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Sharp-eyed diver finds crusader's ancient sword on Israeli seabed
Metre-long relic, encrusted with marine organisms, is believed to be about 900 years old A sword believed to have belonged to a crusader who sailed to the Holy Land almost a millennium ago has been recovered from the Mediterranean seabed thanks to an eagle-eyed amateur diver, the Israel Antiquities Authority has said. Though encrusted with marine organisms, the metre-long blade, hilt and handle w
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Human History Gets a Rewrite
Illustration by Rodrigo Corral. Sources: Hugh Sitton / Getty; Been There YB / Shutterstock M any years ago , when I was a junior professor at Yale, I cold-called a colleague in the anthropology department for assistance with a project I was working on. I didn't know anything about the guy; I just selected him because he was young, and therefore, I figured, more likely to agree to talk. Five minut
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Russian film crew return to Earth after shooting the first movie in space
Actor and director land safely in Kazakhstan after spending 12 days on the International Space Station shooting the first movie in orbit A Russian actor and a film director have returned to Earth after spending 12 days on the International Space Station shooting scenes for the first movie in orbit. Yulia Peresild and Klim Shipenko landed as scheduled on Kazakhstan's steppe early on Sunday, accord
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US Officials Shocked by Chinese Missile Test That Went All the Way Around the Earth
Surprise Launch China launched a hypersonic missile test in late August that took the United States government by surprise. The missile allegedly circled the globe in low-Earth orbit before heading towards its intended target, anonymous sources told Financial Times . The nuclear-capable rocket carried a hypersonic glide vehicle that allowed it to travel at incredible speeds. Shock and Awe Perhaps
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Bitcoin Is Hitting The New York Stock Exchange Tomorrow
Bitcoin Boom In what might be one of the most significant steps that cryptocurrency has taken toward the mainstream during its decade-long history, the New York Stock Exchange is expected to start allowing traders to bet on Bitcoin. "2021 will be remembered for this milestone," Michael Sapir, the CEO of ProShares, which will be running the fund, told the New York Times . He also took a dig at les
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Physicist Says China's New Telescope May Be Able to Spot Alien Probes
FAST Detection A new radio telescope in China might be able to detect massive swarms of self-replicating alien robots before they attack Earth. Dr. Zaza Osmanov, an associate physics professor at the Free University of Tbilisi, recently published a preprint paper that calculates how China's new Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical Radio Telescope (FAST) could be able to detect swarms of hypothet
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Experiments reveal formation of a new state of matter: Electron quadruplets
The central principle of superconductivity is that electrons form pairs. But can they also condense into foursomes? Recent findings have suggested they can, and a physicist at KTH Royal Institute of Technology today published the first experimental evidence of this quadrupling effect and the mechanism by which this state of matter occurs.
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New giant exoplanet detected with TESS
Using NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS), an international team of astronomers has detected a new giant alien world. The newfound exoplanet, designated TOI-530b, is only about 17 percent smaller than Jupiter. The finding is reported in a paper published October 8 on the arXiv pre-print repository.
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The orbital flatness of planetary systems
The planets of the solar system all orbit the Sun more-or-less in a plane. Compared to the Earth's orbit, which defines the plane at zero degrees, the orbit with the largest angle is Mercury's whose inclination is 7 degrees (the angle of the orbit of the dwarf planet Pluto is 17. 2 degrees). The orbital characteristics of planets evolve as the protoplanetary disk of gas and dust dissipates, and as
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Scientist Says the Solar System Is Surrounded by a Huge Magnetic Tunnel
Tunnel-Like Structure An astronomer has proposed a bold model suggesting that the entire solar system is surrounded by a massive, magnetic tunnel. The model focuses on two major structures in the sky: the North Polar Spur and the Fan Region, according to a press release from the University of Toronto . While the structures were seemingly unconnected since their discoveries in the sixties, a team
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Unfreezing the ice age: the truth about humanity's deep past
Archaeological discoveries are shattering scholars' long-held beliefs about how the earliest humans organised their societies – and hint at possibilities for our own In some ways, accounts of "human origins" play a similar role for us today as myth did for ancient Greeks or Polynesians. This is not to cast aspersions on the scientific rigour or value of these accounts. It is simply to observe tha
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Museums Are Getting on OnlyFans After Other Platforms Keep Banning Them for Nudity
Vienna OnlyFans Who says you can't get a little classy on OnlyFans? The Vienna Tourist Board is turning to the content subscription platform to post images of artwork deemed too NSFW for Facebook, Instagram, and TikTok, according to a fascinating new story by NBC . The images — from famed Austrian museums including the Leopold Museum, the Kunsthistorisches Museum Vienna, and the Albertina — previ
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Greg Abbott Fears Fox News More Than COVID
Governor Greg Abbott is afraid. Not of COVID-19, which is killing thousands of Texans, but of losing his primary. Last week, Abbott announced that he was banning COVID-vaccine mandates by "any entity" in Texas, a policy so absurd that you'd be forgiven for thinking, as the running joke on social media goes, that the coronavirus wrote the executive order itself. You might as well ban restaurants f
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Did the Earth tip on its side 84 million years ago?
Hold on to your hats, because scientists have found more evidence that Earth tips over from time to time. We know that the continents are moving slowly due to plate tectonics, but continental drift only pushes the tectonic plates past each other. It has been debated for the past few decades whether the outer, solid shell of the Earth can wobble about, or even tip over relative to the spin axis. Su
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Hear sounds captured from Mars by NASA's Perseverance rover
Thanks to two microphones aboard NASA's Perseverance rover, the mission has recorded nearly five hours of Martian wind gusts, rover wheels crunching over gravel, and motors whirring as the spacecraft moves its arm. These sounds allow scientists and engineers to experience the Red Planet in new ways—and everyone is invited to listen in.
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How the Sun affects asteroids in our neighborhood
Asteroids embody the story of our solar system's beginning. Jupiter's Trojan asteroids, which orbit the Sun on the same path as the gas giant, are no exception. The Trojans are thought to be left over from the objects that eventually formed our planets, and studying them might offer clues about how the solar system came to be.
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A new treatment for glaucoma?
A new study in mice has identified new treatment targets for glaucoma, including preventing a severe pediatric form of glaucoma, as well as uncovering a possible new class of therapy for the most common form of glaucoma in adults.
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The New Lost Cause
One of my favorite things about covering political rallies is that they typically start with a recitation of the Pledge of Allegiance. For anyone above school age, occasions to recite the pledge with a large group of people are irregular, and the ritual serves as a good reminder of what politics is about at its best, no matter how divisive what follows might be. The pledge at a rally for the Repu
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Earth's demise could rid galaxy of meaning, warns Brian Cox ahead of Cop26
Unique events that led to civilisation mean its demise could 'eliminate meaning in galaxy for ever' Humans might be the only intelligent beings in our galaxy, so destroying our civilisation could be a galactic disaster, Prof Brian Cox has warned leaders in the run-up to Cop26. Speaking at the launch of his new BBC Two series Universe, the physicist and presenter said that having spoken to the sci
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Psychosis cases soar in England as pandemic hits mental health
75% rise in referrals for first suspected episode of psychosis between April 2019 and April 2021 Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Cases of psychosis have soared over the past two years in England as an increasing number of people experience hallucinations and delusional thinking amid the stresses of the Covid-19 pandemic. There was a 75% increase in the number of peop
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Factory farms of disease: how industrial chicken production is breeding the next pandemic
At least eight types of bird flu, all of which can kill humans, are circulating around the world's factory farms – and they could be worse than Covid-19 One day last December, 101,000 chickens at a gigantic farm near the city of Astrakhan in southern Russia started to collapse and die . Tests by the state research centre showed that a relatively new strain of lethal avian flu known as H5N8 was ci
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'Maybe the Coronavirus Was Lower-Hanging Fruit'
Two years ago, approximately nobody on Earth had ever heard of mRNA vaccines. This was for the very good reason that no country had ever authorized one. As a scientific experiment, synthetic mRNA was more than 40 years old . As a product, it had yet to be born. Last year, mRNA technology powered the two fastest vaccine developments in history. Moderna famously prepared its COVID-vaccine recipe in
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The Loosest, Funniest SNL of the Season So Far
When a Saturday Night Live host really commits to the job, even a sketch with a simple premise can feel surprising. Consider last night's " Mattress Store ," in which Rami Malek, the show's latest celebrity guest, and cast member Aidy Bryant play a couple searching for the right mattress by enacting every over-the-top scenario they might encounter in bed. Their skits escalate predictably, and Mal
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China's New Space Station Looks Like an Apple Store Inside
With the arrival of three astronauts to China's Tiangong space station, the unofficial rival to the International Space Station (ISS) is now being used for the country's longest space mission yet. The Shenzhou 13 mission includes astronauts Zhai Zhigang, Wang Yaping, and Ye Guangfu, according to Space.com . The trio arrived at Tiangong on Saturday after launching into orbit from the Jiuquan Satel
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'I Don't Know That I Would Even Call It Meth Anymore'
I n the fall of 2006 , law enforcement on the southwest border of the United States seized some crystal methamphetamine. In due course, a five-gram sample of that seizure landed on the desk of a 31-year-old chemist named Joe Bozenko, at the Drug Enforcement Administration lab outside Washington, D.C. Organic chemistry can be endlessly manipulated, with compounds that, like Lego bricks, can be use
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Scientists Believe There Are People Genetically Immune To COVID
A team of scientists say that there might be people out there who are genetically immune to COVID-19 — and they want to find and study them to potentially develop treatments for the disease. The international team of researchers published a paper in the journal Nature Immunology on Monday proposing a "strategy for identifying, recruiting, and genetically analyzing individuals who are naturally re
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Offshoot of Covid Delta variant on the rise in England
UK Health Security Agency monitoring AY.4.2 as daily cases at highest level since late July Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage A newly detected coronavirus variant is on the rise in England, with the virus believed to be an offshoot of Delta. According to a briefing from the UK Health Security Agency, released on Friday , "a Delta sublineage newly designated as AY.4.2 i
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The New Question Haunting Adoption
Ever since I entered what can generously be called my "mid-30s," doctors have asked about my pregnancy plans at every appointment. Because I'm career-minded and generally indecisive, I've always had a way of punting on this question, both in the doctor's office and elsewhere. Well, we can always adopt , I'll think, or say out loud to my similarly childless and wishy-washy friends . Adoption, afte
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Microsoft's Top Lawyer Had to Tell Bill Gates to Stop Hitting on Employee
Bad Bill Bill Gates has spent the years since retiring from Microsoft cultivating an image as a lovable, philanthropic nerd. But reports keep emerging of bad behavior by the powerful software billionaire — mistreating and sexually propositioning employees, not to mention his friendship with now-deceased sex trafficker Jeffrey Epstein . And the latest revelation, reported by the Wall Street Journa
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What Working for Colin Powell Taught Me
My favorite recollection of Colin Powell was the look he got when he was amused. He'd tilt his head up and look at you under the base of his glasses, smiling, and take joy in the moment. He had such a great capacity for merriment. Powell died today, at age 84, of complications of COVID-19, his family said. People who only want to judge him for his policy acts and his achievements—creating the Pow
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We put our child in charge for a day – it was both terrifying and freeing
One day a year our daughter does as she pleases and it's always great fun… and a good education for us all We call it her "in-charge day". A day when our nine-year-old daughter Flora is in charge, and we are, effectively, hers to command. A day when all the traditional hierarchies between parent and child are reversed, when she can fulfil her fantasies, refuse to do anything she doesn't want to an
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'Case closed': 99.9% of scientists agree climate emergency caused by humans
Trawl of 90,000 studies finds consensus, leading to call for Facebook and Twitter to curb disinformation The scientific consensus that humans are altering the climate has passed 99.9%, according to research that strengthens the case for global action at the Cop26 summit in Glasgow. The degree of scientific certainty about the impact of greenhouse gases is now similar to the level of agreement on
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A Hint of Dark Matter Sends Physicists Looking to the Skies
Approximately 85% of the mass in the universe is missing — we can infer its existence, we just can't see it. Over the years, a number of different explanations for this "dark matter" have been proposed, from undiscovered particles to black holes. One idea in particular, however, is drawing renewed attention: the axion. And researchers are turning to the skies to track it down. Source
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China Says It Was Testing a New Spaceship, Not a Hypersonic Missile
Not a Missile Just a day after The Financial Times scooped that China tested a nuclear-capable hypersonic missile in August, Beijing is now denying the reports — claiming that it was merely testing a totally harmless, non-nuclear-capable spacecraft . The country's Ministry of Foreign Affairs spokesperson Zhao Lijian commented on the test at a press conference on Monday saying it "was not a missil
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Seismic 'Telescope' Reveals a Titanic, Tree-Like Plume Feeding Earth's Volcanoes
Some 75% of the world's volcanoes live along the aptly name Ring of Fire. This makes sense. Hugging a boundary between tectonic pates, the Ring of Fire is an open seam on the planet's interior. But then there's Hawaii, a chain of volcanic islands smack in the middle of the Pacific plate, far from any boundaries. What feeds its fire? Scientists have long theorized that columns of superheated rock—
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Pregnant women at risk from NHS workers' mixed messages over safety of jab
Expectant mothers tell helpline that midwives are advising them against vaccines despite threat posed by virus • Coronavirus – latest updates • See all our coronavirus coverage Pregnant women are being advised by some health professionals not to have the Covid vaccine despite an edict from the NHS that they should encourage them to get the jab. One in six of the most critically ill Covid patients
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Researcher Predicts Anti-Aging Drug "by the Time It's Relevant for Me"
The longevity industry — startups trying to make people live longer or even forever , basically — tends to attract charlatans and scandal . But a terrific feature story in New Statesman makes the case that a handful of ventures in the space are finally starting to hone in on some compelling ideas that might eventually provide modest or even radical life extension . "I'm confident we'll have an ag
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Elon Musk Gives Surprise Motivational Talk to Rival Carmaker's Employees
Surprise Guest Tesla CEO and Iron Man-suit inspector Elon Musk is full of surprises. His latest is popping in on a rival carmaker's executive conference to give a motivational talk. Musk spoke to 200 Volkswagen (VW) executives on a video call last Thursday to encourage the company's leaders to embrace efficient electric car production, according to Reuters . He reportedly received the invitation
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Here's What Uranus Scientists Think About Your Disgusting Jokes
Uranus is a fascinating place. Planetary scientists are captivated by the ice giant's unusual methane-rich atmosphere, sporadic weather, and magnetic field that interacts with the Sun all the way from its distant orbit. And, unfortunately, it also has a name that lends itself really well to dirty jokes. It can be pronounced either "urine-us" or "your-anus," both of which open up endless possibili
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Ultrafast control of quantum materials
An international team with participation of the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI shows how light can fundamentally change the properties of solids and how these effects can be used for future applications. The researchers summarize their progress in this field, which is based among other things on experiments that can also be carried out at the Swiss X-ray free-electron laser SwissFEL, in the scientifi
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Neuron Bursts Can Mimic Famous AI Learning Strategy
Every time a human or machine learns how to get better at a task, a trail of evidence is left behind. A sequence of physical changes — to cells in a brain or to numerical values in an algorithm — underlie the improved performance. But how the system figures out exactly what changes to make is no small feat. It's called the credit assignment problem, in which a brain or artificial intelligence…
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Could Elon Musk Paint a Giant Picture of His Face on the Moon?
In a post today, a redditor posed an provocative question: could you paint your face on the Moon, so that it was visible from Earth, and get away with it? "Let's say that Elon musk Does [go] to the moon and paints his face on it," read the post , before it was deleted by the trigger-happy mods of r/space . "The space treaty says no one owns the moon or can claim it, so could someone get away with
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Researchers observe translation symmetry breaking in twisted bilayer graphene
Magic-angle twisted bilayer graphene is a material made of two sheets of graphene placed on top of each other, with one sheet twisted at precisely 1.05 degrees with respect to the other. This material has been found to be a very promising platform for studying different phases of matter, as it combines metallic, superconducting, magnetic and insulating phases in a single crystal.
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Scientists Use AI, 3D Printing to Uncover Hidden Picasso Painting
Fine Art(ificial Intelligence) Despite dying 48 years ago, Pablo Picasso is still dropping art . Such is the case with a "new" painting scientists discovered beneath the surface of a painting using AI. Oxia Palus, a company dedicated to finding lost art, uncovered the piece titled "The Lonesome Crouching Nude," according to a statement obtained by CNN . The portrait was painted over by Picasso wh
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Is Biden Doing Enough to Protect Democracy?
As a reporter for The Philadelphia Inquirer in the early 2000s, I once received a call from a couple of Republican campaign operatives who said they had something to show me. We met at their office in Washington, D.C., a few days later. They presented printouts of recent election records and pointed to a few cases of what they suspected were people voting illegally. One after another, their examp
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We must not allow Covid deaths to be 'normalised' | Letters
Dr Jo Fayram hopes the apathy of the British public will not last; Professors Joe Sim and Steve Tombs condemn the government's lamentable failures; Professor Patricia Deps reports on Brazil's Covid inquiry; and Margaret Farnworth highlights a super-spreader football match Last week the government's response to Covid was criticised in a report by two Commons committees for apparently pursuing herd
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The Volcanologist's Paradox
On March 16, 2017, Mount Etna almost killed Boris Behncke. He was on the volcano's snow-covered flanks, accompanying a film crew from the BBC. Serpents of lava were slithering out of a southeastern crater, but Behncke , a volcanologist at Italy's National Institute of Geophysics and Volcanology, felt no need to take his hard hat out of his bag. They were more than a mile away from the crater, see
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Valneva Covid vaccine could be as effective as Oxford jab, study suggests
Vaccine produced by French company uses inactivated Sars-CoV-2 virus and can be stored in fridge Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage A coronavirus jab based on traditional vaccine technology might be as effective as the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine, data suggests, offering new hope for global vaccination efforts. Vaccines currently approved for use in the UK deliver instru
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Volcanic memories: Black holes give shape to bubbles, rings and 'intergalactic smoke' filaments
An international team of researchers, including scholars from the University of Bologna and the Italian National Astrophysics Institute (INAF), observed for the first time the evolution of warm gas coming from an active black hole. They were able to look at these structures, which are strongly reminiscent of the smoke streams produced by volcanic eruptions, with unprecedented detail and on a time
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US 'very concerned' despite China denials over hypersonic missile
Disarmament ambassador casts doubt on ability to defend against technology after reports of test The United States is "very concerned" about China's development of hypersonic technology, the US disarmament ambassador, Robert Wood, has said, after reports that Beijing had recently launched a hypersonic missile with a nuclear capacity. "We are very concerned by what China has been doing on the hype
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China Is Watching You
E ven if you have never set foot in China, Hikvision's cameras have likely seen you. By 2017, Hikvision had captured 12 percent of the North American market. Its cameras watched over apartment buildings in New York City, public recreation centers in Philadelphia, and hotels in Los Angeles. Police departments used them to monitor streets in Memphis, Tennessee, and in Lawrence, Massachusetts. Londo
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Australia could see Covid surge from new variants even after 80% vaccination when border reopens
Modelling shows increased risk of outbreaks if a mutation similar to the transmissibility of Delta were to circulate with international arrivals Follow our Covid live blog for the latest updates Vaccine rollout and rates tracker ; cases and data tracker Get our free news app ; get our morning email briefing If the Australian international border is reopened while highly transmissible Covid-19 var
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Polygenic screening of embryos is here, but is it ethical?
The first child born using the technique arrived last year. But can it really help reduce diseases in a new generation, or is it 'techno-eugenics'? The birth of the first IVF baby, Louise Brown, in 1978 provoked a media frenzy. In comparison, a little girl named Aurea born by IVF in May 2020 went almost unnoticed. Yet she represents a significant first in assisted reproduction too, for the embryo
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Getting value from your data shouldn't be this hard
The potential impact of the ongoing worldwide data explosion continues to excite the imagination. A 2018 report estimated that every second of every day, every person produces 1.7 MB of data on average—and annual data creation has more than doubled since then and is projected to more than double again by 2025. A report from McKinsey Global Institute estimates that skillful uses of big data could
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These weird virtual creatures evolve their bodies to solve problems
An endless variety of virtual creatures scamper and scuttle across the screen, struggling over obstacles or dragging balls toward a target. They look like half-formed crabs made of sausages—or perhaps Thing, the disembodied hand from The Addams Family . But these "unimals" (short for "universal animals") could in fact help researchers develop more general-purpose intelligence in machines. Agrim G
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Why Did Dostoyevsky Write Crime and Punishment?
Illustration by Gabriela Pesqueira. Source: Universal History Archive / Getty J esus meets Dostoyevsky . He takes one look at him, peers for a diagnostic instant into those tunnels-of-torment eyes, and performs an immediate exorcism. Brisk and bouncerly, no fuss, in the Jesus style: Party's over, little devil. Out you go . A slight buzzing sound, and it's done. And Dostoyevsky, with the infernal
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Gaze in Awe at This Fiery Pac-Man Shaped Supernova, Gobbling Stars
Snacky Supernova Chances are, at some point, you've looked towards the sky and been awestruck by a cloud that resembles a worldly object. It takes the right place, the right time, and the right kind of imagination. It's that kind of serendipity that's clearly best suited for a job, say, working at NASA with the Hubble Space Telescope and catching images of the swirling, distant cosmos — as they d
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Titan's river maps may advise Dragonfly's sedimental journey
With future space exploration in mind, a Cornell-led team of astronomers has published the final maps of Titan's liquid methane rivers and tributaries—as seen by NASA's late Cassini mission—so that may help provide context for Dragonfly's upcoming 2030s expedition.
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The four LHC experiments are getting ready for pilot beams
Since 2019, many places at CERN have been operating like beehives to complete the scheduled upgrades for the second long shutdown (LS2) of the accelerator complex. This period of intense work is now coming to an end with the injection of the first pilot beams into the LHC. This major milestone will be featured during a live event on CERN's social media channels on 20 October at 4 pm (CEST).
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Dwarf galaxy catches even smaller galaxy
Astronomers know that the Milky Way grew by taking in smaller galaxies. But now, a team of Italian-Dutch researchers has shown that a small galaxy neighboring the Milky Way has in turn absorbed an even smaller galaxy from its vicinity. The researchers will publish their findings on Monday in the journal Nature Astronomy.
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Bo G: Jag hade roligt hela tiden
Vetenskapens värld fyller 50 år och det firar redaktionen genom att titta tillbaka på vad vi har sänt det här halvseklet. Det är mycket arkeologi, rymd och så klart Lennart Nilssons filmer om livet. Spela videon och se godbitar från programmet genom tiderna.
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The challenges of hybrid cloud adoption find answers in HCI
Christine McMonigal is director of hyperconverged marketing at Intel Corporation. Never before has the need for businesses to make progress along their digital journeys been more pressing—with more options to evaluate, urgencies to respond to, and complexities to understand in a complex landscape. Shifting demands, fueled in part by the covid-19 pandemic, have driven the need for businesses to ma
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The Decision That Could Doom Democrats for a Decade
D emocrats wanted to play fair, and they tried to lead by example. In the decade-long battle over who gets to draw the districts that determine control of Congress, the party even relinquished some of its power in the name of good government. Now Democrats are discovering the potential cost of that attempt at high-mindedness: their House majority and, perhaps, the presidency. To rid the country o
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Image: Hubble uncovers a burst of star formation
NGC 4666 takes center stage in this image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. This majestic spiral galaxy lies about 80 million light-years away in the constellation Virgo and is undergoing a particularly intense episode of star formation. Astronomers refer to galaxies that rapidly form stars as starburst galaxies. NGC 4666's starburst is likely due to gravitational interactions with its unr
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Even in a pandemic, bait-and-switch acupuncture studies still get published in Nature
Last week, a study claiming to have identified a neurologic mechanism by which acupuncture reduces inflammation was published in Nature . It does no such thing. it's another bait-and-switch mouse study that likely would never have been published in such a high profile journal if it hadn't rebranded electrical stimulation as "electroacupuncture". The post first appeared on Science-Based Medicine
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The True Cost of Wealth on HBO's Succession
As Season 3 of Succession begins, the mighty Logan Roy (played by Brian Cox) is in the crosshairs. His son Kendall (Jeremy Strong) has exposed the family patriarch's involvement in covering up a litany of scandals at their company, Waystar Royco, calling him "a malignant presence, a bully, and a liar." The impulsive decision could be fatal for the media conglomerate, potentially attracting the at
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Ecstasy, LSD and magic mushrooms: are these drugs the future of therapy?
Scientists treating depression and a range of other mental illnesses have been running controlled trials using MDMA and psychedelic drugs such as LSD, and the results have been encouraging. Dr Robin Carhart Harris , head the Centre for Psychedelic Research at Imperial College London, discusses his work showing how psilocybin (or magic mushrooms) can be used to assist psychotherapy for difficult-t
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How Rage Can Battle Racism
When we think of love, we recognize its varieties. Philia , brotherly love. Eros , romantic love. Agape , universal love. Conditional and unconditional love, requited and unrequited love, love for virtue and love for vice. Our awareness of these different kinds of love not only allows us to perceive its varied forms; it also gives us adequate information to approve or disapprove of a particular t
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Without Covid-19 jab, 'reinfection may occur every 16 months'
Reports grow of repeat infection as experts warn prevalence among school pupils puts older people at risk Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage As Covid-19 infections surge in England, people are increasingly reporting catching Sars-CoV-2 for a second or even third time. New analysis has suggested that unvaccinated individuals should expect to be reinfected with Covid-19 e
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SpaceX Opponents Complain About Falling Debris, Fires in FAA Hearing
The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) held a hearing on Monday that allowed members of the public to voice opinions about SpaceX's planned Starship flights from its launch site in Boca Chica, Texas — and some folks had strong criticisms for the aerospace company. The hearing, which went on for more than three hours, gave the public an opportunity to speak for up to three minutes about the fli
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Creating and studying radioactive molecules advances nuclear structure and fundamental symmetry studies
An international team performed the world's first measurement of how the size of the radium nucleus modifies the structure of molecules containing different radium isotopes. The research used a combination of lasers and ion traps at the Isotope mass Separator On-Line (ISOLDE) Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at CERN. The team studied the quantum structure of radium monofluoride (RaF) molecules. Quant
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The Self-Help That No One Needs Right Now
Nothing about The Body Keeps the Score screams "best seller." Written by the psychiatrist Bessel van der Kolk, the book is a graphic account of his decades-long career treating survivors of traumatic experiences such as rape, incest, and war. Page after page, readers are asked to wrestle with van der Kolk's theory that trauma can sever the connection between the mind, which wants to forget what h
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Exploring the mysterious origins of the most extreme light flashes in the universe
Our universe shines bright with light across the electromagnetic spectrum. While most of this light comes from stars like our sun in galaxies like our own, we are often treated with brief and bright flashes that outshine entire galaxies themselves. Some of these brightest flashes are believed to be produced in cataclysmic events, such as the death of massive stars or the collision of two stellar c
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How Not to Be Your Own Worst Enemy
Listen and subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google In the social-media age , we curate images of our lives on a screen—making it especially easy to translate images of perfection as the image of oneself. But the pressure to pretend we are perfect is exactly the thing holding us back from experiencing the happiness we seek—and limiting our ability to be our whole, authentic selves.
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Powerful new technique allows scientists to study how proteins change shape inside cells
Understanding how proteins bend, twist, and shape-shift as they go about their work in cells is enormously important for understanding normal biology and diseases. But a deep understanding of protein dynamics has generally been elusive due to the lack of good imaging methods of proteins at work. Now, for the first time, scientists at the UNC School of Medicine have invented a method that could ena
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How Nanotechnology Will Help Us Probe the Brain in Unimaginable Detail
One of the biggest challenges when it comes to probing and manipulating the brain are the blunt tools we have at our disposal. B ut b reakthroughs in nanotechnology could soon change that , say researchers. Neuroscience has experienced a technological revolution in the last couple decades thanks to rapid improvements in brain-machine interfaces and groundbreaking new methods like functional magne
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Scientists develop novel 'shapeshifting' liquid crystal
Physicists at Case Western Reserve University and Tufts University say they've changed the shape of a flat liquid crystal surface without applying any local stimulus—essentially remotely altering its physical appearance without touching it.
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Valuable peatlands at risk of disappearing
Peatlands are valuable ecosystems that store water and large quantities of carbon and that support high biodiversity. However, 20 percent of the European raised bog habitat is currently under threat from climate change and dewatering.
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I Learn to Shoot a Bow
Lisa Edi / Connected Archives It is no River Jordan that flows here between the railroad tracks and the back porch. It's a canal. Not unlike my mother: low as it want to be and fullest when it rains. Existing for however long without a name, and flowing under a timber bridge that we built. We built that. Isn't that our story? To be denied the beginning. I cross the bridge to shoot a sapling bow m
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Winners of the 2021 Epson International Pano Awards
The top-scoring panoramic photos entered in the 12th Epson International Pano Awards have just been announced. The contest showcases the best work of panoramic photographers around the world. Organizers reported that they received 5,378 entries from 1,245 professional and amateur photographers in 97 countries this year, competing for the top spots in five categories, for several special awards, a
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Russian Director Who Filmed Movie on ISS Says He's Doing the Moon or Mars Next
Martian Movies Mere days after wrapping the first-ever feature film with scenes shot in space , the movie's director already has his sights set even further into the cosmos. Klim Shipenko, the Russian director of "The Challenge," which was filmed aboard the International Space Station (ISS) this month, told reporters at a news conference that he'd be willing to shoot a sequel on the Moon or even
30min
Why extraterrestrial intelligence is more likely to be artificial than biological
Is there intelligent life elsewhere in the universe? It's a question that has been debated for centuries, if not millenia. But it is only recently that we've had an actual chance of finding out, with initiatives such as Seti (Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) using radio telescopes to actively listen for radio messages from alien civilisations.
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Cutting through the noise: AI enables high-fidelity quantum computing
Researchers led by the Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research (SANKEN) at Osaka University have trained a deep neural network to correctly determine the output state of quantum bits, despite environmental noise. The team's novel approach may allow quantum computers to become much more widely used.
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First controllable nanoscale gas-liquid interface fabricated
When liquid meets gas, a unique zone forms. Variable by nature, molecules can cross from one state to another, combining in unique ways to either desirable or unwanted ends. From heat escaping a mug of coffee to increasing molecular concentrations in chemical solutions, gas-liquid interfaces are ubiquitous across nature and engineering. But a lack of tools capable of precisely controlling such gas
3h
Successful beam pipe installation at LHCb
The LHC experiments are nearing the completion of maintenance and upgrade works carried out in the framework of the second long shutdown of CERN's accelerator complex. Of all the experiments, LHCb is undergoing the most significant metamorphosis during these two years, namely the installation of a faster Vertex Locator (VELO), a new scintillating-fiber particle-tracking detector (SciFi), and upgra
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Paper linking COVID-19 vaccines to myocarditis is temporarily removed without explanation
A paper claiming that myocarditis cases spiked after teenagers began receiving COVID-19 vaccines has earned a "temporary removal" — without any explanation from the publisher. The article, "A Report on Myocarditis Adverse Events in the U.S. Vaccine Adverse Events Reporting System (VAERS) in Association with COVID-19 Injectable Biological Products," was published in Current Problems in … Continue r
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The Atlantic Daily: Have Democrats Taken the High Road to Defeat?
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox. This past July, after the Supreme Court voted 6–3 to further gut the 1965 Voting Rights Act, my colleague Ronald Brownstein warned that only one way was left to protect the right to cast a ballot
5h
Did Titan give Saturn its tilt?
Giant planets like Saturn don't just tilt over all by themselves; something has to knock them over, or tug on them gravitationally, to push them off axis. Scientists expect that when new planets are born, they form with almost no tilt at all, lining up like spinning tops with their equators level to the orbital plane in which they circle around their sun.
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Lakes are changing worldwide: Human activities to blame
Worldwide, lake temperatures are rising and seasonal ice cover is shorter and thiner. This effects lake ecosystems, drinking water supply and fishing. International research now shows that these global changes in lake temperature and ice cover are not due to natural climate variability. They can only be explained by massive greenhouse gas emissions since the Industrial Revolution. To demonstrate t
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X-ray Pulsar XTE J1946+274 investigated with NuSTAR
Using NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) spacecraft, Russian astronomers have investigated a transient X-ray pulsar known as XTE J1946+274. Results of the study, presented in a paper published October 11 on arXiv.org, provide more insights into the nature of this object.
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Putting honeybee hives on solar parks could boost the value of UK agriculture
The value of UK agriculture could be boosted by millions of pounds a year if thousands of honeybee hives were deployed on solar parks across the country, a new study reveals. However, scientists caution that the benefits of managing solar parks for wild pollinators over honeybees should be prioritized where appropriate and should be assessed on a site by site basis.
22h
Solar energy can be cheap and reliable across China by 2060
How much will solar power really cost in China in the coming decades, including the challenges its inherent variability poses to the grid? Researchers have found that solar energy could provide 43.2% of China's electricity demands in 2060 at less than two-and-a-half U.S. cents per kilowatt-hour.
23h
A beacon molecule that prevents vision, behavioral problems in mice
Nestled deep in the middle of the vertebrate brain is a multi-sensory integration and movement control center called the superior colliculus. In rodents, this brain region integrates multi-sensory inputs—visual cues, sounds, touch information, and smells—and delivers output signals to a variety of motor control centers in the brain, coordinating the animal's movements in response to its environmen
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Death in space: Here's what would happen to our bodies
As space travel for recreational purposes is becoming a very real possibility, there could come a time when we are traveling to other planets for holidays, or perhaps even to live. Commercial space company Blue Origin has already started sending paying customers on sub-orbital flights. And Elon Musk hopes to start a base on Mars with his firm SpaceX.
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Fasting is required to see the full benefit of calorie restriction in mice
Over the last few decades, scientists have discovered that long-term calorie restriction provides a wealth of benefits in animals. Researchers have largely assumed that reduced food intake drove these benefits by reprogramming metabolism. But a new study finds that reduced calorie intake alone is not enough; fasting is essential for mice to derive full benefit.
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'Ray guns' let scientists use light instead of DNA to tell plant populations apart
In Star Trek, characters carry a little handheld device called a tricorder that they can point at objects to analyze and identify them. When the show's writers cooked up the idea in the 1960s, it was purely science fiction, but a new paper in New Phytologist takes the idea a step closer to reality. The researchers used a handheld device that looks a little like a ray gun to record how plant leaves
3h
Is a 'negative microwave' – a device that quickly cools food and drink – possible?
The long-running series in which readers answer other readers' questions on subjects ranging from trivial flights of fancy to profound scientific and philosophical concepts I've been grappling for decades about how you'd get a "negative microwave" to work, a device that very quickly cools things such as food or drinks without having to pre-fill it with something that's already cold. I understand
9h
California records driest year in a century
In a year of both extreme heat and extreme drought, California has reported its driest water year in terms of precipitation in a century, and experts fear the coming 12 months could be even worse.
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Molecular interfaces as building blocks for innovative sensors and data storage devices
Molecular interfaces formed between metals and molecular compounds have enormous potential as building blocks for future opto-electronics and spin-electronics devices. Transition metal phthalocyanine and porphyrin complexes are promising components for such interfaces. Scientists at Forschungszentrum Jülich, together with a team of international scientists, have been working to develop a model sys
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Small-scale foragers left more than footprints on the landscape
Archaeological sites like the Great Wall of China and the pyramids can be seen with the naked eye from space, but for ancient societies that did not build, their traces on the landscape are more difficult to find. Now Penn State researchers have used satellite data to identify areas in coastal southwest Madagascar where indigenous foragers altered their surroundings.
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Study reconstructs 232-year history of prairie fire in Midwestern US
Researchers combed through thousands of historical documents for first-person accounts of fires occurring between 1673 and 1905 in the Midwestern tallgrass prairie. Their study is the first systematic analysis of the timing, causes and consequences of prairie fires in this part of the world. They report their findings in Natural Areas Journal.
20min
The Most Famous Low-Wage Workers in the Country
On September 14, Nabisco workers at a bakery in Portland, Oregon, who had been striking for more than a month to protest proposed contract changes were joined on the picket line by what might have seemed unlikely allies: players for the Portland Thorns , the city's professional women's soccer team. "The message you should take from that is that we're workers just like anybody else," Meghann Burke
23min
Risky 'grease proof' chemicals hang around forever
Chemicals that "grease proof" everything from food packaging to carpets have built up in the environment for decades and contaminate ecosystems across the globe. A new study says we need a better understanding of the risks that these chemicals pose. The study, published in the journal Trends in Food Science & Technology , collects the proceedings of a symposium and issues a call to action on the
52min
Jessica Orwig
Contributor is a freelance writer for Inside Science focusing on physics. She majored in astrophysics at Ohio State and earned her masters in science and tech journalism from Texas A&M. When she's not at her computer you can find her biking, hiking, painting, or playing the piano. Author Articles Technology If Pilots Took More Control of Traffic Over the North Atlantic New research recommends al
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All Is Not Well With NASA's Lucy Spacecraft
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/Conceptual Image Lab/Adriana Gutierrez NASA's Lucy spacecraft is having difficulties with its solar panels. The spacecraft launched on Oct. 16th without incident, and sucessfully unfolded both its solar panels. But only one of its panels successfully latched into position. Telemetry via NASA's Deep Space Network shows that Lucy as a whole is still safe, and its
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Agricultural runoff contributes to global warming, but a new study offers insight on climate-change mitigation
Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent greenhouse gas, with 300 times the warming ability of carbon dioxide. Due to fertilizer runoff from farm fields, an increasing load of nitrogen is washing into rivers and streams, where nitrogen-breathing microbes break some of the fertilizer down into N2O, which the river releases into the atmosphere as it tumbles toward the ocean. But, until now, scientists haven'
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What is stopping us from making long-range wireless power transfer?
Does anyone know what exactly would need to be done in order to make wireless power transfer work over long distances or what is the barrier stopping it from doing so? Maybe it's the way electricity flows through the air and/or the fact that it would fry many of the things that get in its way. But perhaps it is just something to do with the machines. I do not know. Is it even physically possible?
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Short-term high-fat feeding exacerbates degeneration in retinitis pigmentosa by promoting retinal oxidative stress and inflammation [Neuroscience]
A high-fat diet (HFD) can induce hyperglycemia and metabolic syndromes that, in turn, can trigger visual impairment. To evaluate the acute effects of HFD feeding on retinal degeneration, we assessed retinal function and morphology, inflammatory state, oxidative stress, and gut microbiome in dystrophic retinal degeneration 10 (rd10) mice, a model…
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A new regime of heme-dependent aromatic oxygenase superfamily [Biochemistry]
Two histidine-ligated heme-dependent monooxygenase proteins, TyrH and SfmD, have recently been found to resemble enzymes from the dioxygenase superfamily currently named after tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO), that is, the TDO superfamily. These latest findings prompted us to revisit the structure and function of the superfamily. The enzymes in this superfamily share…
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Gene Therapy Is Coming of Age
Various approaches are approved for treating blood cancers and a few rare disorders—they may soon become standard care — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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This Real Estate Investment Platform Saves You Time and Money
Investing in single-family rental properties is a pretty good deal if you can afford to do it. They can provide a steady stream of revenue from rent and a decent hedge against whatever the future might hold. However, in addition to the capital requirements of such an investment, buying and maintaining such properties has historically been a world-class hassle. But with a real estate investment pl
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New study calls for mitigation, monitoring of common grease-proofing food packaging chemicals
A scientist is calling for a better understanding of the health ramifications of ubiquitous 'grease proofing' chemicals that have been used for decades. A new study based on a symposium involving scientists at public and private institutions strikes an urgent tone on the need for new and better ways to detect and mitigate this class of chemical compounds, collectively known as per- and polyfluoroa
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Arctic krill use twilight to guide their daily rhythms through the polar winter
Most animals sync their body clocks to the daily rhythm of the sun, but what happens during the polar winter when the sun never rises above the horizon? According to a study by Jonathan Cohen at the University of Delaware and colleagues, publishing October 19th in the open-access journal PLOS Biology, arctic krill can detect tiny changes in light intensity during polar winter days, allowing them t
2h
Will supply chain woes stymie 2021 holiday shopping?
As the holiday season and end of the year approaches, the global supply chain has been navigating pandemic-related disruptions for nearly two years. Microchip and semiconductor shortages, inconsistent shipping, production factory shutdowns, and consumer demand shifts have created supply chain issues like never before. Jason Miller , associate professor of supply chain management at Michigan State
2h
DNA tangles can help predict evolution of mutations
Researchers have identified evolutionary hotspots in DNA where mutations are more likely. The study authors say these findings will help us in the future to predict the evolution of bacteria and viruses over time, which could aid vaccine design and better understanding of antibiotic resistance.
3h
MCAs in Arabidopsis are Ca2+-permeable mechanosensitive channels inherently sensitive to membrane tension
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26363-z Mechanosensitive ion channels convert mechanical stimuli into intracellular electric and ionic signals. Here the authors show that Arabidopsis MCA2 is a Ca2+-permeable mechanosensitive channel that is directly activated by membrane tension.
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De novo biosynthesis of bioactive isoflavonoids by engineered yeast cell factories
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26361-1 Isoflavonoids are a class of industrially important plant natural products, but their low abundance and structural complexity limits their availability. Here, the authors engineer Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolism to become a platform for efficient production of daidzein which is core chemical scaffold for
3h
Structural basis of soluble membrane attack complex packaging for clearance
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26366-w To prevent unregulated complement activation, extracellular chaperones capture soluble precursors to the membrane attack complex (sMAC). Here, structural analysis of sMAC reveals how clusterin recognizes heterogeneous sMAC complexes and inhibits polymerization of complement protein C9.
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Fast ion transport for synthesis and stabilization of β-Zn4Sb3
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26265-0 β-Zn4Sb3 has promising thermoelectric performance, but its ionic migration properties make it prone to degradation. Here the authors exploit the ion migration in an electric field-assisted synthesis method, fast producing β-Zn4Sb3 with improved phase stability and extended temperature range for the thermoelec
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Satb2 acts as a gatekeeper for major developmental transitions during early vertebrate embryogenesis
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26234-7 Activation of the zygotic genome is a critical transition during development, though the link to tissue-specific gene regulation remains unclear. Here the authors demonstrate distinct functions for Satb2 before and after zygotic genome activation, highlighting the temporal coordination of these roles.
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A mutational hotspot that determines highly repeatable evolution can be built and broken by silent genetic changes
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26286-9 Mutational hotspots can determine evolutionary outcomes and make evolution repeatable. Experiments in bacteria reveal that a powerfully deterministic genetic hotspot can be built and broken by a handful of silent mutations, highlighting an underappreciated role for silent genetic variation in determining adap
3h
Perseverance Rover Records the Sound of Mars
Even before launch, NASA talked at length about the suite of more than 20 cameras on the Perseverance rover, but did you know it also has a pair of microphones? NASA has used these off-the-shelf components to record the sounds of Mars in high fidelity for the first time. Some of the team's favorite eerie recordings are available for your listening pleasure, but they're also of intense scientific
3h
New gene could help improve tomato flavor and shelf-life
Buying tomatoes and other fruits in the grocery store is always a gamble because, however good they look, they are often firm but lack flavor. A group of plant scientists has discovered a gene that could increase the odds that future store-bought tomatoes stay firm until the consumer gets them home, and have the right combination of flavor and softness when eaten.
3h
Efficient light with the help of mathematics
How do you make sure that light gets to the right place without loss of energy? To do that, lamps often use mirrors and lenses. But how do you adjust them properly to get the correct light output? Lotte Romijn investigated how to get light from a to b as efficiently as possible with the help of a mathematical algorithm, for very complicated target light outputs. She will obtain her doctorate on 19
3h
Co-worker interventions can moderate customer sexual harassment in service industry
Although the #MeToo movement raised public awareness of sexual harassment in Hollywood and other high-profile industries, comparatively little attention has been paid to the rampant sexual harassment experienced by frontline service workers such as waitresses, baristas, bartenders and retail clerks. A new paper co-written by a team of University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign experts who study occup
3h
Motorized droplets thanks to feedback effects
A team of physicists from Germany and Sweden working with first author Jens Christian Grauer from Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf (HHU) has examined a special system of colloidal particles that they activated using laser light. The researchers discovered that self-propelling droplets, which they have named 'droploids', formed which contain the particles as an internal motor. They describe the
3h
How a bacterium may help solve the plastic pollution crisis
Plastic pollution is one of the most pressing environmental issues of our time. The accumulation of petroleum-based plastics is having devastating effects on our environment, wildlife and human health. In a recent study published in Scientific Reports, researchers from Nara Institute of Science and Technology revealed a bacterium that is not only able to degrade difficult-to-recycle petroleum-base
3h
Wearable sensor patch monitors glucose via sweat
A new wearable, noninvasive monitoring device prototype monitors glucose in sweat—no needles necessary. Noninvasive glucose monitoring devices are not currently commercially available in the United States, so people with diabetes must collect blood samples or use sensors embedded under the skin to measure their blood sugar levels. Now, with the new wearable device, less intrusive glucose monitori
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Agricultural runoff contributes to global warming – New study helps us figure out how and what we can do about it
Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent greenhouse gas, with 300 times the warming ability of carbon dioxide. Due to fertilizer runoff from farm fields, an increasing load of nitrogen is washing into rivers and streams, where nitrogen-breathing microbes break some of the fertilizer down into N2O, which the river releases into the atmosphere as it tumbles toward the ocean. But, until now, scientists haven'
4h
Amning kopplas till minskad risk för typ 1-diabetes
Barn i Sverige löper den näst högsta risken i världen att utveckla typ 1-diabetes. Amning och att vänta med gluten skulle kunna ha en skyddande effekt. Allt fler barn i världen drabbas av typ 1-diabetes. I Sverige får 40 barn per 100 000 diagnosen varje år, vilket är den näst högsta risken i världen. Den negativa utvecklingen verkar bero på en kombination av arv och miljö – men frågan hur sjukdom
4h
New fibers can make breath-regulating garments
A new kind of fiber can be made into clothing that senses how much it is being stretched or compressed, and then provides immediate tactile feedback in the form of pressure, lateral stretch, or vibration. Such fabrics could be used in garments that help train singers or athletes to better control their breathing, or that help patients recovering from disease or surgery to recover their breathing p
5h
Should you squash the invasive spotted lanternfly?
Not too many bugs are more destructive than the Lycorma delicatula , better known as the spotted lanternfly. Some experts say that when you see one, you should report it, then smash it. The invasive pest native to Asia first arrived in the United States seven years ago. It's a threat to trees, plants, crops, orchards, vineyards, and even jobs. And as if that's not bad enough, it excretes a gross
5h
Bacterial infections in sinuses of cystic fibrosis patients share surprising similarities
A collaboration among microbiologists, clinicians and experts on bacterial evolution revealed that, with time, highly adapted bacterial communities in the sinuses of people with cystic fibrosis (CF) become more fragmented and experience mutations that erode their genomes—a dogma-challenging discovery that has scientists reimagining how they think about the evolution of microbes in chronic infectio
5h
COVID-19 vaccination strategies: When is one dose better than two?
In many parts of the world, the supply of COVID-19 vaccines continues to lag behind the demand. While most vaccines are designed as a two-dose regimen, some countries, like Canada, have prioritized vaccinating as many people as possible with a single dose before giving out an additional dose.
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Targeted interventions to contain pandemics, minimize societal disruption
The COVID-19 pandemic has led to more than 218 million infections and over 4.5 million deaths as of Sept. 3, 2021. Nonpharmaceutical interventions (NPIs), such as case isolation, quarantining contacts, and the complete lockdown of entire countries, were implemented in an effort to contain the pandemic. But these NPIs often come at the expense of economic disruption, harm to social and mental well-
5h
How climate change affects animal behavior
Humans are shaping environments at an accelerating rate. Indeed, one of the most important current topics of research is the capacity of animals to adapt to human-induced environmental change and how that change affects the expression of animal traits.
5h
New report reveals hidden complexities of uplift for Universal Credit claimants
A new report released today shows that the cut in benefit caused by the withdrawal of the £20 uplift in Universal Credit will have a significant impact, especially for claimants without other sources of income. But the findings also highlight deeper, structural issues with Universal Credit which are revealed by the ways in which the uplift affects different groups of claimants.
5h
Road impacts on ecosystems in sub-Saharan Africa
Sub-Saharan Africa is developing rapidly. With growing economies and increased trade, major road infrastructure plans have been developed for the region, which also hosts some of the world's most unique and diverse ecosystems. New research looked into how roads might impact ecosystems in the region.
5h
A path-setting method to enable vast applications for a graphene
Super strong and only one atom thick, graphene holds promise as a nanomaterial for everything from microelectronics to clean energy storage. But lack of one property has limited its use. Now, researchers at Princeton University and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have overcome that problem using low-temperature plasma, creating a novel technique tha
5h
How quickly does the climate recover?
Climate change is causing temperatures to rise and is also increasing the likelihood of storms, heavy rain, and flooding—the recent flood disaster in the Ahr valley in Germany is just one such example. What we need to ask ourselves in this connection is how quickly the climate can recover from the warming caused by an increase in carbon dioxide in the atmosphere.
5h
Palladium-based metallic glass with high thrombogenic resistance
Advancements in the design of medical devices have greatly improved patient survival rates, but currently employed metals, which are mostly based on crystalline titanium, still provoke a thrombosis response upon contact with blood, with potentially life-threatening consequences. This severe problem has also been recognized in the Zurich Heart project of University Medicine Zurich (HMZ), which aims
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How we could eat real meat without harming animals | Isha Datar
What if you could eat chicken nuggets without harming a chicken? It's possible through "cellular agriculture," says Isha Datar. In a talk about cutting-edge science, she explains how this new means of food production makes it possible to eat meat without the negative consequences of industrial farming — and how it could fundamentally change our food systems for the better. "It's our once-in-a-lif
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Pakistan's amphibians need more research efforts and better protection
In Pakistan, amphibians have long been neglected in wildlife conservation, management decisions and research agendas. To counter this, scientists have now published the first comprehensive study on all known amphibian species in the country. The little we currently know about the occurrence of the chytrid fungus, which has already eradicated many amphibian species globally, is a grim example of ho
6h
Interferon does not improve outcomes for hospitalized adults with COVID-19, clinical trial finds
A clinical trial has found that treatment with the immunomodulator interferon beta-1a plus the antiviral remdesivir was not superior to treatment with remdesivir alone in hospitalized adults with COVID-19 pneumonia. In addition, in a subgroup of patients who required high-flow oxygen, investigators found that interferon beta-1a was associated with more adverse events and worse outcomes.
6h
The surprising marine biodiversity in the Barcelona Forum beach
A study identified 514 marine species in the bathing areas of the Barcelona Forum, an artificial beach affected by different anthropogenic impacts. This high biodiversity—which includes the presence of exotic species—is a shocking finding in such an altered marine habitat like this city beach in Barcelona (Catalonia, Spain).
6h
Cross-coupling reactions: Semiheterogeneous PCN-Cu based metallaphotocatalysis
Recently, photoredox catalysis has emerged as an appealing coupling partner for transition metal catalysis, termed metallaphotocatalysis, to develop new synthetic methodologies as well as improve the efficiency of established transformations. Conversely, most of these dual catalytic platforms have focused on the use of homogeneous photoredox catalysts such as Ru- and Ir-based polypyridyl complexes
6h
Nonchlorinated solvent-processed high-performance ambipolar transistors
This research is led by Prof. Yunqi Liu (Institute of Chemistry Chinese Academy of Sciences) and Prof. Yunlong Guo (Institute of Chemistry Chinese Academy of Sciences). Ambipolar polymer semiconductors have wide applications in electronic devices such as organic field-effect transistors (OFETs), logic circuits, and organic light-emitting transistors (OLETs). Although some high-performance ambipola
6h
Super-Precise CRISPR Gene Editing Tool Could Tackle Tough Genetic Diseases
For all its supposed genetic editing finesse, CRISPR's a brute. The Swiss Army knife of gene editing tools chops up DNA strands to insert genetic changes. What's called "editing" is actually genetic vandalism —pick a malfunctioning gene, chop it up, and wait for the cell to patch and repair the rest. It's a hasty, clunky process, prone to errors and other unintended and unpredictable effects. Bac
6h
Huge Crash! Jerry Bird vs Tony McKinney | Street Outlaws: No Prep Kings
Stream Street Outlaws: No Prep Kings on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/street-outlaws-no-prep-kings About Street Outlaws: No Prep Kings: Street racers battle at rough, untested tracks across the country and earn points depending on how they perform. Whoever has the most points at the end is crowned the true No Prep King! #StreetOutlaws #Discovery #NoPrepKings Subscribe to Discove
6h
Distribution of soil bacterial community in surface and deep layers reported along elevational gradient
Soil microorganisms are important components of the soil ecosystem, they play critical roles in biogeochemical and nutrient cycling processes. The distribution pattern of bacterial community along the elevational gradient is critical for predicting future ecosystem functions and climate feedbacks. Patterns of soil bacterial community distribution in surface soil layer along elevational gradients h
7h
Novel targeted nano-immunostimulant for cancer immunotherapy developed
Immunotherapy is promising for cancer treatment. The key to improving the therapeutic effect is to drive the patient's own immune system to produce a strong, effective, and enduring tumor-specific immune response. Engineered nanoplatforms show promising potential in strengthening antitumor immune responses.
7h
Novel high-accuracy twist measurement for bi-grid modulation collimator
A research team led by Prof. Yang Jianfeng from the Xi'an Institute of Optics and Precision Mechanics (XIOPM) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) recently proposed high-accuracy twist measurement based on the spherical wave Talbot effect for a bi-grid modulation collimator. Their up-to-date results were published in Applied Optics.
7h
Solar storm stirs stunning aurora
After the sun ejected a violent mass of fast-moving plasma into space on 9 October, ESA waited for the storm to strike. A few days later, the coronal mass ejection (CME) arrived at Earth, crashing into our planet's magnetosphere, and lighting up the sky.
7h
Female journalists at top level advocate gender equality in newsrooms
Research and studies around the world have described the career journey of female journalists in two metaphors: glass ceiling and labyrinth. These metaphors suggest women's career prospects in journalism are bleak as they face various challenges not only from society but also the media organizations they work for.
7h
Children deserve answers to their questions about climate change: How universities can help
Our children are growing up in a volatile climate. It's already damaging their health, wealth and well-being. Universities can be leaders in helping young people gain the knowledge they need to navigate this uncertain future. Curious Climate Schools, a project that connects young people directly with experts who can answer their climate questions, is a model for just this kind of leadership.
7h
Climate action needed to avert 'health catastrophe'
To achieve sustained recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic and avoid an "impending health catastrophe," countries must commit to targeted action on climate change, health experts have urged ahead of the UN climate summit, COP26.
7h
Efficient light-emitting diodes based on oriented perovskite nanoparticles
Planar perovskite light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are high-performance and cost-effective electroluminescence devices that are ideal for large-area display and lighting applications. By exploring the emission layers with high ratios of horizontal transition dipole moments (TDMs), researchers can boost the photon outcoupling of planar LEDs. The LEDs that are based on anisotropic perovskite are ineffic
7h
How plants know winter is coming
Plants know winter is coming. But exactly how they detect this change in seasons has never been clear. Researchers took a new approach to uncover this plant secret: They asked one. The answer they received—in the form of changes in the gene expression of a common weed known as Arabidopsis —has implications for farmers and conservationists alike as climate change increasingly makes native ecosyste
7h
Launch Into The Skies With 75% Off This Easy-To-Use 4K Drone
The wide availability of drones has changed everything, including making throwing a grenade a thing of the past . Fortunately, most of us will put them to more peaceful uses, like filming our lives, something the Black YLR/C S32T HD 4K Single-Camera Drone excels at. It's on sale for just $99.95 (reg. $410). Flying With Ease First of all, it's built with newcomers in mind. It's easy to control, wi
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Easing medical debt may get people to the doctor
People with unpaid health care bills are less likely to seek needed medical care, evidence indicates. Earlier this summer, Stanford economist Neale Mahoney sounded an alarm with a study he coauthored: Americans have at least $140 billion in unpaid health care bills sitting in collection agencies—making the country's medical debt crisis far bigger than anyone had realized. Based on an analysis of
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Five facts to help you understand sea ice
One way that scientists monitor climate change is through the measure of sea ice extent. Sea ice extent is the area of ice that covers the Arctic Ocean at a given time. Sea ice plays an important role in reflecting sunlight back into space, regulating ocean and air temperature, circulating ocean water, and maintaining animal habitats.
8h
Net Zero by 2050
Next month the UN will host the 26th conference on climate change, the COP26 . At this point the discussion is not so much what the goal should be, it's how to achieve that goal. The Paris Accords set that goal at limiting global warming to 1.5 C above pre-industrial levels. In order to achieve this outcome goal the consensus is that we need to achieve the primary goal of net zero green house gas
8h
Three hours to save Integral
On 22 September, around midday, ESA's Integral spacecraft went into emergency Safe Mode. One of the spacecraft's three active 'reaction wheels' had turned off without warning and stopped spinning, causing a ripple effect that meant the satellite itself began to rotate.
8h
Violence against women in Kenya: Data provides a glimpse into a grim situation
Kenyan world record holder Agnes Tirop was found stabbed to death at her home in the western town of Iten last week. The fact that the police arrested her husband in connection with the death has brought the subject of domestic violence to the fore in Kenya. Population and reproductive health researcher Yohannes Dibaba Wado shares his insights into how widespread it is and what must be done to add
8h
Anaesthetic-related mortality in horses cut by half in the past 20 years
CEPEF4 is the largest study globally on anesthetic-related mortality in horses. Three researchers from the Faculties of Veterinary Studies of Edinburgh, Zurich and the CEU Cardenal Herrera of Valencia, along with the two British authors who founded the study, have just published in journal Animals the preliminary results on the first 6,701 cases of anesthesia and 1,995 cases of sedation registered
8h
NASA selects gamma-ray telescope to chart Milky Way evolution
NASA has selected a new space telescope proposal that will study the recent history of star birth, star death, and the formation of chemical elements in the Milky Way. The gamma-ray telescope, called the Compton Spectrometer and Imager (COSI), is expected to launch in 2025 as NASA's latest small astrophysics mission.
8h
Targeting cancer at the nanoscale
Scientists from the Department of Nuclear Medicine and Tracer Kinetics at Osaka University developed a novel system for targeted cancer radiation therapy that uses gold nanoparticles labeled with astatine-211. Owing to the limited range and half-life of the radiation, along with the localization of the nanoparticles, healthy cells are considerably less likely to be harmed. This work may lead to ef
8h
In Defense of Fakeness
Arguably, no mode of writing has influenced the past decade of novels more than autofiction, a catchall term for books that call themselves fiction while claiming to be rooted, in some way, in their authors' real lives. Amid this boom, critics and readers alike have shown a certain anxiety over how based in fact a novel can be—and how anyone might know, given that no autofiction writer purports t
9h
Lancet retracts 10-year-old case report
The Lancet has retracted a decade-old case report by a group from Japan after concluding that the authors misrepresented the originality of the work. The paper was a case report, titled "Hidden Harm," by a team at Nihon University School of Medicine in Tokyo. The authors described a 46-year-old woman with a history of self-harming … Continue reading
9h
Monsters of the deep revealed for what they are
Grotesque little creatures with armor-like horns, misshapen torsos and some with spikes protruding from their sides are lurking in the waters of the Gulf of Mexico. They appear in an array of oranges and blues, though several are see-through. Some appear part alien and part Hunchback of Notre Dame. They are the visions of which nightmares are made. But to marine scientist Heather Bracken-Grissom,
9h
There is more than one way to accelerate decarbonization
While West Virginia's Senator Joe Manchin is doing his best to block climate policy and save his state's dying fossil fuel industry, there is no reason to believe that the proposed "Clean Electricity Program" policy design is the only way to accelerate decarbonization. The problem for many utilities is the capital cost of the infrastructure for decarbonization. The infrastructure and Build Back Be
9h
Rhinoceros genomes uncover family secrets
Nature, Published online: 19 October 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02777-z Genomes from living and extinct rhinos reveal that different species evolved as a result of geographic isolation. A comparison of DNA from different species also shows that rhinos have long displayed low genetic variability.
10h
Untwisted trilayer graphene hosts superconductivity and magnetism
Nature, Published online: 19 October 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02773-3 Superconductivity and magnetism have been observed in layered graphene in which the sheets are twisted with respect to each other. But a simpler, more stable graphene system also exhibits these phases.
10h
Daily briefing: The environmental conflict heating up in low-Earth orbit
Nature, Published online: 18 October 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02856-1 As companies fill low-Earth orbit with thousands of satellites, it's becoming a new region of environmental dissent. Plus, tips for writing a popular-science book, and a super-precise measure of the neutron's lifetime leaves a mystery unsolved.
10h
An Acquaintance Remembers Bobby McIlvaine
Twenty Years Gone In September, Jennifer Senior wrote about one family's struggle to make sense of 9/11. Thank you for your cover story about the family of Bobby McIlvaine. I remember him. In 2001, I worked as a writer and editor for Waters , the financial-technology magazine that hosted the conference at Windows on the World on September 11. (It was supposed to be a two-day conference, and I pla
10h
Pulling Funding for Fossil Fuel Projects in Africa Is Unjust
Wealthy countries are increasingly vowing to cease public funding for nearly all fossil fuel projects in less developed countries while making no such commitments at home. The blunt exclusion of these projects is an inequitable and ineffective climate strategy that gaslights more than a billion Africans.
11h
Smart skogsmaskin kan själv hämta och lämna timmer
En självkörande skogsmaskin som hämtar och lämnar timmer – samtidigt som den väljer den väg som är mest skonsam för marken – det är framtiden skogsbruk, enligt forskarna. För första gången i världshistorien har en självkörande skogsmaskin klarat av att "skota" – alltså att helt utan mänsklig inblandning hämta och transportera virke. Forskarna ser det som ett viktigt steg mot ett mer hållbart skog
11h
Striving for sustainability in sport
It is a sign of the times that last week's declaration by the Williams Formula One team of its aim to become a climate-positive organisation by 2030, was greeted in muted terms.
12h
Pakistan's amphibians need more research efforts and better protection
Amphibians are bioindicators of an ecosystem's health and may also serve as biological control of crop and forest pests. The First Herpetological Congress, organized in 1989, presented alarming findings about the decline in amphibian populations. Currently, amphibians include the highest percentage of threatened species (>40%), as well as the highest number of data deficient species (>1500 species
12h
Covid-19: how 43,000 false negative tests were uncovered as wrong
Last week, testing at a private Covid lab in Wolverhampton was halted, after the UK Health Security Agency found tens of thousands of people may have been falsely given a negative PCR result. But since the start of September, scientists had been alerted to strange patterns in the testing data which suggested something was out of the ordinary. Anand Jagatia speaks to Dr Kit Yates, a mathematical bi
16h
Covid-19: how 43,000 false negative tests were uncovered as wrong | podcast
Last week, testing at a private Covid lab in Wolverhampton was halted, after the UK Health Security Agency found tens of thousands of people may have been falsely given a negative PCR result. But since the start of September, scientists had been alerted to strange patterns in the testing data which suggested something was out of the ordinary. Anand Jagatia speaks to Dr Kit Yates, a mathematical b
16h
I am a student at The New School researching transhumanism, cyborgs, robotic medical prosthetics, bio-hacking, etc. and want to hear your story.
My two research partners and I are in a class taught by Christian Madsbjerg called Technology and Human Observation . As the title implies, we want to observe and listen! We will definitely have questions but are ultimately more concerned with your individual story and life. I am not trying to imply that the aforementioned topics are all similar. I truly do not know how related they all are. We a
21h
Does "visualization" act to enhance cognition function/efficacy in any way?
I think it does the opposite. Simply cause as a kid and teenager, I was the worst kind of daydreamer, all I did all day was visualize and get lost in visuals. And my day to day cognitive function was diabolical. I was simply "away with the fairies", "out of touch", "not tuned in", and as a result, cognitively demanding tasks that required attention and focus was something I often made a mess of.
22h
New active agent against parasites
Researchers have identified a chemical compound that may be suitable as an active agent against several different unicellular parasites. Among these are the pathogens that cause malaria and toxoplasmosis. The point of attack for this promising substance is the protein tubulin: It helps cells divide and therefore is essential for the multiplication of the parasites.
22h
In unpredictable times, a data strategy is key
More than 18 months after the 2020 coronavirus pandemic struck, it's clear that the ability to make quick decisions based on high-quality data has become essential for business success. In an increasingly competitive and constantly shifting landscape, companies must be agile enough to tackle persistent challenges, ranging from cost-cutting and supply chain issues to product development and market
23h
How marsh grass protects shorelines
Marsh plants can play a major role in mitigating coastal damage as sea levels rise and storm surges increase. A new study provides greater detail about how these protective benefits work under real-world conditions shaped by waves and currents.
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Luktsinnet – människans snabbaste varningssystem
Hjärnan reagerar blixtsnabbt när det luktar fara. Med hjälp av ny teknik har forskare vid Karolinska Institutet nu kunnat studera vad som händer i hjärnan när det centrala nervsystemet avgör om en lukt är en fara eller inte. Förmågan att upptäcka och reagera på lukten av möjliga hot är en förutsättning för människors och andra däggdjurs överlevnad. Studien från Karolinska institutet som publicera
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Powerful technique allows scientists to study how proteins change shape inside cells
The scientists' new 'binder-tag' technique allows researchers to pinpoint and track proteins that are in a desired shape or 'conformation,' and to do so in real time inside living cells. The scientists demonstrated the technique in, essentially, movies that track the active version of an important signaling protein — a molecule, in this case, important for cell growth.
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NASA, ULA launch Lucy Mission to 'fossils' of planet formation
NASA's Lucy mission, the agency's first to Jupiter's Trojan asteroids, launched from Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida. Over the next 12 years, Lucy will fly by one main-belt asteroid and seven Trojan asteroids, making it the agency's first single spacecraft mission in history to explore so many different asteroids. Lucy will investigate these 'fossils' of planetary formation up close
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COVID-19 lockdowns drive decline in active fires in southeastern United States [Sustainability Science]
Fire is a common ecosystem process in forests and grasslands worldwide. Increasingly, ignitions are controlled by human activities either through suppression of wildfires or intentional ignition of prescribed fires. The southeastern United States leads the nation in prescribed fire, burning ca. 80% of the country's extent annually. The COVID-19 pandemic…
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Critical regulation of follicular helper T cell differentiation and function by G{alpha}13 signaling [Immunology and Inflammation]
GPCR-Gα protein–mediated signal transduction contributes to spatiotemporal interactions between immune cells to fine-tune and facilitate the process of inflammation and host protection. Beyond this, however, how Gα proteins contribute to the helper T cell subset differentiation and adaptive response have been underappreciated. Here, we found that Gα13 signaling in T…
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Neural mechanisms of deliberate dishonesty: Dissociating deliberation from other control processes during dishonest behaviors [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
Numerous studies have sought proof of whether people are genuinely honest by testing whether cognitive control mechanisms are recruited during honest and dishonest behaviors. The underlying assumption is: Deliberate behaviors require cognitive control to inhibit intuitive responses. However, cognitive control during honest and dishonest behaviors can be required for other…
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Digital printing of shape-morphing natural materials [Engineering]
We demonstrate how programmable shape evolution and deformation can be induced in plant-based natural materials through standard digital printing technologies. With nonallergenic pollen paper as the substrate material, we show how specific geometrical features and architectures can be custom designed through digital printing of patterns to modulate hygrophobicity, geometry, and…
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Aminopeptidases trim Xaa-Pro proteins, initiating their degradation by the Pro/N-degron pathway [Biochemistry]
N-degron pathways are proteolytic systems that recognize proteins bearing N-terminal (Nt) degradation signals (degrons) called N-degrons. Our previous work identified Gid4 as a recognition component (N-recognin) of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteolytic system termed the proline (Pro)/N-degron pathway. Gid4 is a subunit of the oligomeric glucose-induced degradation (GID) ubiquitin ligase. Gid4..
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Correction for Donate et al., Cigarette smoke induces miR-132 in Th17 cells that enhance osteoclastogenesis in inflammatory arthritis [Immunology and Inflammation]
IMMUNOLOGY AND INFLAMMATION. Correction for "Cigarette smoke induces miR-132 in Th17 cells that enhance osteoclastogenesis in inflammatory arthritis," by Paula B. Donate, Kalil Alves de Lima, Raphael S. Peres, Fausto Almeida, Sandra Y. Fukada, Tarcilia A. Silva, Daniele C. Nascimento, Nerry T. Cecilio, Jhimmy Talbot, Rene D. Oliveira, Geraldo A….
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People are more tolerant of inequality when it is expressed in terms of individuals rather than groups at the top [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
Despite the ever-growing economic gap between the very wealthy and the rest of the population, support for redistributive policies tends to be low. This research tested whether people's tolerance of inequality differs when it is represented in terms of a successful individual versus a group of people at the top…
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No aggregate deforestation reductions from rollout of community land titles in Indonesia yet [Sustainability Science]
In Indonesia, 60 million people live within 1 km of state forest. The government of Indonesia plans to grant community titles for 12.7 million hectares of land to communities living in and around forests. These titles allow for using nontimber forest products, practicing agroforestry, operating tourism businesses, and selective logging…
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The membrane-linked adaptor FRS2{beta} fashions a cytokine-rich inflammatory microenvironment that promotes breast cancer carcinogenesis [Medical Sciences]
Although it is held that proinflammatory changes precede the onset of breast cancer, the underlying mechanisms remain obscure. Here, we demonstrate that FRS2β, an adaptor protein expressed in a small subset of epithelial cells, triggers the proinflammatory changes that induce stroma in premalignant mammary tissues and is responsible for the…
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Miniaturized wireless, skin-integrated sensor networks for quantifying full-body movement behaviors and vital signs in infants [Engineering]
Early identification of atypical infant movement behaviors consistent with underlying neuromotor pathologies can expedite timely enrollment in therapeutic interventions that exploit inherent neuroplasticity to promote recovery. Traditional neuromotor assessments rely on qualitative evaluations performed by specially trained personnel, mostly available in tertiary medical centers or specialized fac
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Early warm-season mesoscale convective systems dominate soil moisture-precipitation feedback for summer rainfall in central United States [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Land–atmosphere interactions play an important role in summer rainfall in the central United States, where mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) contribute to 30 to 70% of warm-season precipitation. Previous studies of soil moisture–precipitation feedbacks focused on the total precipitation, confounding the distinct roles of rainfall from different convective storm types. Here,…
1d
Visual exposure enhances stimulus encoding and persistence in primary cortex [Neuroscience]
The brain adapts to the sensory environment. For example, simple sensory exposure can modify the response properties of early sensory neurons. How these changes affect the overall encoding and maintenance of stimulus information across neuronal populations remains unclear. We perform parallel recordings in the primary visual cortex of anesthetized cats…
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Pterosaurs evolved a muscular wing-body ȷunction providing multifaceted flight performance benefits: Advanced aerodynamic smoothing, sophisticated wing root control, and wing force generation [Evolution]
Pterosaurs were the first vertebrate flyers and lived for over 160 million years. However, aspects of their flight anatomy and flight performance remain unclear. Using laser-stimulated fluorescence, we observed direct soft tissue evidence of a wing root fairing in a pterosaur, a feature that smooths out the wing–body junction, reducing…
1d
Trained innate immunity, long-lasting epigenetic modulation, and skewed myelopoiesis by heme [Immunology and Inflammation]
Trained immunity defines long-lasting adaptations of innate immunity based on transcriptional and epigenetic modifications of myeloid cells and their bone marrow progenitors [M. Divangahi et al., Nat. Immunol. 22, 2–6 (2021)]. Innate immune cells, however, do not exclusively differentiate between foreign and self but also react to host-derived molecules referred…
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Spatial transcriptomics reveals a role for sensory nerves in preserving cranial suture patency through modulation of BMP/TGF-{beta} signaling [Developmental Biology]
The patterning and ossification of the mammalian skeleton requires the coordinated actions of both intrinsic bone morphogens and extrinsic neurovascular signals, which function in a temporal and spatial fashion to control mesenchymal progenitor cell (MPC) fate. Here, we show the genetic inhibition of tropomyosin receptor kinase A (TrkA) sensory nerve…
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A specialized spinal circuit for command amplification and directionality during escape behavior [Neuroscience]
In vertebrates, action selection often involves higher cognition entailing an evaluative process. However, urgent tasks, such as defensive escape, require an immediate implementation of the directionality of escape trajectory, necessitating local circuits. Here we reveal a specialized spinal circuit for the execution of escape direction in adult zebrafish. A central…
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Molecular insights into mechanisms of GPCR hijacking by Staphylococcus aureus [Biochemistry]
Atypical chemokine receptor 1 (ACKR1) is a G protein–coupled receptor (GPCR) targeted by Staphylococcus aureus bicomponent pore-forming leukotoxins to promote bacterial growth and immune evasion. Here, we have developed an integrative molecular pharmacology and structural biology approach in order to characterize the effect of leukotoxins HlgA and HlgB on ACKR1…
1d
Ultrafast synthesis of hard carbon anodes for sodium-ion batteries [Chemistry]
Hard carbons (HCs) are a significantly promising anode material for alkali metal-ion batteries. However, long calcination time and much energy consumption are required for the traditional fabrication way, resulting in an obstacle for high-throughput synthesis and structure regulation of HCs. Herein, we report an emerging sintering method to rapidly fabricate…
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4 things parents should know about RSV this year
After a year of COVID-19 precautions that saw virtually no cases of respiratory syncytial virus, the common childhood illness is back with a vengeance and health care professionals are concerned. "The symptoms are virtually synonymous with the common cold—runny nose, congestion, maybe a little cough—but RSV is associated with a much higher risk of progression from an upper respiratory cold to a l
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This Comprehensive, All-In-One Supplement Covers Your Daily Nutritional Needs
If you think you're eating a balanced diet rich in the vitamins and nutrients that keep human beings healthy and strong, think again. According to data from the CDC and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, 92 percent of Americans have a vitamin deficiency. With numbers that high, even if you think you're eating a balanced diet, the chances are you're lacking in some vitamin or mineral. That's beca
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Americans are getting more calories from ultra-processed foods
Consumption of ultra-processed foods has increased over the past two decades across nearly all segments of the US population, according to a new study. "The overall composition of the average US diet has shifted towards a more processed diet. This is concerning, as eating more ultra-processed foods is associated with poor diet quality and higher risk of several chronic diseases," says lead author
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Machine learning in the cloud is helping businesses innovate
In the past decade, machine learning has become a familiar technology for improving the efficiency and accuracy of processes like recommendations, supply chain forecasting, developing chatbots, image and text search, and automated customer service functions, to name a few. Machine learning today is becoming even more pervasive, impacting every market segment and industry, including manufacturing,
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The human immune system is an early riser
Circadian clocks, which regulate most of the physiological processes of living beings over a rhythm of about 24 hours, are one of the most fundamental biological mechanisms. By deciphering the cell migration mechanisms underlying the immune response, scientists have shown that the activation of the immune system is modulated according to the time of day. Indeed, the migration of immune cells from
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Russian Film Crew Returns to Earth, Continues Shooting Immediately After Landing
That's a Wrap After 12 days of filming aboard the International Space Station (ISS), the first ever feature-length movie shot in space has finally wrapped filming in orbit — and its crew has safely landed back on Earth , as they kept filming during and after the journey home. The crew consisted of actress Yulia Peresild and director Klim Shipenko, according to The New York Times . Russian cosmona
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Quantum Analysis of Ancient Space Dust Reveals Why the Inner and Outer Planets Differ
An image from Juno showing the clouds of Jupiter in astounding detail. When the solar system was first organizing itself, a disk of gas and dust took shape around the sun's central mass. It eventually sorted itself into the system of planets we see today. But there are things we don't know about how that happened. One observation that has been challenging to explain is the difference in compositi
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What's the history behind Dia de los Muertos?
Día de los Muertos is a time for people to mourn the loss of family members and friends, and to ensure they're never forgotten, says Michelle Téllez. Día de los Muertos, or Day of the Dead, is a holiday with roots in Mexico that's now celebrated over two days, November 1 and 2, all over the world. The holiday's unique symbols are ubiquitous in some locations come October: Calaveras, or skulls—oft
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How badly would low fertility rate affect the people?
The fertility rate of Korea is currently 0.9 and has had the lowest fertility rate in the world for 17 years now. Followed up with Taiwan of 1.0 and Singapore of 1.1, this is a growing concern for many countries. This is no doubt a huge concern for their governments, but should the people be worried as well? There is a growing community of people in east asia, planning to move to US, Canada, Aust
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New discovery can improve industrial yeast strains
Baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is used industrially to produce a great variety of biochemicals. These biochemicals can be produced from waste material from the agricultural or forest industry (second-generation biomass). During the mechanical and enzymatic degradation of biomass acetic acid is released. Acetic acid inhibits the growth and the biochemical production rate of yeast. Now, re
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A virus that disrupts the sex routines of roundworms
Viruses influence the sex life of the roundworm C. elegans. Male roundworms of this non-parasitic nematode species are less sexually attracted to females infected with the Orsay virus. The virus also eventually leads to more male offspring and therefore an increase in mating behavior. This has been shown in doctoral research by microbiologist Lisa van Sluijs, lecturer at the Laboratory of Nematolo
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Molekylmixning skapar superstabilt glas
Superstabilt glas med lång livslängd kan bidra till att förbättra alltifrån läkemedel till avancerade bildskärmar och solceller. Forskare vid Chalmers visar hur en mix av många molekyler – upp till åtta på samma gång – kan skapa glas med efterlängtade egenskaper. Glas är ett så kallat amorft ämne och saknar en vidsträckt ordnad struktur. Det gör att det inte bildar kristaller. Just det faktum att
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Scientists discover method to boost energy generation from microalgae
The variety of humble algae that cover the surface of ponds and seas could hold the key to boosting the efficiency of artificial photosynthesis, allowing scientists to produce more energy and lower waste in the process. A study showed how encasing algae protein in liquid droplets can dramatically enhance the algae's light-harvesting and energy-conversion properties by up to three times. This energ
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Exploring the global environmental impacts of China's growing demand for food
Ensuring China's future food security will have huge environmental impacts, both domestically and globally. A study by IIASA researchers and Chinese colleagues shows that carefully designed policies across the whole of China's food system, including international trade, are crucial to ensuring that future demand can be satisfied without destroying the environment.
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Artificial chromosomes study sheds light on gene therapies
A research team led by Dr Karen Wing Yee YUEN, Associate Professor from the School of Biological Sciences at the University of Hong Kong (HKU), revealed the mechanism of artificial chromosome (AC) formation in the embryos of the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans, a 1-mm long, transparent nematode.
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Opportunities for scientific cooperation between developing countries in the BRICS + Global South format
Volume of R&D funding and number of Scopus-indexed publications of the BRICS countries in total already exceed those of the EU-total and the United States. These metrics have opportunity for further growth if the five developing countries strengthen scientific cooperation with other countries from Global South that have significant growth potential. Researchers from the Institute for Statistical S
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Lakes are changing worldwide
Worldwide, lake temperatures are rising and seasonal ice cover is becoming shorter and thinner. This affects lake ecosystems, drinking water supply and fishing. An international research team led by Luke Grant, Inne Vanderkelen and Prof Wim Thiery of Vrije Universiteit Brussel has shown for the first time that these global changes in lake temperature and ice cover are not due to natural climate va
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Banned Crypto-Miners Siphoning Power from Chinese Public Firms
China was once a burgeoning hub for digital currencies, but the country recently came out against cryptocurrency. With transactions and mining banned, officials are on the hunt for illegal crypto operations, and extreme power usage often points the way. As reported by Bloomberg , two provinces have found that a substantial chunk of illegal mining was happening at public institutions. Naturally, t
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Too much screen time may put kids born early at risk
Children born very prematurely are at risk for cognitive and behavioral problems linked to excess screen time, a new study shows. Research has linked excessive screen time to cognitive and behavioral problems in the general population of children, leading the American Academy of Pediatrics to recommend that parents limit their children's daily screen exposure to no more than two hours per day. Bu
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Improving management everywhere
In the Indian state of Karnataka, many smallholder farmers have traditionally sold their products to intermediaries—wholesale traders who turn around and resell the goods for a quick profit. Much of the dealing between farmers and those traders has occurred locally, and farmers do not typically know what should be a "fair" price for their products.
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These Revolutionary Memory Foam Pillows Are Made With Water, Not Chemicals
A good night's rest is essential to recharging both your mental and physical wellbeing. Since people spend about a third of their lives sleeping, the pillow you sleep on is as important as the mattress you use. So why are you still sleeping on an old pillow with drool stains all over it, especially when memory foam exists? Memory foam debuted in the '60s to absorb shock and relieve pressure in NA
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Weather to climate: More research needed to understand sea-air influences
Red sky at night, sailor's delight. Red sky in the morning, sailor's warning. The adage holds some truth: the relationship between ocean and atmosphere can be smooth sailing or stormy. Yet, despite extensive research on their co-dependence, it is still not fully understood how sea-air interactions influence weather and climate and everything in between, according to a research team based in China.
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More water in magma actually prevents volcano blast
New research suggests high water content in magma can significantly reduce the risk that a volcano will explode. Two questions have long troubled volcanologists: When exactly will a volcano erupt next? And how will that eruption unfold? Will the lava flow down the mountain as a viscous paste, or will the volcano explosively drive a cloud of ash kilometers up into the atmosphere? The first questio
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Social prairie dogs 'greet kiss' to connect
Prairie dogs—those chubby little burrowing rodents found in grasslands across the central and western United States—have intricate social networks, a new study shows. Understanding their connections, interactions, and surprisingly complex world could help wildlife conservationists more successfully relocate and reintroduce species into the wild. Jennifer Verdolin, an assistant professor of conser
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Retrieving Gear from an Avalanche Becomes a Survival Situation | Gold Rush: Winter's Fortune
Stream Full Episodes of Gold Rush: Winter's Fortune: discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/gold-rush-winters-fortune-us #Discovery #GoldRush #GoldRushWintersFortune Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Foll
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Probing plant infections
Sometimes the pathogens that infect plants also affect people—through our pocketbooks. Which is why plant pathologist Erica Goss, a University of Florida professor with the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, spends a lot of time studying microbes that infect tomatoes, peppers and strawberries.
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Invasiv ullhandskrabba ökar i Vänern
Yrkesfiskare i Vänern har sett en ökning av den invasiva arten ullhandskrabba de senaste åren. Krabban förstör både fiskeredskap och fångst, och kan orsaka kräftpest. En fortsatt övervakning är viktigt för att den inte ska få fäste när klimatet blir varme, menar forskare vid Högskolan i Skövde. På uppdrag av Vänerns vattenvårdsförbund och länsstyrelserna i Värmland och Västra Götalands län har fo
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A spacecraft could use gravity to prevent a dangerous asteroid impact
The idea of avoiding asteroid impacts has featured prominently in the public's mind for decades—especially since the release of movies such as Deep Impact and Armageddon. But is using a nuclear explosion the best way to deal with potentially hazardous space rocks? Decidedly not. If given enough time, there is a much more effective (and safer) way to deal with any object on a collision course with
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Robot Dogs Now Fielding Robot Guns
(Image: Sword International) In a somewhat dystopian turn of events, robot "dogs" are now entrusted to carry guns. At the Association of the US Army's annual conference last week, Ghost Robotics unveiled its Vision 60 quadrupedal robot, which wielded a custom-made gun atop its already eerie figure. Ghost Robotics' Vision 60 is considered a Quadrupedal Unmanned Ground Vehicle, or Q-UGV. At about k
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Babbel Introduces a New Way to Learn a Foreign Language: Babbel Live
Learning didn't always work like this, did it? We all grew up with loads of classroom-focused, one-on-one coursework in schools with teachers we knew, who knew us and we're constantly keeping a sharp eye on our scholastic progress. As the smartphone rose to prominence, so did the novelty of app-based learning, making courses in virtually any area available right through your phone. That was an un
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Rocky planets might need to be the right age to support life
Extrasolar planets are being discovered at a rapid rate—4,531 planets in 3,363 systems (with another 7,798 candidates awaiting confirmation). Of these, 166 have been identified as rocky planets (also known as "Earth-like"), while another 1,389 have been categorized as rocky planets that are several times the size of Earth ("Super-Earths"). As more and more discoveries are made, the focus of astron
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Africa is the key to ending the harmful use of polluting fuels in the home
In wealthy countries, most people can barely imagine using anything other than electricity or gas to cook in their homes. But billions of people around the world, including the majority of Africans and most of the world's rural population, rely on polluting fuels like wood or charcoal for their cooking energy needs.
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Watch for scammy stem cell therapies for COVID-19
The global race to develop new stem cell-based COVID-19 treatments during the pandemic featured violations of government regulations, inflated medical claims, and distorted public communication, say a group of researchers. Their perspective piece appears in the journal Stem Cell Reports . While stem cell therapy—using stem cells to promote regeneration, repair, or healing—may be used to treat a l
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A test to diagnose psychopaths can help identify fish behaviors that could benefit aquaculture
In November 1888, fear stalked the streets of London as the Whitechapel Murderer claimed his latest victim. The unusually gruesome attacks had puzzled investigators, so police surgeon Dr. Thomas Bond examined the victims for clues that might help reveal the killer's identity. Dr. Bond concluded that the violence of these attacks meant that the Whitechapel Murderer—who would later become known as J
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Tuning transparency and opacity
Making a dark human hair transparent, or even an opaque bar of silicon: this optical "sorcery" is possible by manipulating the incident light. This new phenomenon is called "mutual extinction and transparency." Until now only existing in theory, photonics researchers of the University of Twente's MESA+ Institute demonstrated the effect with experiments. Applications include, for example, broadenin
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The Source of Elements
Perhaps the most famous line from Carl Sagan's Cosmos series is, "We're made of star stuff". In this statement Sagan was referring to the fact that most of the elements that make up people (and everything else) were created (through nuclear fusion) inside long dead stars. While this core claims is true, physicists are finding potential supplemental sources of heavy elements, including in some sur
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The kids who'd get the most out of extracurricular activities are missing out: How to improve access
One-third of Australian children aged 12 to 13 in low-income suburbs do not take part in any extracurricular activities. That's 2.5 times as many as those from higher-income suburbs—only 13% of them don't take part—according to research we will present next week to the Australian Social Policy Conference. Yet research also shows it is children from disadvantaged backgrounds who are likely to benef
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Två olika vaccin gav bättre skydd mot covid-19
De som fick första sprutan med Astra Zenecas vaccin och ett mRNA-vaccin i spruta nummer två löpte mindre risk att bli sjuka i covid-19, än de som fick bägge doserna av Astra Zenecas vaccin, visar en studie från Umeå universitet. – Allt vaccin är mycket bättre än inget vaccin, och två doser är alltid bättre än en dos, oavsett vilken sort man får. Men vår studie visar att skyddet blir signifikant b
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Limits to Growth: Can AI's Voracious Appetite for Data Be Tamed?
By processing massive datasets, machine learning reveals patterns in data. But some computer scientists are asking whether the brute force approach of compiling ever-larger datasets is necessary to sustain AI technology, and if the expansion can continue indefinitely. They're also looking for an exit ramp.
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A gravity-driven sintering method to fabricate geometrically complex compact piezoceramics
Nature Communications, Published online: 18 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26373-x Fabricating geometrically complex piezoceramics in compact sintered bodies has been difficult to achieve. Here the authors demonstrate a gravity-driven sintering strategy where high-temperature viscous behavior of piezoceramic allows for forming of complex shaped sintered bodies.
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A hierarchical cellular structural model to unravel the universal power-law rheological behavior of living cells
Nature Communications, Published online: 18 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26283-y Different types of cells exhibit a universal power-law rheological behavior which to this date has not been captured by a single theoretical model. Here, the authors propose a self-similar hierarchical cellular model that can naturally reproduce the universal power-law characteristics of cell rheology.
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Spontaneous traveling waves naturally emerge from horizontal fiber time delays and travel through locally asynchronous-irregular states
Nature Communications, Published online: 18 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26175-1 Spontaneous traveling cortical waves shape neural responses. Using a large-scale computational model, the authors show that transmission delays shape locally asynchronous spiking dynamics into traveling waves without inducing correlations and boost responses to external input, as observed in vivo.
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Bright single photon emitters with enhanced quantum efficiency in a two-dimensional semiconductor coupled with dielectric nano-antennas
Nature Communications, Published online: 18 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26262-3 Single photon emitters (SPEs) in 2D semiconductors can be deterministically positioned using localized strain induced by underlying nanostructures. Here, the authors show SPE coupling in WSe2 to GaP dielectric nanoantennas, substantially increasing quantum efficiency and photoluminescence brightness.
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Preclinical characterization of an intravenous coronavirus 3CL protease inhibitor for the potential treatment of COVID19
Nature Communications, Published online: 18 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26239-2 The 3CL protease of SARS-CoV-2 is inhibited by PF-00835231 in vitro. Here, the authors show that the prodrug PF-07304814 has broad spectrum activity, inhibiting SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2 in mice and its ADME and safety profile support clinical development.
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Noradrenergic arousal after encoding reverses the course of systems consolidation in humans
Nature Communications, Published online: 18 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26250-7 Memories are assumed to undergo a time-dependent systems consolidation, during which hippocampal contributions to memory decrease while neocortical contributions increase. Here, the authors show that noradrenergic arousal after encoding may reverse this course of systems consolidation in humans
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Shifting beams at normal incidence via controlling momentum-space geometric phases
Nature Communications, Published online: 18 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26406-5 Light beams can undergo small shifts due to interesting physical phenomena at interfaces. Here, the authors design a photonic crystal slab that enables a large lateral shift at normal incidence by engineering the light-interface interaction through the design of the momentum-space phase distribution.
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Palmitoylation targets the calcineurin phosphatase to the phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase complex at the plasma membrane
Nature Communications, Published online: 18 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26326-4 Calcineurin — the Ca2+ regulated phosphatase and target of immunosuppressants — regulates GPCR-mediated phospholipid signaling at the plasma membrane. Here the authors show that CNAβ1 (a poorly studied isoform of the calcineurin catalytic subunit) is targeted to the plasma membrane through palmitoylation to d
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Daily briefing: The puzzle of COVID super-immunity
Nature, Published online: 15 October 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02841-8 Why do people who have recovered from COVID-19 show such spectacular immune responses when they get vaccinated? Plus, the first mission to the Trojan asteroids is ready to launch and how eclectic acupuncture zaps inflammation in mice.
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Statsministeren og robotterne er på 5G
Fynske robotter kan nu via 5G navigere med hjælp fra skyen, og videobilleder af statsministeren ved Folketingets åbning blev sendt samme vej. Dansk 5G er dog mere eksperimenter end funktionelle services.
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TGA dismisses bid to make contraceptive pill available over the counter in Australia
Two applications were made to amend poisons legislation so that the pill would not need ongoing prescriptions from doctor Download the free Guardian app ; get our morning email briefing A push to make the contraceptive pill available over the counter has been dismissed by Australia's drugs regulator. In an interim decision, now open for further consultation, the Therapeutic Goods Administration f
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EAN-EBRAINS Joint Workshop – Promotional Video
'The future of medical data sharing in clinical neurosciences' will take place from 9-11 December 2021. The event aims at exposing and openly discussing all issues and challenges associated with data sharing in Europe, from ethics to data safety and privacy, including those specific to data federation, such as the development and validation of federated algorithms. Register here: https://www.huma
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Starwatch: early risers can enjoy a Mercury morning
Copernicus never saw it, so the story goes, but here's your chance to chase the elusive planet This coming week, there is a chance to spot the elusive inner planet Mercury in the morning sky. It will be tricky as the solar system's smallest planet will only appear low in the dawn sky before the sunrise washes it away. The chart shows the view looking east from London at 0700 BST on 25 October. Th
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