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Dave Chappelle's Rorschach Test
At the end of Dave Chappelle's latest Netflix stand-up special—after 72 brutal, bruised, combative minutes that conclude with the story of a suicide—my other half turned to me and said: "That wasn't very funny, was it?" Was it even meant to be? The emotion that defines The Closer is not laughter, but anger. Chappelle once delivered his most offensive jokes with a goofy, quizzical, little-lost-boy
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Prince William: great minds should focus on saving Earth not space travel – video
The Duke of Cambridge has criticised the space race and space tourism, saying the world's greatest minds need to focus on fixing the Earth instead. In an interview with Newscast on BBC Sounds before his Earthshot prize awards , Prince William also warned about a rise in 'climate anxiety' among younger generations. His comments come the day after William Shatner, 90, made history by becoming the o
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The Hypocrisy of the Anti-vax Patriot
Molly didn't feel particularly patriotic as she said goodbye to her husband, a Navy doctor, early one morning in September. He was leaving on his second deployment in nine months, with just four days' notice (he'd gotten only 36 hours' notice ahead of his previous operation). And although his initial mission had been to the Middle East—on an aircraft carrier as a critical-care physician in case o
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New Treatment Eradicated Tumors in Terminally Ill Cancer Patients
A team of scientists at London's Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) has tested a new drug cocktail that they say has eradicated previously untreatable tumors in some terminally ill head and neck cancer patients. Giving patients two immunotherapy drugs, nivolumab and ipilimumab, seemed to shrink tumors in patients with advanced stages of cancer, The Guardian reports . Some of the patients walked a
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By Attacking Me, Justice Alito Proved My Point
Last month, Justice Samuel Alito insisted that the Supreme Court's critics are wrong. The Court is not "a dangerous cabal" that is "deciding important issues in a novel, secretive, improper way, in the middle of the night, hidden from public view," he said. Reading aloud from a piece I wrote in the aftermath of the Court's recent ruling on an abortion law, Alito insisted that it was "false and in
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William Shatner Tried to Tell Jeff Bezos About the Glory of Spaceflight, But Bezos Interrupted Him to Spray Staff With Champagne
It was an awkward moment. As soon as famed "Star Trek" actor William Shatner clambered out of Blue Origin's New Shepard capsule, as seen on Blue Origin's live stream today , he was clearly overcome, visibly shaken by the experience of seeing the Earth whip by. Shatner, alongside three other passengers, reached an apogee of over 66 miles during today's launch, narrowly crossing the boundary of spa
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'Sophisticated': ancient faeces shows humans enjoyed beer and blue cheese 2,700 years ago
Austrian Alps salt miners had a 'balanced diet', with an analysis of bronze and iron age excrement finding the earliest evidence of cheese ripening in Europe It's no secret that beer and blue cheese go hand in hand – but a new study reveals how deep their roots run in Europe, where workers at a salt mine in Austria were gorging on both up to 2,700 years ago. Scientists made the discovery by analy
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The Second Assassination of Martin Luther King Jr.
E arly on the evening of October 23, 2019, I took a tour of the Lorraine Motel. I'd been to Memphis, Tennessee, several times before, and I'd come back to speak at the National Civil Rights Museum, which encompasses the motel. But until that October, I'd never been able to bring myself to visit the site of Martin Luther King Jr.'s assassination. I saw what King saw moments before he saw no more.
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Why skyrmions could have a lot in common with glass and high-temperature superconductors
Scientists have known for a long time that magnetism is created by the spins of electrons lining up in certain ways. But about a decade ago, they discovered another astonishing layer of complexity in magnetic materials: Under the right conditions, these spins can form little vortexes or whirlpools that act like particles and move around independently of the atoms that spawned them.
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New record set for coldest temperature—38 picokelvins
A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in Germany and two in France has set a new record for the coldest temperature ever recorded in a lab setting—38 picokelvins. In their paper published in the journal Physics, the group describes their work with a time-domain matter-wave lens system. Vincenzo Tamma with the University of Portsmouth has published a Viewpoint article in the sa
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Leprosy in wild chimpanzees
Nature, Published online: 13 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03968-4 Monitoring of western chimpanzee populations in Guinea-Bissau and Côte d'Ivoire reveals the presence of rare and different genotypes of Mycobacterium leprae, suggesting greater circulation in wild animals than previously thought.
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Personality traits linked to hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease
New research found that changes in the brain associated with Alzheimer's disease are often visible early on in individuals with personality traits associated with the condition. The study focused on two traits previously linked to the risk of dementia: neuroticism, which measures a predisposition for negative emotions, and conscientiousness, which measures the tendency to be careful, organized, go
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Jon Gruden Just Put It in Writing
Updated at 12:04 p.m. ET on October 13, 2021 Jon Gruden's resignation as head coach of the Las Vegas Raiders is just the beginning of a long-overdue reckoning for the NFL, and it underscores the basic problem: The NFL is full of Jon Grudens. Gruden made racist, homophobic, and misogynistic comments in emails for nearly a decade, but he was forced out only when some of those reprehensible statemen
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Woman Almost Smashed by Meteorite That Crashed Through Ceiling and Landed on Her Bed
Meteorite Hit Golden, British Columbia native Ruth Hamilton was woken up by her dog barking — and seconds later, she says, a roughly two-pound rock smashed through her roof, landing inches from where she was sleeping. And as it turns out, it wasn't some dangerous prank. The rock was a chunk of actual meteorite, Canadian broadcaster Global News reports , which had lit up the night sky earlier that
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We Accidentally Solved the Flu. Now What?
Perhaps the oddest consolation prize of America's crushing, protracted battle with the coronavirus is the knowledge that flu season, as we've long known it, does not have to exist. It's easy to think of the flu as an immutable fact of winter life, more inconvenience than calamity. But each year, on average, it sickens roughly 30 million Americans and kills more than 30,000 (though the numbers var
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America Is Not Ready for Trump's Second Term
The United States was unprepared for the scope of President Donald Trump's attempt to steal the 2020 presidential election. By Election Day, Trump had spent months calling the election "rigged," and historians and democracy experts warned of the damage that these false claims could make . But when the president stepped to a lectern in the White House late on Election Night and insisted he'd won ,
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NASA Adviser Resigns Over Giant Homophobic Telescope
Hard Pass Last month, NASA deliberated and decided against changing the name of the James Webb Space Telescope, an orbital observatory expected to revolutionize astronomy that happens to be named after a homophobic former NASA Administrator . The space agency announced, without giving any details, that an investigation had occurred and that it found no reason to rename the space telescope, despit
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Calls for inquiry as negative Covid PCR tests after positive lateral flow reported
Scientists urge urgent investigation to ensure that people are not being given false negative results Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Scientists are calling for an urgent investigation after dozens of reports of people testing negative using gold-standard Covid PCR tests, despite testing positive on rapid lateral flow tests, and in many cases experiencing Covid-like
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Homeland Security Warns of Cyberattacks Intended to Kill People
Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas is warning that the next cyberattack could end up killing people — a dangerous and imminent shift from ransomware to "killware." In an interview with USA Today , Mayorkas noted that the Colonial Pipeline ransomware attack in April, which shut down much of the gas supply along the East Coast, was distracting from a far more egregious hack. "And that i
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Bezos' Blue Origin is at odds with everything Star Trek represents | Akin Olla
The entire premise of Star Trek was utopian: it pushed the limits of diversity, progressivism and inclusion on television and the science fiction genre The 90-year-old actor William Shatner, best known for his leading role as Captain James Tiberius Kirk of Star Trek: The Original Series, is headed to space, for real this time. Shatner will be launched off this Wednesday by on-again-off-again rich
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A Secretive Hedge Fund Is Gutting Newsrooms
The Tribune Tower rises above the streets of downtown Chicago in a majestic snarl of Gothic spires and flying buttresses that were designed to exude power and prestige. When plans for the building were announced in 1922, Colonel Robert R. McCormick, the longtime owner of the Chicago Tribune , said he wanted to erect "the world's most beautiful office building" for his beloved newspaper. The best
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Prince William criticises space race and tourism's new frontier
Duke of Cambridge says world's greatest minds need to focus on trying to fix the Earth instead The Duke of Cambridge has criticised the space race and space tourism, saying the world's greatest minds need to focus on trying to fix the Earth instead. Prince William's comments, in an interview with Newscast on BBC Sounds, will be aired the day after William Shatner made history by becoming the olde
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Meteor May Have Caused Huge Explosion Over New Hampshire, Scientists Say
Whodunnit The sound of an earth-shattering boom rocked New Hampshire while the ground shook on Sunday morning, in a statewide incident that left both state residents and experts baffled . Now, meteorologists think they finally know what caused the boom, The New York Times reports . Satellite imagery suggests that a meteor could have sailed over New Hampshire before exploding, causing the loud bla
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The FDA Just Officially Endorsed Vaping
The FDA, the government agency that regulates pharmaceuticals and medical devices to make sure that they're safe and effective, now endorses vaping. The agency announced on Tuesday that it would allow the company Vuse to market three products: an e-cigarette called the Vuse Solo Power Unit and two different kinds of replacement vape juice pods. This marks the first time that the FDA officially ap
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Scientists abused and threatened for discussing Covid, global survey finds
Poll of 321 scientists found 15% received death threats after speaking publicly on the pandemic How my ivermectin research led to Twitter death threats Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Scientists around the world have received threats of death and sexual assault after speaking to the media about Covid-19, a survey has revealed. Of 321 scientists asked by Nature magazi
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Ground control to Captain Kirk! William Shatner is off to the final frontier, for real
At the age of 90, the Star Trek star is set to board Jeff Bezos's space ship today. It's just the latest chapter in a long relationship between the sci-fi smash and real-life space odysseys William Shatner to blast off on Bezos rocket to become oldest person in space 'Risk is our business!" So declared William Shatner in the 1968 Star Trek episode Return to Tomorrow. His character, Cpt James T Ki
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Do We Really Need to Meet In Person?
R emember huddling in a conference room? It's almost cartoonish to imagine everybody squeezing into a poorly ventilated space to talk and trade germs for the purpose of … what, exactly? As many workers begin returning to their office for all or some of the work week, they're noticing a key change: The pandemic is nearing its conclusion, but meetings are still happening virtually. In many cases, o
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As Its Price Spikes, JPMorgan CEO Says Bitcoin Is "Worthless"
Worthless While Wall Street has increasingly started to embrace cryptocurrency, some executives of the biggest financial firms are still staunchly against the idea. Case in point, JPMorgan Chase CEO and outspoken crypto-critic Jamie Dimon said this week that he has no hope for the tech. "I personally think that bitcoin is worthless," Dimon said during an Institute of International Finance event o
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Deep Sea Creature Surprises Researchers Exploring Shipwreck
Photobomb In October 2020, a remotely-controlled deep sea vessel got surprised by a sizeable sea creature while exploring a shipwreck in the Red Sea almost 2,800 feet below the surface. There are still plenty of unanswered questions, but researchers are fairly certain that the tentacled visitor wasn't a giant squid, thanks to its body proportions. And that's despite the fact that it was larger th
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North Korea: Squid Game Is Proof Capitalism Doesn't Work
Squid Game North Korean propaganda website Arirang Meari wrote on Tuesday that Netflix's megahit TV show "Squid Game" proves once and for all that South Korea-style capitalism doesn't work. "It is said that it makes people realize the sad reality of the beastly South Korean society in which human beings are driven into extreme competition and their humanity is being wiped out," a short article po
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Covid booster shots important to stop infection, finds English study
Study shows protection against Covid starts to wane several months after full vaccination Scientists have urged eligible people to have Covid booster shots after a major survey in England found evidence of "breakthrough infections" more than three months after full vaccination. Researchers at Imperial College London analysed more than 100,000 swabs from a random sample of the population and found
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President of Brazil says it 'makes no sense' for him to be vaccinated
Jair Bolsonaro's comments called 'stupid and selfish' in country where 600,000 people have died of Covid Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage More than 600,000 of his citizens have lost their lives to a Covid-19 outbreak he once pooh-poohed as a "little flu", but Brazil's science-denying president, Jair Bolsonaro , has announced he will decline to be vaccinated, saying "i
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How Wavelets Allow Researchers to Transform, and Understand, Data
In an increasingly data-driven world, mathematical tools known as wavelets have become an indispensable way to analyze and understand information. Many researchers receive their data in the form of continuous signals, meaning an unbroken stream of information evolving over time, such as a geophysicist listening to sound waves bouncing off of rock layers underground, or a data scientist studying..
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Microsoft's Massive New Language AI Is Triple the Size of OpenAI's GPT-3
Just under a year and a half ago OpenAI announced completion of GPT-3 , its natural language processing algorithm that was, at the time, the largest and most complex model of its type. This week, Microsoft and Nvidia introduced a new model they're calling "the world's largest and most powerful generative language model." The Megatron-Turing Natural Language Generation model (MT-NLG) is more than
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William Shatner, TV's Capt. Kirk, blasts into space
Hollywood's Captain Kirk, 90-year-old William Shatner, blasted into space Wednesday in a convergence of science fiction and science reality, reaching the final frontier aboard a ship built by Jeff Bezos' Blue Origin company.
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A highly simplified way to predict quantum light-matter interactions
When light interacts with matter, for example, when a laser beam hits a two-dimensional material like graphene, it can substantially change the behavior of the material. Depending on the form of interaction between light and matter, some chemical reactions appear differently, substances turn magnetic or ferroelectric or begin to conduct electricity without any losses. In particularly thrilling cas
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'The real problem is the repetition of mistakes': scientists react to Covid inquiry
Senior figures say failure to prevent second wave was inexcusable given what was known about the virus Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The failure to prevent tens of thousands of deaths during Britain's brutal second wave of Covid infections was a more serious error than the timing of the first lockdown, senior scientists have told the Guardian, after a damning repor
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Russian Study Confirms That Space Travel Damages Your Brain Cells
A new study on the brains of five Russian cosmonauts who spent months on the International Space Station confirms that space travel can do some serious damage to the human body and mind. For years, scientists have been tallying up adverse effects of space travel including weakened muscles and bones and worsened vision . This new research , published in the journal JAMA Neurology on Monday, is the
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How my ivermectin research led to Twitter death threats | Dr Andrew Hill
I was sent images of coffins and hanged Nazi war criminals after finding medical fraud in clinical trials The story of online threats and abuse is very dark. In early 2021, my research team was analysing a new drug called ivermectin. In the first clinical trials, this drug seemed to prevent new infections and improve survival. When I first wrote about this, I started getting regular threats on Tw
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When the Place You Live Becomes Unlivable
"New Orleans is the only ship I'd go down with," my friend Ben wrote on Facebook in the hours before Hurricane Ida upended southeast Louisiana. He rode out the storm in the city—"hunkering down," in standard hurricane parlance. Anxious but safe, I read his post at a splash pad in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. My family and I had evacuated New Orleans the day before, on August 28—two dogs, two kids, and tw
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Winners of Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2021
The Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition, founded in 1965, is an annual international showcase of the best nature photography. This year, the contest attracted more than 50,000 entries from 95 countries. Wildlife Photographer of the Year is developed and produced by the Natural History Museum, London. The owners and sponsors have once more been kind enough to share the following winning
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NASA's Scandal-Plagued James Webb Telescope Arrives at Launch Site
Final Destination After decades of development — and delays — the James Webb Space Telescope is finally being prepped for launch. The European Space Agency (ESA) has confirmed that the giant space telescope has arrived at its spaceport in French Guiana, a territory of France located on the northeast corner of South America. There, the spaceport's proximity to the equator will help the ESA's Arian
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William Shatner Takes Blue Origin Joyride, as Scandals Plague Company
Beam me up, Jeffrey! Blue Origin has launched William Shatner, best known as the actor who played Captain Kirk in the "Star Trek" franchise, to an altitude of 66.5 miles. Shatner was joined by biotech entrepreneur Glen de Vries, Blue Origin's Vice President of Mission & Flight Operations Audrey Powers, and Australian physicist and engineer Chris Boshuizern. "That was unlike anything they describe
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Climate Change Mission Control
How do we work together to create a nation resilient against climate change? Earlier today, NASA joined forces with FEMA to co-host their Resilient Nation Partnership Network Alliances for Climate Action Virtual Forum Series . NASA Administrator Sen. Bill Nelson, Official Portrait, Monday, May 17, 2021, NASA Headquarters Mary W. Jackson Building in Washington. Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls NASA's res
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Meteorite crashes through roof of Canada woman's home and on to bed
'I've never been so scared in my life,' says Ruth Hamilton after meteorite shower above a western Canadian region A woman in Canada awoke in shock earlier this week when a rock crashed through the ceiling of her home and landed on her bed, narrowly missing her but spraying grit and other debris on her face, as her dog barked frantically. Police were called and the culprit was initially suspected
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Holey metalens! New metalens focuses light with ultra-deep holes
Metasurfaces are nanoscale structures that interact with light. Today, most metasurfaces use monolith-like nanopillars to focus, shape and control light. The taller the nanopillar, the more time it takes for light to pass through the nanostructure, giving the metasurface more versatile control of each color of light. But very tall pillars tend to fall or cling together. What if, instead of buildin
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Ridley Scott's New Film Plays a Masterly Trick
The Last Duel introduces Jean de Carrouges (played by Matt Damon ), its ostensible hero, with the gritty fanfare expected from a Ridley Scott epic. Much like the valiant former Roman general Maximus of Gladiator or the stouthearted Crusader Balian of Kingdom of Heaven , Jean proudly charges into battle, sword in hand, hacking at the enemy with no regard for his own life. The film follows Jean in
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Underwater gardens boost coral diversity to stave off 'biodiversity meltdown'
Corals are the foundation species of tropical reefs worldwide, but stresses ranging from overfishing to pollution to warming oceans are killing corals and degrading the critical ecosystem services they provide. Because corals build structures that make living space for many other species, scientists have known that losses of corals result in losses of other reef species. But the importance of cora
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What will happen after the sun dies? 'Serendipitous' discovery gives clues
A distant gas giant found orbiting a white dwarf star suggests outer planets in our solar system might survive the sun's demise Get our free news app ; get our morning email briefing A Jupiter-sized planet has been found orbiting a white dwarf star in the Milky Way, providing clues as to what will happen in our solar system when the sun eventually dies. An international team of astronomers observ
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Ancient poop shows people in present-day Austria drank beer and ate blue cheese up to 2,700 years ago
Human feces don't usually stick around for long—and certainly not for thousands of years. But exceptions to this general rule are found in a few places in the world, including prehistoric salt mines of the Austrian UNESCO World Heritage area Hallstatt-Dachstein/Salzkammergut. Now, researchers who've studied ancient fecal samples (or paleofeces) from these mines have uncovered some surprising evide
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Rocket men: how billionaires are using celebrities as PR for their space projects
Critics see the 'awful business' of private space tourism as having little technological or exploration value As Star Trek's iconic Captain James T Kirk, he voyaged the universe for the good of humanity. The nonagenarian actor William Shatner's brief, real-life thrill ride off the planet today, however, is much less about advancing the species as promoting the fortunes of Blue Origin, the private
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Drug trial offers new hope for those with metastatic breast cancer
Scientists are studying whether talazoparib could help treat those with incurable breast cancer Scientists have launched a new trial that could offer hope to those with incurable breast cancer. They are studying whether an existing drug, talazoparib, also known by the brandname Talzenna, may offer a new treatment to people with incurable breast cancer that has spread to the brain. Continue readin
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Arctic Ocean's 'last ice area' may not survive the century
With warming climate, summer sea ice in the Arctic has been shrinking fast, and now consistently spans less than half the area it did in the early 1980s. This raises the question: It this keeps up, in the future will year-round sea ice—and the creatures who need it to survive—persist anywhere?
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Dozens of Self-Driving Cars Getting Stuck on Same Dead-End Street
Traffic Jam Well, this is a new one. Waymo, a Google offshoot that develops usually-impressive self-driving cars , has run into a problem as dozens of its semi-autonomous vehicles are getting stuck on the same dead-end street. 15th Avenue in San Francisco's Richmond District is normally a quiet, residential, and — pivotally — dead-end street. But for the past several weeks, it's become a hotspot
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The Sleeper SCOTUS Case That Threatens the Separation of Church and State
The Supreme Court's upcoming abortion- and guns-rights cases are getting much of the attention right now, but a third, relatively overlooked case could transform one of the most consequential areas of American law: the separation of Church and state. If the plaintiffs win, states and municipalities could be required to use taxpayer dollars to supplement strands of private religious education that
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Ultrasound trial offers hope for brain cancer patients
New technique temporarily allows drugs to cross blood brain barrier to treat tumours A technique has been developed that could revolutionise the treatment of brain cancers and neurodegenerative diseases by temporarily allowing drugs and other substances to cross the blood brain barrier – a structure that separates the brain's blood vessels from the rest of its tissues. A trial in four women whose
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The Cost of William Shatner's 'Most Profound Experience'
Updated at 2:38 p.m. on Oct. 13, 2021. William Shatner was a little nervous about that rocket. A week ago, during a CNN interview , his eyes went wide when the network showed a clip of a Blue Origin rocket taking off, streams of blazing exhaust unfurling from below. He'd never seen that footage before, he said, with all that "fire and brimstone." "Oh my gosh," the actor said. "Things like that go
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The Energy Crunch, in Six Paragraphs
This is an excerpt from The Atlantic 's climate newsletter, The Weekly Planet. Subscribe today . This is the month that the world's energy transition got messy. Over the past few weeks, the world has sleepwalked into an energy crunch. The benchmark price of a barrel of crude oil is up more than 25 percent from its August low. In Asia, natural-gas prices are approaching an all-time high . The risk
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The most powerful space telescope ever built will look back in time to the Dark Ages of the universe
Some have called NASA's James Webb Space Telescope the "telescope that ate astronomy." It is the most powerful space telescope ever built and a complex piece of mechanical origami that has pushed the limits of human engineering. On Dec. 18, 2021, after years of delays and billions of dollars in cost overruns, the telescope is scheduled to launch into orbit and usher in the next era of astronomy.
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Researchers find Greenland's groundwater changes with thinning ice sheet
For more than a decade, a team of University of Montana researchers and students have studied the dynamics of the Greenland Ice Sheet as it responds to a warming climate. University of Montana (UM) Department of Geosciences researchers Toby Meierbachtol and Joel Harper said water has always been central to their research.
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Shape-shifting worm blob model could inspire future robot swarms
Blackworms (Lumbriculus variegatus) are distant relatives of rainworms, measuring up to 10 cm long. They live in shallow marshes, ponds, and swamps in Europe and North America, where they feed on microorganisms and debris. To protect themselves from drought, blackworms can aggregate as entangled, shape-shifting "blobs" composed of a few to hundreds of individuals. Just like swarms of bees, rafts o
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Fall Is in the Air: Images of the Season
Autumn, the best season, is upon us once again. The autumnal equinox took place a few weeks ago, marking the end of summer and the start of fall across the Northern Hemisphere. It is the season of harvests, festivals, migrations, winter preparations, and, of course, spectacular fall foliage. Across the North, people are beginning to feel a chill in the evening air, leaves are splashing mountainsi
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Climate study linking early Māori fires to Antarctic changes sparks controversy
Research tying Māori activity 700 years ago to Antarctic changes sparks debate in New Zealand over Indigenous inclusion in science Deep in the ice of a remote Antarctic peninsula, a group of researchers found evidence that fires started by early Māori wreaked changes in the atmosphere detectable 7,000km away. In New Zealand, the research sparked a heated controversy of its own – over Indigenous i
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Covid conspiracy theories are driving people to anti-Semitism online
A warning: Conspiracy theories about covid are helping disseminate anti-Semitic beliefs to a wider audience, warns a new report by the antiracist advocacy group Hope not Hate. The report says that not only has the pandemic revived interest in the "New World Order" conspiracy theory of a secret Jewish-run elite that aims to run the world, but far-right activists have also worked to convert people'
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'Most profound experience': William Shatner starstruck by encounter with space – video
Actor William Shatner soared aboard a Blue Origin rocketship on a suborbital trip on Wednesday to become, at the age 90, the oldest person ever in space – an experience he called profound – as US billionaire businessman Jeff Bezos's company carried out its second tourist flight William Shatner completes flight on Bezos rocket to become oldest person in space Continue reading…
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How Animals Map 3D Spaces Surprises Brain Researchers
Leaping, scurrying, flying and swimming through their natural habitats, animals compile a mental map of the world around them — one that they use to navigate home, find food and locate other points of vital interest. Neuroscientists have chiseled away at the problem of how animals do this for decades. A crucial piece of the solution is an elegant neural code that researchers uncovered by… Sourc
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Binary stars boost cosmic carbon footprint
The cosmic origin of carbon, a fundamental building block of life, is still uncertain. Massive stars play an important role in the synthesis of all heavy elements, from carbon and oxygen to iron and so on. But even though most massive stars are born in multiple systems, the nucleosynthesis models so far have almost exclusively simulated single stars. An international team of astrophysicists has no
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Facebook wants machines to see the world through our eyes
We take it for granted that machines can recognize what they see in photos and videos. That ability rests on large data sets like ImageNet , a hand-curated collection of millions of photos used to train most of the best image-recognition models of the last decade. But the images in these data sets portray a world of curated objects—a picture gallery that doesn't capture the mess of everyday life
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San Andreas Fault-like tectonics discovered on Saturn moon Titan
Strike-slip faulting, the type of motion common to California's well-known San Andreas Fault, was reported recently to possibly occur on Titan, Saturn's largest moon. New research, led by planetary scientists from the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST), suggests this tectonic motion may be active on Titan, deforming the icy surface.
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'Selective promiscuity,' chaperones, and the secrets of cellular health
A team of researchers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst has announced a major new advance in understanding how our genetic information eventually translates into functional proteins—one of the building blocks of human life. The research, recently published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), elucidates how chaperones display "selective promiscuity" for the speci
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Evidence found of sea slugs stealing photosynthesizing machinery from algae, using it to boost reproduction
A team of researchers affiliated with multiple institutions in Portugal and France has found evidence suggesting that sea slugs that steal photosynthesizing machinery from the algae they eat use it to boost their own reproduction efforts. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes their study of the unique creatures and what they learned about them.
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Scientists report evidence for a new but now extinct species of ancient ground-dwelling sloth
Scientists at Johns Hopkins Medicine and the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine report new evidence that some 5,000 years ago, a sloth smaller than a black bear roamed the forest floor of what is now the Dominican Republic in the Caribbean Sea, living a lowland life different from its cousins on the other side of the island. The newly identified mammalian species—now extinct—was smaller
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'The Men Who Are Killing America's Newspapers'
Many people assume that local newspapers are dying because they haven't been able to create a sustainable business model for the digital age, now that Facebook and Google command the advertising space. But that's only part of the story. For The Atlantic 's November cover story, " The Men Who Are Killing America's Newspapers ," staff writer McKay Coppins reports on the secretive hedge fund Alden G
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The Christians Who Mock Wokeness for a Living
The Babylon Bee, an online satire publication that launched in 2016, has become a popular destination for Christians disaffected with megachurch culture and right-wingers who crave clever commentary about the hypocritical left. Kyle Mann, the website's editor in chief, sometimes gives talks on college campuses. For conservative students, he told me, "It's like they found their underground cabal o
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'Cleaning up' an oil spill
After thousands of gallons of oil poured into the Pacific Ocean following the October 2 spill, agencies and volunteers have worked around the clock to mitigate the damage and stop the spread.
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Over a thousand cosmic explosions detected in 47 days
An international research team led by Prof. Li Di and Dr. Wang Pei from National Astronomical Observatories of Chinese Academy of Sciences (NAOC) caught an extreme episode of cosmic explosions from Fast Radio Burst (FRB) 121102, using the Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope (FAST). A total of 1,652 independent bursts were detected within 47 days starting Aug. 29, 2019 (UT).
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New, non-invasive blood sugar testing methods using saliva
Despite breakthrough diabetes research over the past century, people with diabetes still need to rely on obtaining blood samples to monitor their sugar levels. Daily glucose monitoring by tracking blood sugar levels is essential for managing both types 1 and 2 diabetes, however the current method—finger pricking—is invasive and can become burdensome with how often it needs to be done.
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Government must be transparent about science advice it receives
Analysis: inquiry into UK's response to Covid crisis shows Sage guidance should be put in public domain as soon as possible Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The parliamentary inquiry into the UK's response to the Covid crisis raises the serious issue of transparency around scientific advice – and why this remains crucial even as the country moves beyond an emergency s
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ENSO impacts child undernutrition in the global tropics
Nature Communications, Published online: 12 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26048-7 The El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) influences the weather around the world and, therefore, has strong impacts on society. Here, the authors show that ENSO is associated with child nutrition in many countries, with warmer El Niño conditions leading to more child undernutrition in large parts of the develo
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Homegrown Covid vaccines fill gap as UN Covax scheme misses target
India, Egypt and Cuba among first states to develop and make their own vaccines as Covax falls behind Developing countries are increasingly turning to homegrown Covid vaccinations as the UN-backed Covax programme falls behind. While western countries roll out booster jabs to their own populations, Covax, which was set up by UN agencies, governments and donors to ensure fair access to Covid-19 vac
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Molecular mixing creates super stable glass
Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have succeeded in creating a new type of super-stable, durable glass with potential applications ranging from medicines, advanced digital screens, and solar cell technology. The study shows how mixing multiple molecules—up to eight at a time—can result in a material that performs as well as the best currently known glass formers.
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The Experiment Podcast: Liberals Don't Get The Babylon Bee. Neither Do Conservatives.
Listen and subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Podcasts The satire site The Babylon Bee , a conservative Christian answer to The Onion , stirred controversy when some readers mistook its headlines for misinformation. In this episode, The Atlantic 's religion reporter Emma Green sits down with The Bee 's editor in chief, Kyle Mann, to talk about where he draws the line between
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To Be Happy, Hide From the Spotlight
" How to Build a Life " is a weekly column by Arthur Brooks, tackling questions of meaning and happiness. Click here to listen to his new podcast series on all things happiness, How to Build a Happy Life . Humans have a bad habit of wanting things that are terrible for us. An abundance of refined sugar rots our teeth and blows out our insulin system. Avoiding exercise can weaken our bones and mak
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Indian scientists explore galaxy cluster Abell 725
Using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT), Indian astronomers have conducted radio observations of a galaxy cluster known as Abell 725. Results of this observational campaign deliver important information regarding the structure and morphology of Abell 725, revealing the presence of diffuse filaments in this cluster. The study was presented in a paper published October 7 on arXiv.org.
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Ancient feces shows people in present-day Austria drank beer and ate blue cheese up to 2,700 years ago
Human feces don't usually stick around for long — and certainly not for thousands of years. But exceptions to this general rule are found in a few places in the world, including prehistoric salt mines of the Austrian UNESCO World Heritage area Hallstatt-Dachstein/Salzkammergut. Now, researchers who've studied ancient fecal samples (or paleofeces) from these mines have uncovered some surprising ev
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Podcast: The story of AI, as told by the people who invented it
Welcome to I Was There When , a new oral history project from the In Machines We Trust podcast. It features stories of how breakthroughs in artificial intelligence and computing happened, as told by the people who witnessed them. In this first episode, we meet Joseph Atick— who helped create the first commercially viable face recognition system. Credits: This episode was produced by Jennifer Stro
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People taking statins less likely to die from Covid, study suggests
Experts warn findings do not prove cholesterol-lowering drugs can reduce death rates Millions of people who take statins may be less likely to die from Covid, research suggests. The cholesterol-lowering drugs are one of the world's most popular medications. They can also reduce inflammation in blood vessels, which has prompted questions over whether they could help with outcomes in coronavirus pa
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The first unequivocal experimental evidence of a superfluid state in 2D 4He films
Over the past few decades, some physicists worldwide have been trying to use the second layer of 4He films adsorbed on a graphite substrate to study the interplay between superfluid and supersolid phases of matter. Some teams have collected torsional oscillator (TO) measurements on this layer, including P.A. Crowell, F.W. Van Keuls and J.D. Reppy at Cornell University, as well as Dr. Jan Nyeki and
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The Atlantic Daily: A Profession Is Not a Personality
Here's a six-word story for this economic moment: Job opening, just posted. Please apply. Americans are quitting their gigs at a record-setting rate: 4.3 million people said bye to their boss in August , according to new data from the Department of Labor. That's up from the previous all-time peak, logged this past April. Open positions are likewise trending high. As we've written, this "great res
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First evidence of microtubules' mechanosensitive behavior
Inside cells, microtubules not only serve as a component of the cytoskeleton (cell skeleton) but also play a role in intracellular transport. In intracellular transport, microtubules act as rails for motor proteins such as kinesin and dynein. Microtubules, the most rigid cytoskeletal component, are constantly subjected to various mechanical stresses such as compression, tension, and bending during
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Surface chemistry reveals corrosive secrets
One can easily see with the naked eye that leaving an old nail out in the rain causes rust. What does require the keen eyes and sensitive nose of microscopy and spectroscopy is observing how iron corrodes and forms new minerals, especially in water with a pinch of sodium and calcium.
22h
'Gen Z' Only Exists in Your Head
You know there's drama in research circles—or at least what qualifies as drama in research circles—when someone writes an open letter. Earlier this year, that someone was Philip Cohen, a sociologist at the University of Maryland at College Park. His request: that Pew Research Center, the nonpartisan "fact tank," "do the right thing" and stop using generational labels such as Gen Z and Baby Boomer
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William Shatner ready for 'life-changing' space flight at 90 – video
William Shatner, who played Captain Kirk in Star Trek, is to become the oldest person to venture into space. 'I shall be entranced by the view of space. I want to look at that orb and appreciate its beauty … its tenacity is sustaining this life of ours,' Shatner, 90, said in a video released by the aerospace company Blue Origin William Shatner to blast off on Bezos rocket to become oldest perso
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The Atlantic Daily: The Real 2024 Election Nightmare
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox. Melissa Sue Gerrits / Getty The 2024 presidential election could very well be a rematch of 2020. "A Trump candidacy in 2024 is almost certain, and a nomination is probable," my colleague David A.
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Smoke from nuclear war would devastate ozone layer, alter climate
The massive columns of smoke generated by a nuclear war would alter the world's climate for years and devastate the ozone layer, endangering both human health and food supplies, new research shows. The international study draws on newly developed computer climate modeling techniques to paint an even grimmer picture of a global nuclear war's aftermath than previous analyses.
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Improved fluorescent amino acids for cellular imaging
New research conducted by researchers in the lab of Penn's E. James Petersson in collaboration with Oregon State University and the University of Washington describes how proteins in living cells can be engineered to include synthetic fluorescent amino acids that are bright, long-lasting, and have properties that sense their environment. This work can help biologists study proteins more easily, wi
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By 2500 Earth could be alien to humans
To fully grasp and plan for climate impacts under any scenario, researchers and policymakers must look well beyond the 2100 benchmark. Unless CO2 emissions drop significantly, global warming by 2500 will make the Amazon barren, the American Midwest tropical, and India too hot to live in, according to a team of international scientists.
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Evidence of superionic ice provides new insights into unusual magnetic fields of Uranus and Neptune
Not all ice is the same. The solid form of water comes in more than a dozen different – sometimes more, sometimes less crystalline – structures, depending on the conditions of pressure and temperature in the environment. Superionic ice is a special crystalline form, half solid, half liquid – and electrically conductive. Its existence has been predicted on the basis of various models and has alread
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Lone changer: Fish camouflage better without friends nearby
While gobies aren't the only fish with camouflage abilities, new research shows that their colour change is influenced by their social context: they transform faster and better when alone. This is likely an adaptive, stress response to perceived threat from predators – with possible application to other camouflaging species.
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HTC Announces Smaller, Lighter Vive Flow VR Headset
HTC's presence in the smartphone market has all but evaporated, but it's still a presence in the world of VR. Facebook's Oculus is way out in the lead, but HTC hopes its new Vive Flow might attract a new kind of VR enthusiast. The lightweight headset is styled more like a pair of glasses, making it easier to pop them on to watch Netflix or play a simple game. However, you're going to need an exte
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12-Year-Old Develops Slenderman Phobia After Seeing Him in VR
Technophobia As Facebook and other companies take steps to build a "metaverse" and strive to make virtual and mixed reality experiences as much of an all-encompassing tech as the internet is today, experts are sharing concerns about safety, both during the experiences themselves and in terms of the impact they can have on our offline lives. One 12-year-old girl told Slate that she now has a " pho
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Third-Ever Tardigrade Fossil Discovered Hiding in a Hunk of Amber
Again with the accidental discoveries! It's the third unexpected find within six weeks. This time, the good news was born from debris in a hunk of Dominican amber. The researchers were studying ants from the Miocene period, trapped in a piece of amber. A closer look at the "debris" inclusions, however, revealed an even greater prize than the ants. What researchers had thought was just a fleck of
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Study finds male, female responses to performance pay similar across contexts, programs
Past studies have raised the possibility that performance pay—programs that give employees incentives to be productive by offering rewards for achieving performance objectives—may widen the gender earnings gap because women do not respond to performance incentives as strongly as men for psychological or cultural reasons. A new study evaluated this notion by aggregating evidence from experiments on
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Climate change threatens hydropower energy security in the Amazon basin
Hydropower is the dominant source of energy in the Amazon region, the world's largest river basin and a hotspot for future hydropower development. However, a new Global Environmental Change study warns that in the coming decades, climate change-driven reductions in precipitation and river discharge will diminish the Amazon's hydropower capacity.
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Scientists discover large rift in the Arctic's last bastion of thick sea ice
A new study documents the formation of a 3,000-square-kilometer rift in the oldest and thickest Arctic ice. The area of open water, called a polynya, is the first to be identified in an area north of Ellesmere Island, Canada's northernmost island, and is another sign of the rapid changes taking place in the Arctic, according to researchers.
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Evidence of superionic ice provides new insights into the unusual magnetic fields of Uranus and Neptune
Not all ice is the same. The solid form of water comes in more than a dozen different—sometimes more, sometimes less crystalline—structures, depending on the conditions of pressure and temperature in the environment. Superionic ice is a special crystalline form—half solid, half liquid—and electrically conductive. Its existence has been predicted on the basis of various models and has already been
1h
The planet does not fall far from the star
A compositional link between planets and their respective host star has long been assumed in astronomy. For the first time now, a team of scientists deliver empirical evidence to support the assumption—and partly contradict it at the same time.
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Predicting phosphine reactivity with one simple metric
Phosphines are among the most important ligands for transition metal catalysis. Phosphines bind to a metal and modify its structure, reactivity, and selectivity. Many of the most practiced catalytic reactions in the pharmaceutical/commodity chemical industry use phosphines as ligands, such as cross-coupling. In these and many other cases, small changes to the phosphine structure often have signifi
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More than half of survivors experience 'long COVID'
More than half of the 236 million people diagnosed with COVID-19 worldwide since December 2019 will experience post-COVID symptoms—commonly known as "long COVID"—up to six months after recovering. Governments, health care organizations, and public health professionals should prepare for the large number of COVID-19 survivors who will need care for a variety of psychological and physical symptoms,
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William Shatner has taken a small step, but it's a giant leap to call him an astronaut | Brief letters
Space travel | Books | Duels in film Amazing though William Shatner's short journey into near space was, I think it's a bit of a stretch to call him an astronaut ( William Shatner in tears after historic space flight: 'I'm so filled with emotion, 13 October ). You'll be calling us letter writers journalists next. David Edwards Hulme Stockport, Greater Manchester • As we seem to have entered a per
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Lupus sufferers pleaded for hydroxychloroquine before Clive Palmer's doses were destroyed
Drug's potential as Covid treatment, since dispelled, affected availability for people with proven medical need Get our free news app ; get our morning email briefing Lupus sufferers pleaded for more supplies of hydroxychloroquine two months before the federal government told billionaire Clive Palmer it didn't want more of the 33m doses he wanted to donate as a potential Covid-19 treatment. One t
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Getting the most from your data-driven transformation: 10 key principles
The importance of data to today's businesses can't be overstated. Studies show data-driven companies are 58% more likely to beat revenue goals than non-data-driven companies and 162% more likely to significantly outperform laggards. Data analytics are helping nearly half of all companies make better decisions about everything, from the products they deliver to the markets they target. Data is bec
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Researchers Announce Most Precise Measurement Ever Taken of a Free Neutron's Lifetime
To answer the big questions, sometimes we must look to the very small. Researchers at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center's Ultracold Neutron Source, within Los Alamos National Lab, have been passing the cryo-baton for more than a decade, working at ever colder temperatures in order to study the behavior of neutrons. Now, an international collaboration of scientists has announced the most preci
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Drones Have Now Been Used to Deliver Lungs for Medical Transplant
(Photo: Unither Bioélectronique) The world's first drone delivery of lungs has gone down in history as a success. Unither Bioélectronique, a bioengineering firm focused on organ transportation, recently completed a "proof-of-concept" flight in which a pair of human lungs were shipped via drone to the transplant site in about six minutes. The lungs were flown from the Toronto Western Hospital to T
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The Radeon RX 6600 is AMD's Weakest RDNA2 GPU Yet
AMD has launched its RDNA2-powered Radeon 6600 and taken the crown as the least-attractive GPU since Ampere kicked off the most recent product update cycle just over a year ago. That's the overall opinion of the various publications that have spent time with the card. These lower-end versions of RDNA2 may be more affordable and at least slightly easier to find than the 6700 XT and 6800 XT, but th
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Team makes most precise measurement of neutron lifetime
Physicists have announced the world's most precise measurement of the neutron's lifetime. The scientific purpose of the experiment is to measure how long, on average, a free neutron lives outside the confines of atomic nuclei. The results represent a more than two-fold improvement over previous measurements—with an uncertainty of less than one-tenth of a percent. "This work sets a new gold-standa
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Cannabis labels often wrong and misleading
The well-known India and Sativa labels that are used on cannabis products and form the basis for the information provided to users of medicinal cannabis are usually wrong and misleading. That is what researchers from Wageningen University & Research and the Canadian Dalhousie University conclude after analysizing hundreds of cannabis samples. Their research showed that the genetic and chemical com
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Using Disney movies to help with child development
Worried your children are getting too much screen time during the COVID-19 pandemic? How many times can a person watch "Frozen," right? Turns out, animated movies can serve as valuable tools for parents and counselors alike to improve communication with children about tough issues.
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COVID super-immunity: one of the pandemic's great puzzles
Nature, Published online: 14 October 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02795-x People who have previously recovered from COVID-19 have a stronger immune response after being vaccinated than those who have never been infected. Scientists are trying to find out why.
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Physics outreach programs are a win-win for students, community
Although they sometimes get short shrift in terms of prioritizing, funding, and staffing, physics educational outreach programs are a solid investment with benefits far beyond the institutional bottom line, according to a new study. For the study, physicists and learning scientists spent roughly two years surveying and interviewing more than 100 undergraduate and graduate students involved in pre
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Scientists develop fully solar-driven autonomous chemical mini-plant
Professor Timothy Noël and co-workers in the Flow Chemistry group of the University of Amsterdam's Van 't Hoff Institute for Molecular Sciences have developed a fully operational standalone solar-powered mini-reactor which offers the potential for the production of fine chemicals in remote locations on Earth, and possibly even on Mars. In a paper published by ChemSusChem, the team present their un
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British Royal Disses William Shatner's Spaceflight
Prince William, a member of the British royal family and second in line for the throne, wasn't impressed with "Star Trek" actor William Shatner's brief joyride to the upper reaches of the Earth's atmosphere on board a Blue Origin rocket. "We need some of the world's greatest brains and minds fixed on trying to repair this planet, not trying to find the next place to go and live," he told the BBC
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Growing dominance of diatom algae in the Pearl River estuary
It is a common perception that waters close to population would be more polluted than those offshore or at higher latitudes. However, researchers from The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) found that the ratio between two common microalgae diatom and dinoflagellate (dino) – a common benchmark of water quality, has been nearly doubled in the Pearl River Estuary (PRE), one of th
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Robots can improve agriculture, but old laws stand in the way
Agricultural robots are capable of working around the clock to help farmers produce food. However, laws and regulations are outdated and may, at worst, be slowing the development of new technologies, according to a new study by the University of Copenhagen's Department of Food and Resource Economics and others.
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Sense of smell is our most rapid warning system
The ability to detect and react to the smell of a potential threat is a precondition of our and other mammals' survival. Using a novel technique, researchers have been able to study what happens in the brain when the central nervous system judges a smell to represent danger. The study indicates that negative smells associated with unpleasantness or unease are processed earlier than positive smells
3h
How the Sun's magnetic forces arrange gas particles
Solar prominences hover above the visible solar disk like giant clouds, held there by a supporting framework of magnetic forces, originating from layers deep within the Sun. The magnetic lines of force are moved by ever-present gas currents — and when the supporting framework moves, so does the prominence cloud. A research team has observed how magnetic forces lifted a prominence by 25,000 kilome
3h
Metamaterial eENZ can control correlations of light
Researchers have theoretically demonstrated that the correlations of light can be controlled with a metamaterial known as enhanced epsilon-near-zero (eENZ) materials. The material allows small and high-quality lasers that are expected to have applications for example in imaging, flow detection and wireless optical communication.
3h
Tackling the collateral damage from antibiotics
Antibiotics help us to get rid of bacterial infections — but they can also harm the helpful microbes residing in our guts. Researchers have analyzed the effects of 144 antibiotics on the well-being of our most common gut microbes. The study significantly improves our understanding of antibiotics' side effects and suggests a new approach to mitigating the adverse effects of antibiotics therapy on
4h
Freezing fruit flies for future function
Researchers demonstrate a new technique for the cryopreservation of fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Frozen Drosophila primordial germ cells, which give rise to reproductive cells during development, may be thawed and implanted into host flies. This can lead to offspring that bear genetic characteristics of the donor flies. This technique offers a way to store Drosophila strains for future use,
4h
Most commonly mutated gene in all cancers revealed
For the past fifteen years, cancer researchers have been using DNA sequencing technology to identify the gene mutations that cause the different forms of cancer. Now, computational scientists have combined gene mutation information with cancer prevalence data to reveal the genetic basis of cancer in the entire population of cancer patients in the United States. The study reveals how common each ge
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How immunotherapy changes tumors
Engineers have used a non-invasive optical probe to understand the complex changes in tumors after immunotherapy, a treatment that harnesses the immune system to fight cancer. Their method combines detailed mapping of the biochemical composition of tumors with machine learning.
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The first step towards more inclusive dermatology | Jenna C. Lester
Skin is one of the most powerful predictors of health, yet nearly half of all new dermatologists admit to feeling uncomfortable identifying health issues on darker skin tones — resulting in poorer health outcomes for patients of color. In this crucial talk, TED Fellow and dermatologist Jenna C. Lester shares her effort to extend medical training beyond its current limited scope and ensure all med
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Michio Kaku: SpaceX Is Absolutely Destroying Blue Origin
Bury the Lead It's no secret that SpaceX is several steps ahead of its competition — to put it lightly. The Elon Musk-led company has sent multiple crews of astronauts into orbit, and is making significant progress on developing a heavy launch vehicle capable of sending the first humans in decades to the surface of the Moon. Blue Origin, in contrast, has only sent two crews of tourists to an alti
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Plant-based jet fuel could reduce emissions by 68%
Replacing petroleum-based aviation fuel with sustainable aviation fuel derived from a type of mustard plant can reduce carbon emissions by up to 68%, according to new research from University of Georgia scientist Puneet Dwivedi.
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Long-term experiment shows warming slows microbes' growth
In a first-of-its-kind warming experiment, researchers at Northern Arizona University found that microbes growth rate decreased over 15 years of warming. The research, published this week in Global Change Biology, showed that under warmer climate conditions, growth decreased among all types of microbes in the community, and suggested that a loss of soil carbon may be responsible for the slowdown.
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Exotic magnetic states in miniature dimensions
We are all used to the idea that simpler units in nature interact to form complex structures. Take, for example, the hierarchy of life, where atoms combine to form molecules, molecules combine to form cells, cells combine to form tissues, and so on, ultimately leading to the formation of complex organisms such as humans. In the quantum world, however, this process may play in reverse, where intera
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No to the re-approval of glyphosate – Large aerial dispersal confirmed
The EU authorities' assumption that glyphosate does not spread through the air has been disproven. The results of the German study "Pesticide pollution of the air" prove that glyphosate and dozens of other pesticides are traveling through the air for miles into national parks and cities. The analysis was initially published in 2019 and has now been peer-reviewed by independent scientists and publi
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Serendipitous discovery leads to a new understanding of how cells multitask
Quantitative Biosciences Institute (QBI) researchers at UC San Francisco have discovered a new paradigm for how fundamental biological switches, proteins that can be turned on and off to control processes like cell differentiation, cell growth, and transport within a cell, are regulated at the molecular level, specifically by molecules binding at newly discovered sites far away from the main bindi
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Unique underpinnings revealed for stomach's acid pump
Nagoya University researchers and colleagues have improved understanding of the molecular mechanisms of a key protein that makes the stomach acidic. Their findings, published in the journal Nature Communications, could lead to better drugs for stomach ulcers and shed light on the functions of similar proteins across the human body."This gastric protein pumps in acidic ions to fortify our stomach,
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Sustainable farming: There's no one solution
Sustainable agriculture will not be achieved by one universal solution. A meta-analysis by the University of Basel shows that the current focus on no-till farming does not achieve the desired results. A sustainable system of agriculture must be designed for local needs and in dialog with local farmers.
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When a Contestant Has Zero Survival Skills | Naked and Afraid
Stream Naked and Afraid on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/naked-and-afraid About Naked and Afraid: What happens when you put two complete strangers – sans clothes – in some of the most extreme environments on Earth? Each male-female duo is left with no food, no water, no clothes, and only one survival item. #NakedAndAfraid #Discovery #Survival Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.l
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Scientists Find the First Known Planet to Have Survived the Death of Its Star
How will the solar system die? It's a hugely important question that researchers have speculated a lot about, using our knowledge of physics to create complex theoretical models. We know that the sun will eventually become a " white dwarf ," a burnt stellar remnant whose dim light gradually fades into darkness. This transformation will involve a violent process that will destroy an unknown number
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These Nootropics Are Customized Based on Brain Chemistry and Lifestyle
For centuries human beings have used caffeine to give ourselves a boost. And that's not a bad thing. Caffeine helps us feel more awake and alert by blocking the brain's drowsiness receptors. However, thanks to modern science, today we can do a lot more for our brains than simply making them feel not drowsy . Our understanding of brain chemistry and nootropic compounds has come a long way over the
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We've spotted a planet surviving its dying star – here's what it tells us about end of our Solar System
How will the solar system die? It's a hugely important question that researchers have considered deeply, using our knowledge of physics to create complex theoretical models. We know that the sun will eventually become a "white dwarf", a burnt stellar remnant whose dim light gradually fades into darkness. This transformation will involve a violent process that will destroy an unknown number of its
6h
Inter-atomic photon emission during contact-electrification
Contact electrification can arise when physical contact occurs between two materials. In a new report now published on Science Advances, Ding Li, and a team of scientists in nanoscience, nanoenergy and materials science in China and the U.S., detailed atomic-featured photon emission spectra between two solid materials. Electron transfer can take place at the interface from an atom in one material
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Råg bättre än vete för den som vill gå ner i vikt
Att välja fullkornsbröd av råg i stället för formfranska kan vara en väg mot bättre hälsa. Den som väljer fiberrika produkter av fullkornsråg framför siktade veteprodukter tappar mer i både kroppsfett och vikt, visar en studie från livsmedelsforskare vid Chalmers. Livsmedelsforskare vid Chalmers presenterar nu en studie som visar att personer som väljer fiberrika produkter av råg framför veteprod
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3D structure of cell receptor with critical role in health and disease
Cells communicate with their environment via receptors on their surface. When a protein approaches these receptors, they can pass along a message to the inside of the cell, for example the instruction to grow which can lead to tumor formation. New research by the team of prof. Savvas Savvides (VIB-UGent, Belgium), the National Cancer Research Institute (Tokyo, Japan), the Memorial Sloan Kettering
6h
The influence collective risks have on the acceptance of social norms
Faced with large collective risk, such as climate change or the COVID crisis, people may accept stronger or more restrictive social norms and may be more inclined to cooperate with them. However, when the perception of risk decreases, so does adherence to these norms. This is one of the conclusions of an experimental study conducted by the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M), the Collegio Carl
6h
Cognitive study shows lack of bilingual education adversely affects English language learners' writing skills
As the number of Spanish-speaking English learners has increased in U.S. schools, research and attention have focused on how to boost students' reading and speaking skills. A first-of-its-kind study from the University of Kansas has examined three key cognitive functions and their role in learning to write, showing that a lack of focus on bilingual education has contributed to Hispanic English lea
6h
Design A Better Website With 72% Off SitePoint's Developer Library
A well-designed website can make life better for everyone who uses it, and protect ourselves, our kids, and even our pets from hackers. Yet staying on top of the ever-changing world of web development can be a second job itself. The SitePoint Web Development Hub Premium Membership helps keep experts on track with the field, while making it easy for new developers to catch up. It's on sale for jus
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A new twist on 2D materials may lead to improved electronic, optical devices
A new generation of electronics and optoelectronics may soon be possible by controlling twist angles in a particular type of bilayer 2D material used in these devices, strengthening the intrinsic electric charge that exists between the two layers, according to researchers from Penn State, Harvard University, Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Rutgers University.
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Adapting crops for future climate conditions
With crops, farmers will adapt—they always have and always will. To help this adaptation, however, a Texas A&M AgriLife research project has used artificial intelligence modeling to determine what traits cultivars will need to be successful under changing climate conditions.
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New proteins enable scientists to control cell activities
Sailan Shui, a doctoral assistant at EPFL's Laboratory of Protein Design and Immunoengineering, enjoys playing with proteins, activating and deactivating them as she wishes, as if light switches that can be turned on and off. However, instead of using electronic, her method relies on proteins to trigger the process. Shui's research has just been published in Nature Communications.
6h
PFAS-kemikalier ger fettlever – och drabbar kvinnor mer än män
Kvinnor blir mer påverkade än män när de utsätts för högfluorerade kemikalier, så kallade PFAS. Det visar en studie om hur kemikalierna leder till skador på levern, så kallad fettlever. – Exponering för miljökemikalier som PFAS kan förvärra vissa sjukdomar och öka risken till diabetes, säger Matej Orešič, professor i medicinska vetenskaper som ansvarat för studien tillsammans med Tuulia Hyötyläin
6h
Is the best planetary defense a good offense?
Researchers call for a more proactive way of dealing with dangerous extraterrestrial space debris. The project is called PI, which affectionately stands for Pulverize It. In February of 2013, skywatchers around the world turned their attention toward asteroid 2012 DA14, a cosmic rock about 150 feet (50 meters) in diameter that was going to fly closer to Earth than the spacecraft that bring us sat
6h
RNA kan bekämpa potatisbladmögel
Genom att spruta ut RNA på bladen skulle man kunna bekämpa potatisbladmögel. Metoden släcker ner de gener hos skadegöraren som annars kan infektera växten. Metoden är effektiv, miljövänlig, GMO-fri och har potential att sänka kostnaden för lantbrukarna. I labbstudier kunde forskarna visa att det dsRNA som de tillförde på blad, effektivt kunde tas upp av skadegöraren Phytophtora infestans och att
7h
The world finally has a malaria vaccine. Why has it taken so long?
Last week the World Health Organization approved the world's first malaria vaccine. It's been hailed as a historic breakthrough that could save tens of thousands of lives each year. But researchers have been trying to create one for more than a century – so why has it taken so long? Anand Jagatia speaks to Dr Latif Ndeketa and Prof Chris Drakeley about how the new RTS,S vaccine works and why it's
7h
The world finally has a malaria vaccine. Why has it taken so long? – podcast
Last week the World Health Organization approved the world's first malaria vaccine. It's been hailed as a historic breakthrough that could save tens of thousands of lives each year. But researchers have been trying to create one for more than a century – so why has it taken so long? Anand Jagatia speaks to Dr Latif Ndeketa and Prof Chris Drakeley about how the new RTS,S vaccine works and why it's
7h
Lack of Infrastructure Killed Early Electric Car
At the turn of the 19th century there were three relatively equal contenders for automobile technology, electric cars, steam powered, and the internal combustion engine (ICE). It was not obvious at the time which technology would emerge dominant, or even if they would all continue to have market share. By 1905, however, the ICE began to dominate , and by 1920 electric cars fell out of production.
7h
NASA's James Webb Space Telescope Arrives at Launch Site
It's a moment 20 years in the making—NASA's James Webb Space Telescope has arrived at the launch site . From there, it will ride a rocket into orbit, and then jet out beyond the moon. It's the most powerful (and expensive) telescope humanity has ever built, and it's almost ready to reveal the mysteries of the cosmos. Well, not all of them, but it's sure to build on the knowledge we've garnered fr
7h
Which plants and animals are affected by climate change? Some may surprise you
We've all seen the picture of the polar bear perched precariously on a melting iceberg. It's the obligatory poster child for any discussion about species that are endangered by climate change. It isn't alone, of course. To commandeer a clickbait cliché, you'll be amazed to hear about some of the plants and animals—from household names to virtual unknowns—that could be consigned to the history book
7h
Exploring Earth's oceans to reach Europa
Geographically and logistically, Antarctica is about as far away from anywhere as you can get on this planet. Yet in the scope of our solar system, Earth's southernmost continent is right in our own backyard.
7h
Solar eruption arrives at Earth
A mass of solar material that erupted from the sun on Oct. 9, 2021, reached Earth on Oct. 12. The Earth-directed coronal mass ejection, or CME, elevated the Kp index, a measure of disturbance to Earth's magnetic field, to 6 (moderate level). Kp index levels range from 0 (quiet) to 9 (intense).
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Till dig som är medlem i VoF Göteborg
Hej kära medlemmar i VoF Göteborg! Nu öppnar samhället upp igen efter pandemin och vi håller tummarna att vi framöver kan börja träffas och umgås igen! För Vetenskap och Folkbildnings … Continued Inlägget dök först upp på Vetenskap och Folkbildning .
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A correction is retracted (sort of)
Thanks to a publisher's error, a group of infectious disease researchers has experienced a double negative for their 2020 article on tick-borne illness in South Africa. The paper, "Serum-free in vitro cultivation of Theileria annulata and Theileria parva schizont-infected lymphocytes," appeared in Transboundary and Emerging Diseases, a Wiley title. The authors were affiliated with institutions … C
7h
Her er manden der skal modernisere rejsekortet
Som ny direktør for Rejsekort & Rejseplan skal Kasper A. Schmidt stå i spidsen for en teknologisk modernisering af Rejsekortet og samtidig tage hensyn til en helt anden gruppe – de ikke-digitale. En karriere med erfaringer som både køber og sælger af kritiske it-løsninger skal hjælpe direktøren g…
9h
'The Most Influential Action Movies Ever Made'
Listen and subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Pocket Casts Conceived in the 1950s and first put to film in 1962, James Bond is in many ways a relic of the past. A Cold War vision of white male fantasy, Bond has had to evolve over the franchise's six decades, beyond the sexism and racism that marked the character's influential early chapters. Now, with the release of No Time to Die a
9h
Venus hade kanske aldrig några hav
Eftersom Venus är ungefär lika stor som jorden, och inte ligger så mycket närmare solen, brukar forskare förmoda att de båda planeterna en gång var ganska lika. De skulle båda ha haft vatten på ytan – och därmed förutsättningar för liv. Med hjälp av en ny klimatmodell, mer avancerad än dem som tidigare använts för att förstå Venus, har forskare från Schweiz och Frankrike nu dragit slutsatsen att V
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Daily briefing: mRNA vaccines take on flu
Nature, Published online: 12 October 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02810-1 The race to apply mRNA technology, which has been so successful in COVID-19 jabs, to influenza vaccines. Plus, the economics Nobel prizewinners, and an abandoned oil tanker that threatens millions of lives.
9h
Kondo effect and spin–orbit coupling in graphene quantum dots
Nature Communications, Published online: 14 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26149-3 The Kondo effect has been observed in a variety of systems, including carbon nanotube quantum dots and graphene in the presence of impurities. Here, the authors report the observation of the Kondo effect in bilayer graphene quantum dots and study its interplay with weak spin-orbit coupling.
10h
Morc3 silences endogenous retroviruses by enabling Daxx-mediated histone H3.3 incorporation
Nature Communications, Published online: 14 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26288-7 Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) compose a significant portion of mammalian genomes; however, how ERVs are regulated is not well known. Here the authors performed a genome-wide sgRNA screen to identify Morc3 as a mediator of ERV silencing. They show Morc3 associates with the H3.3 chaperone Daxx, and that loss o
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Active droploids
Nature Communications, Published online: 14 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26319-3 Active matter can spontaneously form complex patterns and assemblies via a one-way energy flow from the environment into the system. Here, the authors demonstrate that a two-way coupling, where active particles act back on the environment can give rise to novel superstructures, named as active droploids.
10h
Rapid incidence estimation from SARS-CoV-2 genomes reveals decreased case detection in Europe during summer 2020
Nature Communications, Published online: 14 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26267-y The true number of infections from SARS-Cov-2 is unknown and believed to exceed the reported numbers by several fold. National testing policies, in particular, can strongly affect the proportion of undetected cases. Here, the authors propose a method that reconstructs incidence profiles within minutes, solely
10h
The transcription factor NF-Y participates to stem cell fate decision and regeneration in adult skeletal muscle
Nature Communications, Published online: 14 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26293-w Satellite cells represent myogenic stem cells that allow the homeostasis and repair of adult skeletal muscle. Here the authors report that the transcription factor NF-Y is expressed in satellite cells and is important for their maintenance and proper myogenic differentiation.
10h
Death threats, law suits: COVID experts targeted
Marc Van Ranst, a virologist famous in Belgium for providing expertise about the COVID-19 pandemic, was at home for his first afternoon off in months in May, unaware that his life was under threat and that he would soon be forced to go into hiding.
10h
Death toll in Philippines storm rises to 19
The death toll from a storm that triggered landslides and flash floods across the Philippines has risen to at least 19, authorities said Thursday, linking the extreme rainfall to climate change.
11h
Improvements in microscopy home in on biology's elusive details
In the late 1600s, the Dutch tradesman Anthoni van Leeuwenhoek began investigating the world of the very small using the first microscope, discovering a riotous world of protists, bacteria, and other previously unseen organisms. Subsequent generations of scientists have developed ever-more-sophisticated means of probing the microscopic world, bringing many mysteries of the biological realm into st
11h
'Debilitating': health impacts of smoke from Australia's black summer bushfires revealed in study
Only one in five people sought medical attention but half reported anxiety, depression and sleep loss Get our free news app ; get our morning email briefing The film-maker Shaun Humphreys vividly remembers the miserable summer of the 2019-20 bushfires. His house, in a north Canberra suburb, was far from the burning fires, but the surrounding smoke was thick and stifling. Continue reading…
13h
We Are Beast Machines – Issue 107: The Edge
I have a childhood memory of looking in the bathroom mirror, and for the first time realizing that my experience at that precise moment—the experience of being me—would at some point come to an end, and that "I" would die. I must have been about 8 or 9 years old, and like all early memories this one too is unreliable. But perhaps it was at this moment that I also realized that if my consciousness
17h
Neuroscience Weighs in on Physics' Biggest Questions – Issue 107: The Edge
For an empirical science, physics can be remarkably dismissive of some of our most basic observations. We see objects existing in definite locations, but the wave nature of matter washes that away. We perceive time to flow, but how could it, really? We feel ourselves to be free agents, and that's just quaint. Physicists like nothing better than to expose our view of the universe as parochial. Whi
17h
The Spiritual Consciousness of Christof Koch – Issue 107: The Edge
Consciousness is a thriving industry. It's not just the meditation retreats and ayahuasca shamans. Or the conferences with a heady mix of philosophers, quantum physicists, and Buddhist monks. Consciousness is a buzzing business in neuroscience labs and brain institutes. But it wasn't always this way. Just a few decades ago, consciousness barely registered as a credible subject for science. Perhap
17h
Quarks and antiquarks at high momentum shake the foundations of visible matter
Two independent studies have illuminated unexpected substructures in the fundamental components of all matter. Preliminary results using a novel tagging method could explain the origin of the longstanding nuclear paradox known as the EMC effect. Meanwhile, authors will share next steps after the recent observation of asymmetrical antimatter in the proton.
20h
Solving mystery of rare cancers directly caused by HIV
For nearly a decade, scientists have known that HIV integrates itself into genes in cells that have the potential to cause cancer. And when this happens in animals with other retroviruses, those animals often develop cancer. But, perplexingly and fortunately, that isn't regularly happening in people living with HIV. A new study reveals why doctors aren't seeing high rates of T cell lymphomas — or
20h
When will cyborgs become a commonplace
I believe cyborgs already exists in real life. However, I never met anyone that was a cyborg. Some people have machines implanted in their bodies, so they are cyborgs. That kind of thing, when will we see cyborgs becoming a mainstream in our daily lives? In 10 years? submitted by /u/wiluniverse [link] [comments]
21h
William Shatner Rides Blue Origin Rocket to Space and Back
William Shatner gained worldwide notoriety playing a spaceman on TV, and now he's become one for real. The Star Trek actor was among three other passengers on a Blue Origin rocket on Wednesday. The flight went off without a hitch , delivering Shatner and his fellow passengers to space and returning them safely to Earth. Blue Origin is one of three companies that have begun offering expensive tick
21h
Probiotika ökar tarmens produktion av antikroppar
Tarmens B-celler ökar sin produktion av antikroppar när de stimuleras av en viss sorts probiotiska bakterier. Därför kan intag av en liten mängd probiotika förbättra tarmhälsan trots att den bara utgör en droppe i tarmbakterie-havet, visar en studie från Uppsala universitet. – Det här är första studien som kan förklara hur en probiotisk bakterie som normalt inte finns i tarmen och som utgör en vä
22h
LSD and Shrooms Linked to Lower Heart Disease and Diabetes Risk
Scientists seem to have found a pleasant side effect of taking psychedelic drugs: a reduced risk of developing heart disease and diabetes. A team of scientists identified the unexpected trend after poring over ten years' worth of data from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health, finding that respondents who said they've tried psychedelics at least once in their lives had a reduced risk of dev
22h
Longstanding magnetic materials classification problem solved
For over 100 years, physicists, chemists, and materials scientists have developed extensive theoretical and experimental machinery to predict and characterize the electronic properties of magnetic materials, but even the most successful classification system, developed almost 75 years ago by Lev Shubnikov, was incomplete. An international team of researchers announced this week that it has finally
22h
Minutes matter: Policies to improve care for deadliest heart attacks
Converting advances in scientific knowledge and innovations in cardiac care into improvements in patient outcomes requires comprehensive cardiac systems of care optimize cardiac care delivery. New recommendations support policies that standardize the delivery of cardiac care, lower barriers to emergency care for STEMI heart attacks, ensure patients receive care at appropriate hospitals in a timely
22h
Study asserts that assessments of parolees' risk should consider recidivism-free time
As efforts to reverse mass incarceration rise, so does the need to supervise more individuals in the community. Faced with heightened demand, corrections agencies increasingly use risk assessment to allocate supervision and treatment resources efficiently and improve public safety. A new study examined the time individuals have spent without being arrested or returning to prison, looking at the re
22h
Photosynthesizing algae injected into the blood vessels of tadpoles supply oxygen to their brains
Leading a double life in water and on land, frogs have many breathing techniques — through the gills, lungs, and skin — over the course of their lifetime. Now scientists have developed another method that allows tadpoles to 'breathe' by introducing algae into their bloodstream to supply oxygen. The method provided enough oxygen to effectively rescue neurons in the brains of oxygen-deprived tadpo
23h
The human olfactory bulb processes odor valence representation and cues motor avoidance behavior [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
Determining the valence of an odor to guide rapid approach–avoidance behavior is thought to be one of the core tasks of the olfactory system, and yet little is known of the initial neural mechanisms supporting this process or of its subsequent behavioral manifestation in humans. In two experiments, we measured…
23h
Four-dimensional chromosome reconstruction elucidates the spatiotemporal reorganization of the mammalian X chromosome [Cell Biology]
Chromosomes are segmented into domains and compartments, but how these structures are spatially related in three dimensions (3D) is unclear. Here, we developed tools that directly extract 3D information from Hi-C experiments and integrate the data across time. With our "4DHiC" method, we use X chromosome inactivation (XCI) as a…
23h
Frequency of enforcement is more important than the severity of punishment in reducing violation behaviors [Social Sciences]
External enforcement policies aimed to reduce violations differ on two key components: the probability of inspection and the severity of the punishment. Different lines of research offer different insights regarding the relative importance of each component. In four studies, students and Prolific crowdsourcing participants (Ntotal = 816) repeatedly faced temptations…
23h
Surface equilibration mechanism controls the molecular packing of glassy molecular semiconductors at organic interfaces [Chemistry]
Glasses prepared by physical vapor deposition (PVD) are anisotropic, and the average molecular orientation can be varied significantly by controlling the deposition conditions. While previous work has characterized the average structure of thick PVD glasses, most experiments are not sensitive to the structure near an underlying substrate or interface. Given…
23h
Smärtlindring utan läkemedel med sjögräsmjuk teknik
Stimulans direkt i hjärnans smärtkontrollcentra med mjuka tunna elektroder, kan blockera svår smärta. Metoden, som än så länge bara testats på råttor, ger bättre effekt än morfin och saknar biverkningar, enligt forskare från Lunds universitet. Traditionell och stark smärtlindring med läkemedel ger ofta stora biverkningar och kan påverka förmågan att fungera i vardagen för den drabbade. I Lund har
23h
How to force photons to never bounce back
Scientists have developed a topology-based method that forces microwave photons to travel along on way path, despite unprecedented levels of disorder and obstacles on their way. This discovery paves the way to a new generation of high-frequency circuits and extremely robust, compact communication devices.
23h
Virtual reality and regular meditative breathing both ease pain
Two different kinds of meditative breathing—traditional mindful breathing and virtual reality, 3D-guided mindful breathing—reduce pain but do so differently, research finds. It's long been known that meditative mindful breathing helps with various health conditions, including pain. The new findings indicate that the two types of meditative breathing both lessened pain by modulating the somatosens
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Garmin Fenix 6X Pro Solar review
Garmin's rugged Fenix range is back once again, and with the Garmin Fenix 6X Pro Solar it's harnessing the power of the sun to supercharge your workouts and track your daily fitness.
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A hotter and drier climate is set to hurt agriculture in the West and help farmers in Asia
By Caitlin Looby, Climate Central and Clarisa Diaz, Quartz Both of these fields are at risk This story was produced through a partnership between Quartz and Climate Central. Scientists have found that climate change will strain the global food supply as drought and heat waves collide more often in the future. That concerning finding comes from a new study published in Nature Food that analyzed hi
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How many people get 'long COVID'? More than half, researchers find
More than half of the 236 million people who have been diagnosed with COVID-19 worldwide since December 2019 will experience post-COVID symptoms — more commonly known as 'long COVID' — up to six months after recovering, according to researchers. The research team said that governments, health care organizations and public health professionals should prepare for the large number of COVID-19 survi
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Chinese Authorities Are Testing Thousands of Blood Samples From Wuhan
In coming weeks, Chinese authorities say they plan to run tests on thousands and thousands of blood samples from Wuhan, the original epicenter of the COVID-19 pandemic. There are up to 200,000 blood samples stored at the Wuhan Blood Center dating back to 2019, potentially giving officials access to a sort of real-time historical archive that could help reveal how the first coronavirus outbreaks b
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Shocking Images Show Rising Sea Levels Swallowing Cities
Sea-Level Rise Shocking new visualizations by the nonprofit Climate Central shows just how much populated land would be lost to rising sea levels resulting from even a modest amount of global warming. The images produced by the nonprofit show various landmarks around the world at present day, contrasted with the flooding that would occurr if global warming continues unabated. An estimated ten per
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How tidal flooding is impacting students, caretakers and education in Atlantic City
By John Upton, Kelly Van Baalen, Scott Kulp, Climate Central and Selena Vasquez, Joe Martucci, The Press of Atalntic City Miriam Spellman, of Atlantic City, discusses the risk of flooding to the Pennsylvania Avenue School while picking up her great grandchildren William, 3, and Asa, 8. Edward Lea, Staff Photographer, Press of Atlantic City. A computer-generated image shows the forecaast risk of f
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Fewer frogs died by vehicles in the outset of the pandemic, study finds
Researchers discovered that 50 percent fewer frogs died from vehicle collisions in Maine in spring 2020, when the COVID-19 pandemic began, that during the season in other recent years. They also found a broader decline in animal road fatalities in spring 2020, but not noble change in vehicle-related mortality among salamanders.
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Widespread masking nudges people to follow the crowd
The increased use of face coverings as a defense against COVID-19 creates social norms that encourage more people to mask up in public, according to a new study. Researchers based the study on two survey-based experiments conducted in the United States and Italy, countries that have experienced severe COVID-19 outbreaks . The study found evidence that, in both countries, when increasing numbers o
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Immense set of mysterious fast radio bursts
An international team of astronomers recently observed more than 1,650 fast radio bursts (FRBs) detected from one source in deep space, which amounts to the largest set — by far — of the mysterious phenomena ever recorded. The source, dubbed FRB 121102, was observed using the Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical Telescope (FAST) in China, and represents more FRBs in one event than all previous
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Catching malaria evolution in the act
Researchers can now detect brand new mutations in individual malaria parasites infecting humans. Such high resolution could help us understand how parasites develop drug resistance and evade immune responses, and suggest potential treatment targets.
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Immune system keeps the intestinal flora in balance
Trillions of benign bacteria live in the intestine. They are kept in a continuous balance by the immune system, which thereby makes them harmless to humans. Researchers have been able to show how certain natural antibodies keep these bacteria in check. The findings could make an important contribution to the development of superior vaccines.
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Soybean study designs and implements a more effective and less toxic bio-fungicide
Fungal diseases of plants are normally managed through the application of fungicides, which are not only toxic to the pathogens that cause these diseases but to other organisms, including humans, animals, and the environment, especially after long and repeated applications. A recent article summarizes an attempt to use dsRNA molecules, which are non-toxic by themselves and present in all living or
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Malaria vaccine could save thousands of kids every year
The World Health Organization (WHO) has announced its recommendation for widespread use of the first-ever malaria vaccine. The move gives a green light to a vaccine that has the potential to prevent hundreds of millions of cases of malaria and thousands of deaths in children worldwide each year. It's the first time a vaccine will be rolled out to combat infection caused by a parasite, rather than
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Fluorescent spray lights up tumors for easy detection during surgery
The prognosis for a cancer patient who undergoes surgery is better if the surgeon removes all of the tumor, but it can be hard to tell where a tumor ends and healthy tissue begins. Now, scientists report that they have developed a fluorescent spray that specifically lights up cancerous tissue so it can be identified readily and removed during surgery.
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Leprosy confirmed in wild chimpanzees
Leprosy has been found in wild chimpanzees. Researchers have confirmed cases of the disease among two unconnected West African populations of chimpanzees, in Guinea-Bissau and the Ivory Coast.
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Did Venus ever have oceans?
The planet Venus can be seen as the Earth's evil twin. At first sight, it is of comparable mass and size as our home planet, similarly consists mostly of rocky material, holds some water and has an atmosphere. Yet, a closer look reveals striking differences between them: Venus' thick CO2 atmosphere, extreme surface temperature and pressure, and sulphuric acid clouds are indeed a stark contrast to
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Treatment for kidney failure dropped early in pandemic
In the four months following the COVID-19 pandemic's arrival, the number of patients in the US initiating treatment for kidney failure declined by 30%, according to a new study. Notably, Black patients and patients living in counties with high numbers of COVID-19 deaths initiated treatment with significantly worse levels of kidney function when compared to prior years. Unfortunately, the results
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A 5-sigma standard model anomaly is possible
One of the best chances for proving beyond-the-standard-model physics relies on something called the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix. The standard model insists that the CKM matrix, which describes the mixing of quarks, should be unitary. But growing evidence suggests that during certain forms of radioactive decay, the unitarity of the CKM matrix might break.
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To find sterile neutrinos, think small
Experiments have spotted anomalies hinting at a new type of neutrino, one that would go beyond the standard model of particle physics and perhaps open a portal to the dark sector. But no one has ever directly observed this hypothetical particle.
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Some of the biggest asteroids in our Solar System
Astronomers have imaged 42 of the largest objects in the asteroid belt, located between Mars and Jupiter. The observations reveal a wide range of peculiar shapes, from spherical to dog-bone, and are helping astronomers trace the origins of the asteroids in our Solar System.
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How the Sun's magnetic forces arrange gas particles
Solar prominences hover above the visible solar disk like giant clouds, held there by a supporting framework of magnetic forces, originating from layers deep within the Sun. The magnetic lines of force are moved by ever-present gas currents—and when the supporting framework moves, so does the prominence cloud. A research team from the University of Göttingen and the astrophysics institutes at Pari
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Team transforms sulfur into flame retardant plastic
Researchers have developed a way to turn sulfur, the byproduct of fossil fuel refining, into a flame retardant, high-end plastic. "We are still in the early developmental stages, but this is the first demonstration of a polymer (or plastic) with these properties," says Jeff Pyun, a professor in the chemistry and biochemistry department at the University of Arizona. When oil and gas are pulled fro
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Pandemic took a toll on Iowa towns in different ways
The pandemic took a steep toll on the mental health and personal relationships of many rural Iowans, while people in larger towns tended to report physical health and economic challenges with greater frequency. The findings, which come from survey data collected between December 2020 and February 2021, illustrate how the pandemic affected Iowa communities in different ways and can inform how publ
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Convergent somatic mutations in metabolism genes in chronic liver disease
Nature, Published online: 13 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03974-6 Whole-genome sequencing analysis of somatic mutations in liver samples from patients with chronic liver disease identifies driver mutations in metabolism-related genes such as FOXO1, and shows that these variants frequently exhibit convergent evolution.
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A Jovian analogue orbiting a white dwarf star
Nature, Published online: 13 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03869-6 The authors show not only that planetary bodies around white dwarfs can survive but also that more than half of white dwarfs might have Jovian planetary companions.
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Estimating a social cost of carbon for global energy consumption
Nature, Published online: 13 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03883-8 Using global data, econometrics and climate science to estimate the damages induced by the emission of one ton of carbon dioxide, climate change is projected to increase electricity spending but reduce overall end-use energy expenditure.
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Structural basis of cytokine-mediated activation of ALK family receptors
Nature, Published online: 13 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03959-5 Structural studies of the complex of anaplastic lymphoma kinase and leukocyte tyrosine kinase and their activating cytokines identify unique architectural features of the complex, and provide a novel mechanistic paradigm among receptor tyrosine kinases.
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The cellular environment shapes the nuclear pore complex architecture
Nature, Published online: 13 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03985-3 Structure of human nuclear pore complex in its cellular environment reveals a substantially dilated central channel and shows that its nucleoplasmic and cytoplasmic rings restrict channel dimensions and create membrane asymmetry at the inner ring.
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Parallelism of intestinal secretory IgA shapes functional microbial fitness
Nature, Published online: 13 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03973-7 The functional role of intestinal secretory IgA for host–microbiota interactions is investigated, showing that intestinal bacterial exposure leads to selection of diverse plasma cells that secrete antigen-specific IgA, which predominantly targets bacterial membranes.
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Unravelling the collateral damage of antibiotics on gut bacteria
Nature, Published online: 13 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03986-2 This study systematically profiles the activity of several classes of antibiotics on gut commensal bacteria and identifies drugs that mitigate their collateral damage on commensal bacteria without compromising their efficacy against pathogens.
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Venus might never have been habitable
Nature, Published online: 13 October 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02720-2 A sophisticated climate model suggests that liquid-water oceans never formed on Venus, and that some planets outside the Solar System that were thought to be habitable might not be.
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Opioid peptide signal in the brain makes mice hungrier for reward
Nature, Published online: 13 October 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02723-z Release of opioid peptide in the brain leads food-deprived mice to eat more sugar than do mice that are well fed. This opioid signalling mechanism fine-tunes the reward value of food according to the animal's state.
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Electroacupuncture activates neurons to switch off inflammation
Nature, Published online: 13 October 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02714-0 Neurons that express a specific molecular marker are activated by 'electroacupuncture' stimulation. They can then mediate the treatment's anti-inflammatory effects in a mouse model of the inflammatory condition sepsis.
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The cost of changes in energy use in a warming world
Nature, Published online: 13 October 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02721-1 How will global energy usage change as Earth warms? Modelling now suggests that there will be a modest net decrease in energy consumption — but probably at the expense of human well-being in many regions.
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Cervical myelopathy screening focusing on finger motion using noncontact sensor
Researchers have developed a simple screening tool using a non-contact sensor for Cervical myelopathy (CM) combining a finger motion analysis technique and machine learning. The tool allows for non-specialists to screen people for the possibility of having CM. The screening test results can be used to encourage those with suspected CM to seek specialist's attention for early diagnosis and early tr
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New technique combines single-cell and metagenomic analyses to characterize microbes
Metagenomic analysis has greatly advanced our understanding of the complex human microbiome without the need for extensive bacterial isolation and culturing. However, metagenome-assembled genomes may be imprecise and insufficiently differentiate closely related species. Now, researchers have developed a novel integrated framework that combines conventional metagenomics and single-cell genomics and
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Genes and collective behavior
The targeted manipulation of individual genes in zebrafish larvae changes their behavioral responses to visual stimuli and thus affects the collective behavior of the animals.
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Empowering communities through local monitoring
Over recent decades, community-based environmental monitoring (often called "citizen science") has exploded in popularity, aided both by smartphones and rapid gains in computing power that make the analysis of large data sets far easier.
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Lack of power grids sealed fate for early electric cars
New research shows that insufficient infrastructure was key in American car manufacturers choosing gasoline cars over electric cars in the early 20th century. If electricity grids had spread just 15 or 20 years earlier, a majority of producers would have likely opted for electric cars, according to the study.
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Warm milk makes you sleepy — peptides could explain why
According to time-honored advice, drinking a glass of warm milk at bedtime will encourage a good night's rest. Milk's sleep-enhancing properties are commonly ascribed to tryptophan, but scientists have also discovered a mixture of milk peptides, called casein tryptic hydrolysate (CTH), that relieves stress and enhances sleep. Now, researchers have identified specific peptides in CTH that might som
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A 'sponge' for adsorbing and desorbing gas molecules
A group of researchers led by scientists from the RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science and the University of Tokyo has created an unusual material—a soft crystal made of molecules known as a catenanes—that behaves in a novel way that could be used in applications such as films that capture carbon dioxide molecules. The research was published in Nature.
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Plastics recycling deadlines loom—will companies meet their goals?
Many of the world's largest consumer product companies, including Cocoa-Cola, Unilever and PepsiCo, have set ambitious targets for replacing virgin plastics with recycled ones— typically 25% of their total packaging by 2025. So far, however, most companies have made only modest progress and will need to ramp up their efforts to reach these lofty goals, according to a new cover story in Chemical &
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Bots were not very active on Twitter during the Finnish municipal elections
Researchers from the Department of Computer Science in Aalto University and University of Helsinki Faculty of Social Sciences joined their forces in the ELEBOT-2021 project. They analyzed a large set of social media data and focused on automated accounts, so called ´bots´, on Twitter around the municipal elections from May until June 2021.
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Protein linked to oxidative stress and related diseases
Scientists at Monash University's Biomedicine Discovery Institute (BDI) have discovered a new role for a known protein in oxidative stress, which is linked to diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, viral infection and cancer.
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What you discover when you really listen | Hrishikesh Hirway
"Every conversation has the potential to open up and reveal all the layers and layers within it, all those rooms within rooms," says podcaster and musician Hrishikesh Hirway. In this profoundly moving talk, he offers a guide to deep conversations and explores what you learn when you stop to listen closely. Stay tuned to the end to hear a performance of his original song "Between There and Here (fe
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Extroverted and conscientious employees most 'burdened' by working from home
Prolonged working from home during the corona pandemic has led to less productivity and less happiness at work among employees who score high on the personality traits extroversion and conscientiousness. People who scored low on these characteristics actually improved their work performance over the same period. For the many organizations that are now thinking about the continuation of remote work
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Non-native mangroves on Hawaii's Moloka'i Island provide beneficial ecosystem services
In a new paper published in the Journal of Applied Ecology, environmental science and management professor Elise Granek and lead author Casey Lewis, PSU alumna, report the findings of a census of zooplankton communities in non-native mangrove habitats and open coastline on the island of Moloka'i, Hawaii. The study found the diversity of zooplankton communities in mangrove stands was comparable to
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Warm milk makes you sleepy—peptides could explain why
According to time-honored advice, drinking a glass of warm milk at bedtime will encourage a good night's rest. Milk's sleep-enhancing properties are commonly ascribed to tryptophan, but scientists have also discovered a mixture of milk peptides, called casein tryptic hydrolysate (CTH), that relieves stress and enhances sleep. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chem
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Widespread monoculture found to increase prevalence of pollinator parasites
A team of researchers affiliated with a host of entities across the U.S., has found evidence that suggests the practice of widespread monoculture has increased the prevalence of pollinator parasites. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes their study of bees in California's Central Valley, and what they found.
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Attention-based deep neural network increases detection capability in sonar systems
In underwater acoustics, deep learning may improve sonar systems to help detect ships and submarines in distress or in restricted waters. However, noise interference can be a challenge. Researchers now explore an attention-based deep neural network to tackle this problem. They tested two ships, comparing their results with a typical deep neural network, and found the ABNN increases its predictions
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Phage therapy research brings scientists a step closer to harnessing viruses to fight antibiotic resistance
Phage therapy is the concept of using viruses (known as phage) to kill bacteria, instead of using antibiotics. Until now, experiments have largely focussed on exposing bacteria to phage in a flask. Now, researchers have developed a new way to mimic these microenvironments, in which a single bacterium would colonize a specific area. Using this method, the team found that in these microenvironments
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Winds of change: Improvements for wind energy production
In recent years, much progress has been made in the wind energy industry as the cost of development has declined significantly with emerging technologies and incentive policies. Nevertheless, wind farms can be made more efficient. Researchers now examine diurnal and seasonal patterns of wind speeds and their impact on the adequacy of energy production. The results helped them develop a seasonal ad
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Challenging the Big Bang puzzle of heavy elements
It has long been theorized that hydrogen, helium, and lithium were the only chemical elements in existence during the Big Bang, and that supernova explosions are responsible for transmuting these elements into heavier ones. Researchers are now challenging this and propose an alternative model for the formation of nitrogen, oxygen, and water based on the history of Earth's atmosphere. They postulat
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Remote work may be keeping some cities' air cleaner
In the spring of 2020, COVID-19-related restrictions in the United States led to reductions in nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions because of the sudden drop in road traffic. But even after restrictions were lifted and the flow of traffic resumed, NOx emissions from transportation remained around 20% lower than pre-COVID-19 averages in some cities through the end of 2020.
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AMD Will Offer V-Cache on AM4, Updated AM5 With Next-Gen PCIe 5.0 Coming in 2022
AMD has made several new platform and chip announcements as part of its five-year celebration of Ryzen. While Ryzen didn't launch until March 2, 2017, AMD is evidently counting the anniversary from when it debuted in December of 2016, and kicking off celebrations a few months early. AMD's Director of Technical Marketing, Robert Hallock, sat down with John Taylor, who is AMD's Chief Marketing Offi
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Massive Storm Threatens the Whole Fleet | Deadliest Catch
Stream Full Episodes of Deadliest Catch: discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/deadliest-catch Discovery ► https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch/ #DeadliestCatch #Discovery #Hurricane Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://
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Astronomers see dust disk around young super-Jupiter
An international team of astronomers led by scientists from Leiden University has for the first time characterized a dust disk surrounding a young super-Jupiter, which is either a giant planet or brown dwarf. They used so-called direct imaging observations at mid-infrared wavelengths. They detected emission from the disk and speculate that moons may have formed. The researchers will publish their
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This Great-Tasting Hard Kombucha Is the Alcoholic Drink You've Been Waiting For
If you're an American who thinks you're living healthy, think again. It turns out, less than 3-percent of Americans qualify as living a "healthy lifestyle," based on a study out of the Mayo Clinic. A healthy lifestyle consists of four basic lifestyle choices: exercise for at least 150 minutes a week, a diet score in the top 40 percent on the Healthy Eating Index, a body fat percentage under 20 pe
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Storing data as mixtures of fluorescent dyes
As the world's data storage needs grow, new strategies for preserving information over long periods with reduced energy consumption are needed. Now, researchers have developed a data storage approach based on mixtures of fluorescent dyes, which are deposited onto an epoxy surface in tiny spots with an inkjet printer. The mixture of dyes at each spot encodes binary information that is read with a f
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Overseas trade has a hidden environmental 'disaster footprint'
Environmental disasters are increasingly a fact of life around the world. Each year, floods, droughts and landslides affect tens of millions of people, leaving vast human and economic destruction in their wake. The cost in human lives and livelihoods each year is enormous.
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Monsoon rainfall's response to volcanic eruptions relies on pre-eruption ENSO states
Volcanic eruptions inject sulfur gases high into the atmosphere, forming sulfate aerosol and blocking the incoming sunlight like a parasol. This causes decreased global monsoon rainfall, but the regional monsoon responses are different, which are dominated by the pre-eruption El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phases, according to a study by Zuo Meng, a postdoctoral fellow from the Institute of A
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More effective cell studies using new AI method
A new study from the University of Gothenburg opens the way for more effective microscopy, making it easier to research diseases. The study shows how artificial intelligence can be used to develop faster, cheaper and more reliable information about cells, while also eliminating the disadvantages from using chemicals in the process.
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Genetic changes can affect collective behavior
Individual zebrafish (Danio rerio) exhibit predictable behavioral responses to certain visual stimuli that are sufficient to explain the collective behavior of the animals—even in their larval stage. Genetic mutations associated with neurological disorders in humans alter these behavioral responses and, as a consequence, the group behavior of the larvae. These are the results of a study conducted
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How AI is helping the natural sciences
Nature, Published online: 13 October 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02762-6 Collaborations across disciplines are growing, and artificial intelligence is helping to make joint working more effective.
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Image: Tethered satellites for propulsion without fuel
How to propel a spacecraft without propellant? Use electrodynamic tethers. These are long, strong conductors connecting two spacecraft. When direct current is applied to the tether, the tether exerts a force on the spacecraft, causing it to either accelerate or brake.
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Path correction
Nature, Published online: 13 October 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02765-3 In the midst of chaos.
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Sådan vil Region H stramme kontrollen med praksissektoren
På baggrund af en række svindelsager har embedsværket i Region Hovedstaden fremlagt otte forslag til, hvordan kontrollen med praksissektoren kan forbedres. Forslagene mødte bred opbakning i regionsrådet tirsdag aften. PLO erkender behov for mere transparens, men nogle af forslagene er for vidtgående, lyder det.
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Plant extract holds promise to cut 'use and abuse of opiates'
The extract of the plant Corydalis yanhusuo prevents morphine tolerance and dependence while also reversing opiate addiction, research in animals indicates. The findings appear in the journal Pharmaceuticals . Over the past two decades, dramatic increases in opioid overdose mortality have occurred in the United States and other nations. During the COVID-19 pandemic, the situation has only worsene
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This Wine Subscription Box Uses Technology to Discover Your Favorite Wines
Life is too short to settle on bad wine. With its antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties, there are more benefits to wine than just a delicious way to complement meals, relax after long days or celebrate special occasions. But how many times have you looked forward to what you thought might be a great vintage, only to discover hints of nail polish remover and burnt rubber? Thanks to a coup
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Varför går björnen i ide – men inte vi?
Nu gör björnar vad många önskar så här års, går i ide och sover tills det är vår igen. Men vi människor skulle aldrig överleva vintersömn i ide som björnar gör. Peter Stenvinkel, professor i njurmedicin vid Karolinska Institutet berättar varför. Varför går björnen i ide? – Det mesta talar för att björnar är tvungna att gå i ide för att det inte finns någon mat under vinterhalvåret. För att överle
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Daily briefing: Electric vehicles must get lighter
Nature, Published online: 12 October 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02803-0 Tax heavy cars and shrink batteries to make electric vehicles cleaner and safer, say three energy-policy researchers. Plus, nanotechnology antiviral drugs that target SARS-CoV-2, and career tips from Nobel laureates.
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Bitcoin – betallösningen som blivit ett miljöhot
Bitcoin löste problemet att skicka pengar via nätet utan att blanda in banken. Men den ökande elanvändningen gör att kryptovalutan nu pekas ut som ett hot mot miljön. Den 15 september år 2008 gick den amerikanska investmentbanken Lehman Brothers i konkurs. En finanskris drabbade världen. Centralbanker och regeringar pumpade in tusentals miljarder kronor för att rädda banksystem och ländernas ekon
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Facing Rising Violence, Hospital Workers Speak Out
Workplace violence has always been a problem for hospitals. But as the Covid-19 pandemic marches on, nurses and other health care workers say the issue is getting worse. Many are now seeking nationwide standards for protection, going beyond those offered at the individual hospital level.
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MesoNet allows automated scaling and segmentation of mouse mesoscale cortical maps using machine learning
Nature Communications, Published online: 13 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26255-2 High content imaging of the brain holds the promise of improving our understanding of the brain's circuitry. Here, the authors present a tool that automates the scaling and segmentation of cortical maps to accelerate neurobiological discovery using mesoscale images.
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Direct on-swab metabolic profiling of vaginal microbiome host interactions during pregnancy and preterm birth
Nature Communications, Published online: 13 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26215-w Here, the authors apply DESI-MS, a sample preparation-free, direct on-swab mass spectrometry analytical tool, to profile the cervicovaginal metabolome of two independent cohorts of pregnant women and, combined with matched metataxonomic and immuno-profiling data, show that DESI-MS predicts vaginal microbiota
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Exposure to 16 h of normobaric hypoxia induces ionic edema in the healthy brain
Nature Communications, Published online: 13 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26116-y Prolonged hypoxia, which can be due to stroke or ascent to high altitude, can lead to cerebral edema. Here, the authors used a combination of sodium and proton MRI and experimentally induced hypoxic conditions to identify the cause for brain swelling: Ionic edema, an intermediate between cytotoxic and vasogen
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A self-healing catalyst for electrocatalytic and photoelectrochemical oxygen evolution in highly alkaline conditions
Nature Communications, Published online: 13 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26281-0 While self-healing catalysts may survive the harsh environments used for oxygen evolution, understanding how to develop such electrocatalysts remains a challenge. Here, authors find cobalt to promote the self-healing of leached iron centers in borate-intercalated nickel-iron-cobalt oxyhydroxides.
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Phase separation of Nur77 mediates celastrol-induced mitophagy by promoting the liquidity of p62/SQSTM1 condensates
Nature Communications, Published online: 13 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26295-8 How phase separation participates in mitophagy remains unclear. Here the authors show that Nur77 and p62/SQSTM1 through "head-to-head" and "tail-to-tail" interactions form membraneless condensates capable of sequestering dysfunctional mitochondria and tethering them to autolysosome for degradation.
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BRCA2 associates with MCM10 to suppress PRIMPOL-mediated repriming and single-stranded gap formation after DNA damage
Nature Communications, Published online: 13 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26227-6 Tumor suppressor BRCA2 is known to stabilize and restart stalled DNA replication forks. Here the authors show that BRCA2 is recruited to the replication fork through its interaction with MCM10 and inhibits Primase-Polymerase-mediated repriming, lesion bypass and single strand DNA gap formation after DNA damag
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Shear relaxation governs fusion dynamics of biomolecular condensates
Nature Communications, Published online: 13 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26274-z Phase-separated biomolecular condensates are implicated in a myriad of biological processes. Here the authors apply optical tweezers to characterize the viscoelasticity and interfacial tension of a range of condensates, finding that condensates can deviate from simple fluids in opposite directions; and identi
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