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Amount of information in visible universe quantified
Researchers have long suspected a connection between information and the physical universe, with various paradoxes and thought experiments used to explore how or why information could be encoded in physical matter. The digital age propelled this field of study, suggesting that solving these research questions could have tangible applications across multiple branches of physics and computing.
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LATEST

Bitcoin Is Hitting The New York Stock Exchange Tomorrow
Bitcoin Boom In what might be one of the most significant steps that cryptocurrency has taken toward the mainstream during its decade-long history, the New York Stock Exchange is expected to start allowing traders to bet on Bitcoin. "2021 will be remembered for this milestone," Michael Sapir, the CEO of ProShares, which will be running the fund, told the New York Times . He also took a dig at les
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Physicist Says China's New Telescope May Be Able to Spot Alien Probes
FAST Detection A new radio telescope in China might be able to detect massive swarms of self-replicating alien robots before they attack Earth. Dr. Zaza Osmanov, an associate physics professor at the Free University of Tbilisi, recently published a preprint paper that calculates how China's new Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical Radio Telescope (FAST) could be able to detect swarms of hypothet
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Unfreezing the ice age: the truth about humanity's deep past
Archaeological discoveries are shattering scholars' long-held beliefs about how the earliest humans organised their societies – and hint at possibilities for our own In some ways, accounts of "human origins" play a similar role for us today as myth did for ancient Greeks or Polynesians. This is not to cast aspersions on the scientific rigour or value of these accounts. It is simply to observe tha
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Museums Are Getting on OnlyFans After Other Platforms Keep Banning Them for Nudity
Vienna OnlyFans Who says you can't get a little classy on OnlyFans? The Vienna Tourist Board is turning to the content subscription platform to post images of artwork deemed too NSFW for Facebook, Instagram, and TikTok, according to a fascinating new story by NBC . The images — from famed Austrian museums including the Leopold Museum, the Kunsthistorisches Museum Vienna, and the Albertina — previ
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Greg Abbott Fears Fox News More Than COVID
Governor Greg Abbott is afraid. Not of COVID-19, which is killing thousands of Texans, but of losing his primary. Last week, Abbott announced that he was banning COVID-vaccine mandates by "any entity" in Texas, a policy so absurd that you'd be forgiven for thinking, as the running joke on social media goes, that the coronavirus wrote the executive order itself. You might as well ban restaurants f
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Hear sounds captured from Mars by NASA's Perseverance rover
Thanks to two microphones aboard NASA's Perseverance rover, the mission has recorded nearly five hours of Martian wind gusts, rover wheels crunching over gravel, and motors whirring as the spacecraft moves its arm. These sounds allow scientists and engineers to experience the Red Planet in new ways—and everyone is invited to listen in.
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A new treatment for glaucoma?
A new study in mice has identified new treatment targets for glaucoma, including preventing a severe pediatric form of glaucoma, as well as uncovering a possible new class of therapy for the most common form of glaucoma in adults.
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Earth's demise could rid galaxy of meaning, warns Brian Cox ahead of Cop26
Unique events that led to civilisation mean its demise could 'eliminate meaning in galaxy for ever' Humans might be the only intelligent beings in our galaxy, so destroying our civilisation could be a galactic disaster, Prof Brian Cox has warned leaders in the run-up to Cop26. Speaking at the launch of his new BBC Two series Universe, the physicist and presenter said that having spoken to the sci
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China's New Space Station Looks Like an Apple Store Inside
With the arrival of three astronauts to China's Tiangong space station, the unofficial rival to the International Space Station (ISS) is now being used for the country's longest space mission yet. The Shenzhou 13 mission includes astronauts Zhai Zhigang, Wang Yaping, and Ye Guangfu, according to Space.com . The trio arrived at Tiangong on Saturday after launching into orbit from the Jiuquan Satel
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Scientists Believe There Are People Genetically Immune To COVID
A team of scientists say that there might be people out there who are genetically immune to COVID-19 — and they want to find and study them to potentially develop treatments for the disease. The international team of researchers published a paper in the journal Nature Immunology on Monday proposing a "strategy for identifying, recruiting, and genetically analyzing individuals who are naturally re
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Offshoot of Covid Delta variant on the rise in England
UK Health Security Agency monitoring AY.4.2 as daily cases at highest level since late July Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage A newly detected coronavirus variant is on the rise in England, with the virus believed to be an offshoot of Delta. According to a briefing from the UK Health Security Agency, released on Friday , "a Delta sublineage newly designated as AY.4.2 i
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The New Question Haunting Adoption
Ever since I entered what can generously be called my "mid-30s," doctors have asked about my pregnancy plans at every appointment. Because I'm career-minded and generally indecisive, I've always had a way of punting on this question, both in the doctor's office and elsewhere. Well, we can always adopt , I'll think, or say out loud to my similarly childless and wishy-washy friends . Adoption, afte
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Microsoft's Top Lawyer Had to Tell Bill Gates to Stop Hitting on Employee
Bad Bill Bill Gates has spent the years since retiring from Microsoft cultivating an image as a lovable, philanthropic nerd. But reports keep emerging of bad behavior by the powerful software billionaire — mistreating and sexually propositioning employees, not to mention his friendship with now-deceased sex trafficker Jeffrey Epstein . And the latest revelation, reported by the Wall Street Journa
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What Working for Colin Powell Taught Me
My favorite recollection of Colin Powell was the look he got when he was amused. He'd tilt his head up and look at you under the base of his glasses, smiling, and take joy in the moment. He had such a great capacity for merriment. Powell died today, at age 84, of complications of COVID-19, his family said. People who only want to judge him for his policy acts and his achievements—creating the Pow
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'Case closed': 99.9% of scientists agree climate emergency caused by humans
Trawl of 90,000 studies finds consensus, leading to call for Facebook and Twitter to curb disinformation The scientific consensus that humans are altering the climate has passed 99.9%, according to research that strengthens the case for global action at the Cop26 summit in Glasgow. The degree of scientific certainty about the impact of greenhouse gases is now similar to the level of agreement on
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A Hint of Dark Matter Sends Physicists Looking to the Skies
Approximately 85% of the mass in the universe is missing — we can infer its existence, we just can't see it. Over the years, a number of different explanations for this "dark matter" have been proposed, from undiscovered particles to black holes. One idea in particular, however, is drawing renewed attention: the axion. And researchers are turning to the skies to track it down. Source
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Researcher Predicts Anti-Aging Drug "by the Time It's Relevant for Me"
The longevity industry — startups trying to make people live longer or even forever , basically — tends to attract charlatans and scandal . But a terrific feature story in New Statesman makes the case that a handful of ventures in the space are finally starting to hone in on some compelling ideas that might eventually provide modest or even radical life extension . "I'm confident we'll have an ag
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Could Elon Musk Paint a Giant Picture of His Face on the Moon?
In a post today, a redditor posed an provocative question: could you paint your face on the Moon, so that it was visible from Earth, and get away with it? "Let's say that Elon musk Does [go] to the moon and paints his face on it," read the post , before it was deleted by the trigger-happy mods of r/space . "The space treaty says no one owns the moon or can claim it, so could someone get away with
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Getting value from your data shouldn't be this hard
The potential impact of the ongoing worldwide data explosion continues to excite the imagination. A 2018 report estimated that every second of every day, every person produces 1.7 MB of data on average—and annual data creation has more than doubled since then and is projected to more than double again by 2025. A report from McKinsey Global Institute estimates that skillful uses of big data could
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These weird virtual creatures evolve their bodies to solve problems
An endless variety of virtual creatures scamper and scuttle across the screen, struggling over obstacles or dragging balls toward a target. They look like half-formed crabs made of sausages—or perhaps Thing, the disembodied hand from The Addams Family . But these "unimals" (short for "universal animals") could in fact help researchers develop more general-purpose intelligence in machines. Agrim G
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Why Did Dostoyevsky Write Crime and Punishment?
Illustration by Gabriela Pesqueira. Source: Universal History Archive / Getty J esus meets Dostoyevsky . He takes one look at him, peers for a diagnostic instant into those tunnels-of-torment eyes, and performs an immediate exorcism. Brisk and bouncerly, no fuss, in the Jesus style: Party's over, little devil. Out you go . A slight buzzing sound, and it's done. And Dostoyevsky, with the infernal
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Gaze in Awe at This Fiery Pac-Man Shaped Supernova, Gobbling Stars
Snacky Supernova Chances are, at some point, you've looked towards the sky and been awestruck by a cloud that resembles a worldly object. It takes the right place, the right time, and the right kind of imagination. It's that kind of serendipity that's clearly best suited for a job, say, working at NASA with the Hubble Space Telescope and catching images of the swirling, distant cosmos — as they d
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Without Covid-19 jab, 'reinfection may occur every 16 months'
Reports grow of repeat infection as experts warn prevalence among school pupils puts older people at risk Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage As Covid-19 infections surge in England, people are increasingly reporting catching Sars-CoV-2 for a second or even third time. New analysis has suggested that unvaccinated individuals should expect to be reinfected with Covid-19 e
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SpaceX Opponents Complain About Falling Debris, Fires in FAA Hearing
The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) held a hearing on Monday that allowed members of the public to voice opinions about SpaceX's planned Starship flights from its launch site in Boca Chica, Texas — and some folks had strong criticisms for the aerospace company. The hearing, which went on for more than three hours, gave the public an opportunity to speak for up to three minutes about the fli
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The Self-Help That No One Needs Right Now
Nothing about The Body Keeps the Score screams "best seller." Written by the psychiatrist Bessel van der Kolk, the book is a graphic account of his decades-long career treating survivors of traumatic experiences such as rape, incest, and war. Page after page, readers are asked to wrestle with van der Kolk's theory that trauma can sever the connection between the mind, which wants to forget what h
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How Not to Be Your Own Worst Enemy
Listen and subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google In the social-media age , we curate images of our lives on a screen—making it especially easy to translate images of perfection as the image of oneself. But the pressure to pretend we are perfect is exactly the thing holding us back from experiencing the happiness we seek—and limiting our ability to be our whole, authentic selves.
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Powerful new technique allows scientists to study how proteins change shape inside cells
Understanding how proteins bend, twist, and shape-shift as they go about their work in cells is enormously important for understanding normal biology and diseases. But a deep understanding of protein dynamics has generally been elusive due to the lack of good imaging methods of proteins at work. Now, for the first time, scientists at the UNC School of Medicine have invented a method that could ena
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Scientists develop novel 'shapeshifting' liquid crystal
Physicists at Case Western Reserve University and Tufts University say they've changed the shape of a flat liquid crystal surface without applying any local stimulus—essentially remotely altering its physical appearance without touching it.
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Winners of the 2021 Epson International Pano Awards
The top-scoring panoramic photos entered in the 12th Epson International Pano Awards have just been announced. The contest showcases the best work of panoramic photographers around the world. Organizers reported that they received 5,378 entries from 1,245 professional and amateur photographers in 97 countries this year, competing for the top spots in five categories, for several special awards, a
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Russian Director Who Filmed Movie on ISS Says He's Doing the Moon or Mars Next
Martian Movies Mere days after wrapping the first-ever feature film with scenes shot in space , the movie's director already has his sights set even further into the cosmos. Klim Shipenko, the Russian director of "The Challenge," which was filmed aboard the International Space Station (ISS) this month, told reporters at a news conference that he'd be willing to shoot a sequel on the Moon or even
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Why extraterrestrial intelligence is more likely to be artificial than biological
Is there intelligent life elsewhere in the universe? It's a question that has been debated for centuries, if not millenia. But it is only recently that we've had an actual chance of finding out, with initiatives such as Seti (Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) using radio telescopes to actively listen for radio messages from alien civilisations.
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First controllable nanoscale gas-liquid interface fabricated
When liquid meets gas, a unique zone forms. Variable by nature, molecules can cross from one state to another, combining in unique ways to either desirable or unwanted ends. From heat escaping a mug of coffee to increasing molecular concentrations in chemical solutions, gas-liquid interfaces are ubiquitous across nature and engineering. But a lack of tools capable of precisely controlling such gas
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The Atlantic Daily: Have Democrats Taken the High Road to Defeat?
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox. This past July, after the Supreme Court voted 6–3 to further gut the 1965 Voting Rights Act, my colleague Ronald Brownstein warned that only one way was left to protect the right to cast a ballot
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X-ray Pulsar XTE J1946+274 investigated with NuSTAR
Using NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) spacecraft, Russian astronomers have investigated a transient X-ray pulsar known as XTE J1946+274. Results of the study, presented in a paper published October 11 on arXiv.org, provide more insights into the nature of this object.
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Putting honeybee hives on solar parks could boost the value of UK agriculture
The value of UK agriculture could be boosted by millions of pounds a year if thousands of honeybee hives were deployed on solar parks across the country, a new study reveals. However, scientists caution that the benefits of managing solar parks for wild pollinators over honeybees should be prioritized where appropriate and should be assessed on a site by site basis.
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Solar energy can be cheap and reliable across China by 2060
How much will solar power really cost in China in the coming decades, including the challenges its inherent variability poses to the grid? Researchers have found that solar energy could provide 43.2% of China's electricity demands in 2060 at less than two-and-a-half U.S. cents per kilowatt-hour.
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'Ray guns' let scientists use light instead of DNA to tell plant populations apart
In Star Trek, characters carry a little handheld device called a tricorder that they can point at objects to analyze and identify them. When the show's writers cooked up the idea in the 1960s, it was purely science fiction, but a new paper in New Phytologist takes the idea a step closer to reality. The researchers used a handheld device that looks a little like a ray gun to record how plant leaves
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Is a 'negative microwave' – a device that quickly cools food and drink – possible?
The long-running series in which readers answer other readers' questions on subjects ranging from trivial flights of fancy to profound scientific and philosophical concepts I've been grappling for decades about how you'd get a "negative microwave" to work, a device that very quickly cools things such as food or drinks without having to pre-fill it with something that's already cold. I understand
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Molecular interfaces as building blocks for innovative sensors and data storage devices
Molecular interfaces formed between metals and molecular compounds have enormous potential as building blocks for future opto-electronics and spin-electronics devices. Transition metal phthalocyanine and porphyrin complexes are promising components for such interfaces. Scientists at Forschungszentrum Jülich, together with a team of international scientists, have been working to develop a model sys
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Small-scale foragers left more than footprints on the landscape
Archaeological sites like the Great Wall of China and the pyramids can be seen with the naked eye from space, but for ancient societies that did not build, their traces on the landscape are more difficult to find. Now Penn State researchers have used satellite data to identify areas in coastal southwest Madagascar where indigenous foragers altered their surroundings.
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Study reconstructs 232-year history of prairie fire in Midwestern US
Researchers combed through thousands of historical documents for first-person accounts of fires occurring between 1673 and 1905 in the Midwestern tallgrass prairie. Their study is the first systematic analysis of the timing, causes and consequences of prairie fires in this part of the world. They report their findings in Natural Areas Journal.
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The Most Famous Low-Wage Workers in the Country
On September 14, Nabisco workers at a bakery in Portland, Oregon, who had been striking for more than a month to protest proposed contract changes were joined on the picket line by what might have seemed unlikely allies: players for the Portland Thorns , the city's professional women's soccer team. "The message you should take from that is that we're workers just like anybody else," Meghann Burke
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Risky 'grease proof' chemicals hang around forever
Chemicals that "grease proof" everything from food packaging to carpets have built up in the environment for decades and contaminate ecosystems across the globe. A new study says we need a better understanding of the risks that these chemicals pose. The study, published in the journal Trends in Food Science & Technology , collects the proceedings of a symposium and issues a call to action on the
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Jessica Orwig
Contributor is a freelance writer for Inside Science focusing on physics. She majored in astrophysics at Ohio State and earned her masters in science and tech journalism from Texas A&M. When she's not at her computer you can find her biking, hiking, painting, or playing the piano. Author Articles Technology If Pilots Took More Control of Traffic Over the North Atlantic New research recommends al
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All Is Not Well With NASA's Lucy Spacecraft
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/Conceptual Image Lab/Adriana Gutierrez NASA's Lucy spacecraft is having difficulties with its solar panels. The spacecraft launched on Oct. 16th without incident, and sucessfully unfolded both its solar panels. But only one of its panels successfully latched into position. Telemetry via NASA's Deep Space Network shows that Lucy as a whole is still safe, and its
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Agricultural runoff contributes to global warming, but a new study offers insight on climate-change mitigation
Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent greenhouse gas, with 300 times the warming ability of carbon dioxide. Due to fertilizer runoff from farm fields, an increasing load of nitrogen is washing into rivers and streams, where nitrogen-breathing microbes break some of the fertilizer down into N2O, which the river releases into the atmosphere as it tumbles toward the ocean. But, until now, scientists haven'
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What is stopping us from making long-range wireless power transfer?
Does anyone know what exactly would need to be done in order to make wireless power transfer work over long distances or what is the barrier stopping it from doing so? Maybe it's the way electricity flows through the air and/or the fact that it would fry many of the things that get in its way. But perhaps it is just something to do with the machines. I do not know. Is it even physically possible?
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Short-term high-fat feeding exacerbates degeneration in retinitis pigmentosa by promoting retinal oxidative stress and inflammation [Neuroscience]
A high-fat diet (HFD) can induce hyperglycemia and metabolic syndromes that, in turn, can trigger visual impairment. To evaluate the acute effects of HFD feeding on retinal degeneration, we assessed retinal function and morphology, inflammatory state, oxidative stress, and gut microbiome in dystrophic retinal degeneration 10 (rd10) mice, a model…
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A new regime of heme-dependent aromatic oxygenase superfamily [Biochemistry]
Two histidine-ligated heme-dependent monooxygenase proteins, TyrH and SfmD, have recently been found to resemble enzymes from the dioxygenase superfamily currently named after tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO), that is, the TDO superfamily. These latest findings prompted us to revisit the structure and function of the superfamily. The enzymes in this superfamily share…
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Gene Therapy Is Coming of Age
Various approaches are approved for treating blood cancers and a few rare disorders—they may soon become standard care — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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This Real Estate Investment Platform Saves You Time and Money
Investing in single-family rental properties is a pretty good deal if you can afford to do it. They can provide a steady stream of revenue from rent and a decent hedge against whatever the future might hold. However, in addition to the capital requirements of such an investment, buying and maintaining such properties has historically been a world-class hassle. But with a real estate investment pl
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New study calls for mitigation, monitoring of common grease-proofing food packaging chemicals
A scientist is calling for a better understanding of the health ramifications of ubiquitous 'grease proofing' chemicals that have been used for decades. A new study based on a symposium involving scientists at public and private institutions strikes an urgent tone on the need for new and better ways to detect and mitigate this class of chemical compounds, collectively known as per- and polyfluoroa
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Arctic krill use twilight to guide their daily rhythms through the polar winter
Most animals sync their body clocks to the daily rhythm of the sun, but what happens during the polar winter when the sun never rises above the horizon? According to a study by Jonathan Cohen at the University of Delaware and colleagues, publishing October 19th in the open-access journal PLOS Biology, arctic krill can detect tiny changes in light intensity during polar winter days, allowing them t
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Will supply chain woes stymie 2021 holiday shopping?
As the holiday season and end of the year approaches, the global supply chain has been navigating pandemic-related disruptions for nearly two years. Microchip and semiconductor shortages, inconsistent shipping, production factory shutdowns, and consumer demand shifts have created supply chain issues like never before. Jason Miller , associate professor of supply chain management at Michigan State
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DNA tangles can help predict evolution of mutations
Researchers have identified evolutionary hotspots in DNA where mutations are more likely. The study authors say these findings will help us in the future to predict the evolution of bacteria and viruses over time, which could aid vaccine design and better understanding of antibiotic resistance.
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MCAs in Arabidopsis are Ca2+-permeable mechanosensitive channels inherently sensitive to membrane tension
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26363-z Mechanosensitive ion channels convert mechanical stimuli into intracellular electric and ionic signals. Here the authors show that Arabidopsis MCA2 is a Ca2+-permeable mechanosensitive channel that is directly activated by membrane tension.
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De novo biosynthesis of bioactive isoflavonoids by engineered yeast cell factories
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26361-1 Isoflavonoids are a class of industrially important plant natural products, but their low abundance and structural complexity limits their availability. Here, the authors engineer Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolism to become a platform for efficient production of daidzein which is core chemical scaffold for
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Structural basis of soluble membrane attack complex packaging for clearance
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26366-w To prevent unregulated complement activation, extracellular chaperones capture soluble precursors to the membrane attack complex (sMAC). Here, structural analysis of sMAC reveals how clusterin recognizes heterogeneous sMAC complexes and inhibits polymerization of complement protein C9.
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Fast ion transport for synthesis and stabilization of β-Zn4Sb3
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26265-0 β-Zn4Sb3 has promising thermoelectric performance, but its ionic migration properties make it prone to degradation. Here the authors exploit the ion migration in an electric field-assisted synthesis method, fast producing β-Zn4Sb3 with improved phase stability and extended temperature range for the thermoelec
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Satb2 acts as a gatekeeper for major developmental transitions during early vertebrate embryogenesis
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26234-7 Activation of the zygotic genome is a critical transition during development, though the link to tissue-specific gene regulation remains unclear. Here the authors demonstrate distinct functions for Satb2 before and after zygotic genome activation, highlighting the temporal coordination of these roles.
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A mutational hotspot that determines highly repeatable evolution can be built and broken by silent genetic changes
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26286-9 Mutational hotspots can determine evolutionary outcomes and make evolution repeatable. Experiments in bacteria reveal that a powerfully deterministic genetic hotspot can be built and broken by a handful of silent mutations, highlighting an underappreciated role for silent genetic variation in determining adap
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Perseverance Rover Records the Sound of Mars
Even before launch, NASA talked at length about the suite of more than 20 cameras on the Perseverance rover, but did you know it also has a pair of microphones? NASA has used these off-the-shelf components to record the sounds of Mars in high fidelity for the first time. Some of the team's favorite eerie recordings are available for your listening pleasure, but they're also of intense scientific
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New gene could help improve tomato flavor and shelf-life
Buying tomatoes and other fruits in the grocery store is always a gamble because, however good they look, they are often firm but lack flavor. A group of plant scientists has discovered a gene that could increase the odds that future store-bought tomatoes stay firm until the consumer gets them home, and have the right combination of flavor and softness when eaten.
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Efficient light with the help of mathematics
How do you make sure that light gets to the right place without loss of energy? To do that, lamps often use mirrors and lenses. But how do you adjust them properly to get the correct light output? Lotte Romijn investigated how to get light from a to b as efficiently as possible with the help of a mathematical algorithm, for very complicated target light outputs. She will obtain her doctorate on 19
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Co-worker interventions can moderate customer sexual harassment in service industry
Although the #MeToo movement raised public awareness of sexual harassment in Hollywood and other high-profile industries, comparatively little attention has been paid to the rampant sexual harassment experienced by frontline service workers such as waitresses, baristas, bartenders and retail clerks. A new paper co-written by a team of University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign experts who study occup
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Motorized droplets thanks to feedback effects
A team of physicists from Germany and Sweden working with first author Jens Christian Grauer from Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf (HHU) has examined a special system of colloidal particles that they activated using laser light. The researchers discovered that self-propelling droplets, which they have named 'droploids', formed which contain the particles as an internal motor. They describe the
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How a bacterium may help solve the plastic pollution crisis
Plastic pollution is one of the most pressing environmental issues of our time. The accumulation of petroleum-based plastics is having devastating effects on our environment, wildlife and human health. In a recent study published in Scientific Reports, researchers from Nara Institute of Science and Technology revealed a bacterium that is not only able to degrade difficult-to-recycle petroleum-base
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Wearable sensor patch monitors glucose via sweat
A new wearable, noninvasive monitoring device prototype monitors glucose in sweat—no needles necessary. Noninvasive glucose monitoring devices are not currently commercially available in the United States, so people with diabetes must collect blood samples or use sensors embedded under the skin to measure their blood sugar levels. Now, with the new wearable device, less intrusive glucose monitori
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Agricultural runoff contributes to global warming – New study helps us figure out how and what we can do about it
Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent greenhouse gas, with 300 times the warming ability of carbon dioxide. Due to fertilizer runoff from farm fields, an increasing load of nitrogen is washing into rivers and streams, where nitrogen-breathing microbes break some of the fertilizer down into N2O, which the river releases into the atmosphere as it tumbles toward the ocean. But, until now, scientists haven'
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Amning kopplas till minskad risk för typ 1-diabetes
Barn i Sverige löper den näst högsta risken i världen att utveckla typ 1-diabetes. Amning och att vänta med gluten skulle kunna ha en skyddande effekt. Allt fler barn i världen drabbas av typ 1-diabetes. I Sverige får 40 barn per 100 000 diagnosen varje år, vilket är den näst högsta risken i världen. Den negativa utvecklingen verkar bero på en kombination av arv och miljö – men frågan hur sjukdom
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New fibers can make breath-regulating garments
A new kind of fiber can be made into clothing that senses how much it is being stretched or compressed, and then provides immediate tactile feedback in the form of pressure, lateral stretch, or vibration. Such fabrics could be used in garments that help train singers or athletes to better control their breathing, or that help patients recovering from disease or surgery to recover their breathing p
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Should you squash the invasive spotted lanternfly?
Not too many bugs are more destructive than the Lycorma delicatula , better known as the spotted lanternfly. Some experts say that when you see one, you should report it, then smash it. The invasive pest native to Asia first arrived in the United States seven years ago. It's a threat to trees, plants, crops, orchards, vineyards, and even jobs. And as if that's not bad enough, it excretes a gross
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Bacterial infections in sinuses of cystic fibrosis patients share surprising similarities
A collaboration among microbiologists, clinicians and experts on bacterial evolution revealed that, with time, highly adapted bacterial communities in the sinuses of people with cystic fibrosis (CF) become more fragmented and experience mutations that erode their genomes—a dogma-challenging discovery that has scientists reimagining how they think about the evolution of microbes in chronic infectio
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COVID-19 vaccination strategies: When is one dose better than two?
In many parts of the world, the supply of COVID-19 vaccines continues to lag behind the demand. While most vaccines are designed as a two-dose regimen, some countries, like Canada, have prioritized vaccinating as many people as possible with a single dose before giving out an additional dose.
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Targeted interventions to contain pandemics, minimize societal disruption
The COVID-19 pandemic has led to more than 218 million infections and over 4.5 million deaths as of Sept. 3, 2021. Nonpharmaceutical interventions (NPIs), such as case isolation, quarantining contacts, and the complete lockdown of entire countries, were implemented in an effort to contain the pandemic. But these NPIs often come at the expense of economic disruption, harm to social and mental well-
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How climate change affects animal behavior
Humans are shaping environments at an accelerating rate. Indeed, one of the most important current topics of research is the capacity of animals to adapt to human-induced environmental change and how that change affects the expression of animal traits.
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New report reveals hidden complexities of uplift for Universal Credit claimants
A new report released today shows that the cut in benefit caused by the withdrawal of the £20 uplift in Universal Credit will have a significant impact, especially for claimants without other sources of income. But the findings also highlight deeper, structural issues with Universal Credit which are revealed by the ways in which the uplift affects different groups of claimants.
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Road impacts on ecosystems in sub-Saharan Africa
Sub-Saharan Africa is developing rapidly. With growing economies and increased trade, major road infrastructure plans have been developed for the region, which also hosts some of the world's most unique and diverse ecosystems. New research looked into how roads might impact ecosystems in the region.
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A path-setting method to enable vast applications for a graphene
Super strong and only one atom thick, graphene holds promise as a nanomaterial for everything from microelectronics to clean energy storage. But lack of one property has limited its use. Now, researchers at Princeton University and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have overcome that problem using low-temperature plasma, creating a novel technique tha
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How quickly does the climate recover?
Climate change is causing temperatures to rise and is also increasing the likelihood of storms, heavy rain, and flooding—the recent flood disaster in the Ahr valley in Germany is just one such example. What we need to ask ourselves in this connection is how quickly the climate can recover from the warming caused by an increase in carbon dioxide in the atmosphere.
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Palladium-based metallic glass with high thrombogenic resistance
Advancements in the design of medical devices have greatly improved patient survival rates, but currently employed metals, which are mostly based on crystalline titanium, still provoke a thrombosis response upon contact with blood, with potentially life-threatening consequences. This severe problem has also been recognized in the Zurich Heart project of University Medicine Zurich (HMZ), which aims
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How we could eat real meat without harming animals | Isha Datar
What if you could eat chicken nuggets without harming a chicken? It's possible through "cellular agriculture," says Isha Datar. In a talk about cutting-edge science, she explains how this new means of food production makes it possible to eat meat without the negative consequences of industrial farming — and how it could fundamentally change our food systems for the better. "It's our once-in-a-lif
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Pakistan's amphibians need more research efforts and better protection
In Pakistan, amphibians have long been neglected in wildlife conservation, management decisions and research agendas. To counter this, scientists have now published the first comprehensive study on all known amphibian species in the country. The little we currently know about the occurrence of the chytrid fungus, which has already eradicated many amphibian species globally, is a grim example of ho
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Interferon does not improve outcomes for hospitalized adults with COVID-19, clinical trial finds
A clinical trial has found that treatment with the immunomodulator interferon beta-1a plus the antiviral remdesivir was not superior to treatment with remdesivir alone in hospitalized adults with COVID-19 pneumonia. In addition, in a subgroup of patients who required high-flow oxygen, investigators found that interferon beta-1a was associated with more adverse events and worse outcomes.
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The surprising marine biodiversity in the Barcelona Forum beach
A study identified 514 marine species in the bathing areas of the Barcelona Forum, an artificial beach affected by different anthropogenic impacts. This high biodiversity—which includes the presence of exotic species—is a shocking finding in such an altered marine habitat like this city beach in Barcelona (Catalonia, Spain).
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Cross-coupling reactions: Semiheterogeneous PCN-Cu based metallaphotocatalysis
Recently, photoredox catalysis has emerged as an appealing coupling partner for transition metal catalysis, termed metallaphotocatalysis, to develop new synthetic methodologies as well as improve the efficiency of established transformations. Conversely, most of these dual catalytic platforms have focused on the use of homogeneous photoredox catalysts such as Ru- and Ir-based polypyridyl complexes
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Nonchlorinated solvent-processed high-performance ambipolar transistors
This research is led by Prof. Yunqi Liu (Institute of Chemistry Chinese Academy of Sciences) and Prof. Yunlong Guo (Institute of Chemistry Chinese Academy of Sciences). Ambipolar polymer semiconductors have wide applications in electronic devices such as organic field-effect transistors (OFETs), logic circuits, and organic light-emitting transistors (OLETs). Although some high-performance ambipola
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Super-Precise CRISPR Gene Editing Tool Could Tackle Tough Genetic Diseases
For all its supposed genetic editing finesse, CRISPR's a brute. The Swiss Army knife of gene editing tools chops up DNA strands to insert genetic changes. What's called "editing" is actually genetic vandalism —pick a malfunctioning gene, chop it up, and wait for the cell to patch and repair the rest. It's a hasty, clunky process, prone to errors and other unintended and unpredictable effects. Bac
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Huge Crash! Jerry Bird vs Tony McKinney | Street Outlaws: No Prep Kings
Stream Street Outlaws: No Prep Kings on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/street-outlaws-no-prep-kings About Street Outlaws: No Prep Kings: Street racers battle at rough, untested tracks across the country and earn points depending on how they perform. Whoever has the most points at the end is crowned the true No Prep King! #StreetOutlaws #Discovery #NoPrepKings Subscribe to Discove
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Distribution of soil bacterial community in surface and deep layers reported along elevational gradient
Soil microorganisms are important components of the soil ecosystem, they play critical roles in biogeochemical and nutrient cycling processes. The distribution pattern of bacterial community along the elevational gradient is critical for predicting future ecosystem functions and climate feedbacks. Patterns of soil bacterial community distribution in surface soil layer along elevational gradients h
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Novel targeted nano-immunostimulant for cancer immunotherapy developed
Immunotherapy is promising for cancer treatment. The key to improving the therapeutic effect is to drive the patient's own immune system to produce a strong, effective, and enduring tumor-specific immune response. Engineered nanoplatforms show promising potential in strengthening antitumor immune responses.
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Novel high-accuracy twist measurement for bi-grid modulation collimator
A research team led by Prof. Yang Jianfeng from the Xi'an Institute of Optics and Precision Mechanics (XIOPM) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) recently proposed high-accuracy twist measurement based on the spherical wave Talbot effect for a bi-grid modulation collimator. Their up-to-date results were published in Applied Optics.
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Solar storm stirs stunning aurora
After the sun ejected a violent mass of fast-moving plasma into space on 9 October, ESA waited for the storm to strike. A few days later, the coronal mass ejection (CME) arrived at Earth, crashing into our planet's magnetosphere, and lighting up the sky.
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Female journalists at top level advocate gender equality in newsrooms
Research and studies around the world have described the career journey of female journalists in two metaphors: glass ceiling and labyrinth. These metaphors suggest women's career prospects in journalism are bleak as they face various challenges not only from society but also the media organizations they work for.
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Children deserve answers to their questions about climate change: How universities can help
Our children are growing up in a volatile climate. It's already damaging their health, wealth and well-being. Universities can be leaders in helping young people gain the knowledge they need to navigate this uncertain future. Curious Climate Schools, a project that connects young people directly with experts who can answer their climate questions, is a model for just this kind of leadership.
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Climate action needed to avert 'health catastrophe'
To achieve sustained recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic and avoid an "impending health catastrophe," countries must commit to targeted action on climate change, health experts have urged ahead of the UN climate summit, COP26.
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Efficient light-emitting diodes based on oriented perovskite nanoparticles
Planar perovskite light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are high-performance and cost-effective electroluminescence devices that are ideal for large-area display and lighting applications. By exploring the emission layers with high ratios of horizontal transition dipole moments (TDMs), researchers can boost the photon outcoupling of planar LEDs. The LEDs that are based on anisotropic perovskite are ineffic
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How plants know winter is coming
Plants know winter is coming. But exactly how they detect this change in seasons has never been clear. Researchers took a new approach to uncover this plant secret: They asked one. The answer they received—in the form of changes in the gene expression of a common weed known as Arabidopsis —has implications for farmers and conservationists alike as climate change increasingly makes native ecosyste
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Launch Into The Skies With 75% Off This Easy-To-Use 4K Drone
The wide availability of drones has changed everything, including making throwing a grenade a thing of the past . Fortunately, most of us will put them to more peaceful uses, like filming our lives, something the Black YLR/C S32T HD 4K Single-Camera Drone excels at. It's on sale for just $99.95 (reg. $410). Flying With Ease First of all, it's built with newcomers in mind. It's easy to control, wi
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Easing medical debt may get people to the doctor
People with unpaid health care bills are less likely to seek needed medical care, evidence indicates. Earlier this summer, Stanford economist Neale Mahoney sounded an alarm with a study he coauthored: Americans have at least $140 billion in unpaid health care bills sitting in collection agencies—making the country's medical debt crisis far bigger than anyone had realized. Based on an analysis of
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Five facts to help you understand sea ice
One way that scientists monitor climate change is through the measure of sea ice extent. Sea ice extent is the area of ice that covers the Arctic Ocean at a given time. Sea ice plays an important role in reflecting sunlight back into space, regulating ocean and air temperature, circulating ocean water, and maintaining animal habitats.
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Net Zero by 2050
Next month the UN will host the 26th conference on climate change, the COP26 . At this point the discussion is not so much what the goal should be, it's how to achieve that goal. The Paris Accords set that goal at limiting global warming to 1.5 C above pre-industrial levels. In order to achieve this outcome goal the consensus is that we need to achieve the primary goal of net zero green house gas
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Three hours to save Integral
On 22 September, around midday, ESA's Integral spacecraft went into emergency Safe Mode. One of the spacecraft's three active 'reaction wheels' had turned off without warning and stopped spinning, causing a ripple effect that meant the satellite itself began to rotate.
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Violence against women in Kenya: Data provides a glimpse into a grim situation
Kenyan world record holder Agnes Tirop was found stabbed to death at her home in the western town of Iten last week. The fact that the police arrested her husband in connection with the death has brought the subject of domestic violence to the fore in Kenya. Population and reproductive health researcher Yohannes Dibaba Wado shares his insights into how widespread it is and what must be done to add
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Anaesthetic-related mortality in horses cut by half in the past 20 years
CEPEF4 is the largest study globally on anesthetic-related mortality in horses. Three researchers from the Faculties of Veterinary Studies of Edinburgh, Zurich and the CEU Cardenal Herrera of Valencia, along with the two British authors who founded the study, have just published in journal Animals the preliminary results on the first 6,701 cases of anesthesia and 1,995 cases of sedation registered
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NASA selects gamma-ray telescope to chart Milky Way evolution
NASA has selected a new space telescope proposal that will study the recent history of star birth, star death, and the formation of chemical elements in the Milky Way. The gamma-ray telescope, called the Compton Spectrometer and Imager (COSI), is expected to launch in 2025 as NASA's latest small astrophysics mission.
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Targeting cancer at the nanoscale
Scientists from the Department of Nuclear Medicine and Tracer Kinetics at Osaka University developed a novel system for targeted cancer radiation therapy that uses gold nanoparticles labeled with astatine-211. Owing to the limited range and half-life of the radiation, along with the localization of the nanoparticles, healthy cells are considerably less likely to be harmed. This work may lead to ef
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In Defense of Fakeness
Arguably, no mode of writing has influenced the past decade of novels more than autofiction, a catchall term for books that call themselves fiction while claiming to be rooted, in some way, in their authors' real lives. Amid this boom, critics and readers alike have shown a certain anxiety over how based in fact a novel can be—and how anyone might know, given that no autofiction writer purports t
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Lancet retracts 10-year-old case report
The Lancet has retracted a decade-old case report by a group from Japan after concluding that the authors misrepresented the originality of the work. The paper was a case report, titled "Hidden Harm," by a team at Nihon University School of Medicine in Tokyo. The authors described a 46-year-old woman with a history of self-harming … Continue reading
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Monsters of the deep revealed for what they are
Grotesque little creatures with armor-like horns, misshapen torsos and some with spikes protruding from their sides are lurking in the waters of the Gulf of Mexico. They appear in an array of oranges and blues, though several are see-through. Some appear part alien and part Hunchback of Notre Dame. They are the visions of which nightmares are made. But to marine scientist Heather Bracken-Grissom,
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There is more than one way to accelerate decarbonization
While West Virginia's Senator Joe Manchin is doing his best to block climate policy and save his state's dying fossil fuel industry, there is no reason to believe that the proposed "Clean Electricity Program" policy design is the only way to accelerate decarbonization. The problem for many utilities is the capital cost of the infrastructure for decarbonization. The infrastructure and Build Back Be
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Rhinoceros genomes uncover family secrets
Nature, Published online: 19 October 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02777-z Genomes from living and extinct rhinos reveal that different species evolved as a result of geographic isolation. A comparison of DNA from different species also shows that rhinos have long displayed low genetic variability.
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Untwisted trilayer graphene hosts superconductivity and magnetism
Nature, Published online: 19 October 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02773-3 Superconductivity and magnetism have been observed in layered graphene in which the sheets are twisted with respect to each other. But a simpler, more stable graphene system also exhibits these phases.
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Daily briefing: The environmental conflict heating up in low-Earth orbit
Nature, Published online: 18 October 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02856-1 As companies fill low-Earth orbit with thousands of satellites, it's becoming a new region of environmental dissent. Plus, tips for writing a popular-science book, and a super-precise measure of the neutron's lifetime leaves a mystery unsolved.
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An Acquaintance Remembers Bobby McIlvaine
Twenty Years Gone In September, Jennifer Senior wrote about one family's struggle to make sense of 9/11. Thank you for your cover story about the family of Bobby McIlvaine. I remember him. In 2001, I worked as a writer and editor for Waters , the financial-technology magazine that hosted the conference at Windows on the World on September 11. (It was supposed to be a two-day conference, and I pla
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Pulling Funding for Fossil Fuel Projects in Africa Is Unjust
Wealthy countries are increasingly vowing to cease public funding for nearly all fossil fuel projects in less developed countries while making no such commitments at home. The blunt exclusion of these projects is an inequitable and ineffective climate strategy that gaslights more than a billion Africans.
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Smart skogsmaskin kan själv hämta och lämna timmer
En självkörande skogsmaskin som hämtar och lämnar timmer – samtidigt som den väljer den väg som är mest skonsam för marken – det är framtiden skogsbruk, enligt forskarna. För första gången i världshistorien har en självkörande skogsmaskin klarat av att "skota" – alltså att helt utan mänsklig inblandning hämta och transportera virke. Forskarna ser det som ett viktigt steg mot ett mer hållbart skog
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Striving for sustainability in sport
It is a sign of the times that last week's declaration by the Williams Formula One team of its aim to become a climate-positive organisation by 2030, was greeted in muted terms.
12h
Pakistan's amphibians need more research efforts and better protection
Amphibians are bioindicators of an ecosystem's health and may also serve as biological control of crop and forest pests. The First Herpetological Congress, organized in 1989, presented alarming findings about the decline in amphibian populations. Currently, amphibians include the highest percentage of threatened species (>40%), as well as the highest number of data deficient species (>1500 species
12h
Covid-19: how 43,000 false negative tests were uncovered as wrong
Last week, testing at a private Covid lab in Wolverhampton was halted, after the UK Health Security Agency found tens of thousands of people may have been falsely given a negative PCR result. But since the start of September, scientists had been alerted to strange patterns in the testing data which suggested something was out of the ordinary. Anand Jagatia speaks to Dr Kit Yates, a mathematical bi
16h
Covid-19: how 43,000 false negative tests were uncovered as wrong | podcast
Last week, testing at a private Covid lab in Wolverhampton was halted, after the UK Health Security Agency found tens of thousands of people may have been falsely given a negative PCR result. But since the start of September, scientists had been alerted to strange patterns in the testing data which suggested something was out of the ordinary. Anand Jagatia speaks to Dr Kit Yates, a mathematical b
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I am a student at The New School researching transhumanism, cyborgs, robotic medical prosthetics, bio-hacking, etc. and want to hear your story.
My two research partners and I are in a class taught by Christian Madsbjerg called Technology and Human Observation . As the title implies, we want to observe and listen! We will definitely have questions but are ultimately more concerned with your individual story and life. I am not trying to imply that the aforementioned topics are all similar. I truly do not know how related they all are. We a
21h
Does "visualization" act to enhance cognition function/efficacy in any way?
I think it does the opposite. Simply cause as a kid and teenager, I was the worst kind of daydreamer, all I did all day was visualize and get lost in visuals. And my day to day cognitive function was diabolical. I was simply "away with the fairies", "out of touch", "not tuned in", and as a result, cognitively demanding tasks that required attention and focus was something I often made a mess of.
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New active agent against parasites
Researchers have identified a chemical compound that may be suitable as an active agent against several different unicellular parasites. Among these are the pathogens that cause malaria and toxoplasmosis. The point of attack for this promising substance is the protein tubulin: It helps cells divide and therefore is essential for the multiplication of the parasites.
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In unpredictable times, a data strategy is key
More than 18 months after the 2020 coronavirus pandemic struck, it's clear that the ability to make quick decisions based on high-quality data has become essential for business success. In an increasingly competitive and constantly shifting landscape, companies must be agile enough to tackle persistent challenges, ranging from cost-cutting and supply chain issues to product development and market
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