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Phys.org

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Researchers make hardened wooden knives that slice through steak

The sharpest knives available are made of either steel or ceramic, both of which are man-made materials that must be forged in furnaces under extreme temperatures. Now, researchers have developed a potentially more sustainable way to make sharp knives: using hardened wood. The method, presented October 20th in the journal Matter, makes wood 23 times harder, and a knife made from the material is ne

5h

Nature

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Evidence for European presence in the Americas in ad 1021

Nature, Published online: 20 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03972-8 Precise dating of wooden artefacts at a Norse settlement in Newfoundland establishes that the Norse were in the Americas in ad 1021.

3h

Viden | DR

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Arkæologiske fund beviser, at vikingerne var i Amerika allerede for 1.000 år siden

Rester af træ viser, at vikingerne boede i Canada i 1021.

4h

LATEST

NYT > Science

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In a First, Surgeons Attached a Pig Kidney to a Human

Pig Kidney NYU Human

A kidney grown in a genetically altered pig seemed to function normally, potentially a new source for desperately needed transplant organs.

17h

NPR

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The U.S. is ready to roll out the COVID vaccine once it's approved for kids age 5-11

The White House says the U.S. has enough doses for the country's 28 million kids age 5 to 11 and has laid out a plan to get them inoculated as soon as the vaccine is authorized for the age group. (Image credit: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

3h

NYT > Science

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Biden's Plan to Vaccinate Young Children 5 to 11

COVID 5 11 tWH FDA

White House officials, anticipating the approval of coronavirus shots for 5- to 11-year-olds within weeks, will rely on doctors, clinics and pharmacies instead of mass inoculation sites.

7h

NYT > Science

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Vikings Were in the Americas Exactly 1,000 Years Ago

By studying tree rings and using a dash of astrophysics, researchers have pinned down a precise year that settlers from Europe were on land that would come to be known as Newfoundland.

5h

Futurism

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Doctors Successfully Transplant a Pig Kidney to a Human for First Time Ever

For the first time ever, doctors have successfully transplanted a kidney from a pig to a human — and, they say, the organ functioned normally. The procedure occurred between a genetically-altered pig and a brain dead human patient at NYU Langone Health, according to The New York Times . The pig was genetically engineered to grow a kidney that would be accepted by a human body. The organ was then

3h

The Atlantic

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Dune Is Epic, but That's Not Why It's Great

Villeneuve D. Lynch Dune

Paul Atreides, the handsome young protagonist of Dune , is one of science fiction's original chosen ones . His heroic journey from plucky teenager to feared warrior has been imitated time and time again—think of Luke Skywalker or Harry Potter . But the director Denis Villeneuve's film is the first adaptation of Frank Herbert's novel to properly portray the grim tragedy of Paul's arc; the movie is

6h

Livescience.com

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Extremely rare, bright-yellow catfish caught in the Netherlands

Fishers in the Netherlands caught an enormous, bright-yellow catfish recently. The species is common, but the yellow body may be the result of a genetic disorder.

9h

ScienceAlert – Latest

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Two Planets Smashed Together So Hard One of Them Lost Its Atmosphere

Space is a rough place.

3h

Phys.org

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Simulating chaotic interactions of three black holes

Dutch student Arend Moerman (Leiden University, the Netherlands) has defended his thesis research on the simulation of chaotic interactions of three black holes. The simulations, which he carried out together with researchers from Leiden and Oxford, show that lighter black holes tend to slingshot each other out into space, while heavier ones tend to merge. The research will be published in the lea

13h

Science

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Health leaders call for immediate Covid restrictions in England

Demand comes as daily death toll hits highest level since March and hospitalisations near 1,000

12h

MIT Technology Review

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Surgeons have successfully tested a pig's kidney in a human patient

Surgeons Pig Kidney Human

The news: Surgeons have successfully attached a pig's kidney to a human patient and watched it start to work, the AP reported today . The pig had been genetically engineered so that its organ was less likely to be rejected. The feat is a potentially huge milestone in the quest to one day use animal organs for human transplants, which would shorten waiting lists. How it worked: The surgical team,

9h

Nature

200+

The origins and spread of domestic horses from the Western Eurasian steppes

Nature, Published online: 20 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-04018-9 Analysis of 273 ancient horse genomes reveals that modern domestic horses originated in the Western Eurasian steppes, especially the lower Volga-Don region.

4h

Phys.org

100+

Humans did not cause woolly mammoths to go extinct—climate change did: study

For five million years, woolly mammoths roamed the earth until they vanished for good nearly 4,000 years ago—and scientists have finally proved why.

5h

Phys.org

100+

Studying the edge of the sun's magnetic bubble

Our corner of the universe, the solar system, is nestled inside the Milky Way galaxy, home to more than 100 billion stars. The solar system is encased in a bubble called the heliosphere, which separates us from the vast galaxy beyond—and some of its harsh space radiation.

7h

ScienceAlert – Latest

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Physicists May Have Discovered 'New Force of Nature' in LHC Experiment

On the brink of a major breakthrough.

14h

BBC News – Science & Environment

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Climate change: Fossil fuel production set to soar over next decade

Fossil Fuel UN 1.5C

Government plans to extract coal, oil and gas are incompatible with safe temperatures, says the UN.

16h

ScienceAlert – Latest

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Earth Tipped on Its Side 84 Million Years Ago, New Evidence Suggests

Hold on tight.

18h

ScienceAlert – Latest

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900-Year-Old Crusader Sword Found Covered in Barnacles Off Israel Coast

"A beautiful and rare find."

20h

NYT > Science

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FDA Moves to Make Some Hearing Aids Available Without a Prescription

The proposed rule could make it easier for Americans with mild to moderate hearing impairments to get the devices.

21h

ScienceAlert – Latest

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Scientists Are Closely Tracking a New Delta Subtype Spreading in The UK

This is what we know so far about AY.4.2.

20h

BBC News – Science & Environment

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Climate plan urging plant-based diet shift deleted

A research paper recommending people shift towards plant-based foods is not policy, the government says.

4h

The Atlantic

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Kyrsten Sinema Isn't Hitting the Panic Button

'Tis the season of Kyrsten Sinema. The wig-wearing triathlete senator from Arizona has quickly become one of the most hated figures in present-day American politics. She's blocking her own party's agenda; she's shutting down questions from reporters; she's schmoozing with lobbyists and jetting off to Europe. Sinema is "not demonstrating the basic competence or good faith of a member of Congress,"

9h

Science | The Guardian

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Jane Goodall on fires, floods, frugality and the good fight: 'People have to change from within'

The climate emergency has been a wakeup call to everyone, and the ethologist and environmentalist is working as hard as ever to defeat it. She discusses horror, hope and heroism in her late 80s In Jane Goodall's new book, there is a vivid description of her "deep bond" with a beech tree in the garden of her childhood home in Bournemouth. She would climb into its branches to read, hauling books an

12h

NYT > Science

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How Chemours and DuPont Avoid Paying for PFAS Pollution

DuPont factories pumped dangerous substances into the environment. The company and its offspring have gone to great lengths to dodge responsibility.

1h

NPR

500+

In a major scientific advance, a pig kidney is successfully transplanted into a human

The kidney, which came from a genetically altered pig, worked normally and showed no signs of rejection. It's seen as a significant step toward using animal organs for life-saving transplants. (Image credit: Joe Carrotta/AP)

8h

BBC News – Science & Environment

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COP26: Russia's Vladimir Putin will not attend climate summit

No reason was given for the Russian leader's decision not to attend the conference in Glasgow.

9h

Wired

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More Covid Vaccine Boosters Are Coming. Who Should Get Them?

Federal advisers meet again this week to discuss third shots, but it's still not clear what the best timing is—or what the US owes the world.

9h

NYT > Science

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Waiting on U.S. Mandate, Some Nursing Homes Are Slow to Vaccinate Staff

At facilities in several states, many workers are still not immunized. "I just feel like a sitting duck," one resident said.

11h

BBC News – Science & Environment

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Environment bill: Green groups' dismay as ministers reject changes

Ministers say the new law will demonstrate global leadership, but critics accuse them of "inaction".

21h

Science | smithsonianmag.com

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What Drove Homo Erectus Out of Africa?

Excavations at a site in northern Israel are at the heart of a debate about the species' migrations

23h

Science | The Guardian

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No 10 to buy new antiviral treatments for Covid in time for winter

UK Two Covid Pfizer

Trials show one of the drugs cuts risk of hospitalisation or death for patients by half Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage No 10 has made deals to buy hundreds of thousands of doses of two new antiviral treatments for coronavirus, ministers have announced, with the hope they will be approved for use in the UK ahead of the winter. One deal covers 480,000 courses of molnu

4h

New Scientist

300+

Watch a wooden knife that is sharper than steel cut through steak

Wood knives sharpened to be three times sharper than steel require less energy to produce than standard tableware

4h

The Atlantic

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John Eastman Is Not a Victim of Cancel Culture

I am a lifelong conservative. For the past 20 years, I have been a leader in the Federalist Society. I was nominated by President Donald Trump three times to serve as a federal judge, though I never secured a hearing, because then-Senator Kamala Harris blocked my nomination. I did not vote for President Joe Biden in 2020, and I hope he is defeated in 2024 by a principled and ethical conservative

5h

Science | The Guardian

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Surgeons successfully test pig kidney transplant in human patient

US Pig Kidney Human

Researchers in US say trial on dead person is a 'significant step' toward animal-to-human organ transplants Surgeons have attached a pig's kidney to a human and watched it begin to work, a small step in the decades-long quest to one day use animal organs for life-saving transplants. Pigs have been the most recent research focus to address the organ shortage, but a sugar in their cells, which is f

13h

ScienceAlert – Latest

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A Physicist Quantified The Amount of Information in The Entire Observable Universe

Incredible!

14h

Futurism

200+

A Florida Restaurant Got a Robot Waiter and Tips Spiked

Servi Robot The labor shortage has affected industries of all stripes — but perhaps none have felt the impact more than restaurants and bars. While many have turned to unique methods of solving their hiring issues , one restaurant group in Florida decided to take on a more innovative approach by renting robot waiters. Sergio's Restaurant, a chain in Florida, began using a Servi robot in July, acc

1h

Science | The Guardian

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UK Covid live: Sajid Javid warns country could hit 100,000 cases per day and urges people to get jabs

Latest updates: health secretary says 'pandemic is not over' but confirms UK will not implement its 'plan B' measures just now No 10 to buy new antiviral treatments for Covid in time for winter Complacency holding back booster rollout in England, says NHS boss Further restrictions not needed in England for now, says minister Morocco bans flights from UK, Germany and Netherlands Coronavirus – late

5h

Quanta Magazine

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The Uselessness of Useful Knowledge

Is artificial intelligence the new alchemy? That is, are the powerful algorithms that control so much of our lives — from internet searches to social media feeds — the modern equivalent of turning lead into gold? Moreover: Would that be such a bad thing? According to the prominent AI researcher Ali Rahimi and others, today's fashionable neural networks and deep learning techniques are based on a.

6h

ScienceAlert – Latest

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The Arctic Could Be Turning Into an 'Ecological Trap' For Migrating Animals

A long journey for nothing.

15h

Futurism

100+

Is This Facebook's New Name?

Facebook Verge Change

Facename The internet basically exploded last night when The Verge reported that the embattled megacorporation Facebook is apparently considering changing its name. Jokey speculation about what the social media giant's new name might be ran rampant, ranging from " Bookface " to " Zuckussy ." But now a more serious suggestion — though still just a guess — has emerged, this time from Samidh Chakrab

3h

NYT > Science

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When M.I.T. Asked Dorian Abbot to Speak, It Invited Criticism

Dorian Abbot is a scientist who has opposed aspects of affirmative action. He is now at the center of an argument over free speech and acceptable discourse.

3h

NYT > Science

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Fossil Fuel Drilling Plans Undermine Climate Pledges, U.N. Report Warns

Fossil UN 1.5 Paris

Countries are planning to produce more than twice as much oil, gas and coal through 2030 as would be needed if governments want to limit global warming to Paris Agreement goals.

3h

New Scientist

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We've found the time and place that horses were first domesticated

The domestication of horses revolutionised transport and warfare, and we finally know when and where it happened

4h

New Scientist

100+

We now know Vikings were in the Americas exactly 1000 years ago

Ancient wooden artefacts from Newfoundland cut using Viking tools have been dated to AD 1021, telling us that Vikings were in the Americas exactly 1000 years ago

4h

ScienceAlert – Latest

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Microplastics in The Wind May Already Have a Minor Impact on Earth's Climate Itself

But it could grow bigger.

5h

NYT > Science

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Ancient-DNA Researchers Set Ethics Guidelines for Their Work

New, international standards for handling ancient genetic material draw support from many scientists, criticism from others.

5h

Science | The Guardian

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Your green credentials may be linked to your genes, study says

Identical twins have more similar views on environmental issues than non-identical ones, research finds Some people are more environmentally conscious than others, and scientists say the reason could be in their genes. A study has found that identical twins have more similar views on conservation and environmentalism than non-identical twins. The researchers say this suggests there could be a lin

7h

The Atlantic

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The Simplest Fix to America's Rent Problem

In an obscure but public meeting last week, local and federal housing officials discussed a controversial idea that could transform U.S housing policy: What if the government gave money directly to renters, rather than relying on a complicated voucher system that drives both tenants and landlords up the wall? You've heard of universal basic income . What about universal basic rent? The status quo

8h

Livescience.com

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4,400-pound sunfish caught off North Africa literally tips the scales

The enormous fish was caught and released earlier this month.

9h

BBC News – Science & Environment

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Tips on how to save energy at home and help the planet

What can homeowners do to reduce their energy consumption?

19h

BBC News – Science & Environment

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Covid vaccine pioneer: Lives depend on science funding

Sir Andrew Pollard warns against possible moves to reverse planned investment in science.

19h

New Scientist

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Domestic cats are driving parasitic infections in wild animals

Toxoplasmosis, a disease caused by a parasite found in cat faeces, is spread from house cats to wild animals living near cities

20h

NYT > Science

100+

If China Tested a New Orbital Weapon, It's Not Much of a Surprise

China Spacecraft Chinese

Experts report that similar technologies were developed by Russia and the United States starting more than a half century ago.

23h

Livescience.com

98

World's biggest underwater eruption birthed skyscraper-size volcano

Thousands of earthquakes tipped off geologists that there might be a new submarine volcano.

4h

Phys.org

93

Using an atomic clock to demonstrate general relativity

A team of researchers at the JILA, National Institute of Standards and Technology at the University of Colorado has found a way to use an atomic clock to demonstrate a principle of general relativity. The team has published a paper describing their work on the arXiv preprint server.

7h

New Scientist

90

Quick saliva test can reveal cannabis use over the past 12 hours

A sample of saliva placed on a strip and analysed with a smartphone camera can reveal if a person has ingested cannabis in the last 12 hours

57min

Scientific American News

89

How Airborne Microplastics Affect Climate Change

Like other aerosols, these tiny particles scatter and absorb sunlight, influencing Earth's temperature — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

New Scientist

84

Global fossil fuel extraction plans are double what we can safely burn

Fossil UN 1.5 2030

Staying under 1.5°C of warming means limiting the amount of fossil fuel we burn, but global extraction plans are already double that limit

14h

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

77

Researchers design antibodies that destroy old cells, slowing down aging

Antibodies Old Cells

No one knows why some people age worse than others and develop diseases -such as Alzheimer's, fibrosis, type 2 diabetes or some types of cancer- associated with this aging process. One explanation for this could be the degree of efficiency of each organism's response to the damage sustained by its cells during its life, which eventually causes them to age. In relation to this, researchers at the U

7h

Wired

76

How Hackers Hijacked Thousands of YouTube Accounts

Google YouTube Cookie

Google has shed light on a spate of attacks that turned creator channels into cryptocurrency scam livestreams.

6h

NYT > Science

69

Boeing Deepens NASA Starliner Probe, Prompting More Delays

The Starliner capsule for NASA crews is now unlikely to have another orbital flight test until the middle of next year.

21h

Phys.org

66

Astronomers discover twin sub-Neptune exoplanets orbiting nearby star

By analyzing the data from the TESS-Keck Survey (TKS), an international team of astronomers reports the detection of two almost identically sized sub-Neptune exoplanets orbiting a nearby star. The newly found alien worlds, designated HD 63935 b and HD 63935 c, are about three times larger than the Earth. The finding is detailed in a paper published October 13 on the arXiv pre-print server.

7h

BBC News – Science & Environment

65

Is the UK's green plan enough to halt climate change?

Support for roads, aviation and fossil fuel drilling could undermine UK's green credentials at COP26.

11h

The Atlantic

64

How Hong Kong's Elite Turned on Democracy

A core member of Hong Kong's prodemocracy camp stood on the balcony of the city's legislature a quarter century ago, his fist raised in the air, and promised to continue to fight for universal suffrage. Today, he promotes the destruction of what limited voting freedoms Hong Kong has. Among the loudest present-day advocates for the national-security law imposed by Beijing on Hong Kong last year is

10h

Wired

63

Microplastics May Be Cooling—and Heating—Earth's Climate

Tiny bits of plastic are swirling in the sky, and a new model suggests they could be subtly affecting the climate.

5h

New Scientist

62

Covid-19 news: NHS boss calls for UK to implement 'Plan B'

Months Covid October

The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic

8h

Science | The Guardian

57

Why is it business as usual in England while Covid infections rise?

Analysis: a winter plan has been set out but implementing it could be hampered by political squeamishness Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage More than 20 months into the Covid pandemic and with a tough winter looming, the public could be excused for having a distinct sense of deja vu. Infection rates are rising sharply, scientists and senior NHS figures are sounding the

2h

NYT > Science

51

Gates Foundation Pledges $120 Million to Help Get Merck Covid Pills to Poor Countries

Gates Merck Covid 19

Regulatory hurdles and supply chain issues could slow efforts to produce generic versions of Merck's antiviral molnupiravir for developing nations, despite licensing agreements.

6h

Wired

50

The Mathematics of Cancel Culture

To add fractions, you find the least common denominator—a term that has a certain resonance in our age of mass cancellation.

7h

Phys.org

50

Long-term greenhouse gas influence on retreating glaciers

Research conducted in the Southern Alps by Te Herenga Waka—Victoria University of Wellington's Dr. Shaun Eaves and others shows greenhouse gases, particularly carbon dioxide, have been integral to the retreat of Aotearoa's glaciers for at least the past 5,000 to 7,000 years, since the mid-Holocene epoch.

7h

The Atlantic

47

The Key Insight That Defined 50 Years of Climate Science

Look out the nearest window and imagine, if you can, an invisible column of air. It sits directly on the tufts of grass, penetrates clear through any clouds or birds above, and ends only at the black pitch of space. Now envision a puff of heat rising through this column, passing through all the layers of the atmosphere on its journey. What happens as it rises? Where does it go? The answer to that

6h

Nature

40

Late Quaternary dynamics of Arctic biota from ancient environmental genomics

Nature, Published online: 20 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-04016-x A large-scale metagenomic analysis of plant and mammal environmental DNA reveals complex ecological changes across the circumpolar region over the past 50,000 years, as biota responded to changing climates, culminating in the postglacial extinction of large mammals and emergence of modern ecosystems.

4h

BBC News – Science & Environment

36

Ros Atkins on… Europe's climate challenge

Ros Atkins looks at how Europe is getting to grips with its emissions problem.

13h

New Scientist

33

Danish children trap 19,000 ants to study impact of climate change

A citizen science project which saw children and their families trap 19,000 ants has identified how different species are coping with climate change in Denmark

20h

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

32

Toxoplasmosis in wild animals found to be more common in dense urban areas

A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in Canada has found evidence that the parasitic disease toxoplasmosis is more common in wild animals that live in or around large urban areas. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes their analysis of data collected by other researchers looking into various aspects of the disease.

7h

Phys.org

32

New study probes X-ray bursts from low-mass X-ray binaries

An international research team has performed a new measurement of an important astrophysical reaction, 22Mg(α, p)25Al, providing essential experimental data for understanding the light curve of X-ray bursts and the astrophysical environment in low-mass X-ray binaries.

7h

Wired

32

I Never Want to Stop Riding the LeMond Prolog

I don't need it, but I could ride this ebike all day, every day, forever.

8h

Scientific American Content

32

Disabled Astronauts Blaze New Space Trails

Efforts are underway to make space missions more accessible — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

New Scientist

31

99-million-year-old crab discovered trapped inside amber

A 99-million-year-old crab trapped in amber might show us when the shelled animals moved into freshwater

57min

Livescience.com

30

Pablo Escobar's 'cocaine hippos' are being sterilized because the population is out of control

Contraception may be the only key to controlling a population boom in feral hippos living in Colombian rivers near Pablo Escobar's former estate.

9h

Livescience.com

29

Scientists create most detailed map of Uranus' mysterious auroras

Scientists have imaged the whole globe of Uranus in the infrared part of the light spectrum for the first time, hoping to shed light on the planet's mysterious auroras and weird magnetic field.

7h

The Atlantic

27

Winners of the 2021 Close-up Photographer of the Year

The third year of the Close-up Photographer of the Year competition has just come to a close, and the winners have been announced . The contest "celebrates close-up, macro, and micro photography," among seven separate categories. More than 9,000 entries were received from 56 countries this year. The organizers have once again been kind enough to share some of the winners and finalists with us bel

2h

Wired

27

7 Early Black Friday TV Deals to Help You Cozy Up This Fall

From LG OLEDs to affordable TCL screens, a ton of our favorite models are steeply discounted.

9h

The Atlantic

27

Sometimes Altruism Needs to Be Enforced

The coronavirus pandemic has engendered lots of altruism. This is welcome but also unsurprising, since a group of people facing a threat typically relies on collective action to keep self-interest in check. Cooperation and generosity are part of our evolutionary heritage, and they usually require only light pressure to foster. Most people are happy to wear a mask in a hospital or on an airplane,

10h

Scientific American Content

26

Four Success Stories in Gene Therapy

Gene Therapy CRISPR

The field is beginning to fulfill its potential. These therapies offer a glimpse of what's to come — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Dagens Medicin

26

Tusindvis uden for risikogruppen vaccineret mod influenza før tid

SSI er gået i restordre med en mangel på 83.000 vacciner, og mens sårbare risikerer at gå forgæves efter influenzavaccination, har store spillere som ATP og Erhvervsstyrelsen taget forskud på vaccinen og tilbudt stik til deres medarbejdere.

8h

Phys.org

24

Europeans in the Americas 1,000 years ago

Columbus was not the first European to reach the Americas. The Vikings got there centuries before, although exactly when has remained unclear. Here, an international team of scientists show that Europeans were already active in the Americas in 1021 AD.

5h

Phys.org

24

Nanotwinned titanium forges path to sustainable manufacturing

Titanium is strong and lightweight, boasting the highest strength to weight ratio of any structural metal. But processing it while maintaining a good balance of strength and ductility—the ability of a metal to be drawn out without breaking—is challenging and expensive. As a result, titanium has been relegated to niche uses in select industries.

5h

Phys.org

24

Study reveals patterns of fern communities turnover during the late triassic mass extinction

The end-Triassic mass extinction (ETME), one of the five most severe extinction events in Earth history, caused the disappearance of ~80 percent of all species.

7h

New Scientist

23

Will London's expanded Ultra Low Emission Zone cut air pollution?

Clean air zones across Europe, including in London, are really working to cut dangerous air pollutio

5h

Phys.org

23

Researchers zero in on methane released from reservoirs

Methane is a potent greenhouse gas that accounts for about a fifth of today's global warming. In addition to methane emitted from livestock and other agricultural practices, the gas is also spewed from the production, transport, and burning of fossil fuels and the breakdown of organic material. Methane is released into the atmosphere continually. Scientists track these emissions to use in climate

7h

Science | The Guardian

22

Floating props and little sleep: Russians describe filming world's first movie in space

Film crew say shooting was a 'huge challenge' and they had to learn to walk again after 12 days in orbit Their movie props floated around, sleeping was difficult and they used Velcro to keep objects in place but Russia's first film crew in space said they were delighted with the result and had "shot everything we planned". Yulia Peresild, one of Russia's most glamorous actors, and film director K

19h

Phys.org

22

New tool can identify harmful blue-green algae

A new way to detect early signs of harmful blue-green algae, which bloom in lakes, rivers and reservoirs around the world, has been developed by researchers at the University of Birmingham together with researchers at the Culture Collection of Algae & Protozoa (CCAP), based at the Scottish Association of Marine Science.

20h

Scientific American News

21

Will Giving COVID Booster Shots Make It Harder to Vaccinate the Rest of the World?

India Covid Booster

Wealthy countries have bought up most of the available vaccine doses for booster shots but still have far more than they need — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Futurism

Scientists: Uh, Earth Flipped Over On Its Side 84 Million Years Ago

Take this, flat-Earthers: The entire planet rolled over on its side 84 million years ago, before correcting itself and flopping back up. Or so goes the argument of a new paper published in Nature , attempting to once and for all settle the debate over what's called "true polar wander," which is the process by which a planet or a moon's various layers shift around, resulting in the location of sai

6min

Livescience.com

What is DOMS?

Find out exactly; Plus, how can you ease the pain to make facing your next workout a little easier?

9min

NPR

Scientists made a wooden steak knife that's 3 times sharper than a steel blade

Researchers have hardened wood and fashioned a knife out of it. It's three times sharper than steel and can slice through steak, and could be a sustainable alternative.

17min

ScienceDaily

Origin of domestic horses finally established

The modern horse was domesticated around 2200 years BCE in the northern Caucasus. In the centuries that followed it spread throughout Asia and Europe. An international team of 162 scientists collected, sequenced and compared 273 genomes from ancient horses scattered across Eurasia to come up with this finding.

22min

ScienceDaily

Hit the sleep 'sweet spot' to keep brain sharp

Older adults who sleep short or long experienced greater cognitive decline than those who sleep a moderate amount, even when the effects of early Alzheimer's disease were taken into account, according to a new study.

22min

ScienceDaily

Astronomers detect signs of an atmosphere stripped from a planet in a giant impact

A team has discovered evidence of a giant impact in the nearby HD 17255 star system, in which an Earth-sized terrestrial planet and a smaller impactor likely collided at least 200,000 years ago, stripping off part of one planet's atmosphere.

22min

ScienceDaily

Humans did not cause woolly mammoths to go extinct — climate change did

. For five million years, woolly mammoths roamed the earth until they vanished for good nearly 4,000 years ago — and scientists have finally proved why. The hairy cousins of today's elephants lived alongside early humans and were a regular staple of their diet — their skeletons were used to build shelters, harpoons were carved from their giant tusks, artwork featuring them is daubed on cave wall

22min

ScienceDaily

Unmasking the magic of superconductivity in twisted graphene

Researchers report an uncanny resemblance between the superconductivity of magic graphene and that of high temperature superconductors. Magic graphene may hold the key to unlocking new mechanisms of superconductivity, including high temperature superconductivity.

22min

Phys.org

Cancer therapies and nuclear material detection get a boost from newly discovered protein

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Penn State scientists have demonstrated how a protein can be recovered and purified for radioactive metals like actinium that could be beneficial for both next-generation drugs used in cancer therapies and the detection of nuclear activities.

33min

Phys.org

Reducing carbon dioxide using a panchromatic osmium complex photosensitizer

Finding solutions for the current climate and energy crisis has become a common goal across the globe. And why look far when we have the perfect solution right around us? Taking a page out of nature's book, scientists have been trying to recreate the process of photosynthesis to combat climate change. Beyond helping plants prepare their food, photosynthesis also makes them one of the major carbon

33min

Livescience.com

Giant ram head statues found on 'Avenue of Sphinxes' in Egypt

Three giant statues of ram heads — at least one of which had a cobra on top — have been discovered south of Karnak Temple in Luxor, Egyptologists announced.

39min

cognitive science

CAN GUT BACTERIA CONTROL WHAT WE EAT? I find this topic fascinating since they are in the gut, but can still activate neural circuits to make us feel satisfied when they get the nutrients they need or make us feel good when we eat what they want (many different mechanisms involved).

submitted by /u/Epistimi300 [link] [comments]

47min

ScienceDaily

Lightweight electric wristband heaters for constant, portable warmth

As the fall chill settles in across the U.S., people are getting out their cozy sweaters and electric blankets, or stocking up on handheld heat packets for extra warmth. But sweaters and blankets are bulky, and heat packs only work for a little while. Now, researchers demonstrate a conductive, durable yarn for lightweight wearable heaters that are re-usable and provide constant, portable warmth.

50min

ScienceDaily

Plugging into ocean waves with a flexible, seaweed-like generator

Ocean waves can be powerful, containing enough energy to push around sand, pebbles and even boulders during storms. These waves, as well as smaller, more gentle ones, could be tapped as a source of renewable energy. Now, researchers have developed flexible power generators that mimic the way seaweed sways to efficiently convert surface and underwater waves into electricity to power marine-based de

50min

ScienceDaily

Male-female differences in heart disease could start before birth

New research suggests that male-female differences in protein expression occur immediately after embryonic cells become heart cells called cardiomyocytes. This is the earliest stage of heart development, well before the embryo is exposed to sex hormones.

50min

ScienceDaily

Urban wastes used as fertilizers contain higher PFAS than livestock manure

Because of their useful surfactant properties, per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) have been massively produced for non-stick coatings, water-repellant fabrics and firefighting foams. However, scientists have detected these highly stable 'forever chemicals' throughout the environment, prompting toxicity concerns. Now, researchers have characterized PFAS in contemporary and historical organi

50min

ScienceDaily

In your face: Children's expressions tell the story of poor sleep

When children are overtired, their facial expressions can forecast social problems years later, according to a new report published by a psychologist.

50min

ScienceDaily

Scientists develop sperm cells from primate stem cells

A new study shows that functional sperm cells can be made in a dish using primate embryonic stem cells.

50min

Phys.org

Tailoring affects people's perceptions of dates suggested by online dating apps

Users of online dating apps evaluate date-worthiness of recommended partners based on the tailoring process used by the app, according to new research led by Penn State. The team's results suggest that it matters whether the app uses an algorithm to suggest potential partners or uses the date preferences indicated by users.

51min

Phys.org

Innovative models predict effects of climate change on nor'easters

Argonne-developed high-resolution models predict the effect of climate change on the extratropical storms that bear down on the Northeast in the winter.

51min

Phys.org

NASA challenges K-12 students to design moon-digging robots

NASA seeks young engineers to help design a new robot concept for an excavation mission on the Moon. The Lunabotics Junior Contest is open to K-12 students in U.S. public and private schools, as well as home-schoolers.

51min

The Atlantic

The Hidden Costs of Living Alone

If you were to look under the roofs of American homes at random, it wouldn't take long to find someone who lives alone. By the Census Bureau's latest count , there are about 36 million solo dwellers, and together they make up 28 percent of U.S. households. Even though this percentage has been climbing steadily for decades , these people are still living in a society that is tilted against them. I

54min

Viden | DR

Fik du også sved på panden? Se de største begivenheder fra Danmarks Motionsuge

Igennem uge 41 har danskerne haft høj puls og kunne prøve alt fra skydning til cheerleading.

1h

ScienceDaily

Brain activation in sleeping toddlers shows memory for words

Very young children learn words at a tremendous rate. Now researchers have seen how specific brain regions activate as two-year-olds remember newly learned words — while the children were sleeping.

1h

ScienceDaily

Small-scale foragers left more than footprints on the landscape

Archaeological sites like the Great Wall of China and the pyramids can be seen with the naked eye from space, but for ancient societies that did not build, their traces on the landscape are more difficult to find. Now researchers have used satellite data to identify areas in coastal southwest Madagascar where indigenous foragers altered their surroundings.

1h

ScienceDaily

Cat bacteria treats mouse skin infection, may help you and your pets as well

Researchers identify a strain of bacteria on healthy cats that produces antibiotics against severe skin infections. The findings may soon lead to new bacteriotherapies for humans and their pets, wherein cat bacteria is applied via topical cream or spray.

1h

ScienceDaily

How quickly does the climate recover?

It took the climate 20,000 to 50,000 years to stabilize after the rise in global temperatures of five to eight degrees Celsius 56 million years ago. Climate change today is causing temperatures to rise and is also increasing the likelihood of storms, heavy rain, and flooding — the recent flood disaster in the Ahr valley in Germany is just one such example. What we need to ask ourselves in this co

1h

ScienceDaily

'Ray guns' let scientists use light instead of DNA to tell plant populations apart

Using a handheld device that looks a little like a ray gun, scientists recorded how plant leaves on different Alaskan mountains reflect light. And, it turns out, different populations of plants of the same species — for instance, plants living on neighboring mountaintops — reflect light differently, in ways that echo their genetic variation from each other.

1h

ScienceDaily

Viral infections could promote neurodegeneration

Some viral diseases could possibly contribute to neurodegeneration. Researchers found that certain viral molecules facilitated intercellular spreading of protein aggregates that are hallmarks of brain diseases like Alzheimer's. These findings may provide clues how acute or chronic viral infections could contribute to neurodegeneration.

1h

MIT Technology Review

Rediscover trust in cybersecurity

The world has changed dramatically in a short amount of time—changing the world of work along with it. The new hybrid remote and in-office work world has ramifications for tech—specifically cybersecurity—and signals that it's time to acknowledge just how intertwined humans and technology truly are. Enabling a fast-paced, cloud-powered collaboration culture is critical to rapidly growing companies

1h

forskning.se

Två vaccindoser boostar antikroppsnivåer i luftvägarna

Antikroppar i luftvägarna försvinner snabbt efter genomgången sars-cov-2-infektion, men vaccination resulterar i en kraftig ökning av antikroppsnivåerna, särskilt efter två doser vaccin. Att fullfölja vaccination med två doser även om man haft covid-19 kan därför vara viktigt för att skydda mot återinfektion och förhindra smittspridning, menar forskarna bakom en ny studie från Karolinska Institut

1h

Science

Javid warns that Covid cases could hit 100,000 a day in England

Health secretary urges people to get booster jabs to avoid fresh restrictions

1h

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

An ultra-low-cost electroporator with microneedle electrodes (ePatch) for SARS-CoV-2 vaccination [Engineering]

Vaccination against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and other pathogens with pandemic potential requires safe, protective, inexpensive, and easily accessible vaccines that can be developed and manufactured rapidly at a large scale. DNA vaccines can achieve these criteria, but induction of strong immune responses has often required bulky,…

1h

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Differential effects of PD-1 and CTLA-4 blockade on the melanoma-reactive CD8 T cell response [Immunology and Inflammation]

Immune checkpoint inhibitors targeting programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) and cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA-4) have revolutionized the treatment of melanoma patients. Based on early studies addressing the mechanism of action, it was assumed that PD-1 blockade mostly influences T cell responses at the tumor site. However, recent…

1h

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Eccentricity forcing of East Asian monsoonal systems over the past 3 million years [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

The East Asian summer monsoon and the precipitation it brings are relevant for millions of people. Because of the monsoon's importance, there has been a substantial amount of work attempting to describe the driving mechanisms behind its past variability. However, discrepancies exist, with speleothem-based East Asian monsoon reconstructions differing from…

1h

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Optogenetic stimulation of glutamatergic neurons in the cuneiform nucleus controls locomotion in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease [Neuroscience]

In Parkinson's disease (PD), the loss of midbrain dopaminergic cells results in severe locomotor deficits, such as gait freezing and akinesia. Growing evidence indicates that these deficits can be attributed to the decreased activity in the mesencephalic locomotor region (MLR), a brainstem region controlling locomotion. Clinicians are exploring the deep…

1h

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

The translatome of neuronal cell bodies, dendrites, and axons [Neuroscience]

To form synaptic connections and store information, neurons continuously remodel their proteomes. The impressive length of dendrites and axons imposes logistical challenges to maintain synaptic proteins at locations remote from the transcription source (the nucleus). The discovery of thousands of messenger RNAs (mRNAs) near synapses suggested that neurons overcome distance…

1h

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Opinion: The importance of offering vaccine choice in the fight against COVID-19 [Social Sciences]

More than 25% of adults in the United States remain unvaccinated for coronavirus disease 2019 [COVID-19 (1)]. Although some of the unvaccinated are vaccine-resistant and may never be convinced that they should get the shot, the hope is that a sizable proportion of the unvaccinated will accept vaccination under the…

1h

The Scientist RSS

Sex of Fetus Affects Immune Response to COVID-19 During Pregnancy

Immune Response Covid 19

Male placentas produce more proinflammatory molecules than female placentas, while people carrying male fetuses produce fewer antibodies in response to infection, a study finds.

1h

Futurity.org

How genetics affect your food choices

Researchers say new information about the genetic links behind food intake, obesity, and diabetes could lead to improved prevention and treatment. In the largest ever study to examine how genetic factors affect a person's food choices and consumption, researchers have identified more than two dozen regions of genetic sequences that may affect individuals' food intake. "The average daily intake of

1h

ScienceDaily

Amount of information in visible universe quantified

Researchers have long suspected a connection between information and the physical universe, with various paradoxes and thought experiments used to explore how or why information could be encoded in physical matter. A researcher attempts to shed light on exactly how much of this information is out there and presents a numerical estimate for the amount of encoded information in all the visible matte

1h

ScienceDaily

More than 99.9% of studies agree: Humans caused climate change

More than 99.9% of peer-reviewed scientific papers agree that climate change is mainly caused by humans, according to a new survey of 88,125 climate-related studies.

1h

forskning.se

Därför fick vi bensinbilar i stället för elbilar

Bristen på elnät fick bilproducenter att börja tillverka bensinbilar istället för elbilar i det tidiga 1900-talets USA. Om elnäten etablerats 15 till 20 år tidigare kunde elbilarna ha dominerat, visar forskning från Lunds universitet. I en studie publicerad i Nature Energy visar forskare från Ekonomihögskolan vid Lunds universitet att bristen på infrastruktur var en viktig faktor bakom att bilpro

2h

Futurism

Researchers Discover Massive Hole in the Arctic's "Last Ice"

The Last Ice An enormous hole has been discovered in an area of the Arctic known as the "Last Ice" — heating up concerns about the impacts of anthropogenic climate change in the region. The hole, known as a polynya, was discovered near Ellesmere Island, Canada's northernmost island, according to a press release from the American Geophysical Union . Its presence is particularly disconcerting to re

2h

Phys.org

Remoteness does not enhance coral reef resilience, according to marine ecologists

There's a widespread hypothesis that links the resilience of coral reefs with their remoteness from human activities—the farther away they are from people, the more likely corals are to bounce back from disturbances.

2h

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Citizen scientists help assure quality of coastal biodiversity monitoring

In 2019, history student Rodrigo Gomes found out on social media about a call for volunteers to take part in a scientific project relating to the ocean and conducted by the Federal University of São Paulo's Institute of Marine Sciences (IMAR-UNIFESP) in Santos, on the coast of the state of São Paulo, Brazil. He signed up for the project, took workshops, and trained in the field. "I was very fortun

2h

Futurity.org

Does depression in pregnancy up c-section risk?

Depression and anxiety in pregnant women may be connected to the type of delivery they have, new research suggests. Perinatal mood and anxiety disorders have already been associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes like low birth weight and preterm birth. And now, a new study finds that they may also be linked to significantly higher rates of first time cesarean deliveries among women who are othe

2h

Scientific American Content

Fossil Fuel Development to Exceed Global Climate Targets

Fossil UN 1.5 Paris

Planned oil, gas and coal production is not inline with countries' pledges to reduce greenhouse gas emissions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Science & technology

A pig kidney has been successfully transplanted into a human for the first time

It will be a long time before such procedures become routine

2h

Phys.org

Changing ocean currents are driving extreme winter weather

Throughout Earth's oceans runs a conveyor belt of water. Its churning is powered by differences in the water's temperature and saltiness, and weather patterns around the world are regulated by its activity.

2h

Phys.org

First artificial scaffolds for studying plant cell growth

As a baby seedling emerges from the depths of the soil, it faces a challenge: gravity's downward push. To succeed, the plant must sense the force, then push upward with an even greater force. Visible growth is proof that the seedling has won against the force of gravity.

2h

Phys.org

Gender gap revealed in academic journal submissions during first COVID-19 wave

A study of 2,329 academic journals has found that, during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, fewer manuscripts were submitted by women than by men, and this gender gap was especially prominent in the medical field and for women in earlier stages of their careers. Flaminio Squazzoni of the University of Milan, Italy, and colleagues present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on

2h

Phys.org

Researchers discover first dinosaur era crab fully preserved in amber

Fossils trapped in amber provide a unique snapshot of the anatomy, biology, and ecology of extinct organisms. The most common fossils found in amber, which is formed from resin exuded from tree bark, are land-dwelling animals, mainly insects. But on very rare occasions scientists discover amber housing an aquatic organism.

2h

Phys.org

Scientists discover how bacteria use liquid protein droplets to overcome stress

Scientists have revealed how bacteria make tiny liquid droplets from proteins to help them survive harsh environments and thus reduce their chances of being killed by antibiotics.

2h

Phys.org

What drove the invention of military technologies?

Peter Turchin from the Complexity Science Hub Vienna (CSH) and an interdisciplinary team of colleagues set out to test competing theories about what drove the evolution of war machines throughout world history. Their study, published today in the journal PLOS ONE, sees the strongest influence on the evolution of military technology coming from world population size, the connectivity between geogra

2h

The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: A Future Without the Flu?

Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . The knowledge we've gained during the pandemic could help us in the fight against other illnesses. We've learned a lot about viruses and vaccines. The pandemic has forced us to—as a society and a

2h

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Author Correction: Single-cell transcriptomic profile of human pulmonary artery endothelial cells in health and pulmonary arterial hypertension

Scientific Reports, Published online: 20 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-021-00563-5

2h

The Scientist RSS

High-Quality Screening and Target Validation During Drug Development

Drew Adams will discuss his work developing therapeutics that promote remyelination for neurological diseases.

2h

Livescience.com

Pig kidney successfully hooked up to human patient in watershed experiment

US Pig Kidney Human

The experiment was brief, but the results hint at the promise of pig-to-human transplants.

2h

NYT > Science

How to Watch the Orionids Meteor Shower

Orionid Meteor Shower

The celestial event caused by debris from Halley's comet will be most active overnight, but a nearly full moon could interfere with your view.

2h

Livescience.com

What causes sleepwalking?

Discovering what causes sleepwalking is the first step in beating it.

2h

The Atlantic

A Worrisome Peek Inside Yale Law's Diversity Office

H ave you ever wondered what deans of diversity do behind closed doors? Until last week, the public had little visibility into bureaucracies such as the Office of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion at Yale Law School. Then covertly recorded audio emerged of Yaseen Eldik, the office's director, and Ellen Cosgrove, an associate dean, pressuring a student to issue a written apology for emailing out a

3h

Phys.org

Going off the rails: Research reveals ecological impact of rail transport on UK bat species

New research from the University of Sussex has revealed the ecological impact of rail transport on bats in the UK, throwing light on a previously unstudied area.

3h

Phys.org

Zapping untreated water gets rid of more waterborne viruses

Using sophisticated microscopy and computational analysis, Texas A&M University researchers have now validated the merit of a water purification technology that uses electricity to remove and inactivate an assortment of waterborne viruses. They said the yet-to-be-implemented water purification strategy could add another level of safety against pathogens that cause gastrointestinal ailments and oth

3h

Discover Magazine

Why We Share Stories of Local Ghosts

Since ancient times, communities have circulated tales of nearby spirits that are attached to specific spaces and carry memorable moral lessons. Often, they serve to spread practical warnings.

3h

Nature

Copper-coordinated cellulose ion conductors for solid-state batteries

Nature, Published online: 20 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03885-6 By coordinating copper ions with the oxygen-containing groups of cellulose nanofibrils, the molecular spacing in the nanofibrils is increased, allowing fast transport of lithium ions and offering hopes for solid-state batteries.

3h

Biochemistry News – Chemistry News

'Like a magic trick,' certain proteins pass through cell walls

For decades, scientists have wondered how large molecules such as proteins pass through cell walls, also known as plasma membranes, without leaving a trace. That ability is part of what makes certain drugs—including some cancer treatments and the COVID-19 vaccine—work. And it is also how bacterial toxins enter human cells and wreak havoc.

3h

Phys.org

Ocean acidity data affirms predictions of changes to El Nino conditions

Score one for a key climate change prediction.

3h

Phys.org

Predicting famines using rainfall season start

The first rains that signal the beginning of the growing season kick off a flurry of activities in rural, agricultural communities. Farmers decide when to plant, how much labor to allocate, how many resources to devote to that season's crop and so on.

3h

Phys.org

No 'silver bullet' for UK reaching net zero carbon emissions for electricity

CO2 emissions from electricity in the UK fell by two thirds in the last decade due to several factors working together, rather than a single panacea.

3h

Phys.org

Proceeding with Caution: First global guidelines proposed for ancient DNA research

As ancient DNA research sweeps the globe, ballooning from zero genomes sequenced as of 2009 to more than 6,000 as of 2021, those involved in and affected by the genetic analysis of human remains have pressed with ever greater urgency for ethical standards that can be applied wherever such research is carried out.

3h

Scientific American Content

Electoral Engineering and the Freedom to Vote

Securing basic voting rights should take priority over more elaborate reforms — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Futurism

Bitcoin Hits Highest Price in Its Entire History

Bitcoin High 000 ETF

Bullish Bitcoin The day after the cryptocurrency finally hit the New York Stock Exchange , Bitcoin has reached the highest price at any point in its 12-year history, jumping up past a red hot $66,000 per coin on Wednesday morning. "Bitcoin to the moon!" tweeted a rapturous Cameron Winklevoss, who along with his twin Tyler has bet much of his post-Facebook career on cryptocurrency. Wild Ride Bitco

4h

Phys.org

First large-scale census of coral heat tolerance published

In a first-of-its-kind study, Florida's critically endangered staghorn corals were surveyed to discover which ones can better withstand future heatwaves in the ocean. Insights from the study, led by scientists at Shedd Aquarium and the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, help organizations working to restore climate-resilient reefs in Florida and provide a

4h

New Scientist

Microplastics in the air have a small cooling effect on our climate

Microplastics pollute the air, and now there is evidence that they have a cooling effect on climate – although it is far smaller than the cooling effect of other particulates

4h

Phys.org

When humanlike chatbots miss the mark in customer service interactions

Researchers from University of Oxford published a new paper in the Journal of Marketing that examines the use of chatbots in customer-service roles and finds that when customers are angry, humanlike chatbots can negatively impact customer satisfaction, overall firm evaluations, and subsequent purchase intentions.

4h

Phys.org

Choosing 'good migrants' for 'Global Britain'

The new visa for Hong Kongers is framed as 'a haven' for Britain's former colonial subjects but has 'undoubtedly colonialist overtones' warns a Lancaster University professor.

4h

Phys.org

How Bali could teach the world to manage its limited resources

Water is a limited resource. As such, efficient ways to jointly manage and optimize water reserves are essential for our present and future. But how can a well-balanced system be established? In order to single out the relevant parameters, an international team of scientists, including Stefan Thurner from the Complexity Science Hub Vienna (CSH), applied a method from physics to a system in equilib

4h

Phys.org

Termite brains can grow in anticipation of a single moment of flight and light

New research on dampwood termites (Zootermopsis angusticollis and A. nevdensis) shows select members of the colony will experience brain changes in anticipation of cognitive demand.

4h

Phys.org

New insights into heat pathways improve understanding of fusion plasma

A high-tech fusion facility is like a thermos—both keep their contents as hot as possible. Fusion facilities confine electrically charged gas known as plasma at temperatures 10 times hotter than the sun, and keeping it hot is crucial to stoking the fusion reactions that scientists seek to harness to create a clean, plentiful source of energy for producing electricity.

4h

Phys.org

Female mountain lion is 99th to be tracked in Santa Monica Mountains study

The National Park Service has captured its 99th mountain lion for an ongoing study of the community of big cats living in the Santa Monica Mountains.

4h

Discover Magazine

Why Our Inner Clocks May Benefit from Stressed-Out Plants

Fruits and veggies provide us with powerful compounds called polyphenols that influence the body's inner rhythms. They could someday deliver innovative treatments for conditions like cancer and diabetes.

4h

Nature

Evidence for unconventional superconductivity in twisted bilayer graphene

Nature, Published online: 20 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-04121-x

4h

Nature

Omnimagnets move non-magnetic objects every which way

Nature, Published online: 20 October 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02863-2 An ancient solar storm helps pinpoint when Vikings lived in the Americas, and using magnets to deftly move non-magnetic metals.

4h

Nature

Dexterous magnetic manipulation of conductive non-magnetic objects

Nature, Published online: 20 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03966-6 Time-varying magnetic fields can be used to manipulate the position and orientation of conductive non-magnetic objects.

4h

Nature

Ethics of DNA research on human remains: five globally applicable guidelines

Nature, Published online: 20 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-04008-x In this Perspective, a group representing a range of stakeholders makes the case for a set of five proposed globally applicable ethical guidelines for ancient human DNA research.

4h

Nature

Linking hippocampal multiplexed tuning, Hebbian plasticity and navigation

Nature, Published online: 20 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03989-z Episodic memory and allocentric spatial navigation are interwoven in the activity of hippocampal neuron ensembles via Hebbian plasticity, which allows rats to encode journey-specific episodes.

4h

Nature

Shigella evades pyroptosis by arginine ADP-riboxanation of caspase-11

Nature, Published online: 20 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-04020-1 This study reports the identification of a new post-translational modification, termed ADP riboxanation, which is mediated by the Shigella effector OspC3 and inactivates the cytosolic LPS sensing pathway of caspase-4 and caspase-11.

4h

Nature

Direct radiative effects of airborne microplastics

Nature, Published online: 20 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03864-x Preliminary modelling of airborne microplastics suggests that they may be exerting a minor cooling influence on the present-day atmosphere, and continued production could have increasing effects on the climate system in future.

4h

Nature

Regulation of intestinal immunity and tissue repair by enteric glia

Nature, Published online: 20 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-04006-z Enteric glial cells have tissue-wide immunoregulatory roles through the upregulation of IFNγ-dependent genes both at steady state and after parasite infection, promoting immune homeostasis and CXCL10-mediated tissue repair after pathogen-induced intestinal damage in mice.

4h

Nature

Low glycaemic diets alter lipid metabolism to influence tumour growth

Nature, Published online: 20 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-04049-2 Lien et al. show that low glycemic diets can reduce tumour growth by deregulating lipid metabolism.

4h

Nature

KDM5B promotes immune evasion by recruiting SETDB1 to silence retroelements

Nature, Published online: 20 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03994-2 KDM5B recruits SETDB1 to repress endogenous retroelements such as MMVL30, suppressing anti-tumour immunity, and the depletion of KDM5B induces a robust adaptive immune response and enhances the response to immune checkpoint blockade.

4h

Nature

Neural dynamics underlying birdsong practice and performance

Nature, Published online: 20 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-04004-1 In male zebra finches, song practice and courtship song performance are associated with distinct patterns of neural activity in the basal ganglia, resulting in reduced vocal variability during performance.

4h

Nature

eccDNAs are apoptotic products with high innate immunostimulatory activity

Nature, Published online: 20 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-04009-w By developing a new eccDNA purification and profiling method, the study revealed close-to-random genomic origination, mechanism of biogenesis and function of eccDNAs.

4h

Nature

Carbon monoxide gas produced by a giant impact in the inner region of a young system

Nature, Published online: 20 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03872-x A carbon monoxide gas ring co-orbiting with dusty debris is observed in the outer terrestrial planet region of the star HD 172555, which indicates that a planetary-scale impact took place.

4h

Nature

Perovskite solar cells with atomically coherent interlayers on SnO2 electrodes

Nature, Published online: 20 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03964-8 An atomically coherent interlayer between the electron-transporting and perovskite layers in perovskite solar cells enhances charge extraction and transport from the perovskite, enabling high power conversion efficiency.

4h

Nature

Pliocene decoupling of equatorial Pacific temperature and pH gradients

Nature, Published online: 20 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03884-7 New proxy data for ocean pH and an ocean–atmosphere model show that a radically different ocean circulation led to decoupling of ocean productivity and upwelling in the equatorial Pacific Ocean 3–6 million years ago.

4h

Nature

Diet comparison suggests a lipid imbalance can slow tumour growth

Nature, Published online: 20 October 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02775-1 Understanding how diet affects tumour growth could lead to better treatments. Analysis in mice reveals that a low-calorie diet, but not a ketogenic diet, slows the growth of pancreatic cancer. This effect is mediated by lipid changes.

4h

Nature

Congo Basin rainforest — invest US$150 million in science

Nature, Published online: 20 October 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02818-7 The world's second-largest rainforest is key to limiting climate change — it needs urgent study and protection.

4h

Nature

Why I swapped the piano for pipettes

Nature, Published online: 20 October 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02868-x Concert pianist-turned-immunologist Gabriel Victora sees parallels between science and music.

4h

Nature

Non-magnetic objects induced to move by electromagnets

Nature, Published online: 20 October 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02771-5 A set of electromagnets has been used to move metal objects without touching them, even though the objects are not magnetic. This method could potentially be used like a 'tractor beam' to move hazardous objects in space.

4h

Science | smithsonianmag.com

New Dating Method Shows Vikings Occupied Newfoundland in 1021 C.E.

Tree ring evidence of an ancient solar storm enables scientists to pinpoint the exact year of Norse settlement

5h

Futurism

21 People Miraculously Survive Horrific Plane Crash in Texas

21 Survivors Despite horrifying videos and images of flaming wreckage, all the passengers of a Texas plane crash on Tuesday survived their near brush with death. In all, according to The Washington Post , 21 passengers aboard a private plane slated to fly from Houston Executive Airport to Boston, Massachusetts walked away unscathed after their plane failed to gain altitude during takeoff . During

5h

Futurity.org

To make the most of exoskeletons, training really matters

New exoskeleton research shows the importance of training. Exoskeleton devices work, researchers say, for a variety of uses such as speeding up our walking or making running easier. Yet they don't know what exactly makes exoskeletons effective. What is the benefit of customization, for example? And how much does simply getting used to the exoskeleton matter? "People are amazing at learning new ta

5h

Phys.org

New tool offers ways to improve CRISPR gene-editing method

The ability to edit the genome by altering the DNA sequence inside a living cell is powerful for research and holds enormous promise for the treatment of diseases. However, existing genome editing technologies frequently result in unwanted mutations or can fail to introduce any changes at all. These problems have kept the field from reaching its full potential.

5h

forskning.se

Statiner kopplas till minskad risk att dö i covid-19

Statiner sänker kolesterolnivåerna i blodet och används ofta för att förebygga hjärt-kärlsjukdom. Ny forskning visar att statinbehandling även innebär en något lägre risk att dö i covid-19. Under pandemin har frågan om statiner kan minska dödligheten i covid-19, via effekter på koagulation och immunsystemet, engagerat forskare och läkare. Statiner är en grupp läkemedel som sänker kolesterolhalten

5h

Vetenskap | SVT Nyheter

Vikingar i Amerika för 1000 år sedan – ny datering

Vikingarna korsade Atlanten och kom till Amerika flera hundra år innan Columbus. Nu har forskare lyckats datera deras närvaro i väst till ett bestämt år. En forntida solstorm avslöjar det exakta årtalet.

5h

Dagens Medicin

Måling af kræft-DNA i blodet: Fremtidens supplement til cancerscreening?

Måling af cirkulerende tumor-DNA kan inden for en årrække blive et supplement til de nationale screeningsprogrammer for cancersygdomme. Metoden har potentiale til at kunne reducere cancerdødeligheden betydeligt ifølge professor.

5h

60-Second Science

How Can an Elephant Squeak Like a Mouse?

New research, using a camera that can "see" sound, shows some elephants can produce high-pitched buzzing with their lips.

5h

Phys.org

Njordarchaeota, a new candidate for a sister group to eukaryotes

The emergence of eukaryotic cells is considered as a critical biological evolutionary event on Earth. The origin of eukaryotes and eukaryosis are frontier issues in both life and Earth sciences. Currently, it is widely accepted that the origin of eukaryotes was initiated with a symbiotic process, in which one endosymbiotic host cell became the cell nucleus and one endosymbiotic alphaproteobacteriu

5h

Phys.org

Twisted-angle dependent exciton in heterobilayer of transition metal dichalcogenides

The type-II band structures in vertically stacked transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) heterobilayers facilitate the formation of interlayer excitons. The twist-angle and the mismatch in the lattice constants of the monolayers create a periodic moiré potential as deep as >100 meV, which can affect the optical bandgap and the optical selection rules of the forming excitons. Identifying the origi

5h

Phys.org

Facet controllable synthesis of two-dimensional rare earth oxides

Since graphene was awarded the Nobel Prize in 2010, two-dimensional (2D) materials have continued to attract researchers' attention in logic, storage, optoelectronic and photonic 2D device manufacturing fields because of the atomic thickness and excellent performance. Based on the research of graphene, scientists have discovered some other 2D materials, such as layered transition metal dichalcogen

5h

Phys.org

Research suggests canals can help the UK to cope with the climate emergency

Research published by The University of Manchester and the Canal & River Trust has shown that the presence of canal water can cool urban areas by up to 1.6°C during heatwaves in a 100-meter-wide corridor along the waterway.

5h

Phys.org

The disappearance of women researchers in times of pandemic

When an article is published in a scientific journal, three authorship positions indicate who the study's principal researchers are: first author, last author and corresponding author. These positions are used for decision-making, particularly in the evaluation of scientific careers and the awarding of possible promotions. Previous studies have shown that women less frequently occupy these authors

5h

Phys.org

Reducing plastic pollution by adding RNA-inspired 'breaking points'

Once plastic products are used and discarded, they can linger in oceans, collecting in large "garbage patches" and harming sea life. One potential solution, a biodegradable polymer called polylactide (PLA), has so far not fully lived up to its promise, showing little sign of breakdown once in seawater. In a new study in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, researchers set out to address t

5h

Phys.org

How plasma technology can safely clean disposable PPE for reuse

A new study from the University of Southampton has demonstrated a new method to safely clean and reuse facemask respirators with advanced low-temperature plasma technology. The discovery could help future pandemic responses by providing contingency options should a shortage of personal protective equipment (PPE) for frontline healthcare staff occur again.

5h

Phys.org

Why Twitter should share revenues with soccer players

High-profile social media users, such as actors, popstars or athletes, compete on social media for user attention, that can translate into ticket sales for concerts or movies, a better contract, or lucrative product endorsements. This kind of competition, research by Gaia Rubera (Bocconi University) and Federico Rossi (Purdue University) published in advance on Marketing Science found, follows its

5h

Phys.org

Researchers observe enhanced bulk photovoltaic effect in 2D ferroelectric material

Bulk photovoltaic effect (BPVE) is widely used in generating electricity. As a process of energy transference from photons to electrons and of voltage formation within ferroelectric material, BPVE acts like a dam, raising up "water" (voltage) to generate "power" (electric currents). Researchers have realized high photovoltage beyond theoretical Shockley-Queisser (SQ) limit in previous studies, how

5h

Phys.org

Crop diversity is needed today for tomorrow's food security and nutrition

Although scientists have been ringing bells for more than 100 years about the decline of crop diversity in agriculture, questions about the magnitude, causes, and significance of this loss remain unanswered.

5h

Science & technology

A simple but ingenious mechanism may give wave power a boost

It is inspired by a party trick and clockwork

6h

Futurity.org

Poll: One third of kids ages 7-9 use social media

Parents in a new national poll report that half of children aged 10-12 years and a third of children ages 7-9 use their devices to engage with others on social media apps. And while most parent track their kids' use of social media, the poll finds one in six aren't using any parental controls for their child's social apps, according to the new poll. "There continues to be debate over how soon is

6h

Discover Magazine

Why Scary Music Sounds, Well, Scary

Horror movie soundtracks might draw on the most familiar expression of terror that we know.

6h

Phys.org

Millions of people were evacuated during disasters last year – another rising cost of climate change

As world leaders prepare for the COP26 climate talks next month, it's worth recalling a sobering line from the royal commission's report into the 2019–20 Australian bushfires: "what was unprecedented is now our future."

6h

Phys.org

Is environmentalism in our genes?

As global environmental crises mount, numerous policies have been proposed with an eye toward a more sustainable future. However, such recommendations have often gone unheeded, falling by the wayside for lack of public support.

6h

Phys.org

Why we must embrace geoengineering and other technologies to stop the climate crisis

Recent adverse climate events—such as summer wildfires—have given Canadians something to worry about. Despite reports that most countries are not on track to meet their 2030 emissions targets to keep the Earth's warming to within 1.5 C to 2 C, many continue to pin their hopes on fulfilling the goals of the Paris Agreement.

6h

The Scientist RSS

Droplet Digital PCR: When qPCR Doesn't Make the Cut

CD19/BCMA Car Therapy

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6h

Singularity Hub

AI-Savvy Criminals Pulled Off a $35 Million Deepfake Bank Heist

Thanks to the advance of deepfake technology, it's becoming easier to clone peoples' voices. Some uses of the tech, like creating voice-overs to fill in gaps in Roadrunner , the documentary about Anthony Bourdain released this past summer, are harmless (though even the ethics of this move were hotly debated when the film came out). In other cases, though, deepfaked voices are being used for ends

6h

Science | smithsonianmag.com

What Does the Future Hold for the Joshua Tree?

The beloved desert denizen is feeling the heat

6h

Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

Broken Motor on the Cornelia Marie Brings the Fleet Together | Deadliest Catch

Stream Full Episodes of Deadliest Catch: discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/deadliest-catch Discovery ► https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch/ #DeadliestCatch #Discovery #Hurricane Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://

6h

Nature

The virologist preparing Africa for the next pandemic

Nature, Published online: 20 October 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02864-1 Kariuki Njenga talks about his work building a pan-African study to find emerging diseases quickly.

6h

Dagens Medicin

Læger bag underskriftindsamling: »Sygeplejerskerne kæmper også lægernes kamp«

Tre læger har startet underskriftindsamling blandt læger til støtte for sygeplejerskernes kamp for ligeløn og bedre arbejdsvilkår. Initiativtagerne anerkender, at lægerne ikke har været gode nok til at bakke op.

6h

Phys.org

Adolescent dating violence affects one in three, but murky policies mean most adults don't know how to help

Adolescent dating violence is a serious public health problem in Canada. Dating violence is also a children's rights issue, because it violates youths' right to safe and healthy development.

6h

Phys.org

How the new human right to a healthy environment could accelerate New Zealand's action on climate change

Last week's formal recognition by the United Nations Human Rights Council that the right to a healthy environment is an essential human right has been heralded as a historic victory for environmental protection and an important step forward for the world's most vulnerable people.

6h

Phys.org

Study: The benefits of automation and AI are mixed regarding worker well-being

Employers who prioritize employee health and well-being enjoy a competitive advantage in retaining and hiring employees during what many are calling "The Great Resignation." Those investing in automation and artificial intelligence (AI) are seeing productivity gains.

6h

forskning.se

Klimattoppmötet i Glasgow – vad handlar det om?

Ambitionen efter Parisavtalet 2015 var att stanna den globala uppvärmningen vid 1,5 grader. Men ansatserna hittills pekar mot en tregradig uppvärmning till år 2100. ­– Det är jättetydligt att klimatlöftena inte räcker, säger Kimberly Nicholas, klimatforskare vid Lunds universitet. Den 31 oktober samlas representanter från världens alla hörn i Glasgow för att delta i FN:s stora klimattoppmöte COP2

7h

Phys.org

How to make climate action popular

Ambitious action is needed to stop average global temperatures rising above 1.5°C. But some measures to cut fossil fuel use and develop alternative industries have provoked resistance. Wind farms can be a common source of public ire, and so can carbon taxes—as large protests in France and Australia show.

7h

Phys.org

What COVID-19 travel bans have done to conservation tourism in Africa

It's been over 20 months since the World Health Organization announced COVID-19 as a global health emergency and pandemic. It's estimated that the resulting reductions in travel in 2020 alone wiped US$4.5 trillion from the global tourism economy and cost millions of jobs.

7h

Phys.org

Cutting-edge forensic analysis identifies rare ceramic dish for the British Museum

Scientific analysis by Cranfield Forensic Institute (CFI) has proven that a stoneware dish is a thousand-year-old Chinese Song dynasty treasure, the rarest of all Imperial Chinese ceramics.

7h

Futurism

If You're Ready To Invest in Crypto, Here's the Best Place To Start

Bitcoin Crypto Invest

Financial experts were pretty skeptical about cryptocurrency when it first came out. In fact, most thought it was just a fad. But now it's pretty clear that those experts were very wrong. Crypto has been around for over a decade, now, and it's stronger than ever. If you're ready to invest in what a lot of successful people think is the most important asset class of the 21st century, the best and

7h

Futurism

Improve Your Writing With Artificial Intelligence Tool Rytr And Earn $20 In Store Credit

Artificial intelligence and machine learning have been used to achieve some amazing things, and also some extremely silly ones . But in your day-to-day life, machine learning is about making your life easier, and Rytr is designed to help non-writers put out amazing copy. A lifetime subscription is on sale for just $75 (reg. $1,250). AI-Powered Copy If you're a team of one, or just a small group t

7h

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Strengthening the climate for sustainable agricultural growth

Today, the 2021 Global Agricultural Productivity Report (GAP Report), "Strengthening the Climate for Sustainable Agricultural Growth," was released by Virginia Tech's College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. It urges the acceleration of productivity growth from smallholders to large-scale farmers to meet consumers' needs and address current and future threats to human and environmental well-being

7h

Science

Putin backs keeping workers at home as Covid deaths soar

Russian workplaces to shut down from October 30 amid rising case numbers and deaths

7h

Phys.org

Key magnet installed at sPHENIX detector

After years of careful planning, crews at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory installed an enormous superconducting magnet that will be the centerpiece of the sPHENIX detector. sPHENIX is an ongoing upgrade to the PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), a DOE Office of Science user facility for nuclear physics research.

7h

Phys.org

Climate crisis: How states may be held responsible for impact on children

The UN Committee on the Rights of the Child has determined that a government can, in theory, be held to account for the impact its country's carbon emissions have on its children, both within and outside of its borders. This is in response to a complaint filed in September 2019 by youth climate activists, including Greta Thunberg.

7h

Futurity.org

5 ways to keep vaccine 'cold chain' safe from hackers

Health systems can prevent the hacking of electronics in the "cold chain" that keeps items like COVID-19 vaccines ultra-cold during storage and transport, say researchers. A major health system commissioned the study, which finds that an attacker located near equipment like freezers and coolers could use electromagnetic interference generated by simple devices like walkie-talkies to fool temperat

7h

Future(s) Studies

Restaurant hires $1000-a-month robot waiter and tips surge – Restaurateurs might want to hire robots over humans during these economic times.

submitted by /u/Gari_305 [link] [comments]

7h

Future(s) Studies

Life inside the Facebook Metaverse

submitted by /u/Tender_Combo [link] [comments]

7h

Future(s) Studies

Elon musk net worth, then and now

submitted by /u/UnfairWishbones [link] [comments]

7h

Future(s) Studies

Surgeons have successfully tested a pig's kidney in a human patient: the test, in a brain-dead patient, was only very short but it represents a milestone in the long quest to use animal organs in human transplants.

submitted by /u/filosoful [link] [comments]

7h

Future(s) Studies

In a First, Surgeons Attached a Pig Kidney to a Human — and It Worked

submitted by /u/frodostarkins [link] [comments]

7h

Phys.org

Image: Auroras viewed from orbit

Auroras make for great Halloween décor over Earth, though ESA astronaut Thomas Pesquet snapped these green smoky swirls of plasma from the International Space Station in August. Also pictured are the Soyuz MS-18 "Yuri Gagarin" (left) and the new Nauka module (right).

7h

Scientific American Content

The Quest to Overcome Gene Therapy's Failures

Gene Therapy CRISPR

Tragic side effects plagued the field's early years, but researchers are finding ways to minimize the risks — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Phys.org

Efficient uptake of uranium(VI) realized by layered manganese thiophosphite intercalated with ammonium

With the rapid development of nuclear power worldwide, the demand for uranium continues to increase. As a consequence, large quantities of uranium-containing wastewater are generated throughout the nuclear fuel cycle as well as during spent fuel reprocessing. Uranium (U) is highly chemical toxic and strongly carcinogenic to the living system. Therefore, it is important to develop materials that ca

7h

Phys.org

New point spread functions developed for particle 3D tracking

Nanoparticle positioning and tracking have a wide range of uses in life science, drug research and development. Real-time recording of the intracellular and extracellular motion of nano particles is of great significance in exploring the basic laws of life activities and drug transformation as it is crucial for clarifying key scientific issues such as disease pathogenesis, viral dynamic infection

7h

Nature

A mysterious object is beaming radio waves into the Milky Way

Nature, Published online: 20 October 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02836-5 The emissions profile measured on Earth does not match that of any known type of space body.

7h

Nature

COVID vaccine makers brace for a variant worse than Delta

Nature, Published online: 20 October 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02854-3 Companies are updating vaccines and testing them on people to prepare for whatever comes next in the pandemic.

7h

Nature

Byzantium

Nature, Published online: 20 October 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02769-z Personal development.

7h

Futurity.org

Finding links eco injustice and COVID's spread

Population density and long-term exposure to air pollution influenced the speed at which COVID-19 spread through metropolitan areas, research finds. During the "first wave" of COVID-19 in the United States, Rajan Chakrabarty, associate professor at Washington University in St. Louis, learned that African Americans made up 47% of the population in St. Louis, Missouri, but nearly three-quarters of

7h

Phys.org

Nickel-catalyzed cross-coupling of aromatic ethers proceeds via a nickelate anion

Metal catalysts are widely used in the production of drugs, dyes, adhesives, and plastics. Researchers have now discovered an intriguing property of nickel as a catalyst: it is able to catalyze the coupling of aromatic hydrocarbons in its anionic form, the nickelate ion. In this form, the two metals, lithium and nickel, work in cooperation in a unique manner, explain the authors in the journal Ang

7h

Phys.org

NASA releases new dataset of cyanobacteria in over 2,300 lakes in the US

Lakes provide drinking water for people, habitat for plants and wildlife, and a place to fish, boat and swim. But the water can become harmful to humans, animals and the ecosystem when toxic algae called cyanobacteria reach abnormally high levels due to warm, nutrient-rich water conditions.

7h

Phys.org

New research shows scientific agreement on anthropogenic nature of climate change strengthened since 2009

Scientific support for the link between human activity and climate change has strengthened to the extent that there is now near universal agreement. Whereas in 1996, reports hedged statements with phrases such as "the balance of evidence suggests…" (Houston et al 1996), this evolved to "it is extremely likely that human influence has been the dominant cause of the observed warming since the mid-20

7h

Forskning & Framsteg – För dig som är nyfiken på allvar

Mot en framtid av trä

Allt som görs av olja kan göras av skog. Så har det länge låtit från både politiker och skogsindustrin. Är det dags för en skoglig revolution? F&F har gått på jakt efter nya material av trä.

7h

Ingeniøren

USA øger elproduktion på kul – men det er på lånt tid

PLUS. Høje gaspriser får amerikanske kulkraftværker til at øge produktionen i 2021. Men det vil ikke vare ved, da flere og flere kulkraftværker bliver taget ud af drift.

7h

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Looking out for waterbirds from high above

UNSW's annual waterbird survey—a unique dataset that allows scientists to monitor more than 50 species, and assess the health of rivers and wetlands—kicked off in early October. Even though it's all a little bit different to previous years, due to COVID-19 restrictions, the team has already made interesting observations onboard the small plane that's taking them across huge parts of Australia in s

7h

Phys.org

Changes to coastal wetlands could be altering carbon capture capacity

Coastal wetlands are one of the most unique and important parts of Connecticut's landscape. They play an important ecological and economic role. A barrier against storms and flooding, natural filtration for water, an important support for fisheries, and one of the largest carbon sinks on the planet—these are all critical functions of coastal wetlands.

7h

Phys.org

Biologist's new book explores how humans have shaped life on Earth

In her new book, UC Santa Cruz biologist Beth Shapiro argues that while gene-editing technology is giving humans remarkable new powers, we have been manipulating other species for as long as we have existed.

7h

Dagens Medicin

Kontinuitet i læge-patient-relationen redder liv

Norsk undersøgelse dokumenterer, at patienter, som har haft samme læge gennem mange år, har markant lavere risiko for at dø eller blive akut indlagt.

8h

Phys.org

The climate emergency is a humanitarian crisis, say aid experts

Aid workers warn that we are currently unprepared for the crises both caused and made worse by the climate emergency, and every year, the lives and livelihoods of millions of people are being destroyed by disasters, with 1 in 33 people in the world expected to need aid in 2021.

8h

Phys.org

Study: Gen Z has the lowest financial literacy

Financial literacy is low within each of the five generations—the Silent Generation, Baby Boomers, Gen X, Gen Y and Gen Z—but is the lowest among Gen Z, according to a new report by the TIAA Institute and the Global Financial Literacy Excellence Center (GFLEC) at the George Washington University (GW) School of Business.

8h

cognitive science

Switching from Cogsci to CS

Hi guys, first of all i'm not sure if this is allowed here so forgive me if i'm doing something wrong. I'm a cognitive science bachelor student and i would like to get a master degree in CS. I'm not sure on what CS oriented courses to take during my bachelor: should I go for math courses like algebra l, calculus and discrete math or rather go for more theoretical computer science subjects like co

8h

Science-Based Medicine

Experts Abused for Talking to the Public

Nature survey finds that most media experts talking about COVID are facing threats and attacks. The post first appeared on Science-Based Medicine .

8h

Nature

Publisher Correction: A pan-serotype dengue virus inhibitor targeting the NS3–NS4B interaction

Nature, Published online: 20 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-04123-9

8h

Livescience.com

What was the Reign of Terror?

The Reign of Terror, also called the Terror, was a period of state-sanctioned violence and mass executions during the French Revolution.

8h

Ingeniøren

Firbenede robotter løser komplekse opgaver i fællesskab

Forskere fra University of Notre Dame i USA har konstrueret små, firbenede robotter, der automatisk kan kommunikere indbyrdes og løse opgaver i flok og håber på, de kan bidrage til alt fra miljøovervågning til udforskning af rummet

9h

Phys.org

Study finds women, honor students prefer active learning spaces

The Association of American Universities has made a recent push to encourage institutions to install more active learning spaces on campuses, in which students can move and work together, instead of sitting in fixed seats in a traditional lecture hall. A new study from the University of Kansas found students are self-sorting between the two spaces and that active learning classrooms can be a way t

9h

Phys.org

New sensor detects low air humidity

Measuring air humidity is important in many areas. However, conventional sensors in hygrometers have so far not been able to determine a very low water vapor content. Physicists at the University of Duisburg-Essen (UDE) and the Yuri Gagarin Technical University in Russia have now developed a new sensor. It detects even the smallest amounts of water molecules that sink to its surface. The detector

9h

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Viruses are both the villains and heroes of life as we know it

Viruses have a bad reputation. They are responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic and a long list of maladies that have plagued humanity since time immemorial. Is there anything to celebrate about them?

9h

Nature

Before making a mammoth, ask the public

Nature, Published online: 20 October 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02844-5 I turned down the role of adviser to a de-extinction company — that task belongs to everyone.

9h

Nature

Daily briefing: Recycled electric car batteries as good as new ones

Nature, Published online: 19 October 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02860-5 Promising recycled lithium-ion batteries, science sleuths under attack and outcry over scientists accused of 'organized crime' in Mexico.

9h

Ingeniøren

Her fjernes gammel PFOS-forurening med tre kæmpe kulfiltre

PLUS. I Københavns Lufthavn bliver der afværgepumpet for PFAS-stoffer, bl.a. under en brandøvelsesplads. Vandet bliver renset med aktivt kul, og sekundavandet bliver genbrugt eller ledes ud i Øresund.

9h

Retraction Watch

Publisher investigating paper a lucrative scale is based on following Retraction Watch reporting

The publishing firm Wiley says it is investigating a pivotal paper about a controversial public health tool after Retraction Watch reported on a robust critique of the article which highlighted a number of potentially serious flaws with the research. We're talking about the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS), whose developer, Donald Morisky, has been hitting … Continue reading

10h

forskning.se

Egen skoldator ger liten effekt på studieresultaten

Mellanstadieelever som får en egen dator i skolan når varken bättre eller sämre resultat i matematik och engelska än andra elever. Däremot finns det en tendens till något förbättrade studieresultat i svenska. Resultaten framkommer i en studie som Institutet för arbetsmarknads- och utbildningspolitisk utvärdering, IFAU, har genomfört. Satsningen "en elev, en dator" Många huvudmän och skolor har va

10h

Phys.org

Floods, landslides kill 116 in India and Nepal

The death toll from days of flooding and landslides in India and Nepal crossed 100 on Wednesday, including several families swept away or crushed in their homes by avalanches of mud and rocks.

10h

Phys.org

Flooding in Venice worsens off-season amid climate change

After Venice suffered the second-worst flood in its history in November 2019, it was inundated with four more exceptional tides within six weeks, shocking Venetians and triggering fears about the worsening impact of climate change.

10h

Phys.org

Helium: South Africa strikes new 'gold'

In a grassy plain in South Africa, once the world's largest gold producer, prospectors have stumbled upon a new treasure: helium.

10h

Undark Magazine

Western Australia Blocked Out Covid. Now What?

Even if 80 percent of West Australians were fully vaccinated, modeling suggests hundreds of thousands will get Covid-19 if the hard border is lifted without restrictions. And with effectively no natural immunity to the virus, West Australians are asking — where is the path out of this gilded cage?

10h

Nature

Hybrid immunity improves B cells and antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 variants

IMM Sars Cov 2 Antibody

Nature, Published online: 20 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-04117-7

10h

Nature

Why fossil fuel subsidies are so hard to kill

Nature, Published online: 20 October 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02847-2 Behind the struggle to stop governments propping up the coal, oil and gas industries.

10h

Nature

Young people will be key to climate justice at COP26

Nature, Published online: 20 October 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02843-6 The world's youth movements are following the science of climate change. It's high time that world leaders did, too.

10h

Nature

The broken $100-billion promise of climate finance — and how to fix it

Nature, Published online: 20 October 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02846-3 At Glasgow's COP26 summit, countries will argue for more money to mitigate and adapt to the effects of climate change.

10h

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

Retraction Note: Mechanically interlocked architecture aids an ultra-stiff and ultra-hard elastically bendable cocrystal

Nature Communications, Published online: 20 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25762-6

11h

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

The mechanism of bending in co-crystals of caffeine and 4-chloro-3-nitrobenzoic acid

Nature Communications, Published online: 20 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26204-z

11h

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

Emergence and control of photonic band structure in stacked OLED microcavities

Nature Communications, Published online: 20 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26440-3 Understanding and manipulating the photonic band structure formed in stacked Fabry-Pérot microcavity organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) is key to optimizing their performance. Here, through intelligent device design, the authors tune the photonic band gap in vertically-stacked OLED microcavities.

11h

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

COVA1-18 neutralizing antibody protects against SARS-CoV-2 in three preclinical models

Nature Communications, Published online: 20 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26354-0 Monoclonal antibodies show great promise in treating Covid-19 patients. Here, Maisonnasse, Aldon and colleagues report pre-clinical results for COVA1-18 and demonstrate that it reduces viral infectivity in three animal models with over 95% efficacy in macaques upper respiratory tract.

11h

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

Viral genome wide association study identifies novel hepatitis C virus polymorphisms associated with sofosbuvir treatment failure

Nature Communications, Published online: 20 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25649-6 Sofosbuvir is a common therapy in hepatitis C virus infection, which targets the NS5B polymerase. Here, Smith et al. analyze the association between whole genome HCV polymorphisms and sofosbuvir treatment failure and identify three common polymorphisms present in non-targeted NS2 and NS3 proteins associated w

11h

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

Structural and functional analysis of target recognition by the lymphocyte adaptor protein LNK

Nature Communications, Published online: 20 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26394-6 LNK is a potent negative regulator of cytokine signaling implicated in blood cells proliferation. Here the authors present structures of the substrate recognition (SH2) domain of LNK in complex with phosphorylated motifs from JAK2 and EPOR; providing insight into its binding specificity and mode of action.

11h

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

Molecular insights into receptor binding of recent emerging SARS-CoV-2 variants

Nature Communications, Published online: 20 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26401-w The SARS-CoV-2 spike (S) protein mediates viral entry by binding of its receptor-binding domain (RBD) to the human angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptor and mutations of the S protein may have a great impact on virus transmissibility. Here, the authors characterize the interactions of six different

11h

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

Spared perilesional V1 activity underlies training-induced recovery of luminance detection sensitivity in cortically-blind patients

Nature Communications, Published online: 20 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26345-1 In humans, stroke damage to V1 causes large visual field defects. Spared V1 activity prior to training predicts the amount of training-induced recovery in luminance detection sensitivity. Moreover, visual training changes population receptive field properties within residual V1 circuits.

11h

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Author Correction: Genetic analysis by targeted next-generation sequencing and novel variation identification of maple syrup urine disease in Chinese Han population

Scientific Reports, Published online: 20 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-021-00718-4

11h

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Author Correction: Deep learning from HE slides predicts the clinical benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy in hormone receptor-positive breast cancer patients

Scientific Reports, Published online: 20 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-021-00546-6

11h

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Author Correction: High-performance symmetric supercapacitors based on carbon nanotube/graphite nanofiber nanocomposites

Scientific Reports, Published online: 20 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-021-99515-2

11h

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

N-doped reduced graphene oxide for room-temperature NO gas sensors

Scientific Reports, Published online: 20 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-021-99883-9

11h

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

SARS-CoV-2 transmission during an indoor professional sporting event

Scientific Reports, Published online: 20 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-021-99997-0

11h

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Snails associated with the coral-killing sponge Terpios hoshinota in Okinawa Island, Japan

Scientific Reports, Published online: 20 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-021-00185-x

11h

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Vitamin D epimers are associated with circulating haemoglobin levels independently of C-reactive protein

Scientific Reports, Published online: 20 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-021-00086-z

11h

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

A numerical study on the effect of CO2 addition for methane explosion reaction kinetics in confined space

Scientific Reports, Published online: 20 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-021-99698-8 A numerical study on the effect of CO 2 addition for methane explosion reaction kinetics in confined space

11h

Ingeniøren

Ny overraskende beregning af informationsmængden i Universet

Hver enkelt elementarpartikel indeholder halvanden bit information, og tilsammen indeholder de 6 x 10^80 bits, viser ny opgørelse baseret på klassisk informationsteori.

11h

Future(s) Studies

Scientists Are Using Chemical Dye For Long Term Data Storage

submitted by /u/bazegha [link] [comments]

11h

Nature

Viral filter, outbreak investigation reboot and the Economics Nobel

Nature, Published online: 20 October 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02845-4 The latest science news, in brief.

11h

Ingeniøren

Politisk krav om digitalisering i fængsler: »Elektroniske journaler bør være en selvfølge«

Indførelsen af en elektronisk patientjournal i landets fængsler skal være en del af den kommende aftale på Kriminalforsorgens område. Sådan lyder den kontante besked fra regeringens støtteparti, SF, der får opbakning af både Det Konservative Folkeparti og Dansk Folkeparti.

11h

cognitive science

A video exploring the neuroscience behind how GRATITUDE rewires your brain for the better

submitted by /u/maharuk [link] [comments]

12h

Nyheder – Forskning – Videnskab

Ny COVID-19-opdagelse kan være med til at forudsige dødsfald og indlæggelser

I et nyt studie viser forskere fra Københavns Universitet, at fænomenet celle fitness kan være…

12h

Nyheder – Forskning – Videnskab

Meningitis: Forskere finder mulig behandlingsstrategi uden antibiotika

I et nyt studie udført på rotter præsenterer forskere fra KU en alternativ behandling…

12h

Nyheder – Forskning – Videnskab

Ny opdagelse kan bane vej for mere målrettet behandling af kræftpatienter

Kvinder med bestemte mutationer i BRCA2 har øget risiko for bryst- og æggestokkekræft….

12h

Ingeniøren

Regeringen tror på tonstung CO2-reduktion med PtX i 2030: »Det virker temmelig urealistisk«

PLUS. I den nye rapport Klimaprogram 2021, anslår Energistyrelsen, at potentialet for at reducere udledningen af CO2 vha. PtX ligger på 9 mio. ton årligt. Men eksperter og energibranchen anser det for helt urealistisk

12h

Phys.org

Boeing aims for unmanned Starliner test flight in first half of 2022

Boeing is aiming for a test flight of its unmanned CST-100 Starliner capsule in the first half of next year and a potential launch of its crewed spacecraft at the end of 2022, company officials said Tuesday.

13h

Phys.org

Study: Fossil fuel plans would far overshoot climate goals

The world needs to cut by more than half its production of coal, oil and gas in the coming decade to maintain a chance of keeping global warming from reaching dangerous levels, according to a U.N.-backed study released Wednesday.

13h

Phys.org

Volcano in southern Japan erupts with massive smoke column

A volcano in southern Japan erupted Wednesday with a massive column of gray smoke billowing into the sky.

13h

Phys.org

Europeans want climate action but show little appetite for radical lifestyle change: new polling

Europeans want urgent action on climate change but remain committed meat-eaters and question policy proposals such as banning the sale of new petrol vehicles after 2030, according to a new poll from the YouGov-Cambridge Centre for Public Opinion Research that surveyed environmental attitudes in seven European countries, including the UK.

13h

Dagens Medicin

Københavnske praksislæger får en indgang til kommunale sundhedstilbud

Københavns Kommune er klar med en ny fælles indgang for deres sundhedstilbud. Indgangen skal skabe et hurtigt overblik for praktiserende læger.

13h

For Better Science

Cell Death and Depravity

Is the journal Cell Death and Disease a disease itself, parasitised by Chinese paper mills? Can it be cured? Not with this team of doctors on editorial board.

14h

Future(s) Studies

U.S. surgeons successfully test pig kidney transplant in human patient

submitted by /u/i-really-like-mac [link] [comments]

14h

Future(s) Studies

EIA: Solar Modules Now Cost just 33 Cents per watt, a 90% reduction from 2008

submitted by /u/kernals12 [link] [comments]

14h

cognitive science

Oct 19, 2021 – Brain Activation in Sleeping Toddlers Shows Memory for Words…

submitted by /u/DomPachino [link] [comments]

15h

Discover Magazine

Best Smart Mattress

Ghost SmartBed vs Sleep Number vs Eight Sleep

15h

ArXiv Query

Translated sums of primitive sets

The Erd\H{o}s primitive set conjecture states that the sum $f(A) = \sum_{a\in A}\frac{1}{a\log a}$, ranging over any primitive set $A$ of positive integers, is maximized by the set of prime numbers. Recently Laib, Derbal, and Mechik proved that the translated Erd\H{o}s conjecture for the sum $f(A,h) = \sum_{a\in A}\frac{1}{a(\log a+h)}$ is false starting at $h=81$, by comparison with semiprimes. I

17h

Future(s) Studies

Avi Loeb: Protocol for Contact with Extraterrestrial Equipment

submitted by /u/Madridsta120 [link] [comments]

18h

Future(s) Studies

The future is here: Mercedes-Benz Canada announces industry-altering mixed reality solution, powered by Microsoft

submitted by /u/madheatteezy [link] [comments]

18h

Future(s) Studies

Extreme light for the production of clean and abundant nuclear energy

submitted by /u/DerBoeseGolfTDI [link] [comments]

18h

Future(s) Studies

New technique paves the way for perfect perovskites

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

18h

Future(s) Studies

AI fake-face generators can be rewound to reveal the real faces they trained on

submitted by /u/Redditditditdahdo [link] [comments]

18h

Ingeniøren

Fanger ikke farlige partikler: Emhætters blinde vinkel under lup

PLUS. Et forsøgsprojekt viser, at emhætter uden aftræk til det fri er langt ringere til at opfange små 2,5M-partikler. Det skal nu undersøges nærmere i et større projekt.

19h

Livescience.com

Are teeth naturally yellow?

A white smile is important to many people, but are teeth naturally yellow?

21h

iBiology (uploads) on YouTube

A Walk in the Woods: After the Flames

https://www.ibiology.org/plant-biology/california-redwoods-fire/ What does a redwood forest look like, and sound like, in the wake of a devastating fire? See a forest in a new way in this new cinematic short from the Science Communication Lab's Wonder Collaborative and iBiology. Walk through a fire-ravaged redwood forest with experts Beatrix Jiménez, a Land Stewardship Associate at the Sempervire

23h

Livescience.com

How does condensation happen?

Have you been wondering 'how does condensation happen?' We're giving you the low-down.

23h

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