapon called the Airborne High Energy Laser (AHEL) to the Air Force, meant to be mounted to a Lockheed AC-130, a heavily armed long-endurance gunship. Rick Cordaro, vice president of Lockheed Martin Advanced Production Solutions, said in a statement that the "technology is read

3min

Futurism

Bureaucracy Could Keep Kids From Getting the Lifesaving New Malaria Vaccine

With the World Health Organization giving a monumental go-ahead to the world's first malaria vaccine after years of development and tests , experts predict that tens of thousands of children's lives will be saved every year. The "malaria vaccine — more than 30 years in the making — changes the course of public health history," WHO director-general Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said at a Wednesday pr

3min

NYT > Science

Kyrsten Sinema Wants to Cut $100 Billion in Proposed Climate Funds, Sources Say

The Arizona senator, who started in politics as an environmentalist, is one of two centrist Democrats who could make or break a spending bill at the center of President Biden's legislative agenda.

27min

ScienceDaily

Rocks on floor of Jezero Crater, Mars, show signs of sustained interactions with water

Since the Perseverance rover landed in Jezero crater on Mars in February, the rover and its team of scientists back on Earth have been hard at work exploring the floor of the crater that once held an ancient lake. Perseverance and the Mars 2020 mission are looking for signs of ancient life on Mars and preparing a returnable cache of samples for later analyses on Earth.

43min

ScienceDaily

The climate-driven mass extinction no one had seen

Two thirds of all mammals vanished from Africa and the Arabian Peninsula around 30 million years ago, when the climate on Earth changed from swampy to icy. But we are only finding out about this mass extinction now. Researchers examined hundreds of fossils from multiple sites in Africa, built evolutionary trees, and pinpointed each species' first and last known appearances. The climate shift 'was

43min

ScienceDaily

Scientists assemble a biological clock in a test tube to study how it works

Daily cycles in virtually every aspect of our physiology are driven by biological clocks (also called circadian clocks) in our cells. The cyclical interactions of clock proteins keep the biological rhythms of life in tune with the daily cycle of night and day, and this happens not only in humans and other complex animals but even in simple, single-celled organisms such as cyanobacteria. A team of

43min

Futurism

Justin Bieber Thinks Deepfake of Tom Cruise Is Real, Challenges It to Fight

Shadow Boxing Justin Bieber seems to have gotten tricked online, as he's been heckling a deepfake of Tom Cruise as though he were interacting with the real actor. Unless he's pulling a prank of his own, Bieber seems to have fallen for the trickery of "DeepTomCruise," a TikTok account that posts videos of a convincing deepfake version of Tom Cruise, the Daily Dot noticed . Bieber shared a video of

1h

Phys.org

Researchers investigate the factors that affected decisions to evacuate during and after the 2018 Montecito debris flow

A new study by UC Santa Barbara researchers speaks to the importance of public awareness programs in keeping residents—and emergency management offices—informed about rare but potentially lethal natural events in their area.

1h

ScienceAlert – Latest

Roundworms Melt Down Their Organs to Squirt Milk From Their Vulvas For Their Young

Deliciously yucky.

1h

Dagens Medicin

To forskere ved Københavns Universitet modtager prestigefyldt pris

Professor og overlæge Anders Perner og professor Ole Kiehn er dette års modtagere af KFJ-prisen, som gives for enestående præstationer inden for lægevidenskaben. Begge prismodtagere er glade for prisen og anerkendelsen af dem og deres respektive forskningsfelter.

1h

Future(s) Studies

Smart robots do all the work at Nissan's 'intelligent' plant

submitted by /u/ChickenTeriyakiBoy1 [link] [comments]

1h

Future(s) Studies

Robots are being deployed on Singapore's streets to discourage 'anti-social behaviour'. Their use is dividing public opinion.

submitted by /u/mancinedinburgh [link] [comments]

1h

Future(s) Studies

Methane sniffing vehicle uses GPS and wind data to track emissions, leaks. Deployed by Ameren Illinois

submitted by /u/manual_tranny [link] [comments]

1h

Phys.org

COVID-19 leads to African agricultural innovation

In a paper published in Advances in Food Security and Sustainability, researchers found that farmers in East Africa (Burundi, Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania, and Uganda) were able to better adapt to the impact of COVID-19 than those in the Southern African countries of Malawi, Zambia, and Zimbabwe.

1h

Phys.org

Dams disproportionately removed from areas with more non-Hispanic white residents

Since the 1970s, dams have been removed from the U.S. at an increasing rate, with the aim to improve the ecology of river ecosystems, fish migration pathways, water quality, and recreation spaces.

1h

Phys.org

A rare feat: Material protects against both biological and chemical threats

A Northwestern University research team has developed a versatile composite fabric that can deactivate both biological threats, such as the novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19, and chemical threats, such as those used in chemical warfare. A material that is effective against both classes of threats is rare.

1h

Phys.org

Climatic impacts of black carbon aerosols over South-East Atlantic underestimated, research shows

The full magnitude of the impact of smoke from seasonal fires in Central Africa—and in particular, the potential climate warming from the absorption by the black carbon component of the aerosol—is underestimated by some climate models over the South-East Atlantic, new research has shown.

1h

The Atlantic

Nine Pandemic Words That Almost No One Gets Right

One of the best and toughest parts of being a science writer is acting as a kind of jargon liaison. Weird, obscure, aggressively multisyllabic words appear in scientific discourse; I, wielding nothing but a Google Doc, a cellphone, and the Powers of the Internet™, wrest these terms from their academic hidey-holes and try to pin them down with some endearing yet accurate analogy. If I do my job we

1h

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Author Correction: Positron emission tomography imaging with 89Zr-labeled anti-CD8 cys-diabody reveals CD8+ cell infiltration during oncolytic virus therapy in a glioma murine model

Scientific Reports, Published online: 08 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-021-00042-x Author Correction: Positron emission tomography imaging with 89 Zr-labeled anti-CD8 cys-diabody reveals CD8 + cell infiltration during oncolytic virus therapy in a glioma murine model

1h

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Reduction in gene expression noise by targeted increase in accessibility at gene loci [Cell Biology]

Many eukaryotic genes are expressed in randomly initiated bursts that are punctuated by periods of quiescence. Here, we show that the intermittent access of the promoters to transcription factors through relatively impervious chromatin contributes to this "noisy" transcription. We tethered a nuclease-deficient Cas9 fused to a histone acetyl transferase at…

2h

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

T6SS translocates a micropeptide to suppress STING-mediated innate immunity by sequestering manganese [Microbiology]

Cellular ionic concentrations are a central factor orchestrating host innate immunity, but no pathogenic mechanism that perturbs host innate immunity by directly targeting metal ions has yet been described. Here, we report a unique virulence strategy of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis (Yptb) involving modulation of the availability of Mn2+, an immunostimulatory metal…

2h

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Improving health and economic security by reducing work schedule uncertainty [Social Sciences]

Work schedules in the service sector are routinely unstable and unpredictable, and this unpredictability may have harmful effects on health and economic insecurity. However, because schedule unpredictability often coincides with low wages and other dimensions of poor job quality, the causal effects of unpredictable work schedules are uncertain. Seattle's Secure…

2h

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Multiple hops move electrons from bacteria to rocks [Chemistry]

The central dogma of bioenergetics is that photons energize electrons in molecules, those electrons push protons, and proton concentration gradients forge chemical bonds. An understanding of how this works—at the level of electrons and atoms—is elusive, especially in organisms that live life on the edge of survival. How do bacteria…

2h

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

A discrete-time infectious disease model for global pandemics [Applied Mathematics]

The ongoing global pandemic of coronavirus (COVID-19), an infectious disease caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), has raised concerns about the effectiveness of current preventive pharmaceutical and nonpharmaceutical interventions (1). In addition, the upward global trends in the numbers of emerging and reemerging infectious diseases, as evidenced…

2h

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

COVID-19 cynomolgus macaque model reflecting human COVID-19 pathological conditions [Microbiology]

COVID-19 19 Turkey

The pandemic of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is a global threat to human health and life. A useful pathological animal model accurately reflecting human pathology is needed to overcome the COVID-19 crisis. In the present study, COVID-19 cynomolgus monkey models including monkeys with underlying diseases causing severe…

2h

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Selective promiscuity in the binding of E. coli Hsp70 to an unfolded protein [Biochemistry]

Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) chaperones bind many different sequences and discriminate between incompletely folded and folded clients. Most research into the origins of this "selective promiscuity" has relied on short peptides as substrates to dissect the binding, but much less is known about how Hsp70s bind full-length client proteins….

2h

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Multiparameter persistent homology landscapes identify immune cell spatial patterns in tumors [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Highly resolved spatial data of complex systems encode rich and nonlinear information. Quantification of heterogeneous and noisy data—often with outliers, artifacts, and mislabeled points—such as those from tissues, remains a challenge. The mathematical field that extracts information from the shape of data, topological data analysis (TDA), has expanded its capability…

2h

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Vasoactive intestinal peptide promotes host defense against enteric pathogens by modulating the recruitment of group 3 innate lymphoid cells [Immunology and Inflammation]

Group 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3s) control the formation of intestinal lymphoid tissues and play key roles in intestinal defense. They express neuropeptide vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) receptor 2 (VPAC2), through which VIP modulates their function, but whether VIP exerts other effects on ILC3 remains unclear. We show that VIP…

2h

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Making ab initio QED functional(s): Nonperturbative and photon-free effective frameworks for strong light-matter coupling [Physics]

Strong light–matter coupling provides a promising path for the control of quantum matter where the latter is routinely described from first principles. However, combining the quantized nature of light with this ab initio tool set is challenging and merely developing as the coupled light–matter Hilbert space is conceptually different and…

2h

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Genomics serology to inform therapies and vaccines for arthritogenic alphaviruses [Microbiology]

In PNAS, Malonis et al. (1) isolate and characterize several human monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) that neutralize infection with arthritogenic alphaviruses. Alphaviruses represent a large group of positive-strand RNA viruses, some of which cause infections in humans. They are widely distributed, are transmitted by mosquitoes, and have been clinically classified as…

2h

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Education's role in China's demographic future [Social Sciences]

The aim of this commentary is to illuminate, for a wider audience, the essential features of the analysis described in the paper on "China's low fertility may not hinder future prosperity" (1), to place the paper in the context of the program of work on the role of education in…

2h

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Wang et al., Genome-wide screen identifies curli amyloid fibril as a bacterial component promoting host neurodegeneration [Corrections]

NEUROSCIENCE Correction for "Genome-wide screen identifies curli amyloid fibril as a bacterial component promoting host neurodegeneration," by Chenyin Wang, Chun Yin Lau, Fuqiang Ma, and Chaogu Zheng, which published August 19, 2021; 10.1073/pnas.2106504118 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 118, e2106504118). The authors note that two references were omitted from the…

2h

Futurism

Man Lost at Sea for 30 Days Says It Was a "Nice Break" From Pandemic

Two men spent 29 days lost at sea, only to be rescued 250 miles off the coast of Papua New Guinea. But the pandemic-ravaged civilization they were forced to return to was a bit of a bummer, despite their near-death experience. "I had no idea what was going on while I was out there," Livae Nanjikana, a man from the Solomon Islands who left the island on September 3 in a small motorboat, told The G

2h

Nature

Publisher Correction: Dysregulation of brain and choroid plexus cell types in severe COVID-19

Nature, Published online: 08 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-04080-3

2h

cognitive science

Hi all! This research based video discusses how exercise affects the body and brain, hope you enjoy, references in the description 🙂

submitted by /u/ava_flava123 [link] [comments]

2h

cognitive science

The "science" of the political compass

submitted by /u/Political-psych-abby [link] [comments]

2h

The Scientist RSS

Fish Poop a Big Player in Ocean Carbon Sequestration

A modeling study estimates that by drastically reducing fish biomass over the past century, industrial fishing may be affecting ocean chemistry, nutrient fluxes, and carbon cycling as much as climate change.

2h

Discover Magazine

A Glimpse Inside Fat Bear Week

The fatter the bear, the better the odds at survival.

2h

Futurism

A Disappointed Putin Is Slashing Funding for Russia's Space Program

Less Is More Russia's space agency, Roscosmos, is about to have to accomplish a whole lot more with a whole lot less in its pocket. Disappointed by a lack of results and faltering performance, Russian President Vladimir Putin will cut Roscosmos' budget by about 16 percent per year over the next three years, Ars Technica reports , citing multiple Russian publications . The disappointment stems fro

3h

Futurism

SpaceX Tourist Says She Was Sick First Two Days of Mission

Space Sickness As pilot for the first all-tourist crew to orbit the Earth, Sian Proctor had the time of her life on board SpaceX's Crew Dragon spacecraft. But while the views out of the massive transparent cupola were breathtaking, the three day journey around the Earth wasn't always smooth sailing. "The first day, I wasn't feeling very good," Proctor told National Geographic . "Space sickness is

3h

Futurity.org

Life-support saved fewer COVID patients as 2020 wore on

The life-support system called ECMO can rescue COVID-19 patients from the brink of death, but not at the rates seen early in the pandemic, a new study finds. Where once about 60% of such patients survived at least 90 days in spring 2020, by the end of the year just under half of COVID patients on ECMO survived that long. The decreased survival over time might be due to a combination of factors, i

3h

ScienceDaily

Roman noblewoman's tomb reveals secrets of ancient concrete resilience

Over time, concrete cracks and crumbles. Well, most concrete cracks and crumbles. Structures built in ancient Rome are still standing, exhibiting remarkable durability despite conditions that would devastate modern concrete. One of these structures is the large cylindrical tomb of first-century noblewoman Caecilia Metella. New research shows that the quality of the concrete of her tomb may exceed

3h

Science

Electrical brain implants: a new way to treat depression?

Researchers are hailing a breakthrough in personalised treatments for mental illness that could be used for other conditions

3h

Futurity.org

Coral once thought to be one species is actually two

A new discovery may settle the decades-long debate over whether a form of coral is one species or two. On a night dive off the coast of St. John in the US Virgin Islands in 2016, two coral reef researchers saw something unexpected: A coral colony with slender, waving branches was releasing larvae into the water. "While I had always wondered if the two forms were really two species, that was the m

3h

ExtremeTechExtreme – ExtremeTech

ExtremeTech Explains: What is a Neural Net?

Photo: Mike MacKenzie, Flickr As Moore's Law approaches its endgame, the technosphere has looked to different and more diverse approaches to computing. In order to continue to increase the computational power of our systems, we can't just depend on driving clock speeds higher and higher, nor can we continue making transistors increasingly smaller. To truly move forward, a new paradigm must be con

4h

Science

US jobs figures knock recovery hopes

September data fall short of expectations and suggest rebound in growth is slowing

4h

Phys.org

Nobel Physics Prize winner says Italy research underfunded

Italian Giorgio Parisi, winner of the 2021 Nobel Physics Prize, slammed Friday the lack of funding for research in Italy, saying it invested one of the lowest amounts in Europe.

4h

Science & technology

The Moon and Mars give up more secrets

A Chinese and an American mission report their latest results

4h

Scientific American Content

Google Bans Ads That Spread Climate Misinformation

Google YouTube Climate

The new rules could put pressure on Facebook to take similar steps — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Phys.org

Studies find mixed results from sage grouse hunting restrictions

A thorough review of the history of sage grouse hunting and populations across the Intermountain West shows that declines in the bird's numbers have prompted significant reductions in hunting opportunities in recent decades—with mixed results for grouse populations.

4h

Retraction Watch

Leading marine ecologist, now White House official, violated prominent journal's policies in handling now-retracted paper

A marine ecologist at Oregon State University now helping lead the Biden White House's climate and environmental initiatives violated the conflict of interest policy at the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences when she edited a paper in the journal last year. Jane Lubchenco, who served as administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric … Continue reading

4h

Futurism

Stream Video With Professional Effects With Up To 60% Off XSplit

In the last two years, video calls and streaming have gone from useful tools and amusements to the centerpiece of our lives and how we stay connected. Yet it's also meant that we've had to upgrade the quality of our video as well. XSplit has two deals that help you polish any video, and support any stream. A Stronger Stream First, XSplit Broadcaster Premium offers a better stream. At the most bas

5h

Phys.org

New measurement method enables more precise investigation of ultrafast processes in matter

A team of researchers from Freiburg led by Prof. Dr. Frank Stienkemeier and Dr. Lukas Bruder has succeeded in developing a new measurement method for investigating ultrafast processes in matter. These are processes at the atomic and molecular level that occur within a billionth of a second (10-12 sec). The new method, which combines different spectroscopy techniques, enables, among other things, n

5h

Phys.org

Artificial intelligence suggests a new narrative for the Out of Africa process

Researchers from Estonia and Italy developed an innovative method by combining neural networks and statistics. Using this newly developed method, they refined the "Out of Africa" scenario. The researchers claimed that the African dynamics around the time of the Out of Africa expansion are more complex than previously thought.

5h

Phys.org

Orange County oil spill leaves many clues, dead ends and mysteries, but few answers

Nearly a week after a 13-inch tear in an undersea pipeline resulted in a massive oil spill off the Southern California coast, the clues keep piling up, but the mystery of what caused the rupture and who is ultimately responsible remains unsolved.

5h

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Author Correction: A multifunctional ultrathin flexible bianisotropic metasurface with miniaturized cell size

Scientific Reports, Published online: 08 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-021-99946-x

5h

Nature

Researchers voice dismay at all-male science Nobels

Nature, Published online: 08 October 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02782-2 All seven winners of this year's science prizes were men. Some say this shows a disappointing lack of progress towards diversifying the awards.

5h

Nature

The wearable device that could help to detect cancer

Nature, Published online: 08 October 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02733-x Xinge Yu hopes to patent a wearable device that measures tissue stiffness to detect serious illnesses.

5h

The Scientist RSS

How Lung Cancer Develops in People Who Have Never Smoked

Lung Cancer One Smokers

[no content]

5h

60-Second Science

COVID Quickly, Episode 16: Vaccines Protect Pregnancies, and a New Antiviral Pill

Today we bring you a new episode in our podcast series COVID, Quickly. Every two weeks, Scientific American 's senior health editors Tanya Lewis and Josh Fischman catch you up on the essential developments in the pandemic: from vaccines to new variants and everything in between. You can listen to all past episodes here .

5h

Scientific American Content

Scientists Hail Historic Malaria Vaccine Approval–But Point to Challenges Ahead

The WHO-approved RTS,S vaccine has a modest efficacy and requires a complex regimen of doses, so ample funding and clear communication are crucial to success — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Futurity.org

New moon rocks are 1.97 billion years old

A lunar probe recently brought back the first fresh samples of rock and debris from the moon in more than 40 years. Now, researchers have determined the age of the moon rocks at close to 1.97 billion years old. "It is the perfect sample to close a 2-billion-year gap," says Brad Jolliff, professor of earth and planetary sciences and director of the McDonnell Center for the Space Sciences at Washin

5h

Futurism

US Nuclear Sub Damaged in Collision With "Unknown Object"

US Navy Connecticut China

Unknown Object According to a statement by the US Navy, the nuclear submarine USS Connecticut sustained damage and several injuries after colliding with an "unknown object" in the South China Sea, CBS News reports . The submarine is now making its way to Guam to assess the damage. It's a hair-raising incident given the location. China, the US, and its allies including the UK have repeatedly made

6h

ScienceDaily

Promising results for Parkinson's disease treatment

Researchers have found a way to make deep brain stimulation (DBS) more precise, resulting in therapeutic effects that outlast what is currently available. The work will significantly advance the study of Parkinson's disease.

6h

Futurity.org

Politics influenced lifting of COVID-19 restrictions

States eased COVID-19 restrictions based on politics as much as death rates or case counts, a new study shows. In the first month of the COVID-19 pandemic, nearly all 50 states announced restrictions on gatherings and businesses, and most issued stay-at-home orders, aiming to curb disease transmission and avoid overburdening health systems. States with Republican governors and a larger vote share

6h

TED Talks Daily (SD video)

How humanity doubled life expectancy in a century | Steven Johnson

Doubling human life expectancy in a century is our greatest achievement, says author Steven Johnson. How did we make it happen — and can we keep it going? Backed by fascinating historical anecdotes, he shares some life-lengthening innovations and reminds us of three key things needed to make sure all of humanity enjoys these advancements in health.

6h

Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

How mussels make a powerful underwater glue

Blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) spend their days being buffeted by crashing waves. They manage to stay tethered to the rocks or their fellow mussels thanks to a highly effective underwater glue they produce. Because achieving adhesion in the presence of water is so challenging, scientists who are interested in producing effective adhesives for use in wet environments (e.g., for surgical or dental tr

6h

forskning.se

Självkörande bilar fixar inte det sociala samspelet

Trafiken är full av "irrationella" människor som ställer till det för de förarlösa fordonen. Därför kommer det att dröja innan självkörande bilar dominerar, menar professorn Barry Brown. – Det har pratats om självkörande bilar i tio års tid. Hela tiden får man höra att de kommer vara i bruk "om två år". Jag tror snarare att det rör sig om 30–40 år. Det sa professor Barry Brown , Institutionen för

6h

Undark Magazine

First-Ever Approval for Malaria Vaccine

On Wednesday, the World Health Organization recommended that children in areas with moderate to high transmission of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum receive the vaccine Mosquirix, initially called RTS,S, developed by the British drugmaker GlaxoSmithKline.

6h

ScienceDaily

A 'cousin' of Viagra reduces obesity by stimulating cells to burn fat

Researchers have found that a drug first developed to treat Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia and sickle cell disease reduces obesity and fatty liver in mice and improves their heart function — without changes in food intake or daily activity.

6h

ScienceDaily

ALMA animation of circling twin young stars

Researchers analyzed the accumulated data from the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) and depicted the motion of a young twin star system XZ Tauri over three years. This 'ALMA Animation' of twin stars sheds new light on the origins of the binary stars and the planets to be formed around them.

6h

ScienceDaily

Something fishy going on? Recent discovery hints at northward shift in fish distribution

Researchers have discovered an individual Eleotris oxycephala in Akita Prefecture, Japan, which is the northernmost record of this species. The juvenile was discovered in the Yoneshiro River system and likely reached the river from the south via larval dispersal in the Tsushima Current. This possible range expansion of Eleotris oxycephala may be linked to increasing water temperatures.

6h

ScienceDaily

Unprecedented rise of heat and rainfall extremes in observational data

Observation data analysis reveals a 90-fold increase in the frequency of monthly heat extremes, so-called 3-sigma-events that deviate strongly from what is normal in a given region, in the past ten years compared to 1951-1980. Record daily rainfall events also increased in a non-linear way — on average, 1 in 4 rainfall records in the last decade can be attributed to climate change. Seemingly smal

6h

ScienceDaily

Small molecules with a dual function

Researchers have deciphered a molecular mechanism with which a small RNA and a small protein regulate the metabolism of cholera bacteria and the production of the cholera toxin.

6h

ScienceDaily

New images lead to better prediction of shear thickening

For the first time, researchers have been able capture images providing unprecedented details of how particles behave in a liquid suspension when the phenomenon known as shear thickening takes place. The work allows us to directly understand the processes behind shear thickening, which had previously only been understood based on inference and computational modeling.

6h

Futurity.org

New leaders might want to let trust grow

New leaders may want to let trust build over time, rather than establishing lots of it right away, according to a new study with military cadets. Numerous studies have shown that trust in leadership is linked to higher individual and team performance. However, that might not be the best strategy for long-term success, according to the researchers. That's because trust is dynamic by nature, and it

7h

Future(s) Studies

A Centuries-Old Physics Mystery? Solved. Post 2015 binary computer processing power for simulations was key to resolution.

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

7h

Phys.org

Physics meets democracy in this modeling study

A study in the journal Physica A leverages concepts from physics to model how campaign strategies influence the opinions of an electorate in a two-party system.

7h

Futurism

This 'Family Operating System®' Organizes Your Important Family Info in Minutes

Adulting is pretty complicated. In addition to the day-to-day grind—going to work, taking care of your kids, cooking dinner, mowing the lawn—you also have to take care of a lot of big picture stuff. There are mortgages to refinance, insurance policies to update, retirement portfolios to manage, important documents to store. And all of it has to be kept in order and up to date so that, when you ne

7h

Phys.org

Snowshoe hares with mismatched coats due to global warming are faring better than ever

A team of researchers affiliated with multiple institutions in Canada has found that despite rising temperatures due to global warming, snowshoe hares with mismatched coats are experiencing reduced mortality rates. They have written a paper describing their findings and have posted it on the bioRxiv preprint server.

7h

ScienceDaily

Colorblind fish show experts how vision evolved

After decades of studying color vision in mice, new research in zebrafish has allowed experts to uncover how some animals regulate their ability to see blue light. The results allow researchers to better understand the evolutionary history and current control mechanisms of color vision.

7h

ScienceDaily

Flying high-speed drones into the unknown with AI

Researchers have developed a new approach to autonomously fly quadrotors through unknown, complex environments at high speeds using only on-board sensing and computation. The new approach could be useful in emergencies, on construction sites or for security applications.

7h

ScienceDaily

Corals once thought to be a single species are really two

It seems like an esoteric question: What, exactly, is a species? Two corals were described as different species, then merged together, and then separated once again. A new study explores the question further.

7h

ScienceDaily

Beyond childhood: Picky eating in college students

Looking beyond the picky eating of childhood, researchers looked at this behavior in college students. Self-identified picky eaters ate significantly less fiber and vegetables and reported greater levels of social phobia than non-picky eaters, according to a new study. Social phobia is the fear of being evaluated during everyday activities by others.

7h

ScienceDaily

Gel enhances CAR-T immunotherapy benefits in brains surgically treated for glioblastoma

Researchers report that pairing a newly developed fibrin gel with CAR-T immunotherapy that was delivered to post-surgical mouse brains with glioblastoma improved the immunotherapy's effectiveness. The gel aided CAR-T cell distribution in the brain by acclimating the T cells to the post-surgical wound environment while also stopping the tumor from recurring.

7h

Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

Car Chase in an Old Toyota Camry | Getaway Driver

Stream Getaway Driver on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/getaway-driver-us About Getaway Driver: Michelle Rodriguez brings the ultimate driving fantasy to life as 24 elite drivers get behind the wheel in a real-life high-speed chase. Can the getaway drivers evade their pursuers, find an exit and escape, or will their cars pay the ultimate sacrifice? #GetawayDriver #MichelleRodrigu

7h

Singularity Hub

This Bipedal Drone Robot Can Walk, Fly, Skateboard, and Slackline

Caltech Bipedal Robot

Most animals are limited to either walking, flying, or swimming, with a handful of lucky species whose physiology allows them to cross over. A new robot took inspiration from them, and can fly like a bird just as well as it can walk like a (weirdly awkward, metallic, tiny) person. It also happens to be able to skateboard and slackline, two skills most humans will never pick up. Described in a pap

7h

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Author Correction: Replicated, urban-driven exposure to metallic trace elements in two passerines

Scientific Reports, Published online: 08 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-021-99964-9

7h

forskning.se

Fick 200 kronor – då vaccinerade sig fler

Pengar kan öka människors vilja att vaccinera sig. Forskarna bakom studien menar att det kan vara en kostnadseffektiv lösning. – Det är rimligt att förmoda att det blir en lägre kostnad för samhället, säger forskaren Pol Campos-Mercade. Vad kan få människor att i högre grad ta emot den vaccinering som erbjuds? Runt om i världen finns exempel på olika försök att belöna den som tvekar. Från 5 dolla

7h

Phys.org

New strategy achieves efficient and stable carbon dioxide electrolysis in solid oxide electrolysis cell

Solid oxide electrolysis cell (SOEC) is promising in CO2 conversion and renewable clean electricity energy storage. It can convert CO2 and H2O simultaneously into syngas or hydrocarbon fuel at the cathode, and produce high purity O2 at the anode.

7h

Phys.org

New rotating liquid reactor design solves issues with current reactors

Intensified reactors are used in a variety of chemical processes. One such reactor is the rotating packed bed (RPB) reactor which uses high centrifugal forces to accelerate chemical reactions between constituents. However, the RPB reactor has a number of issues that affect its efficiency. With this in mind, for this Ph.D. research, Jasper Hacking designed a new reactor referred to as rotating liqu

7h

Phys.org

Controlling electrons and vibrations in a crystal with polarized light

The quantum behavior of atomic vibrations excited in a crystal using light pulses has much to do with the polarization of the pulses, say materials scientists from Tokyo Tech. The findings from their latest study offer a new control parameter for the manipulation of coherently excited vibrations in solid materials at the quantum level.

7h

Phys.org

Hubble detects a dangerous galactic dance

This NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image features two interacting galaxies that are so intertwined, they have a collective name—Arp 91. Their delicate galactic dance takes place more than 100 million light-years from Earth. The two galaxies comprising Arp 91 have their own names: the lower galaxy, which looks like a bright spot, is NGC 5953, and the oval-shaped galaxy to the upper right is NGC 5

7h

Phys.org

Mechanism of actions of cholecystokinin receptors revealed

Cholecystokinin (CCK) and gastrin are the earliest discovered gastrointestinal hormones. They are the most abundant peptides in gastrointestinal tract and central nervous system, acting as physiologically important hormones and neurotransmitters through two CCK receptor subtypes, CCKAR and CCKBR.

7h

Phys.org

Researchers identify ecological mechanism behind dredging to mitigate lake cyanobacterial blooms

Excessive levels of nitrogen and phosphorus in lake waters can easily cause eutrophication of water body, which in turn leads to cyanobacteria blooms and threatens aquatic biodiversity. As a measure of human interference, dredging can effectively alleviate cyanobacteria blooms, and thus plays an important role in improving lake water quality. Dredging can remove part of the nitrogen and phosphorus

7h

Phys.org

Researchers propose novel permanent magnet design methods for quasi-axisymmetric stellarator

A new permanent magnet design of quasi-axisymmetric stellarator was made by researchers led by Prof. Xu Guosheng from the Hefei Institutes of Physical Science (HFIPS) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences.

7h

Forskning & Framsteg – För dig som är nyfiken på allvar

Fredspris går till att försvara yttrandefriheten

Att ge priset till journalister som jobbar för demokrati i en utsatt situation gör frågan mer konkret, enligt freds- och konfliktforskaren Isak Svensson.

7h

ExtremeTechExtreme – ExtremeTech

Researchers Bust Antibacterial Spider Silk Myth

(Photo: Michael Podger/Unsplash) Spider silk has long been said to have antibacterial properties. The ancient Greeks and Romans supposedly used the silk when treating flesh wounds, and some recent studies report antimicrobial activity (AMA) on spider silk, leading many cultures and social circles today to believe the sticky substance is a worthwhile replacement for advanced antibacterial medicine

7h

ScienceDaily

Feather phenomenon: Radar indicates stronger hurricanes trap, transport more birds

Whether birds get caged in the eye of a hurricane may depend on the intensity and totality of the chaos beyond the calm, says a novel study.

7h

Discover Magazine

The Plight of the World's Most Populous Rhinoceros

Southern white rhinos once made a meteoric comeback from the brink of extinction. But the species' future remains uncertain, following a surge in poaching for rare rhino horns.

8h

Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

Metallic complexes made from cyclic molecules

Researchers describe how large cyclic molecules can be used for the synthesis of big metallic complexes with two or more metal atoms.

8h

Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

Restructuring biology: New study shows protein hydrophobic parts do not hate water

Proteins drive nearly all biological functions and insight into their workings is essential for pharmaceutical developments. But now, a pair of scientists from Japan have found that our fundamental understanding of a characteristic of proteins that is key to their proper functioning — the mechanism by which their structures fold — has been flawed. These new findings call for a re-assessment of a

8h

Ingeniøren

Efter togulykken på Storebælt: Region intensiverer træning i beredskabsradioer

PLUS. Forkert indstillede beredskabsradioer ved Storebæltsulykken i 2019, har fået Region Syddanmark til at skrue op for uddannelse og træning i brugen af SINE-beredskabsradioer. De vil dog ikke tvangsstyre indstillinger fra centralt hold, som Rigspolitiet ellers har foreslået.

8h

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Author Correction: The relative deficit of GDF15 in adolescent girls with PCOS can be changed into an abundance that reduces liver fat

Scientific Reports, Published online: 08 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-021-99918-1

8h

Phys.org

Intensively managed grazing can increase profits, improve environment

What is good for the environment can also be profitable for livestock producers.

8h

Retraction Watch

How one US organization hopes to make retractions more visible

As Retraction Watch readers likely know, there's ample evidence that retracted papers — 2,500 per year and growing — continue to attract citations that do not mention the fact the paper has been retracted. Some of that may be because it's not clear on publishers' sites and databases that these papers have been retracted or … Continue reading

8h

Wired

Eric Schmidt Is Funding 'Super Evolution'

Plus: Google's evil perception, selfies from space, and lightning striking way more than twice.

8h

Ingeniøren

København overholder EU's nye legionellakrav: Så meget koster det

PLUS. Der venter en millionregning, når Danmark fremover skal leve op til EU's nye krav om håndtering af legionella.

8h

Phys.org

Children live online more than ever: We need better definitions of 'good' and 'bad' screen time

The pandemic has fundamentally altered every part of our lives, not least the time we spend on digital devices. For young people in particular, the blurred line between recreational and educational screen time presents new challenges we are only beginning to appreciate.

8h

Phys.org

Indonesians' support for the death penalty declines with more rigorous survey methods

Indonesia, like its regional neighbors in Southeast Asia, has supported capital punishments for decades, particularly for drug-related offenses.

8h

Phys.org

The remarkable variability of actinide tetrafluoride electronic structures

Scientists have synthesized tetrafluoride powders of four radioactive elements—thorium, uranium, neptunium, and plutonium. These four elements are actinides, a series of heavy and radioactive elements. Tetrafluoride powders are simply powders with four fluoride atoms per atom of actinide. In this new study, scientists probed the magnetic fields of these powders. This revealed remarkable variations

8h

Phys.org

New report finds stark transit inequity in Baltimore

Shortcomings in the Baltimore region's public transit system disproportionately affect low-income and minority neighborhoods, according to a new report from Johns Hopkins University's Department of Environmental Health and Engineering, which spans the schools of Public Health and Engineering, and the Baltimore Transit Equity Coalition.

8h

Phys.org

Trans people and cisgender gay men in the UK are most likely to experience violence

Using responses from the LGBT survey conducted by the European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights, they compared the findings of over 28,000 people identifying as LGBT in Germany, Portugal and the UK.

8h

forskning.se

Urgammal insjö på Mars upptäckt

En tidigare livskraftig sjö med mjukt meanderformade floddeltan har hittats på Mars, med hjälp av 150 000 bilder från rymdrovern Perseverance. Den nya upptäckten ger nycklar till vår grannplanets geologiska historia och intensifierar sökandet efter utomjordiskt organiskt liv. Ett moln av röd rök. Och ett par sekunder av ovisshet. Så skulle man kunna beskriva de visuellt kittlande realtidsbilderna

8h

Dagens Medicin

Efter to år som eneste leder for AUH's hjerteafdeling: Nu glæder oversygeplejerske sig til nyt ledelsesteam

Oversygeplejerske Rikke Degn har de seneste to år stået alene med det ledelsesmæssige beslutningsansvar på afdelingen for Hjertesygdomme på AUH. I ryggen har hun haft et rådgivende udvalg, men i sidste ende har ansvaret været hendes. Nu gør hun klar til at dele ledelsesstafetten med to nye cheflæger.

9h

Dagens Medicin

Hjertelæger: Rådgivende udvalg har været en god løsning på en dårlig situation

I stedet for at konstituere en ny ledende overlæge blev oversygeplejersken bakket op af et rådgivende udvalg, der skulle give faglig sparring. Det har bragt personalet på Hjertesygdomme på AUH tættere sammen, men den lægefaglige repræsentation har betalt prisen.

9h

Futurity.org

Is Facebook becoming a liability for brands?

New details about Facebook may prompt brands to reconsider the risks and ethics of working with the platform, say experts. This week, Facebook whistleblower Frances Haugen testified about the tens of thousands of pages of internal documents she leaked exposing how Facebook prioritized profits over public safety and called on lawmakers to regulate the social media network. By bringing to light the

9h

Dagens Medicin

På AUH er arbejdet med fremtidens ledelse først lige begyndt

Efter at have sagt farvel til to ledende overlæger inden for kort tid på afdelingen for Hjertesygdomme indså ledelsen på AUH, at der skulle noget andet til for at dække afdelingens enorme ledelsesspænd. Derfor leder man nu efter to nye cheflæger. Netop skræddersyede løsninger er svaret på de ledelsesmæssige udfordringer i sundhedsvæsenet, mener overlægeformand.

9h

NeuroLogica Blog

Hacking the Brain to Treat Depression

A new study published in Nature looks at a closed loop implanted deep brain stimulator to treat severe and treatment resistant depression, with very encouraging results. This is a report of a single patient, with is a useful proof of concept. Severe depression can profoundly limit one's life, and increase risk for suicide ( affecting 300 million people worldwide and causing most of the 800,000 an

9h

ScienceDaily

Microbiology research furthers understanding of ocean's role in carbon cycling

Microbiology researchers have shed new light on the mechanisms of carbon cycling in the ocean, using a novel approach to track which microbes are consuming different types of organic carbon produced by common phytoplankton species.

9h

ScienceDaily

Climate change tipping points: back to the drawing board

We regularly hear warnings that climate change may lead to 'tipping points': irreversible situations where savanna can quickly change into desert, or the warm gulf stream current can simply stop flowing. But the earth is much more resilient than previously thought. Researchers now show that the concept of tipping points is too simple.

9h

ScienceDaily

Ten millennia of hepatitis B virus evolution described

Researchers uncover the evolution of the hepatitis B virus since the Early Holocene by analyzing the largest dataset of ancient viral genomes produced to date.

9h

Wired

How to Transfer Save Data From One Nintendo Switch to Another

Nintendo Switch OLED

Make sure you bring all your games with you when you move into that shiny new Switch OLED.

9h

Wired

Andrew Yang on Micromobility and the Future of Cities

This week, Lauren Goode talks to the politician about his new political party, and how the US can get more bikes, scooters, and pedestrians on the streets.

9h

Phys.org

Perseverance's first major successes on Mars – an update from mission scientists

In the short time since NASA's Perseverance rover landed in Mars' Jezero Crater on Feb. 18, 2021, it's already made history.

9h

Nature

Author Correction: A molecular single-cell lung atlas of lethal COVID-19

Nature, Published online: 08 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03921-5

9h

Nature

Vanishing rainforest and how to catalogue brain cells — the week in infographics

Nature, Published online: 08 October 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02743-9 Nature highlights three key infographics from the week in science and research.

9h

Nature

Friendship and other anomalous results

Nature, Published online: 08 October 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02763-5 It's no joke.

9h

ExtremeTechExtreme – ExtremeTech

TSMC Will Not Leak Sensitive Client Information in Response to US Transparency Requests

TSMC has put out a statement, backed up by the Taiwanese government, emphasizing that it would leak no sensitive data in complying with a US request for greater transparency in the supply chain. The company's statement today emphasized its willingness to protect its customers, but did not say to what degree it would comply with the US request. "We definitely will not leak our company's sensitive

9h

Phys.org

New method for predicting the response of ecosystems to marine heatwaves

Marine heatwaves, driven by climate change, are becoming more frequent and intense worldwide. Although we know that heatwaves kill marine organisms and have devastating effects on ecosystems, there is currently no way to predict these effects or help ecosystems adapt.

9h

Phys.org

Student sex work is happening, and universities need to respond with health services

As university and college semesters unfold, a small but increasing percentage of students will likely also be taking on a largely under-reported and overlooked form of part-time employment: sex work.

9h

Phys.org

Volcanic grit, water shortage threaten La Palma's bananas

"It's worse than a plague," curses Pedro Antonio Sanchez, fuming over the volcanic grit coating his bananas, the main source of wealth on the Canaries' island of La Palma.

9h

Livescience.com

Energy burst from most distant known galaxy might have been a satellite orbiting Earth

The cosmos is the stage for a variety of giant explosions.

9h

Livescience.com

Greenland sharks: The longest-living vertebrates

Greenland sharks may have a lifespan of hundreds of years in the Arctic and North Atlantic oceans, where much about their lives remains a mystery.

9h

Livescience.com

Maryland woman catches rare tropical bacterial disease from her fish tank

The case is unusual because the woman had never traveled outside the U.S.

9h

Phys.org

Ten ways we can better respond to the pandemic in a trauma-informed way

Fear is one of the central emotional responses during the pandemic. Every day brings a new level of stress: concerns about getting sick, the stigma of testing positive, financial difficulties due to not being able to work, separation from loved ones in lockdown (or being locked in an unsafe household). The list goes on.

9h

Phys.org

Feral horses will rule one third of the fragile Kosciuszko National Park under a proposed NSW government plan

The New South Wales government has released a draft plan to deal with feral horses roaming the fragile Kosciuszko National Park. While the plan offers some improvements, it remains seriously inadequate.

9h

Phys.org

With the increased number of Javan rhinos, what is the next conservation goal for these animals?

It's incredible that the Javan rhino (Rhinoceros sondaicus) can still be found on the island of Java, one of the world's most densely populated islands. It's even more remarkable that the rhino population in Indonesia has tripled since the 1960s.

10h

Phys.org

Newly returned moon rock samples chronicle the dying days of lunar volcanism

Billions of years ago, lakes of lava on the surface of the moon eventually dried to form the vast dark patches—the lunar maria—visible today on the lunar nearside. Now, thanks to rock samples recently returned to Earth by China's Chang'e 5 mission, scientists have a new estimate for when one of the last of those lava flows ran dry.

10h

Ingeniøren

Ny metode skal halvere energiforbruget til CO2-fangst på biogasanlæg

PLUS. Forskere fra DTU har udviklet en ny metode til fangst af CO2, der fanger gassen i et fast stof frem for en væske. Nu skal teknologien prøves af på et svensk biogasanlæg.

10h

Ingeniøren

Spillenes svar på Iphone vs Android: Derfor dumper ny forretningsmodel for sportsspil

Pro Evolution Soccer har rebrandet sig selv. FIFA-konkurrenten hedder nu eFootball og har forsøgt sig med en økonomisk model, der afspejler samtidens populære titler – men resultatet har været katastrofalt.

10h

Ingeniøren

Syntetiske data skal hjælpe danske studerende ud af GDPR-begrænsninger

PLUS. De danske universiteter er gået i gang med at opbygge en 'sandkasse' af syntetiske patientdata, som studerende kan øve sig på uden at komme i konflikt med GDPR.

10h

Nature

Daily briefing: HEPA filters could clean SARS-CoV-2 from the air

Nature, Published online: 07 October 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02780-4 First real-world evidence that inexpensive air filters effectively remove SARS-CoV-2 virus particles from the air. Plus, a malaria vaccine will finally be rolled out across Africa and how the world's biggest brain maps could transform neuroscience.

10h

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

Cavity-induced quantum spin liquids

Nature Communications, Published online: 08 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26076-3 Quantum spin liquid states are realized in systems with frustrated magnetic interactions. Here, the authors show that tunable frustrated spin-spin interactions can be induced by coupling a quantum antiferromagnet to the quantized light of a driven optical cavity, giving rise to robust quantum spin liquid stat

11h

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

Circa-SCOPE: high-throughput live single-cell imaging method for analysis of circadian clock resetting

Nature Communications, Published online: 08 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26210-1 Phase Transition Curves (PTCs) describe phase shifts of circadian oscillations due to a stimulus and they are important for studying circadian clock resetting. Here, the authors present a method for high-throughput reconstruction of PTCs using fluorescent live imaging and single-cell analysis.

11h

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

High-spatial and colourimetric imaging of histone modifications in single senescent cells using plasmonic nanoprobes

Nature Communications, Published online: 08 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26224-9 The authors demonstrate a colourimetric imaging method using plasmonic nanoparticles for visualisation of heterochromatin histone markers. Based on the distance-dependent coupling effect, resulting in spectral shifts, they observe reorganisation of histone markers caused by oncogene-induced senescence.

11h

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

A frequency-amplitude coordinator and its optimal energy consumption for biological oscillators

Nature Communications, Published online: 08 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26182-2 Calibrating both anomalous frequency and amplitude of biorhythm prevents physiological dysfunctions or diseases. Here, the authors propose a universal approach to design a frequency-amplitude coordinator rigorously via dynamical systems tools.

11h

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

Selectivity descriptors for the direct hydrogenation of CO2 to hydrocarbons during zeolite-mediated bifunctional catalysis

Nature Communications, Published online: 08 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26090-5 The reaction mechanism of carbon dioxide to high-value hydrocarbons over metal-zeolite bifunctional catalysts remains ambiguous. Here, the authors demonstrate that active zeolite catalysts' topology and hybrid nature are descriptors; regulating the reaction mechanism and ultimate product selectivity.

11h

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

An oncolytic virus expressing a full-length antibody enhances antitumor innate immune response to glioblastoma

Nature Communications, Published online: 08 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26003-6 Oncolytic herpes simplex virus-1 lyses cancer cells while increases their immunogenicity. Blocking the CD47 "don't eat me" signal on cancer cells promotes their phagocytosis by macrophages. Authors here show that oncolytic viruses expressing anti-CD47 antibodies improve glioblastoma survival in mouse models.

11h

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

In situ and transcriptomic identification of microglia in synapse-rich regions of the developing zebrafish brain

Nature Communications, Published online: 08 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26206-x Microglia remodel synapses and engulf apoptotic cells. The molecular program underlying these distinct functions are unclear. Here, the authors identify distinct microglial subsets associated with synaptic vs. neurogenic regions of the developing zebrafish brain.

11h

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

OTULIN maintains skin homeostasis by controlling keratinocyte death and stem cell identity

Nature Communications, Published online: 08 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25944-2 OTULIN is a deubiquitinase for linear ubiquitin chains. Here the authors show, using genetic mouse models and single-cell RNA-sequencing, that deficiency of OTULIN in keratinocytes causes skin inflammation and verrucous carcinoma via the induction of keratinocyte death, thereby implicating a function of OTULI

11h

Ingeniøren

PODCAST: Vi lever i paradis på Jorden, men langtidsprognosen er kedelig

I den nye serie 'Sikkert og vist' sætter Ingeniørens videnskabsjournalist Jens Ramskov fokus på, hvad videnskaben fortæller os om universet og naturens orden og udvikling. Denne gang om, hvordan Jorden opstod, og hvordan den engang vil ende sin eksistens.

11h

Undark Magazine

Book Review: The 'Mystery' Illnesses Informed by Culture

In "The Sleeping Beauties," neurologist Suzanne O'Sullivan explores the world of unexplained comas and other mysterious "culture-bound" disorders. Culturally influenced reactions to trauma, O'Sullivan stresses, have nothing to do with fakery, but are very real, physical manifestations of distress.

11h

Ingeniøren

Forvirrer fusionsforskere bevidst omkring ITER's virkningsgrad?

PLUS. Tysk fysiker og videnskabsjournalist sætter spørgsmålstegn ved, om ITER overhovedet er i stand til at producere energi til elnettet. Dansk forsker understreger, at ITER ikke er en færdig reaktor, men et eksperiment til at lære mere om fusionsenergi.

11h

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Elevated retinal artery vascular resistance determined by novel visualized technique of laser speckle flowgraphy in branch retinal vein occlusion

Scientific Reports, Published online: 08 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-021-99572-7

11h

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Feasibility, safety, and economic consequences of using minimal flow anaesthesia by Maquet FLOW-i equipped with automated gas control

Scientific Reports, Published online: 08 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-021-99648-4

11h

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Predictors for development of palbociclib-induced neutropenia in breast cancer patients as determined by ordered logistic regression analysis

Scientific Reports, Published online: 08 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-021-99504-5

11h

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Sexual dimorphism in size and shape of the head in the sea snake Emydocephalus annulatus (Hydrophiinae, Elapidae)

Scientific Reports, Published online: 08 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-021-99113-2

11h

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Depiction of mosaic perfusion in chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) on C-arm computed tomography compared to computed tomography pulmonary angiogram (CTPA)

Scientific Reports, Published online: 08 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-021-99658-2

11h

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Design of a system for controlling a levitating sphere in superfluid 3He at extremely low temperatures

Scientific Reports, Published online: 08 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-021-99316-7 Design of a system for controlling a levitating sphere in superfluid 3 He at extremely low temperatures

11h

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth attenuate mechanical allodynia in mice through distinct from the siglec-9/MCP-1-mediated tissue-repairing mechanism

Scientific Reports, Published online: 08 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-021-99585-2

11h

Phys.org

Extreme drought in Brazil triggers fatal sand storms

Unusually powerful sandstorms have left at least six people dead in Sao Paulo in recent weeks, local media said, as southeastern Brazil grapples with severe drought.

12h

Nature

Eight career tips from Nobel Laureates

Nature, Published online: 08 October 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02772-4 Stefano Sandrone's Nobel Life features interviews with 24 prizewinners on everything from handling rejection to seizing the moment.

12h

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Author Correction: Aerosol microphysics and chemistry reveal the COVID19 lockdown impact on urban air quality

Scientific Reports, Published online: 08 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-021-99947-w

12h

Phys.org

Pacific's urgent call to climate action as crunch talks loom

Pacific island leaders have urged industrialised nations to bring plans for real action, not good intentions, to upcoming climate talks, painting a grim picture of the environmental horrors they face.

13h

Phys.org

Americans agree misinformation is a problem, poll shows

Nearly all Americans agree that the rampant spread of misinformation is a problem.

13h

Phys.org

Remnants of Black church uncovered in Colonial Williamsburg

The brick foundation of one of the nation's oldest Black churches has been unearthed at Colonial Williamsburg, a living history museum in Virginia that continues to reckon with its past storytelling about the country's origins and the role of Black Americans.

13h

Ingeniøren

Uddannelser skal ud af de store byer – nu fylder udflytningsbøvlet op på ny ministers skrivebord

PLUS. Universiteterne går ind i arbejdet med at flytte undervisning til mindre byer – selvom de ikke er begejstrede for opgaven.

13h

Nyheder – Forskning – Videnskab

Vaccine-lommepenge er kontroversielle – men de virker

Kan et par hundrede kroner motivere folk til at lade sig vaccinere? Ja, til en vis grad, viser et forskningsprojekt,…

13h

Dagens Medicin

Personer med type 1-diabetes præsenterer allerede tidligt med nedsat nervefunktion

Ny dansk forskning viser, at det er muligt at måle helt tidlige nerveskader hos personer med type 1-diabetes – også længe inden de selv bemærker det.

13h

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Team discovers invasive-native crayfish hybrids in Missouri

In a study of crayfish in the Current River in southeastern Missouri, researchers discovered—almost by chance—that the virile crayfish, Faxonius virilis, was interbreeding with a native crayfish, potentially altering the native's genetics, life history and ecology. Reported in the journal Aquatic Invasions, the study highlights the difficulty of detecting some of the consequences of biological inv

13h

Nature

Heart-inflammation risk from Pfizer COVID vaccine is very low

Nature, Published online: 08 October 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02740-y Two studies from Israel quantify the risk of myocarditis following the Pfizer–BioNTech shot, with one suggesting the chance of developing the condition is about one in 50,000.

15h

For Better Science

Schneider Shorts 8.10.2021 – The Wrath of God

Schneider Shorts of 8 October 2021: greedy Big Pharma, killer kitties, fake Viking maps, fake clinical trials, fake CVs and fake grades, other tortured phrases, academic eugenics, updates on lab leak theory, and the scientific lessons for Christianity from Sodom and Gomorrah.

15h

Forskning & Framsteg – För dig som är nyfiken på allvar

Nobels fredspris till journalisterna Maria Ressa och Dmitrij Muratov

Årets fredspris tilldelas Maria Ressa och Dmitrij Muratov. Här kan du se offentliggörandet i efterhand och läsa om pristagarna.

15h

Discover Magazine

The Science of Sleep

What Technological Advancements Can Make a Mattress More Comfortable?

16h

Nature

Scientists hail historic malaria vaccine approval — but point to challenges ahead

Nature, Published online: 08 October 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02755-5 The WHO-approved RTS,S vaccine has modest efficacy and requires a complex regimen of doses, so ample funding and clear communication will be crucial to success.

16h

Science-Based Medicine

The Trolley Problem and Vaccinating Young People Against COVID-19

The harms we cause often lead to more grief than the harms we fail to prevent. Is this why some doctors are willing to leave young people vulnerable to a deadly virus? The post first appeared on Science-Based Medicine .

16h

Viden | DR

Gå på opdagelse i alle de gratis oplevelser, du kan få i Danmarks Motionsuge

I uge 41 er der over 5000 gratis idrætstilbud i hele Danmark.

17h

Science

Migrant exodus sparks worries over Ho Chi Minh City labour squeeze

Workers rush to leave Vietnam trading hub after coronavirus restrictions lifted

18h

Ingeniøren

Beredskabsradioer var indstillet forkert under ulykken på Storebælt

PLUS. 40 procent af beredskabsradioerne ved Storebæltsulykken i 2019 var indstillet forkert, viser en ny kortlægning. Årsagen er en ikke-intuitiv brugergrænseflade og begrænset uddannelse i SINE-radioer blandt det præhospitale personale.

20h

The Scientist RSS

Neuroscientist Nadia Chaudhri Dies at 43

Knowingly facing the end of her life, she raised hundreds of thousands of dollars for underrepresented students in higher education.

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Future(s) Studies

The next fashion trend is clothes that don't exist

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Future(s) Studies

Artificial intelligence takes structural biology to the next level

submitted by /u/Dr_Singularity [link] [comments]

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Future(s) Studies

Artificial intelligence can help halve road deaths by 2030

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Future(s) Studies

Y Combinator-backed CostCertified lands $8.45M to build the 'Amazon for construction' – TechCrunch

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Future(s) Studies

[October 2017] 79% of Americans believe it should be illegal for AI to pose as human

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Future(s) Studies

Explaining why 'green hydrogen' is our best (maybe only) option for getting to net-zero carbon by 2050 and halting climate change

submitted by /u/redingerforcongress [link] [comments]

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Future(s) Studies

Mercedes Starts Producing the EActros Electric Semi Truck

submitted by /u/kernals12 [link] [comments]

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Future(s) Studies

Norway to hit 100 per cent electric vehicle sales early next year | Analysis shows the last new petrol or diesel car sold in Norway will come as early as April, 2022 – three years ahead of the government's target.

submitted by /u/mepper [link] [comments]

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Future(s) Studies

UAP Craft "Rubber Duck" Tracked for Over 40 Minutes by the Department of Homeland Security

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Futurism

NASA Rover Confirms Gigantic Martian Crater Used To Be a Lake

NASA Mars Jezero Crater

Ancient Lakes New data from NASA's Perseverance rover confirms that Jezero Crater, the area on Mars that it's been exploring since it touched down back in February, is indeed the site of a gigantic ancient lake. The rover found geological structures that researchers from NASA and a long list of American and European universities say could have only been formed by a river flowing into a lake for a

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