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Solar storm confirms Vikings settled in North America exactly 1,000 years ago
Analysis of wood from timber-framed buildings in Newfoundland shows Norse-built settlement 471 years before Columbus Half a millennium before Christopher Columbus crossed the Atlantic, the Vikings reached the "New World", as the remains of timber buildings at L'Anse aux Meadows on the northern tip of Canada's Newfoundland testify. The Icelandic sagas – oral histories written down hundreds of year
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DNA shows Japanese wolf closest relative of domestic dogs
A team of researchers affiliated with several entities in Japan has found evidence that the Japanese wolf is the closest known relative of domestic dogs. The team has published a paper describing their genetic analysis of the extinct wolf and its relationship with modern dogs.
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New MOND theory able to account for cosmic microwave background
A pair of researchers at the Czech Academy of Sciences has been shaking up the astrophysics community with a new modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) theory that tosses out the concept of dark matter and instead backs up theories that suggest there is a type of as-yet undiscovered gravity responsible for attributes seen in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Constantinos Skordis and Tom Zlosnik h
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US gun violence increased 30 percent during COVID-19 pandemic
Gun violence increased by more than 30% in the United States during the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a new study by Penn State College of Medicine researchers. The researchers said that stress, domestic violence, lack of social interactions and greater access to firearms might have contributed to the increase.
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Motion och bättre stöd minskar adhd-symtom
Motion och fysisk aktivitet förbättrar både adhd-symtom, funktionsnivå, barnens exekutiva funktion och psykiskt mående. Det visar studier från Lunds universitet. Bättre stöd i skolan och hemma skulle också förbättra barnens livskvalitet. Pia Tallberg är specialist i neuropsykologi som precis doktorerat vid Lunds universitet. I sin forskning har hon undersökt hur barn med adhd utvecklas över tid.
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Europeans in the Americas 1000 years ago
The Vikings were active in North America in the year 1021 AD. This now represents the earliest — and only — known year in which Europeans were present in the Americas prior to the arrival of Columbus in 1492 AD. It also represents a definitive point in time by which the Atlantic Ocean had been traversed and human migration had finally encircled the globe.
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Ivory poaching has led to evolution of tuskless elephants, study finds
Researchers say findings in Mozambique demonstrate impact of human interference in nature Ivory poaching over decades has led to the evolution of tuskless elephants, researchers have found, proving that humans are "literally changing the anatomy" of wild animals. A previously rare genetic mutation causing tusklessness has become very common in some groups of African elephants after a period in wh
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Why helping people pay rent can fight the pandemic
A family in Houston and a plumber in Maryland couldn't afford rent, which pushed them into crowded living quarters. During the COVID-19 pandemic, that common predicament has increased viral spread. (Image credit: Michael Starghill for NPR)
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What is CRISPR?
CRISPR is a simple yet powerful tool for editing genomes. It allows researchers to easily alter DNA sequences and modify gene function.
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Donald Trump Beaten to @DonaldTrump on His Own Social Media Site
TRUTH Social Former government employee Donald Trump announced yesterday that he would be triumphantly returning to social media — after getting unceremoniously banned from both Twitter and Facebook earlier this year — via his own social network. The former president and current complainer-in-chief has created the Trump Media & Technology Group, according to a press release from the newly formed
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What Does Joe Manchin Do Now?
The Democratic Party's push to protect future American elections from GOP suppression and subversion is once again largely in the hands of the moderate senator from West Virginia. For the second time this year, Republicans today unanimously blocked voting-rights legislation from coming up for debate in the Senate. Democrats have the ability to pass the legislation on their own, but only if Manchi
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Britain's Covid numbers show we need to move immediately to 'plan B' | Kit Yates
Our comparatively good position has been eroded and now, heading into the winter, the data looks truly alarming Kit Yates is director of the Centre for Mathematical Biology at the University of Bath All the Covid indicators in the UK are going in the wrong direction. They have been for a while now. Cases are surging upwards; hospitals are feeling the strain of increasing numbers of Covid patients
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Boeing Says Oops, Its Multibillion Dollar Spacecraft Can't Handle Humidity
Valve Troubles Boeing's Starliner — the military contractor's approximate answer to SpaceX's Crew Dragon, as a shuttle for astronauts to reach the International Space Station and other low-Earth orbit destinations — just keeps on finding new ways to cause headaches for its engineers. NASA and Boeing announced on Tuesday that they've removed and shipped two potentially damaged fuel valves from the
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The Good Part About 'Waning' Immunity
In early March, Deepta Bhattacharya, an immunologist at the University of Arizona, celebrated a milestone: hitting the point of full vaccination , two weeks after getting his second Pfizer shot . Since then, he's been watching the number of coronavirus antibodies in his blood slowly but surely decline. The drop hasn't been precipitous, but it's definitely happening—regular checkups have shown his
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New Brain Implant Lets Blind Patient See Without Eyes
Scientists in Spain have implanted a blind patient that allowed a blind patient to see by directly stimulating her brain's visual cortex. The system uses an "artificial retina" attached to a pair of glasses that detects light in front of its wearer, according to New Atlas . The light is then processed into electrical signals and sent to a series of micro-electrodes implanted in the user's brain,
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'What a fool': fellow actors criticise William Shatner's space flight
Dame Joan Collins and Brian Cox unimpressed by historic trip, saying 'let's take care of this planet first' The Star Trek actor William Shatner's recent historic space flight saw him boldly go where some fellow actors refuse to follow, as the nonagenarian was labelled a "fool" for taking part in his record-breaking jaunt. Dame Joan Collins, who once appeared in an episode of the science fiction s
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Man Takes Selfie Right as Volcano Explodes Behind Him
Mt. Aso A Japanese man might have gotten the selfie of a lifetime when he says he snapped a picture of himself as a volcano was erupting behind him. The man had hiked near the summit of Mount Nakadake, one of the five peaks of Mount Aso, according to RKK Kumamoto , a Japanese broadcaster . Mount Aso happens to be the largest active volcano in Japan, and one of the largest ones in the world. Unluc
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The Metaverse Is Bad
In science fiction, the end of the world is a tidy affair. Climate collapse or an alien invasion drives humanity to flee on cosmic arks , or live inside a simulation . Real-life apocalypse is more ambiguous. It happens slowly, and there's no way of knowing when the Earth is really doomed. To depart our world, under these conditions, is the same as giving up on it. And yet, some of your wealthiest
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'Self-Care' Isn't the Fix for Late-Pandemic Malaise
If years could be assigned a dominant feeling (1929: despair ; 2008: hope ), 2021's might be exhaustion . As the coronavirus pandemic rumbles through its 20th month, many of us feel like we are running a race we didn't sign up for, and it's getting longer every mile we run. With this slog has come a renewed focus on mental health. During the pandemic, universities have poured money into psycholog
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UK Covid: over 50,000 cases reported for first time since July as Johnson rejects calls to move to 'plan B' – live
Latest updates: infections in UK at highest level since July but prime minister says 'we are within the parameters of what the predictions were' 'Covid is still around': why Leicester shoppers are still wearing masks England: minister denies there is 'plan C' to ban Christmas mixing Tory MPs appear to heed Javid call to set example by wearing masks Who can get a Covid booster jab in England? Glob
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What the Loss of Freedom Feels Like
F rom my home in Beirut , I think of Hong Kong all the time. Even though I've never been and have no real ties to it, I feel as though I have a stake in its future. I stare at news headlines that read, "Hong Kong Families, Fearing a Reign of Terror, Prepare to Flee the City," and feel a strange, visceral sense of familiarity. I've become obsessed with trying to understand—to feel—Hong Kongers' an
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People Aren't Meant to Talk This Much
Y our social life has a biological limit: 150. That's the number—Dunbar's number, proposed by the British psychologist Robin Dunbar three decades ago—of people with whom you can have meaningful relationships. What makes a relationship meaningful? Dunbar gave The New York Times a shorthand answer : "those people you know well enough to greet without feeling awkward if you ran into them in an airpo
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African Elephants Evolved Tusklessness Amazingly Fast
Shane Campbell-Staton never planned on traveling to Mozambique in search of tuskless elephants, but weird things can happen when you stay up 'til 3 a.m. binge-watching YouTube videos . ("Sometimes, a brother can't get to sleep, Ed," he told me.) Battling insomnia , Campbell-Staton watched a video about Gorongosa National Park . The park was once Edenic, but during Mozambique's civil war, from 197
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Global heating 'may lead to epidemic of kidney disease'
Deadly side-effect of heat stress is threat to rising numbers of workers in hot climates, doctors warn 'You shouldn't work if your kidneys are failing – but people can't afford not to' Read more in the Harmed by heat series Chronic kidney disease linked to heat stress could become a major health epidemic for millions of workers around the world as global temperatures increase over the coming deca
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Largest triceratops ever unearthed sold for €6.6m at Paris auction
US collector 'falls in love' with 8-metre-long dinosaur found in South Dakota and reassembled in Italy An 8-metre-long dinosaur skeleton has sold at auction for €6.6m (about £5.5m), more than four times its expected value, to a private collector in the US said to have fallen in love with the largest triceratops ever unearthed. The 66m-year-old skeleton, affectionately known as Big John , is 60% c
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The Brain Processes Speech in Parallel With Other Sounds
Hearing is so effortless for most of us that it's often difficult to comprehend how much information the brain's auditory system needs to process and disentangle. It has to take incoming sounds and transform them into the acoustic objects that we perceive: a friend's voice, a dog barking, the pitter-patter of rain. It has to extricate relevant sounds from background noise. It has to determine tha
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US Embarrassingly Fails Hypersonic Test Days After Chinese Success
Booster Fail Well, this is embarrassing. Mere days after reports emerged that China successfully launched a nuclear-capable hypersonic missile test , US defense officials admitted that it failed a similar test of its own. The Pentagon said that the missile's booster stack — a rocket system intended to accelerate the weapon to hypersonic speeds — failed during a trial on Thursday, according to CNN
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How to retrain your frazzled brain and find your focus again
Are you finding it harder than ever to concentrate? Don't panic: these simple exercises will help you get your attention back Picture your day before you started to read this article. What did you do? In every single moment – getting out of bed, turning on a tap, flicking the kettle switch – your brain was blasted with information. Each second, the eyes will give the brain the equivalent of 10m b
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Oh Great, MIT Has Taught Its Robotic Cheetah to Leap
Mini Cheetah The MIT engineers are at it again — and this time, they've created a robotic cheetah that knows how to leap. The designers installed a new system in the robot, dubbed the " mini cheetah ," that allows it to jump across gaps in the terrain, according to an MIT news release . The system relies on a real-time video sensor that detects potential obstacles like gaps and holes, and transla
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Quantum-encrypted information transmitted over fiber more than 600 kilometers long
By implementing a new signal stabilization technique, researchers were able to achieve secure quantum communication over a record 605 kilometers of fiber using the twin-field quantum key distribution (QKD) protocol. The new demonstration paves the way for transmitting highly secure, quantum-encrypted information over long distances, such as between cities.
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Academics recreate supernova reaction in a lab
Researchers in Surrey's Nuclear Physics Group have collaborated with TRIUMF National Laboratory (Canada) to achieve the first direct measurement of a supernova reaction in a laboratory using an accelerated beam of radioactive nuclei.
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Stop Shopping
Lately, news stories about the supply chain tend to start in similar ways. The reader is dropped into an American container port, maybe in Long Beach, California , or Savannah, Georgia , full to bursting with trailer-size steel boxes loaded with toilet paper and exercise bikes and future Christmas presents. Some of the containers have gone untouched for weeks or months, waiting for their contents
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How it feels to go into space: 'More beautiful and dazzling and frightening than I ever imagined'
Chris Boshuizen was one of four astronauts – including William Shatner – who flew into space with Blue Origin. Here he describes the wonder of the journey It was a balmy morning in the west Texas desert when Chris Boshuizen stepped into Jeff Bezos' Blue Origin rocket capsule for a journey most of us will never experience. He waved a quick goodbye to the Amazon billionaire and took his seat next t
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Dystopia Is Upon Us. Are You Ready?
From constant surveillance to algorithms that decide what we see, society is entering territory reserved for fictional dystopias. Here's how to push back.
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NASA launches tool that measures Western water loss
NASA on Thursday launched an online platform with information on how much water evaporates into the atmosphere from plants, soils and other surfaces in the U.S. West, data it says could help water managers, farmers and state officials better manage resources in the parched region.
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Chemists develop a fundamentally new mode of adsorption
A research team, led by Northwestern Universitychemists, has made a breakthrough in surface science by introducing a new active mechanism of adsorption. Such adsorption-based phenomena, in which molecules are attracted onto a solid surface, are essential for today's catalysts, energy storage and environmental remediation.
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I locked eyes with a stranger crossing the street and felt the blast of pure eros | Brigid Delaney
Chance encounters, serendipity, the glint in the eye – as we open up from lockdown, they're back baby! It was June 2020, really early in the morning, still dark around the edges, and I was crossing the big intersection at Spencer and Bourke streets in Melbourne. I was half asleep and the only people around were tradies. At the other end of the crossing, I locked eyes with one of them and, out of
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On the hunt for hypernuclei
With the WASA detector, a very special instrument is currently being set up at GSI/FAIR. Together with the fragment separator FRS, it will be used to produce and study so-called hypernuclei during the upcoming experiment period of FAIR Phase 0 in 2022. For this purpose, the assembly, which weighs several tons, is being transferred to the facility in a complex installation procedure. The scientific
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Need for massive space telescope inspires lightweight flexible holographic lens
Inspired by a concept for discovering exoplanets with a massive space telescope, a team of researchers is developing holographic lenses that render visible and infrared starlight into either a focused image or a spectrum. The experimental method, detailed in an article appearing today in Nature Scientific Reports, could be used to create a lightweight flexible lens, many meters in diameter, that c
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A traffic light for light-on-a-chip
Integrated photonics allow us to build compact, portable, low-power chip-scale optical systems used in commercial products, revolutionizing today's optical datacenters and communications. But integrating on-chip optical gain elements to build lasers or to amplify optical power runs the risk of reflected light from other components compromising or interfering with the laser's performance.
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My Daily Life Is a Game of Roulette
Updated at 11:50 a.m. ET on October 21, 2021. A pair of realities: This week, Colin Powell, the former secretary of state whose service under President George W. Bush is most prominently associated with the American invasions of Iraq and Afghanistan, died at 84 due to complications from COVID-19, despite having been fully vaccinated. And: There are conditions under which any generally healthy per
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The Meaning of Life Is Surprisingly Simple
" How to Build a Life " is a weekly column by Arthur Brooks, tackling questions of meaning and happiness. Click here to listen to his new podcast series on all things happiness, How to Build a Happy Life . W ant to live in a directed, resolute way? To always know why you're doing what you're doing? There's a simple way to make your dreams come true: Go find the meaning of life! People who believe
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The Experiment Podcast: Justice, Interrupted
Listen and subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Podcasts Last week, Justice Sonia Sotomayor announced that the Supreme Court had broken with tradition and changed its rules for oral argument. This came after a study revealed that women are disproportionately interrupted by men in the highest court in America. This week, we're re-airing a More Perfect episode about the Northwest
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Plantwatch: one of world's rarest trees found near Welsh coast
Only 30 Menai whitebeam remain, all in a narrow strip of steep land in a nature reserve One of the world's rarest trees grows in north Wales. There are only 30 of the Menai whitebeam left in the world, all growing along a tiny strip of steep coast in a nature reserve by the Menai Strait. "I was amazed to realise that such a highly threatened tree could be found in the nature reserve not far from
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Hubble Space Telescope gives unprecedented, early view of a doomed star's destruction
Like a witness to a violent death, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope recently gave astronomers an unprecedented, comprehensive view of the first moments of a star's cataclysmic demise. Hubble's data, combined with other observations of the doomed star from space- and ground-based telescopes, may give astronomers an early warning system for other stars on the verge of blowing up.
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Male mice exposed to simulated deep space radiation experienced impaired spatial learning
A team of researchers working at multiple facilities in the San Francisco area has found that male mice exposed to radiation similar to that encountered by humans on long space missions experienced problems with spatial learning several months later. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes their simulations, how it impacted the mice and the way they found to p
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Gravitational self-lensing of massive black hole binaries
A "massive" black hole (MBH) is one whose mass is more than about one hundred thousand solar-masses. MBHs reside at the centers of most galaxies, and when they actively accrete gas and dust onto their surrounding hot disk environments they radiate across the electromagnetic spectrum and are classified as active galactic nuclei.
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Scientists Confirm Viking Settlement in Canada 1,000 Years Ago
Many of us grew up hearing the tale of Columbus and his discovery of the "New World." Never mind there were already people living there, it was new to Europeans at least. But was it? For decades, archaeologists have been poring over an ancient Viking settlement in Canada, but a firm accounting of its age has remained elusive until now. As reported by Gizmodo , researchers used cosmic rays analysi
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Quantum material to boost terahertz frequencies
Topological insulators conduct electricity in a special way and hold the promise of novel circuits and faster mobile communications. Under the leadership of the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), a research team from Germany, Spain and Russia questioned a fundamental property of this new class of materials: How exactly do the electrons in the material respond when they are "startled" by
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Victorian government used 'low grade' mask study to justify mandate, experts say
Researcher 'staggered' that institutes used newspaper photos to assess mask use and effect on Covid rates Follow our Covid live blog for the latest updates Vic: hotspots ; restrictions ; vaccination rates by postcode Vaccine rollout tracker ; cases and data tracker Get our free news app ; get our morning email briefing A study relied on by the Victorian government to justify its strict mask manda
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How AI is reinventing what computers are
Fall 2021: the season of pumpkins, pecan pies, and peachy new phones. Every year, right on cue, Apple, Samsung, Google, and others drop their latest releases. These fixtures in the consumer tech calendar no longer inspire the surprise and wonder of those heady early days. But behind all the marketing glitz, there's something remarkable going on. Google's latest offering, the Pixel 6, is the first
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Wes Anderson's Whimsy Goes Too Far
Wes Anderson has always had a penchant for dysfunctional underdogs—the eccentric high schooler Max Fischer of Rushmore , the failed family of geniuses in The Royal Tenenbaums , the herd of garbage-dwelling canines in Isle of Dogs . It's no surprise that the filmmaker's newest feature focuses on another lovable long shot: print media. The film is an homage to the mid-century heyday of The New York
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Deep within the UK's shocking Covid data, there may be reasons for optimism
Analysis: soaring cases in schools are adding to the pool of the immune – which could soon see some community infections fall Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage It is hard to be upbeat about the latest numbers. The government's Covid dashboard is awash with red and upward-pointing arrows. New cases have climbed 17% on the week. Hospital admissions are up 11% and deaths
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Who are Insulate Britain and what do they want?
For the past few months Insulate Britain have been blocking roads in an effort to pressure the government into sealing up the UK's leaky, draughty housing-stock. So why are a group of eco-activists facing confrontations from angry drivers, and even risking injury , for insulation? Shivani Dave speaks to environment correspondent Matthew Taylor about Insulate Britain's demands and explores the pos
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Climate tipping might be predicted using algebraic topology
The Earth's climate system seems to have shifted abruptly between colder and warmer modes in the past. Do we risk the same today from anthropogenic climate change? Frankly, climate models cannot answer that question yet. But a result in the journal Chaos by Gisela D. Charó, Mickaël D. Chekroun, Denisse Sciamarella and Michael Ghil suggests a way to resolve the matter. Analyzing a model that combin
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The Ongoing Volcanic Eruption in the Canary Islands
The Cumbre Vieja volcano on the Spanish island of La Palma continues to erupt, spewing lava and ash for more than a month now. Upwards of 7,000 people have been evacuated, and some 2,100 buildings have been destroyed. A new branch of lava flow is expected to reach the sea today and release more toxic gases into the atmosphere, which may lead to home-confinement orders for neighboring towns. Offic
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Researchers discover monolayer Mott insulator resistant to stimuli such as heat and light
Superconductivity—where electrical resistance drops and current continues without power—is a unique property used to enable MRI machines and particle accelerators, but its temperature-based restrictions have limited applications. Superconductivity commences at temperatures well below freezing, but as temperatures increase, the electrical resistance suddenly returns and can break the system. If sup
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Shrinking quantum key distribution technology to a semiconductor chip
Toshiba Europe Ltd today announced it has developed the world's first chip-based quantum key distribution (QKD) system. This advance will enable the mass manufacture of quantum security technology, bringing its application to a much wider range of scenarios including to Internet of Things (IoT) solutions.
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One of the first models to capture dynamics of confined cell movement
The process of normal cell division in the human body is quite simple: start dividing in response to a signal, such as a wound, and stop when enough cells have been produced and the skin is healed. But cancerous cells ignore the stop signs. They grow and spread rapidly, proliferating even in cramped locations.
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Photos of the Week: Pony Man, Ancient Sword, Foam Fight
Container ships at the Port of Los Angeles, morning light on mountains in Switzerland, a wearable soft toy in France, drag racing in Tennessee, glacier exploration in Austria, an Ironman triathlon in Spain, a torch ceremony in Greece for the Beijing 2022 Winter Olympics, salmon swimming upstream in northern England, and much more
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A High-Risk Group With a Tragically Low Vaccination Rate
Across the U.S., vaccination numbers have been slowly climbing, protecting more and more of the population and bringing the country closer to getting the coronavirus under control. But despite this success, some high-risk groups have lagged behind. In particular, rates among pregnant people are discouragingly low. Although more than three-quarters of all eligible adults have gotten at least one C
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South Korea launches its first homemade space rocket
President hails 'excellent' test, as rocket gets high enough, but fails to put dummy payload into orbit South Korea 's first domestically produced space rocket reached its desired altitude but failed to deliver a dummy payload into orbit in its first test launch. The South Korean president, Moon Jae-in, still described the test as an "excellent accomplishment" that takes the country a step furthe
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Two new species of skinks identified
To coincide with National Reptile Awareness Day today Thursday 21 October, a new paper published in the Journal of Herpetology, led by South Australian Museum Honorary Researcher Dr. Mark Hutchinson in collaboration with Queensland Museum researchers, details the findings of two new species of snake-shaped burrowing skinks each confined to small areas of mid-eastern Queensland.
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Fighting viruses with interchangeable defense genes
Bacterial viruses, so-called phages, destroy bacteria. Bacteria are constantly exposed to viral attacks. A research team led by Martin Polz, a microbiologist at the University of Vienna, has now studied how bacteria defend themselves against viral predators. The study shows that bacteria have exchangeable genetic elements that are specifically designed for defense against viruses, allowing a bacte
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Fingerprinting proteins with force opens a new avenue for single-molecule proteomics
As scientists have probed the mysteries of life down to smaller and smaller scales, they have invented tools to help them understand what they observe. Determining the identity of DNA and RNA molecules has now become commonplace thanks to the commercial development of next-generation sequencing technologies, but the same is not yet true of proteins, which are critically important players in nearly
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Would We Still See Ourselves as 'Human' if Other Hominin Species Hadn't Gone Extinct?
In our mythologies, there's often a singular moment when we became "human." Eve plucked the fruit of the tree of knowledge and gained awareness of good and evil. Prometheus created men from clay and gave them fire. But in the modern origin story, evolution, there's no defining moment of creation. Instead, humans emerged gradually, generation by generation, from earlier species. As with any other
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'It's a Safe Space for Mean Humor'
The following contains spoilers for Succession , up to and including Season 3 Episode 1 . A full two years have passed since HBO's billionaire-family soap opera last aired, but only moments have elapsed on the show. Kendall Roy (played by Jeremy Strong) just used a press conference to betray his father, Logan (Brian Cox). It's war, and the Roy family's scandal-plagued media empire could face subp
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Democrats Stare Into the Abyss
Since mid-summer, Democrats have been trapped in a downward spiral of declining approval ratings for President Joe Biden, rising public anxiety about the country's direction, and widening internal divisions over the party's legislative agenda. The next few weeks will likely determine whether they have bottomed out and can begin to regain momentum before next year's midterm elections. Roughly sinc
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The Atlantic Daily: The 'Big Quit' Tells a Bigger Economic Story
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox. Tom Sibley / Getty The Great Resignation is more than just the sum of its quits, my colleague Derek Thompson argues. The pandemic is restructuring the economy, and forcing fundamental changes in t
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Pioneering new process creates versatile moldable wood
Natural wood already boasts an inherently lower life cycle cost than other materials and is a naturally strong, lightweight, and durable composite material that could offer an attractive alternative to commonly used polymers, metals and alloys, if its properties and functionality could be improved.
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The Atlantic Daily: A Guide to Mixing COVID Boosters
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox. This week, "mix and match" booster shots got two big thumbs up—but the strategy needs one more, from CDC Director Rochelle Walensky, to become official policy. In discussions today, CDC representa
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Traces of an ancient road in a lake
Anyone traveling from the German city of Brandenburg via Berlin to Frankfurt an der Oder at the Polish-German border does so along an ancient route that reaches far into Poland. German and Polish researchers have now documented the influence of this East-West connection on the history of the landscape by examining the sediments of Lake Czechowskie in the Bory Tucholskie and also evaluating histori
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Microorganisms are sensitive to large-scale climate change in Antarctica
For a long time, scientists assumed that microorganisms, due to their broad distribution patterns, were much less affected by such climatic changes than plants and animals that often present very limited distribution areas. By examining fossils of Antarctic microorganisms, an international team led by researchers from Ghent University and Meise Botanic Garden showed that this assumption is incorre
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Why Childhood Friendships Feel So Intoxicating
Earlier this month, a new novel by the late French writer Simone de Beauvoir was published. Written nearly 70 years ago by a woman who died 35 years ago, Inseparable follows the devoted, almost romantic friendship between fictionalized versions of de Beauvoir and her real-life childhood best friend, Zaza. De Beauvoir was besotted with Zaza. Her consuming infatuation with the girl seeps through ev
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Stargate Cast Reunites for Table Read of AI-Generated Script
Heads up, Stargate fans: Amanda Tapping, Michael Shanks, David Hewlett, and Jewel Staite are getting together in a drive-by reunion. The actors will reprise their roles of Samantha Carter, Dr. Daniel Jackson, Dr. Rodney McKay, and Jennifer Keller, respectively. But it's no ordinary reunion. No, this is almost a real-life version of one of those "we forced a bot to watch 1,000 hours of Olive Garde
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Data suggests oil giants are not looking very hard to find ways to reduce their carbon footprint
A small team of environmentalists from the London School of Economics and the Political Science Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development has published a Policy Forum piece in the journal Science highlighting the lack of effort by the world's largest oil and gas companies to reduce their carbon footprint. In their paper, the authors claim that of 52 companies they looked at, just two
4h
Ten mysteries of Venus
The surface of Venus is completely inhospitable for life: barren, dry, crushed under an atmosphere about 90 times the pressure of Earth's and roasted by temperatures two times hotter than an oven. But was it always that way? Could Venus once have been a twin of Earth—a habitable world with liquid water oceans? This is one of the many mysteries associated with our shrouded sister world.
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What LeBron James Gets Wrong About Vaccine Activism
When the NBA star said he would not use his platform to promote Covid-19 vaccination, he seemed to misunderstand an important point: Just like racism, police brutality, and other issues he has deemed worthy of his activism, for many communities of color, vaccination is a social justice issue.
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First dinosaur era crab fully preserved in amber discovered
Researchers describe the first crab from the Cretaceous dinosaur era preserved in amber. The study used micro CT to examine and describe Cretapsara athanata, the oldest modern-looking crab (approximately 100 million years old) and the most complete fossil crab ever discovered.
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Sodium-cooled fast reactors and the future of nuclear energy
A new paper by Technical Director of the Generation IV International Forum, Gilles Rodriguez, published in the open-access journal EPJ Nuclear Sciences & Technologies, provides a comprehensive review of joint research into sodium-cooled fast reactors undertaken by French and Japanese researchers.
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Cochlear outer hair cell electromotility enhances organ of Corti motion on a cycle-by-cycle basis at high frequencies in vivo [Neuroscience]
Mammalian hearing depends on an amplification process involving prestin, a voltage-sensitive motor protein that enables cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs) to change length and generate force. However, it has been questioned whether this prestin-based somatic electromotility can operate fast enough in vivo to amplify cochlear vibrations at the high frequencies…
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Ceramide accumulation induces mitophagy and impairs {beta}-oxidation in PINK1 deficiency [Neuroscience]
Energy production via the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) and mitophagy are two important processes affected in Parkinson's disease (PD). Interestingly, PINK1, mutations of which cause early-onset PD, plays a key role in both processes, suggesting that these two mechanisms are connected. However, the converging link of both pathways currently…
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Possible selection bias limits the interpretation of single-cell transcriptomics data of steroid-resistant asthma exacerbation [Biological Sciences]
We believe there are a few shortcomings in the study design and data interpretation in the research article by Wang et al. (1). These include 1) cell selection bias, 2) cytokine selection bias from single-cell transcriptomics (SCT) data, and 3) lack of a lipopolysaccharide+dexamethasone (LPS+DEX) control group in the mouse…
17min
Dynactin 1 negatively regulates HIV-1 infection by sequestering the host cofactor CLIP170 [Microbiology]
Many viruses directly engage and require the dynein–dynactin motor–adaptor complex in order to transport along microtubules (MTs) to the nucleus and initiate infection. HIV type 1 (HIV-1) exploits dynein, the dynein adaptor BICD2, and core dynactin subunits but unlike several other viruses, does not require dynactin-1 (DCTN1). The underlying reason…
17min
Neural oscillatory activity serving sensorimotor control is predicted by superoxide-sensitive mitochondrial redox environments [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
Motor control requires a coordinated ensemble of spatiotemporally precise neural oscillations across a distributed motor network, particularly in the beta range (15 to 30 Hz) to successfully plan and execute volitional actions. While substantial evidence implicates beta activity as critical to motor control, the molecular processes supporting these microcircuits and…
17min
People mistake the internet's knowledge for their own [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
People frequently search the internet for information. Eight experiments (n = 1,917) provide evidence that when people "Google" for online information, they fail to accurately distinguish between knowledge stored internally—in their own memories—and knowledge stored externally—on the internet. Relative to those using only their own knowledge, people who use Google…
17min
Testing models at the neural level reveals how the brain computes subjective value [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
Decisions are based on the subjective values of choice options. However, subjective value is a theoretical construct and not directly observable. Strikingly, distinct theoretical models competing to explain how subjective values are assigned to choice options often make very similar behavioral predictions, which poses a major difficulty for establishing a…
17min
Collapse of complexity of brain and body activity due to excessive inhibition and MeCP2 disruption [Neuroscience]
Complex body movements require complex dynamics and coordination among neurons in motor cortex. Conversely, a long-standing theoretical notion supposes that if many neurons in motor cortex become excessively synchronized, they may lack the necessary complexity for healthy motor coding. However, direct experimental support for this idea is rare and underlying…
17min
Critical dynamics and phase transition of a strongly interacting warm spin gas [Physics]
Phase transitions are emergent phenomena where microscopic interactions drive a disordered system into a collectively ordered phase. Near the boundary between two phases, the system can exhibit critical, scale-invariant behavior. Here, we report on a second-order phase transition accompanied by critical behavior in a system of warm cesium spins driven…
17min
Dendrite tapering actuates a self-organizing signaling circuit for stochastic filopodia initiation in neurons [Cell Biology]
How signaling units spontaneously arise from a noisy cellular background is not well understood. Here, we show that stochastic membrane deformations can nucleate exploratory dendritic filopodia, dynamic actin-rich structures used by neurons to sample its surroundings for compatible transcellular contacts. A theoretical analysis demonstrates that corecruitment of positive and negative…
17min
Tungsten enzymes play a role in detoxifying food and antimicrobial aldehydes in the human gut microbiome [Microbiology]
Tungsten (W) is a metal that is generally thought to be seldom used in biology. We show here that a W-containing oxidoreductase (WOR) family is diverse and widespread in the microbial world. Surprisingly, WORs, along with the tungstate-specific transporter Tup, are abundant in the human gut microbiome, which contains 24…
17min
Reply to Dutta et al.: Understanding scRNA-seq data in the context of the tissue microenvironment requires clinical relevance [Immunology and Inflammation]
Although we agree with Dutta et al. (1) that our conclusion could be more comprehensive, we disagree that our study design and interpretations are biased (2). Neutrophils in asthma are linked to worsening symptoms, but their role as key determinant cells remains obscure in the pathogenesis (3). Reducing neutrophilic inflammation…
17min
TLR or NOD receptor signaling skews monocyte fate decision via distinct mechanisms driven by mTOR and miR-155 [Immunology and Inflammation]
Monocytes are rapidly recruited to inflamed tissues where they differentiate into monocyte-derived macrophages (mo-mac) or dendritic cells (mo-DC). At infection sites, monocytes encounter a broad range of microbial motifs. How pathogen recognition impacts monocyte fate decision is unclear. Here, we show, using an in vitro model allowing the simultaneous differentiation…
17min
A language-matching model to improve equity and efficiency of COVID-19 contact tracing [Computer Sciences]
Contact tracing is a pillar of COVID-19 response, but language access and equity have posed major obstacles. COVID-19 has disproportionately affected minority communities with many non–English-speaking members. Language discordance can increase processing times and hamper the trust building necessary for effective contact tracing. We demonstrate how matching predicted patient language…
17min
Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus vaccine based on a propagation-defective RNA replicon elicited sterilizing immunity in mice [Microbiology]
Self-amplifying RNA replicons are promising platforms for vaccine generation. Their defects in one or more essential functions for viral replication, particle assembly, or dissemination make them highly safe as vaccines. We previously showed that the deletion of the envelope (E) gene from the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) produces…
17min
Roe-inspired stem cell microcapsules for inflammatory bowel disease treatment [Engineering]
Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which exert regulatory effects on various immune cells, have been a promising therapy for inflammatory bowel disease treatment. However, their therapeutic effects are limited by lack of nutritional supply, immune system attack, and low accumulation on the target site. Here, inspired by the natural incubation mechanism…
17min
A conserved genetic architecture among populations of the maize progenitor, teosinte, was radically altered by domestication [Evolution]
Very little is known about how domestication was constrained by the quantitative genetic architecture of crop progenitors and how quantitative genetic architecture was altered by domestication. Yang et al. [C. J. Yang et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 116, 5643–5652 (2019)] drew multiple conclusions about how genetic architecture influenced…
17min
Large uncertainties in global hydroxyl projections tied to fate of reactive nitrogen and carbon [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
The hydroxyl radical (OH) sets the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere and, thus, profoundly affects the removal rate of pollutants and reactive greenhouse gases. While observationally derived constraints exist for global annual mean present-day OH abundances and interannual variability, OH estimates for past and future periods rely primarily on global…
17min
The Epstein-Barr virus noncoding RNA EBER2 transactivates the UCHL1 deubiquitinase to accelerate cell growth [Microbiology]
The Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) transforms resting B cells and is involved in the development of B cell lymphomas. We report here that the viral noncoding RNA EBER2 accelerates B cell growth by potentiating expression of the UCHL1 deubiquitinase that itself increased expression of the Aurora kinases and of cyclin B1….
17min
A national network examining Earth's planetary limits
University of California San Diego Physics Professor Tom Murphy is among five authors of an essay, appearing in the November 2021 issue of the journal Energy Research & Social Science, that cautions current levels of worldwide economic growth, energy use and resource consumption will overshoot Earth's finite limits.
50min
Bringing new life to ATLAS data
The ATLAS collaboration is breathing new life into its LHC Run 2 dataset, recorded from 2015 to 2018. Physicists will be reprocessing the entire dataset—nearly 18 PB of collision data—using an updated version of the ATLAS offline analysis software (Athena). Not only will this improve ATLAS physics measurements and searches, it will also position the collaboration well for the upcoming challenges o
50min
Novel eremophilane sesquiterpenoids with immunosuppressive activity isolated from Parasenecio albus
Plants of the genus Parasenecio have long been used in traditional Chinese medicine for invigorating the circulation of blood, relieving rheumatic ache, and for the treatment of injures from falls. Previous phytochemical investigations on Parasenecio species demonstrate that sesquiterpenes, especially the eremophilanes, are their characteristic components. Parasenecio albus (P. albus), mainly dist
50min
NASA completes mega-moon rocket stacking
NASA has completed stacking of the agency's mega-Moon rocket and spacecraft that will launch the next generation of deep space operations, including Artemis missions on and around the Moon. Engineers and technicians successfully secured the Orion spacecraft atop the fully assembled Space Launch System (SLS) rocket at the agency's Kennedy Space Center in Florida just before midnight Oct. 21.
50min
Uncovering a Crashed World War II Bomber | Expedition Unknown
Stream Expedition Unknown on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/expedition-unknown #Discovery #ExpeditionUnknown #WorldWarII Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com
1h
US Army Corps of Engineers Uses Azure for Storm Modeling
(Photo: Brian McGowan/Unsplash) The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and Louisiana's Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority are teaming up with Microsoft to better prepare the state for hurricanes. The agencies are using Azure Government, a Microsoft computing and analytics tool reserved specifically for the government, to model synthetic storms and determine the best ways to prevent the need f
1h
New study characterizes the gut virome
A new study has added numerous previously uncharacterized viral genomes and genes to the ever-increasing worldwide pool of human gut viromes. The study will prove helpful in investigating the role of the gut virome in human health and disease.
2h
Massachusetts gun-control legislation has had no effect on violent crime
Although many Americans favor expanding background checks for gun purchases, gun-control measures in Congress have failed to garner enough votes to pass. In contrast, some state legislatures have enacted measures to reduce gun violence in their communities. A new study examined the impact changes to background checks and licensing policies has made on different types of violent crime in Massachuse
3h
Experiences in prison reduce perceptions of corrections officers' fairness, regardless of time served
Numerous studies have examined the coercive nature of prisons, but few have considered the role of in-prison experiences (e.g., confinement in restrictive housing) and time served in prison in incarcerated people's perceptions of corrections officers' fairness. A new study examined whether in-prison experiences among a nationally representative sample of inmates varied in their effect across diffe
3h
Stretchy, bendy, flexible LEDs
Sure, you could attach two screens with a hinge and call a cell phone "foldable," but what if you could roll it up and put it in your wallet? Or stretch it around your wrist to wear it as a watch?
3h
Pro­jection of extre­me rain­fall impro­ved
Mapping the effects of mostly small-scale but extreme rainfall events in global climate models poses major challenges. Computer models that are used to simulate the global climate, for example in the reports of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), usually have a resolution of grids with a scale of approximately 100×100 kilometers.
3h
Guns—Even Props—Are Not Toys
Alec Baldwin was involved in a tragic shooting on the set of his latest movie yesterday. One person was killed and another seriously wounded when a prop gun was discharged by the actor, according to the Santa Fe County Sheriff's Office . Early reports offered conflicting information. A spokesperson for Baldwin told the Associated Press that the gun in question was firing blanks. In an email to me
3h
No One Will Stop You From Getting Whatever Booster You Want
Mixing and matching vaccine brands is officially on the table in the United States. But that option might soon be billed as the B-list choice. Last night, CDC Director Rochelle Walensky gave the green light for Moderna and Johnson & Johnson booster shots, the long-awaited follow-up to a similar recommendation given to the Pfizer formulation last month. As the endorsement stands, all who are eligi
3h
Targeted prostate cancer screening could benefit men with inherited cancer syndrome
Men who inherit an increased risk of cancer through 'Lynch syndrome' could benefit from regular PSA testing from age 40 to detect early signs of prostate cancer, researchers believe. Annual PSA tests were eight times more likely to spot cancer in men with genetic hallmarks of Lynch syndrome than those without. Experts say evidence could be incorporated into a targeted screening program in future.
4h
New way to find cancer at the nanometer scale
Researchers describe a new liquid biopsy method using lab-on-a-chip technology that they believe can detect cancer before a tumor is even formed. Using magnetic particles coated in a specially designed bonding agent, the liquid biopsy chip attracts and captures particles containing cancer-causing biomarkers. A close analysis can identify the type of cancer they are carrying. This, the researchers
4h
Historical analysis finds no precedent for the rate of coal, gas power decline needed to limit climate change to 1.5C
Limiting climate change to the 1.5°C target set by the Paris Climate Agreement will likely require coal and gas power use to decline at rates that are unprecedented for any large country, an analysis of decadal episodes of fossil fuel decline in 105 countries between 1960 and 2018 shows. Furthermore, the findings, published October 22 in the journal One Earth, suggest that the most rapid historica
4h
Hydro/dehydrogenation of N‐heterocycles over bifunctional MoNi₄ electrode with water
The catalytic hydrogenation of N-heteroarenes showcases wide and important applications in the fields of synthetic chemistry, drug discovery, materials science, and hydrogen storage. However, it remains a long-standing scientific and technological challenge in breaking the aromaticity of substrates and overcoming catalyst poisoning by either substrates or hydrogenated products. Although different
4h
Skyrmions can fly!
Topology in optics and photonics has been a hot topic since 1890 where singularities in electromagnetic fields have been considered. The recent award of the Nobel prize for topology developments in condensed matter physics has led to renewed surge in topology in optics with most recent developments in implementing condensed matter particle-like topological structures in photonics. Recently, topolo
4h
An express sensor to determine the toxicity of honey
Russian scientists at Ural Federal University (UrFU, Yekaterinburg) and the Institute of Organic Synthesis, Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences have created an express sensor for the detection of nitrobenzene in food and cosmetics. In addition to requiring an ultra-small amount of material to analyze, the sensor also delivers unprecedented accuracy. It detects the presence of nitrobenze
4h
Black hole thermodynamics: A history from Penrose to Hawking
In 1969, English physicist Roger Penrose discovered a property which would later allow for a long-awaited link between thermodynamics, and the far stranger mechanics of black holes. Through new analysis published in EPJ H, Carla Rodrigues Almeida, based at the University of São Paulo, Brazil, sheds new light on Penrose's motivations and methods, and explores their historical influence on the groun
4h
Examining the accelerating universe
A special edition of EPJST, edited by Balasubramanian Ananthanarayan, Centre for High Energy Physics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, and Subhendra Mohanty, Department of Theoretical Physics, Physical Research Laboratory, Navrangpura, Ahmedabad, brings together a collection of papers focusing improving our understanding of the accelerating expansion of the Universe and the nature of the da
4h
What Joe Biden Could Learn From Henry Kissinger
L ast month, President Joe Biden went before the United Nations General Assembly in New York and declared the end of America's forever wars in the Middle East. "As we close this period of relentless war," he told the assembled representatives, "we're opening a new era of relentless diplomacy." But Biden's speech was accompanied by inauspicious diplomatic steps. First came the shambolic and ignomi
4h
Metal-organic frameworks with covalently bound metal N-heterocyclic carbenes for catalysis
This study is led by Dr. Rong Cao (State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences) and Dr. Yuan−Biao Huang (State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences). Metal N−heterocyclic carbenes (M−NHCs) on the pore walls of a porous metal−
4h
Moulded or folded, this wood stays strong
Nature, Published online: 22 October 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02861-4 By tinkering with the structure of wood fibres, scientists have boosted the material's flexibility and strength.
4h
COVID-19 vaccination strategies: When is one dose better than two?
While most of the COVID-19 vaccines are designed as a two-dose regimen, some countries have prioritized vaccinating as many people as possible with a single dose before giving out an additional dose. In a new study, researchers illustrate the conditions under which a "prime first" vaccine campaign is most effective at stopping the spread of the COVID-19 virus. The team found the vaccine waning rat
4h
Simulation illustrates how COVID-19 social distancing creates pedestrian 'traffic jams'
Researchers examine the dynamics of social distancing practices, common defense against the spread of COVID-19, through the lens of particle-based flow simulations. The study models social distance as the distance at which particles, representing pedestrians, repel fellow particles and sheds light on the relationship between social distancing and pedestrian flow dynamics in corridors by illustrati
4h
Can junk DNA kill cancer cells?
So-called "junk DNA" may be key to preventing tumors, researchers report. The new research shows how selfish genetic elements that can cause tumors may also trigger the death of cancer cells. Selfish genetic elements, also known as "junk DNA," were once thought to be merely parasites of the genome. The researchers report in a paper in Nature Immunology that blind mole rats use selfish genetic ele
4h
The supply chain crisis has a silver lining: Container ships should be decarbonised faster
Several months ago, I warned that the crisis in container ships could jeopardize Christmas by leaving retailers without enough goods on their shelves. Since then, there have been similar fears all over the media, not only due to shipping problems but also shortages of lorry drivers and unavailable products. As we approach November, the worst may be coming to the worst.
4h
Stronger than spider silk: Bagworm silk enables strong conducting fibers
Think spider silk is strong? Recent work has shown that bagworm silk is superior to spider silk in both strength and flexibility. Building on these findings, a research team at the University of Tsukuba, led by Professor Hiromasa Goto, has harnessed the strength of bagworm silk to produce a strong, flexible, conductive fiber. This research may lead to new flexible electronic devices, such as weara
4h
Why was there a super sandstorm in North China this year?
Severe sandstorms reoccurred in the spring of 2021 after absence for more than 10 years in North China. During 14-17 March, the severe sandstorm weather affected a board region of more than 3.8 million square kilometers. The PM10 concentrations in Beijing exceeded 7000 µg m−3, and the visibility was only a few hundred meters, which posed a serious threat to people's health, transportation and ecol
4h
The introduction of perennial plants among rainfed almond trees helps to mitigate climate change
Agriculture and the change in soil use produce 23% of the total emissions of greenhouse gasses of anthropogenic origin. Moreover, the expansion and intensification of agriculture are considered determining factors in soil loss and degradation by accelerating erosion rates and favoring the loss of organic matter and nutrients.The most commonly used sustainable farming practices to maintain and rest
4h
Electrical control over designer quantum materials
Exploring the properties and behaviors of strongly interacting quantum particles is one of the frontiers of modern physics. Not only are there major open problems that await solutions, some of them since decades (think high-temperature superconductivity). Equally important, there are various regimes of quantum many-body physics that remain essentially inaccessible with current analytical and numer
4h
New technology allows molecules to enter cells safely
Professor Kevin Braeckmans from Ghent University focused the last 10 years on a method for safe engineering of therapeutic cells with photothermal nanofibers. Today, Nature Nanotechnology gives insight in how these biocompatible photothermal nanofibers were developed, and how, upon laser irradiation, cells that come in contact with those nanofibers become permeabilized and can be transfected with
4h
Drought curbs a vine disease
Drought and disease are a source of pressure on vines, causing yield loss and mortality in vineyards. But these plant stresses do not necessarily act in synergy. A research team from INRAE, Bordeaux Sciences Agro, the Université de Bordeaux and the Institut Français de la Vigne et du Vin, recently discovered that drought conditions suppress the appearance of esca leaf symptoms, one of the most com
4h
Critical race theory isn't the first social studies controversy
Social studies education in the United States has changed over the last 20-30 years. Why has it become so polarizing, and where should schools go from here? "Contemporary approaches to social studies education emphasize the importance of students thinking critically about issues." Critical race theory has recently become a cultural flashpoint in the US. From Senate chambers to cable news, social
5h
Scientists Are on a Quest to Create the Perfect Cup of Coffee—Without the Beans
Ahh, coffee. Is there anything more delicious, more satisfying? It's always there when you need it, be it first thing in the morning or for a mid-afternoon pick-me-up. According to the Sustainable Coffee Challenge , global consumption of this vital brew is around 600 billion cups per year (I know—I would have guessed higher, too). But as with many of the products we consume, there's a cost beyond
5h
Use Natural Light To Guide Your Way With This Bio-Orb
As we've learned more about bioluminescence, it seems to be everywhere in the natural world. There are even sharks that glow in the dark as they hunt prey and seek mates. Fortunately, the plants that give the Bioluminescent Bio-Orb its light are a little more friendly and offer you a gentle glow whenever you need it, with just a swirl. You can get one on sale for just $44.99 (reg. $49). Truly Nat
5h
What price influence?
Social media influencers can wield considerable power when it comes to advocating for brands and even causes specifically with the niche that is their following on a given platform. Among the various platforms, Instagram, is one of the most influential with many of its most popular users driving sociopolitical opinion and nudging consumers towards particular products and services.
6h
Mini Earth-observer Proba-1's 20 years in orbit
ESA's Proba-1 minisatellite was launched into orbit two decades ago today. It remains fully operational, however, making it the Agency's oldest serving Earth observing mission. Proba-1 is roughly the size of a hotel fridge but hosts two Earth-observing instruments along with numerous technological firsts.
6h
Breakthrough study points to large climate benefits from small fraction of global croplands
Agricultural soils are the largest anthropogenic emission source of nitrous oxide (N2O)—a greenhouse gas 300 times more powerful than carbon dioxide. Mitigating N2O emissions from agricultural soils is an important requirement to stop global warming below the 2°C target. An international team of researchers led by Dr. Zhou Feng from Peking University produced detailed high-resolution maps of globa
6h
The Booster-Shot Debate Was a Debacle
A t long last , the booster-shot debate has come to an end. On Wednesday, the FDA authorized boosters of the Moderna and Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines as well as the "mix and match" approach to booster shots. Yesterday, a CDC advisory panel sanctioned that authorization and CDC Director Rochelle Walensky endorsed it. With a green light for all vaccines from both agencies, the booster plan f
7h
Daily briefing: Extinct Japanese wolf is dogs' closest cousin
Nature, Published online: 21 October 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02890-z An extinct Japanese wolf might be the closest wild relative of dogs, how vaccine makers are bracing for a variant worse than Delta and the broken $100-billion promise of climate finance.
7h
ESA moves forward with Destination Earth
Earth observation provides a wealth of information to benefit our daily lives. As the demand for satellite data grows to address the challenges of climate change and a growing population, ESA, under the leadership of the European Commission, along with its key European partners, are developing high precision digital models of Earth to monitor and simulate both natural and human activity, to enable
7h
Scientists uncover the genetic pathway that colors bumble bee stripes
While most people in the U.S. may think of bumble bees as the standard yellow and black variety, there are an estimated 260 bee species that sport about 400 different color patterns. One reason many people associate bumble bees with distinct colors is because evolution can influence multiple bee species to share similar color patterns in specific geographic regions, which scientists call mimicry.
7h
Oceans like neurons
Nature, Published online: 22 October 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02888-7 Freedom is in the mind.
8h
Minskad avverkning av skog stor nytta för klimatet
Minskad avverkning av skog ger stor klimatnytta på kort och medellång sikt (mer än 50 år). Ökade avverkningsnivåer ger negativa klimateffekter både på både kort och lång sikt – även om man räknar in att biomassa från skogen ersätter fossila källor. De största effekterna ses i skogsrika län med liten befolkning, som exempelvis Jämtland, medan effekterna är mindre i områden med lite skog och stor b
9h
A human multi-lineage hepatic organoid model for liver fibrosis
Nature Communications, Published online: 22 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26410-9 Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) is a genetic disorder which is associated with kidney and liver pathology, including liver fibrosis. Here the authors develop and characterize human liver organoids with a ARPKD mutation, and find that they show aspects of the pathology, including fibrosis
9h
The RNA helicase Dbp7 promotes domain V/VI compaction and stabilization of inter-domain interactions during early 60S assembly
Nature Communications, Published online: 22 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26208-9 Early steps of large 60S ribosomal subunit biogenesis are not well understood. Here, the authors combine biochemical experiments with protein-RNA crosslinking and mass spectrometry to show that the RNA helicase Dbp7 is key player during early 60S ribosomal assembly. Dbp7 regulates a series of events driving c
9h
Engineering digitizer circuits for chemical and genetic screens in human cells
Nature Communications, Published online: 22 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26359-9 Cell-based transcriptional reporters are an invaluable part of highthroughput screening, but many such reporters have weak or transient responses. Here, the authors describe a digitizer circuit for amplifying reporter activity, increasing sensitivity, and retaining memory of pathway activation.
9h
Sympathetic cooling of positrons to cryogenic temperatures for antihydrogen production
Nature Communications, Published online: 22 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26086-1 Positrons are key to the production of cold antihydrogen. Here the authors report the sympathetic cooling of positrons by interacting them with laser-cooled Be+ ions resulting in a three-fold reduction of the temperature of positrons for antihydrogen synthesis.
9h
Generation of hydroxyl radical-activatable ratiometric near-infrared bimodal probes for early monitoring of tumor response to therapy
Nature Communications, Published online: 22 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26380-y The hydroxyl radical is generated during radiotherapy and ferroptosis and accurate imaging of this reactive oxygen species may permit the monitoring of response to therapy. Here, the authors develop a ratiometric probe for accurate imaging of hydroxyl radical generation in vivo.
9h
Targeting miR-126 in inv(16) acute myeloid leukemia inhibits leukemia development and leukemia stem cell maintenance
Nature Communications, Published online: 22 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26420-7 miR-126 is highly expressed in inv(16) Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) but its role is unclear. Here, the authors show that the aberrant expression of miR-126 in inv(16) AML is directly due to the CBFB-MYH11 fusion gene and that it can promote AML development and leukemia stem cell maintenance, highlighting miR-
9h
The flashfm approach for fine-mapping multiple quantitative traits
Nature Communications, Published online: 22 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26364-y Genetic signals from quantitative traits could be a challenge to finemap. Flashfm uses summary-level data in a Bayesian framework to favour shared causal variants and capitalises on information between traits, providing an accurate and efficient joint fine-mapping tool for up to six traits.
9h
Towards complete assignment of the infrared spectrum of the protonated water cluster H+(H2O)21
Nature Communications, Published online: 22 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26284-x Protonated water species have been the subject of numerous experimental and computational studies. Here the authors provide a nearly complete assignment of the experimental IR spectrum of the H+(H2O)21 water cluster based on high-level wavefunction theory and anharmonic vibrational quasi-degenerate perturbati
9h
Book Review: Steven Pinker on the Power of the Rational Mind
In "Rationality," Harvard psychologist Steven Pinker walks readers through the virtues of rational thinking — from logic to various branches of statistics — and why it seems to be in short supply. Rationality is so fundamental, Pinker suggests, that it should be taught in schools as the "fourth R."
10h
Shape-shifting materials with infinite possibilities
Researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have developed a shape-shifting material that can take and hold any possible shape, paving the way for a new type of multifunctional material that could be used in a range of applications, from robotics and biotechnology to architecture.
12h
Schneider Shorts 22.10.2021 – Faking for Putin
Schneider Shorts 22.10.2021: acupuncture in Nature, creationism in Scientific American, proxalutamide scandal reaches Brazilian Senate, a surprise new US academy member, entirely valid conclusions of photoshop fraud, MDPI reaches level X, colchicine doesn't work for COVID-19 but fake Russian statistics do, plus Russian paper mills and a stuck Sputnik V.
13h
The Road to Hitler is Paved with… Masks and Vaccines?
The next time a healthcare worker or educator is attacked by a "freedom-loving" anti-vaxxer, it's reasonable to wonder who convinced the assailant that life-saving public health measures are in fact a ruse to pave the way for the next Hitler. Warning: This article contains offensive images about the Holocaust and sexual assault The post first appeared on Science-Based Medicine .
14h
When and why did human brains decrease in size 3,000 years ago? Ants may hold clues
The brain is the most complex organ in the human body. Now, a new study has brought us closer to understanding some of its evolution. It shows that human brains decreased in size approximately 3,000 years ago. By studying ants as models to illustrate why brains may increase or decrease in size, the researchers hypothesize that brain shrinkage parallels the expansion of collective intelligence in h
15h
Better silicon solar panels
Researchers are applying a new technique to identify defects in silicon solar cells that cause a drop in efficiency. The lessons learned at the atomic level could lead to improvements in the way manufacturers strengthen their products against what is known as light-induced degradation.
17h
How pearls achieve nanoscale precision
In research that could inform future high-performance nanomaterials, a study has uncovered how mollusks build ultradurable structures with a level of symmetry that outstrips everything else in the natural world, with the exception of individual atoms.
18h
Two beams are better than one
History's greatest couples rely on communication to make them so strong their power cannot be denied. But that's not just true for people, it's also true for lasers. According to new research from the USC Viterbi School of Engineering, adding two lasers together as a sort of optical 'it couple' promises to make wireless communications faster and more secure than ever before.
18h
Scientists part of team that points to strong connection between climate change, plastics pollution
At the root of global climate change and the worldwide plastics problem are two related carbon-based fuels — oil and natural gas. Not only are the two among the key drivers of climate change, they are instrumental in the manufacturing of plastics. As storms intensify and become more frequent, the movement of trash from land to our oceans and, and vice versa, is only going to get worse.
18h
Bat study reveals secrets of the social brain
Neuroscientists used wireless devices to record the neural activity of freely interacting Egyptian fruit bats, providing researchers with the first glimpse into how the brains of social mammals process complex group interactions.
19h
Defend The Galaxy With 26% Off This Laser Sword
We all want to wield a lightsaber, and slowly but surely, citizen scientists and engineers are making it happen . But if cracking open industrial lasers or building a plasma torch seems a bit excessive for your cosplay or your next Halloween costume, the Cyber Blade Dagger Laser Sword gives you all the fun without any risk of losing your hand. You can grab one on sale for just $106.99 (reg. $145)
20h
How to make your research reproducible
Nature, Published online: 21 October 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02887-8 Ensuring that your work is reproducible is not as daunting or complicated as you might think. Experts share their tips.
20h
Astronomers provide 'field guide' to exoplanets known as hot Jupiters
By combining Hubble Space Telescope observations with theoretical models, a team of astronomers has gained insights into the chemical and physical makeup of a variety of exoplanets known as hot Jupiters. The findings provide a new and improved 'field guide' for this group of planets and inform ideas about planet formation in general.
21h
New photonic chip for isolating light may be key to miniaturizing quantum devices
Light plays a critical role in enabling 21st century quantum information applications. Limited by size, engineers need to miniaturize quantum devices, which requires re-thinking certain components for harnessing light. Researchers have designed a simple, compact photonic circuit that uses sound waves to rein in light. The team's measurements show that their approach to isolation currently outperfo
21h
SpaceX Finally Installs "Robot Chopsticks" to Catch Super Heavy Booster
Robot Chopsticks After much anticipation, SpaceX has finally installed its " robot chopsticks " on the Super Heavy booster launch tower. The chopsticks are actually a set of massive arms that will be used to recover the giant Super Heavy booster as it lands, catching it as it comes back down to Earth. While SpaceX founder Elon Musk initially announced the catch arms back in December 2020, it wasn
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MacBook Pro 2021: Apple Unveils 14- and 16-Inch Models Powered by the New M1 Pro and M1 Max SOCs
After months of rumors, leaks, and speculation, Apple has finally revealed the first truly "Pro" Apple Silicon devices: 14-inch and 16-inch MacBook Pros powered by the new M1 Pro and M1 Max systems on a chip (SOCs). In one fell swoop, Apple has essentially undone all of its most controversial design decisions of the last six years and created a pair of laptops that professional users can really g
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Why no tusks? Poaching tips scales of elephant evolution
A hefty set of tusks is usually an advantage for elephants, allowing them to dig for water, strip bark for food and joust with other elephants. But during episodes of intense ivory poaching, those big incisors become a liability.
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California proposes new oil drilling ban near neighborhoods
California's oil and gas regulator on Thursday proposed that the state ban new oil and gas drilling within 3,200 feet of schools, homes and hospitals to protect public health in what would be the nation's largest buffer zone between oil wells and communities.
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US must act to protect climate migrants, government report says
National security officials warn that worsening heat waves, droughts and other climate-fueled hazards are likely to drive a surge in global migration in the coming decades, increasing political instability among the United States' allies and strengthening its adversaries.
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Biodiversity of islands worldwide is in peril, scientists warn
Scientists are sounding the alarm. The biodiversity of islands around the world is becoming increasingly threatened, due in large part to habitat loss, overexploitation, invasive species and climate change. If healthy island environments are to be conserved and restored, immediate action is needed by everyone, from policymakers to the general population. These findings and recommendations are in "
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Ras inhibitor CAPRI enables neutrophil-like cells to chemotax through a higher-concentration range of gradients [Cell Biology]
Neutrophils sense and migrate through an enormous range of chemoattractant gradients through adaptation. Here, we reveal that in human neutrophils, calcium-promoted Ras inactivator (CAPRI) locally controls the GPCR-stimulated Ras adaptation. Human neutrophils lacking CAPRI (caprikd) exhibit chemoattractant-induced, nonadaptive Ras activation; significantly increased phosphorylation of AKT, GSK-3α/
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A rapidly reversible mutation generates subclonal genetic diversity and unstable drug resistance [Genetics]
Most genetic changes have negligible reversion rates. As most mutations that confer resistance to an adverse condition (e.g., drug treatment) also confer a growth defect in its absence, it is challenging for cells to genetically adapt to transient environmental changes. Here, we identify a set of rapidly reversible drug-resistance mutations…
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Exploring deep neural networks via layer-peeled model: Minority collapse in imbalanced training [Applied Mathematics]
In this paper, we introduce the Layer-Peeled Model, a nonconvex, yet analytically tractable, optimization program, in a quest to better understand deep neural networks that are trained for a sufficiently long time. As the name suggests, this model is derived by isolating the topmost layer from the remainder of the…
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Dietary {omega}-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids are protective for myopia [Medical Sciences]
Myopia is a leading cause of visual impairment and blindness worldwide. However, a safe and accessible approach for myopia control and prevention is currently unavailable. Here, we investigated the therapeutic effect of dietary supplements of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFAs) on myopia progression in animal models and on decreases…
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Steric interactions and out-of-equilibrium processes control the internal organization of bacteria [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Despite the absence of a membrane-enclosed nucleus, the bacterial DNA is typically condensed into a compact body—the nucleoid. This compaction influences the localization and dynamics of many cellular processes including transcription, translation, and cell division. Here, we develop a model that takes into account steric interactions among the components of…
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Orbitofrontal cortex and dorsal striatum functional connectivity predicts incubation of opioid craving after voluntary abstinence [Neuroscience]
We recently introduced a rat model of incubation of opioid craving after voluntary abstinence induced by negative consequences of drug seeking. Here, we used resting-state functional MRI to determine whether longitudinal functional connectivity changes in orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) circuits predict incubation of opioid craving after voluntary abstinence. We trained rats…
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Acute Csk inhibition hinders B cell activation by constraining the PI3 kinase pathway [Immunology and Inflammation]
T cell antigen receptor (TCR) and B cell antigen receptor (BCR) signaling are initiated and tightly regulated by Src-family kinases (SFKs). SFKs positively regulate TCR signaling in naïve T cells but have both positive and negative regulatory roles in BCR signaling in naïve B cells. The proper regulation of their…
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Soil chemistry determines whether defensive plant secondary metabolites promote or suppress herbivore growth [Agricultural Sciences]
Plant secondary (or specialized) metabolites mediate important interactions in both the rhizosphere and the phyllosphere. If and how such compartmentalized functions interact to determine plant–environment interactions is not well understood. Here, we investigated how the dual role of maize benzoxazinoids as leaf defenses and root siderophores shapes the interaction between…
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Topological magnetic textures and long-range orders in terbium-based quasicrystal and approximant [Physics]
The quasicrystal (QC) possesses a unique lattice structure with rotational symmetry forbidden in periodic crystals. The electric property is far from complete understanding. It has been a long-standing issue whether magnetic long-range order is realized in the QC. Here, we report our theoretical discovery of the ferromagnetic long-range order in…
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Grapevines under drought do not express esca leaf symptoms [Agricultural Sciences]
In the context of climate change, plant mortality is increasing worldwide in both natural and agroecosystems. However, our understanding of the underlying causes is limited by the complex interactions between abiotic and biotic factors and the technical challenges that limit investigations of these interactions. Here, we studied the interaction between…
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Serotonin modulates melatonin synthesis as an autocrine neurotransmitter in the pineal gland [Neuroscience]
The pineal gland secretes melatonin principally at night. Regulated by norepinephrine released from sympathetic nerve terminals, adrenergic receptors on pinealocytes activate aralkylamine N-acetyltransferase that converts 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT, serotonin) to N-acetylserotonin, the precursor of melatonin. Previous studies from our group and others reveal significant constitutive secretion of 5-
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NASA Says It Needs Nuclear Rockets to Put People on Mars Before China
Nuclear Spacecraft NASA officials say that the US needs to invest in nuclear-powered spacecraft if it wants to beat its geopolitical rivals to Mars. The officials were testifying at a House Science, Space, and Tech subcommittee hearing on Wednesday, according to United Press International . They urged lawmakers to invest resources into researching and developing nuclear-powered rockets, which cou
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Study rewrites dogma of adenovirus infection and double-stranded RNA
Challenging the dogma of what scientists thought they understood about DNA viruses, a team of researchers led by Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) has shown that adenovirus uses its own efficient RNA splicing mechanisms to prevent the formation of double-stranded RNA, which otherwise would trigger a host immune response. By splicing its RNA transcripts in a way that prevents them from pai
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To mask or not to mask: Study provides mechanism to test materials
In a study that used inorganic, physical and analytical chemistry to mimic respiratory droplets that can carry viruses, researchers demonstrated a mechanism that enables multiple mask materials to be protective. Led by Stony Brook University Professor Amy Marschilok, Ph.D., the study findings suggest that adsorptivity of mask materials is an important feature in providing protection from viruses s
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Measuring financial and digital literacy in vulnerable populations
Financial inclusion is key to improving economic and social welfare, reducing inequality, and promoting economic growth. Globally, 1.7 billion people have limited access to financial services, especially in the developing world. As governments and NGOs work to strengthen financial resilience, digital technology has become a crucial component. New research from a University of Illinois specialist a
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Novel peroxide-based material emits fluorescence in response to stress
Polymers make up everything from the clothes we wear to the plasticware we use for eating. In recent years, polymers that can release small molecules (like drugs) have been of major interest to pharmaceutical researchers. Previous studies have demonstrated that polymer systems can be modified to release fluorescent molecules when exposed to heat, light, or a change in pH. Now, researchers in the f
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Ivory hunting drives evolution of tuskless elephants
Nature, Published online: 21 October 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02867-y In Mozambique, the selective poaching of elephants with tusks has led to a higher number of females being born without them.
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Cyprus aims for Mars with X-Ray rock dating instrument
Tiny Cyprus aims to join the global space exploration drive by developing a compact, X-Ray instrument capable of dating Martian soil and rock samples relatively accurately to potentially reveal more about the Red Planet's geological history and offer a glimpse of Earth's own future.
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Better touch screens could let you feel stuff before you buy it
Researchers are working on touch screen technology that would allow people to "feel" physical objects—including, for example, the texture of an item of clothing's fabric while shopping online. Cynthia Hipwell, a professor in the mechanical engineering department at Texas A&M University, is leading a team working to better define how the finger interacts with a device with the hope of aiding in th
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AI predicts extensive material properties to break down a previously insurmountable wall
Researchers have developed a machine learning model to predict never-before-determined material properties from energy loss near-edge structure (ELNES) and X-ray near-edge structure (XANES) spectra. The spectra of 22,155 organic molecules were input into the neural network model and allowed the first correct prediction of both intensive and extensive material properties. It is hoped that the model
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Understanding consumer perceptions of sustainability in the dairy industry
Consumer definitions of sustainability are often different than industry definitions. Understanding consumer preferences and opinions of sustainability within the dairy industry can help dairy product developers successfully market their products. In an article appearing in the Journal of Dairy Science, researchers from North Carolina State University reviewed factors that influence consumer susta
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Bright prospects for OCT retinal scans at 30
Around the world, every second, someone gets a retinal OCT scan, typically as a routine portion of an eye exam. The high-resolution images obtained by OCT allow ophthalmologists to diagnose and monitor treatment for many retinal diseases.
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5 ethical guidelines for ancient DNA research
A team of scholars have developed a set of ethical guidelines for research on ancient DNA. In 2009, published genome-wide DNA data was not available for a single ancient human individual. Today, there is genome-wide data available for more than 6,000 ancient humans. This rapid expansion of ancient DNA (aDNA) research enables scientists to uncover more information than ever on past human populatio
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A new Earth bombardment model
A team has updated its asteroid bombardment model of the Earth with the latest geologic evidence of ancient, large collisions. These models have been used to understand how impacts may have affected oxygen levels in the Earth's atmosphere in the Archean eon, 2.5 to 4 billion years ago.
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Controllable nanoscale gas-liquid interface fabricated
When liquid meets gas, a unique zone forms. Variable by nature, molecules can cross from one state to another, combining in unique ways to either desirable or unwanted ends. From heat escaping a mug of coffee to increasing molecular concentrations in chemical solutions, gas-liquid interfaces are ubiquitous across nature and engineering. But a lack of tools capable of precisely controlling such gas
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Targeting cancer at the nanoscale
Researchers fabricate gold nanoparticles with a rapidly decaying radioisotope that can be internalized by cancer cells. Because the radiation remains strongly localized, high doses can be administered without concern for side effects. This research may lead to safer and more effective treatments for many types of cancer.
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New technique gets the drop on enzyme reactions
As part of an international collaboration, researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), the Diamond Light Source synchrotron facility, and Oxford and Bristol Universities in England have developed a novel sample delivery system that expands the limited toolkit for performing dynamic structural biology studies of enzyme catalysis, which have so far mostly been limited to a s
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DNA fingerprinting taro: The 'food of gods'
The tropical root vegetable taro, known as the 'food of the gods' in the Pacific, is under threat from rising sea levels but wild Australian plants being cultivated by The University of Queensland may help boost food security in the region.
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Edgy light on graphene may bring new one-way information routers
Graphene has been the focus of intense research in both academic and industrial settings due to its unique electrical conduction properties. As the thinnest material known to man, graphene is essentially two-dimensional and has distinct electronic and photonic properties from conventional 3D materials. Researchers at Purdue University (Todd Van Mechelen, Wenbo Sun and Zubin Jacob) have shown that
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Shedding light on microbial communities in deep aquifers
Underground in peridotite aquifers, the rock can interact with water to produce hydrogen, which microbes can use to power their cells, research suggests. Yet much of the research on these water-rock interactions has been conducted using water samples collected from open wells or seeps that may have been contaminated by exposure to the atmosphere.
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How a bacterium may help solve the plastic pollution crisis
Researchers have found that the bacterium Ideonella sakaiensis can fermentatively convert environmentally problematic poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) plastics into highly biodegradable poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) plastics. Their findings have promising environmental implications because they provide a new approach not only for PET recycling but also for the sustainable production of biodegrad
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Yrke inte tydligt kopplat till ökad risk att dö i covid-19
Yrke som enskild faktor har inte inneburit en högre risk att dö i covid-19 i Sverige. Däremot var risken högre för äldre som levt ihop med personer som inte kunnat arbeta hemifrån. Det visar en ny studie från Stockholms universitet som analyserat data från pandemins första år. – Resultatet visar att det främst har varit andra socioekonomiska faktorer än yrke som ökat risken för att dö i covid-19.
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Flint water crisis worsened birth outcomes, especially for Black babies
Not long after Flint, Michigan, started using river water as the local drinking supply, incidences of childhood lead poisoning skyrocketed. For the next several months, residents across the city—many of them Black and below the poverty line—would be exposed to dangerous chemicals from the polluted Flint River without knowing it.
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Sleep 'sweet spot' may mean less cognitive decline
Like so many other good things in life, sleep is best in moderation, new research suggests. A multiyear study of older adults found that both short and long sleepers experienced greater cognitive decline than people who slept a moderate amount, even when researchers took into account the effects of early Alzheimer's disease. Poor sleep and Alzheimer's disease are both associated with cognitive de
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Study explores post-mortem fame
It's an age-old question—who lives on in a society's collective memory after they die? New EPFL research has tracked the mentions of thousands of public figures in the year following their deaths, helping to reveal who is remembered, and who is not, after they are gone.
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Photon-counting distributed free-space spectroscopy
Remote sensing of atmospheric gas plays an important role in the fields of greenhouse gas monitoring, toxic, harmful, flammable, explosive gasses, and biochemical weapons early warning. With the advent of quantum mechanics and lasers, precise spectral analysis method has developed rapidly in many fundamental domains. Challenges exist in accurate spectrum analysis in free space, which hinder us fro
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Tribocatalysis: Challenges and perspectives
With an increasing global energy demands and environmental pollution, the development of alternative clean energy technologies has aroused widespread research interest. Harvesting and converting natural energy from the environment, such as solar energy, mechanical energy, thermal energy, chemical and biological energy, is one of the main sources of clean energy.
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Valorizing into urban biowaste locally: Conclusive results of the European DECISIVE project
Biowaste, food waste and other natural biodegradable refuse make up a third of French household waste. This biodegradable waste is a potential source of energy for producing electricity and heat but can also provide a wealth of products with high added value for farmers. While all households are expected to be able to sort biowaste at the source by late 2023, the European multidisciplinary project
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Intermolecular charge-transfer aggregates enable high-efficiency near-infrared emissions
Harnessing the near-infrared (NIR) light is exceedingly important for biomedical sciences, photovoltaics and optical communications. Though urgently needed for flexible, wearable and implantable applications, NIR organic materials suffer from accelerated non-radiative decay rates (knr) and the resulted poor luminous efficiencies as governed by the energy gap law. To date, reported endeavors to dec
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Thirsty cities need a human/nature infrastructure combo
In cities growing in both size and thirst across the globe, sustainability is constrained by the gray of dams and water treatment facilities. In this week's Nature Sustainability, research by Michigan State University scientists advocate going green to ensure water supplies.
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Is Your Brain Getting the Nutrients It Needs for Better Sleep?
When it comes to sleep , we tend to value quantity over quality. If we're feeling tired and rundown, we assume more sleep is the solution. But that's not necessarily the case. In general, it's more important to start by making sure you're getting better sleep. Then, once you make sure you're getting high-quality rest, you can revisit how many hours you need. Luckily, it's easier than ever to maxi
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Chip-based optical tweezers levitate nanoparticles in a vacuum
Researchers have created tiny chip-based optical tweezers that can be used to optically levitate nanoparticles in a vacuum. Optical tweezers—which employ a tightly focused laser beam to hold living cells, nanoparticles and other objects—can be used for a variety of precision measurements and sensing applications. However, these optical traps are usually produced with bulky optical components.
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Survivalists Escape from the South African Jungle | Naked and Afraid
Stream Naked and Afraid on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/naked-and-afraid About Naked and Afraid: What happens when you put two complete strangers – sans clothes – in some of the most extreme environments on Earth? Each male-female duo is left with no food, no water, no clothes, and only one survival item. #NakedAndAfraid #Discovery #Survival Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.l
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Koncernledelsen i Midtjylland: Aldersgrænse for tilbud om MR-skanning er sagligt velbegrundet
Region Midtjyllands begrænsede kapacitet til at lave MR-skanninger af patienter med mistænkt prostatacancer anvendes bedst ved at tilbyde skanninger til patienter under 65 år, fremgår det af koncernledelsens redegørelse til regionsrådets sundhedsudvalg. Formand for hospitalsudvalg er fortsat modstander af et alderskriterie og vil gå videre med sagen, hvis der er flertal i udvalget.
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Long-term exposure to toxins in operating rooms could increase COPD risk
Disinfectants and surgical smoke — the gaseous by-product produced by heat-generating surgical instruments — are among the hazardous chemicals to which physicians, nurses, and other hospital staff are exposed in operating rooms (OR) during electrosurgery and laser procedures. Long-time exposure to these chemicals in the OR may significantly increase one's risk of developing chronic obstructive p
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Protein leak discovery may enhance treatment for lung diseases
Researchers have identified a protein leakage related to chronic airway diseases like asthma and COPD. The researchers discovered that people with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have a protein in their lungs that leaks a small molecule into their bloodstream that restricts their breathing instead of relaxing their airways. The findings will help clinicians diagnose and de
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Supernova: A glowing DNA enzyme
Once thought to function primarily as a storage molecule for genetic information, it is now known that DNA can also catalyze chemical reactions. Although such DNA enzymes (deoxyribozymes) have not been identified in nature, they can be isolated in the lab using powerful methods of artificial evolution.
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Understanding tremors through tree rings
When trying to make sense of past earthquakes, researchers typically turn to the geological record. However, there may be clues to understanding old quakes in the biological record as well—in tree rings, for example. As earthquakes shake Earth's surface, they increase the permeability of soils, potentially shifting the flow of water underground. Previous observations suggest that after a quake, wa
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Watering hole gatherings have complex effects on plant survival
Plants need water to grow. So if there's water, shouldn't there be more plants? A study of what happens around watering holes in Kenya suggest it's more complicated than that. "You might think that water sources in arid locations have more plants," says lead author Georgia Titcomb, a postdoctoral researcher at the University of California, Santa Barbara. "We found that, in really arid locations,
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For oxygen-deprived newborns, rewarming after cooling therapy can trigger seizures
Oxygen-deprived newborns who undergo cooling therapy to protect their brains are at an elevated risk of seizures and brain damage during the rewarming period, which could be a precursor of disability or death, a new study suggests. The finding could lead to better ways to protect these vulnerable patients during an often overlooked yet critical period of cooling — or hypothermia — therapy.
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Få svenskar vet hur de ska leva fossilfritt
Vad krävs för att kunskap om klimatförändringar ska få genomslag? Kunskapen måste bli en självklar del av samhället och människors vardagsliv, menar sociologen Göran Sundqvist. – Men den politiska styrningen för att ställa om är otydlig och närmast obefintlig. FN:s klimatpanel har presenterat forskning om klimatförändringar och dess konsekvenser sedan 1990-talet, men kunskapen har ännu inte lett
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E-handeln missar landsbygden
E-handel och logistiktjänster fungerar bra för den som bor i storstaden. Varorna kommer direkt till dörren – snabbt, flexibelt och med låga transportkostnader. På landsbygden finns inte samma möjligheter. Det är svårare att göra individuella leveransval och vissa varor går inte att beställa till områden utanför storstaden. – Landsbygdens e-shoppare är en av de snabbast växande konsumentgrupperna,
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Daily briefing: Natural COVID immunity might be short-lived
Nature, Published online: 20 October 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02870-3 Unvaccinated people who have been infected with SARS-CoV-2 are at risk of reinfection within a couple years, models propose. Plus, why fossil-fuel subsidies are so hard to kill and how refugee scientists are keeping their research dreams alive.
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Tackling antimicrobial resistance
Researchers from Newcastle University, and colleagues from Spain, Canada and Egypt, have successfully trialed two new qPCR assays to help detect the presence of transmissible AMR using water and wastewater samples. Publishing their results in the journal Water Research, the scientists present a DNA-based testing method that provides a surrogate for monitoring AMR, which will make AMR screening che
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Group ceases egg harvesting on one of two northern white rhinos following an ethical risk assessment
While attempting to save the northern white rhinoceros from extinction through advanced assisted reproduction technologies, the scientists and conservationists of the BioRescue consortium place the highest value on respecting the life and welfare of the individual animals involved. In a special, in-depth ethical risk assessment, the team has reached the decision to retire the older of the two rema
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Economist sheds light on 'Great Resignation'
During the earliest months of the pandemic, employers couldn't downsize fast enough. Millions were laid off, executives took symbolic pay cuts and ordered wage and hiring freezes, and many economists predicted a grim year ahead for workers hoping to just get their old jobs back, never mind get ahead.
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Food pantries essential for reducing hunger among middle-class in 2020
Food pantries, soup kitchens, and other community food services played a critical role in helping Americans meet their food needs, especially during the first five months of the COVID-19 pandemic, according to new research by a team of economists in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences. They found that middle-class Americans benefited the most from these services, demonstrating a key role
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Drivers of Military Technology
There are different ways of looking at history. The traditional way, the one most of us were likely taught in school, is mostly as a sequence of events focusing on the state level – world leaders, their political battles, and their wars with each other. This focus, however, can be shifted in many ways. It can be shifted horizontally to focus on different aspects of history, such as cultural or sc
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Banning anonymous social media accounts is not the answer to online abuse
In the wake of the tragic death of the member of parliament for Southend West, David Amess, fellow MPs have been talking about how to best protect both politicians and the public from abuse and harm. This has included a strong focus on enacting laws designed to halt online abuse, even though police have not linked Amess's killing to this issue directly.
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How climate change will affect Māori, and how to adapt
A new report from Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga (NPM) and Manaaki Whenua Landcare Research provides guidance for Te Ao Māori on climate change adaptation and mitigation. He huringa āhuarangi, he huringa ao: a changing climate, a changing world was produced by a multidisciplinary Māori research team working across many research institutions. Using a novel kaupapa Māori risk assessment approach to climat
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2021: Hospital care for COVID could cost you thousands
People in the United States who get seriously ill from COVID-19 in 2021 might have to pay thousands of dollars in bills from their hospitals, doctors, and ambulance companies, a new study suggests. The new analysis in JAMA Network Open has implications for both policymakers and people who haven't yet gotten vaccinated, as well as people with underlying conditions that put them at risk of a severe
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Do you think using genetic engineering to make everyone gorgeous is ethical?
I think about this from time to time. We all have our little imperfections, but we are not all created equal. We may pretend it's what's inside that counts but we all know, if we are honest with ourselves, that looks matter, a lot. Most of us are not particularly attractive, but just as well most of us are just a few steps away from being attractive. If we could use technologies like CRISPR to ed
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Building materials drive carbon emissions, and they're set to grow
A new study from Leiden researchers shows that the carbon emissions of building materials are set to grow if we do not act rapidly. Even with known interventions implemented in concert, these emissions are much larger than the remaining 1.5 degree budget for building materials at today's share, the researchers state in their Nature Communications paper.
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Validation of lipid-related therapeutic targets for coronary heart disease prevention using human genetics
Nature Communications, Published online: 21 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25731-z Drug target Mendelian randomization (MR) uses genetic variation in or near a gene encoding a drug target to anticipate the effect of drug action on the same target. Using drug target MR, the authors prioritized 30 targets that might elicit beneficial effects in the prevention or treatment of coronary heart di
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Asthma-associated genetic variants induce IL33 differential expression through an enhancer-blocking regulatory region
Nature Communications, Published online: 21 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26347-z Susceptibility to asthma and severity of symptoms are regulated by a number of different genomic regions. Here the authors characterise a 5kb regulatory region and demonstrate genetic and topological regulation of IL33 and association with disease in different human cohorts.
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Regulation of plant phototropic growth by NPH3/RPT2-like substrate phosphorylation and 14-3-3 binding
Nature Communications, Published online: 21 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26333-5 The plasma membrane-localized NPH3 protein is required for phototropic growth in Arabidopsis. Here the authors show that phototropin 1 phosphorylates NPH3 at a conserved C-terminal sequence motif triggering binding of 14-3-3 proteins to NPH3 that is necessary for the phototropic response.
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Enabling three-dimensional porous architectures via carbonyl functionalization and molecular-specific organic-SERS platforms
Nature Communications, Published online: 21 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26385-7 Nanostructured films of organic semiconductors with low lying LUMO orbitals can enhance Raman signals via a chemical enhancement mechanism but currently the material choice is limited to fluorinated oligothiophenes. Here, the authors investigate the growth of a porous thienoacene film enabled by carbonyls and
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When 'out of print' really means 'retracted'
We've taken publishers to task for disappearing articles without providing readers an explanation for the move. Turns out, they do the same with books, too. In September 2014, Springer Nature published "Beekeeping for Poverty Alleviation and Livelihood Security Vol 1: Technological Aspects of Beekeeping," described as: a practical guide that will assist all those who … Continue reading
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Looking for research subjects for a study on emotional responses to sound!- Volunteer at UNLV
Want to participate in science? At the UNLV Music Lab (Principal Investigator: Erin Hannon) we study how different people respond to music, language, and the many sounds in the world. We are currently recruiting for a research study in which we will ask you questions about which sounds you like and dislike, your musical experiences and habits, and your general auditory experiences, and you will d
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Why Cognitive Science essay for college apps [PM preferred]
hello, I'm about to start writing my essays for my intended major, CogSci of course. although I do have a general idea about what I'm going to write about, I would appreciate any input from more experienced people (some of you!). please do suggest absolutely ANYTHING that would make colleges feel that I have solid reason and passion for this subject. [I prefer PM because if I were to use your sug
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The Accident That Led to Machines That Can See – Issue 107: The Edge
For something so effortless and automatic, vision is a tough job for the brain. It's remarkable that we can transform electromagnetic radiation—light—into a meaningful world of objects and scenes. After all, light focused into an eye is merely a stream of photons with different wave properties, projecting continuously on our retinas, a layer of cells on the backside of our eyes. Before it's trans
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One of the Most Egregious Ripoffs in the History of Science – Issue 107: The Edge
James Watson once said his road to the 1962 Nobel Prize began in Naples, Italy. At a conference in 1951, he met Maurice Wilkins, the biophysicist with whom he and Francis Crick shared the Nobel for discovering the double-helix structure of DNA. Meeting Wilkins was when he "first realized that DNA might be soluble," Watson said. "So my life was changed." That's a nice anecdote for the science text
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How Tycoons Created the Dinosaur – Issue 107: The Edge
The dinosaur is a chimera. Some parts of this complex assemblage are the result of biological evolution. But others are products of human ingenuity, constructed by artists, scientists, and technicians in a laborious process that stretches from the dig site to the naturalist's study and the museum's preparation lab. The mounted skeletons that have become such a staple of natural history museums mo
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How an enriched environment fires up our synapses
Processing of sensory impressions and information depends very much on how the synapses in our brain work. A team has now shown how lipid and protein regulation impact brain's processing of a beautiful and stimulating environment. The lipids located in the membranes of the synapses are central to signal transmission, the researchers report.
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Termite brains can grow in anticipation of a single moment of flight and light
In a dampwood termite colony only a select few will, quite literally, see the light. The insects are unique due to their mating flights and the adaptability of their role within the colony, which is based on the overall needs of the group. King and queen termites must leave the nest and are the only members to go outside — briefly –to partner off and tunnel into a new location to start another c
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Researchers make hardened wooden knives that slice through steak
The sharpest knives available are made of either steel or ceramic, both of which are human-made materials that must be forged in furnaces under extreme temperatures. Now, researchers have developed a potentially more sustainable way to make sharp knives: using hardened wood. The method makes wood 23 times harder and a knife made from the material is nearly three times sharper than a stainless-stee
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Decarbonizing industries with connectivity and 5G
Around the world, citizens, governments, and corporations are mobilizing to reduce carbon emissions. The unprecedented and ongoing climate disasters have put the necessity to decarbonize into sharp relief. In 2021 alone these climate emergencies included a blistering "heat dome" of nearly 50 °C in the normally temperate Pacific Northwest of the United States and Canada, deadly and destructive flo
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Why Aren't More People more worried about Quantum Computing?
Math student here. The other day I had a conversation with my cryptography professor about qubits. For those that know, modern encryption is based off of the Diffie-Hellman public key exchange, which is impossible to brute force using computers that store info in binary. However, quantum computing CAN do so. Most people use this argument as a talking point to crap on cryptocurrencies, but NONE of
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