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Team discovers evidence of prehistoric human activity in Falkland Islands
Since its first recorded sighting by European explorers in the 1600s, scientists and historians have believed that Europeans were the first people to ever set foot on the Falkland Islands. Findings from a new University of Maine-led study, however, suggests otherwise; that human activity on the islands predates European arrival by centuries.
1d
DNA from Sitting Bull's hair confirms US man is his great-grandson
Study is the first time DNA from a long-dead person was used to demonstrate a familial link between a living individual and a historical figure A sample of Sitting Bull's hair has helped scientists confirm that a South Dakota man is the famed 19th-century Native American leader's great-grandson using a new method to analyse family lineages with DNA fragments from long-dead people. Researchers sai
21h
McDonald's Partners With IBM to Replace Drive-Thru Employees With AI
I Said Fries! McDonald's is partnering with IBM to implement artificial intelligence tech to take orders at its drive-thru lanes. "In my mind, IBM is the ideal partner for McDonald's given their expertise in building AI-powered customer care solutions and voice recognition," McDonald's CEO Chris Kempczinski said during a Wednesday earnings call, as quoted by CNBC . It's arguably the last thing we
4h
Facebook Changes Name, Announces AR Layer Over Physical Reality
It's official: Facebook's new name is Meta. CEO Mark Zuckerberg made the announcement at the end of the company's Connect conference, which was dedicated to its grand vision for its augmented and virtual reality products. In his concluding remarks, he stressed the company's focus on developing its metaverse before announcing the name "Meta." "Over time I hope that we are seen as a metaverse compa
1h
Elon Musk Says He Wants to Use Wealth to Get Humans to Mars, Not Pay Taxes
It didn't come as a shock when Tesla CEO Elon Musk criticized a plan to tax billionaires earlier this week over a plan to tax billionaires. The billionaire — who also happens to be the richest person in the world — has other goals in mind for his tremendous wealth: making humanity interplanetary. "My plan is to use the money to get humanity to Mars and preserve the light of consciousness," he twe
6h
Revenge of the Donald
Losers don't usually get a second chance in modern U.S. presidential politics. Back in the days of nominating conventions and party bosses, an Adlai Stevenson or a Thomas Dewey could gain two consecutive nominations. Richard Nixon actually won the presidency in 1968 after losing in 1960. But since the coming of primary contests, it's win—or retire. Even Al Gore, who won the popular vote in 2000,
4h
How Silicon Valley hatched a plan to turn blood into human eggs
A few years ago, a young man from California's technology scene began popping up in the world's leading developmental biology labs. These labs were deciphering the secrets of embryos and had a particular interest in how eggs are formed. Some thought if they discovered that recipe, they would be able to copy it and transmute any cell into an egg. Their visitor, Matt Krisiloff, said he wanted to he
8h
Experts name new species of human ancestor
An international team of researchers, led by University of Winnipeg palaeoanthropologist Dr. Mirjana Roksandic, has announced the naming of a new species of human ancestor, Homo bodoensis. This species lived in Africa during the Middle Pleistocene, around half a million years ago, and was the direct ancestor of modern humans.
3h
Four commonly used medications reverse Alzheimer's disease in mice
Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia in Western societies and it is estimated that 24 million people worldwide have this condition. Researchers have managed to reverse the symptoms of Alzheimer's disease in mice by administering drugs currently used to treat hypertension and inflammation in humans.
22h
'Rare find': amphitheatre dig in Kent paints picture of Roman town
Finds at Richborough include skeleton of cat nicknamed Maxipus and potential evidence of figurative arena panels A big night out for the people of the Roman settlement at Richborough on the Kent coast about 2,000 years ago might have involved gladiatorial contests, wild beast hunting or the occasional execution of a criminal. Taking place in a vast amphitheatre, seating up to 5,000 people, on the
16h
A Patriarchal Tradition That Just Won't Budge
About a year before Christine Mallinson gave birth to her first child, she and her husband agreed that all of their children would take her last name. The decision came down to family cohesion: The couple wanted their children—they eventually had two—to share a last name with the only cousin near their kids in age, who was Mallinson's niece. Mallinson knew that their choice was not a popular one
1d
Fast Food Is Filled With Chemicals That Disrupt Hormones, Scientists Say
It's no secret that fast food is bad for you. However, new research indicates that many items found in fast food restaurants throughout the US contain hormone-disrupting chemicals found in plastic. So not only is it bad for you, but it's bad for you on a molecular level . The researchers discovered that many fast food meals contained chemicals known as phthalates , according to a paper published
1d
NASA Says We Need a Plan for When We Discover Alien Life
Alien Evidence NASA's top scientists have a provocative message for the scientific community: that they need a plan in place for when — or if — we find evidence of extraterrestrial life . James Green, the agency's chief scientist, coauthored a new article , published in the journal Nature , urging researchers to create a framework for reporting evidence of aliens. In it, the authors stressed the
5h
'I'm scared I've left it too late to have kids': the men haunted by their biological clocks
It's certainly not just women who worry about ageing and procreation – and now men have begun speaking about their own deep anxieties It was when Connor woke up in the middle of the night to go to the bathroom that he started thinking about it. The 38-year-old civil servant from London got back into bed and couldn't sleep: he was spiralling. "I thought: 'Shit, I might not be able to have children
16h
Universe review – Brian Cox's trip to the stars is sheer cosmic cowardice
As the professor guides us through the solar system via excessive CGI and poetic chat, you can't help but think his latest quest would be more effective if it wasn't so dumbed down I don't know how you make an hour-long programme that takes you slowly through 14bn years of history, but the BBC and Prof Brian Cox have done it with the first episode of Universe. Possibly it is a space-time paradox
1d
NASA Begs Companies to Clone Its Super-Expensive Moon Rocket for Cheap
Spending Less Scratch After spending tens of billions of dollars developing its super-heavy and Moon-bound Space Launch System (SLS), NASA is turning to the private industry to keep the doomed system alive — and for the next 30 years or so. In a request spotted by Ars Technica , NASA is suggesting a single contractor could take over production, ownership of flight hardware, and operations while a
1d
Uber Announces It Will Roll Out 50,000 Teslas to Its Drivers
Uber x Tesla Rental car company Hertz announced on Monday that it was ordering 100,000 Tesla Model 3s, a colossal commission that sent shares of the Elon Musk-led company soaring . And ride-hailing giant Uber is getting in on the fun. In turn, the company has announced a deal with Hertz to make 50,000 Tesla vehicles available to rent to Uber drivers in San Francisco, Los Angeles, San Diego, and W
1d
Elon Musk Mocks Dogecoin Crypto Scams
The internet is teeming with cryptocurrency scams. It's booming business, with US consumers reporting more than $80 million in losses between October 2020 and May 2021 alone, according the Federal Trade Commission — a tenfold increase year-over-year. Scams have become endemic. Even websites teaching users how not to get scammed in the crypto world are getting targeted and replaced with scams . Te
1d
After 30 Years of Breeding Condors, a Secret Comes Out
When you get to be as endangered as the California condor, your sex life becomes a highly public affair. Since 1983, when the number of California condors in existence was a mere 22, biologists have been carefully breeding the birds in captivity . They kept track of who mated with whom, how many offspring they had, and when those offspring were released into the wild. All of this is logged in the
3h
Is Moderna Really Better Than Pfizer—Or Is It Just a Higher Dose?
Way back in February, when COVID-19 vaccines were still largely restricted to the most vulnerable among us, public-health leaders were determined to send a unified message: Don't worry about the differences among the vaccines . "All three of them are really quite good, and people should take the one that's most available to them," Anthony Fauci said on Meet the Press . Now that hundreds of millio
4h
Is the Great Neutrino Puzzle Pointing to Multiple Missing Particles?
In 1993, deep underground at Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico, a few flashes of light inside a bus-size tank of oil kicked off a detective story that is yet to reach its conclusion. The Liquid Scintillator Neutrino Detector (LSND) was searching for bursts of radiation created by neutrinos, the lightest and most elusive of all known elementary particles. "Much to our amazement, that's.
6h
Human species who lived 500,000 years ago named as Homo bodoensis
Species was direct ancestor of early humans in Africa and discovery has led to reassessment of epoch Researchers have announced the naming of a newly discovered species of human ancestor, Homo bodoensis. The species lived in Africa about 500,000 years ago, during the Middle Pleistocene age, and was the direct ancestor of modern humans, according to scientists. The name bodoensis derives from a sk
2h
World's chief scientists urge Cop26 attendees to step up low-carbon policies
Signatories include scientists from US, EU, India and African and South American countries Chief scientists and presidents of the national science academies of more than 20 countries including Sir Patrick Vallance have written to world leaders ahead of the Cop26 climate summit, urging them to set out policies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions sharply, to limit global heating to 1.5C. Governments
22h
Billionaire Warns That Energy Shortages Will Lead to Social Unrest
Stark Warnings A billionaire is sounding the alarm on possible social unrest due to rising energy prices. Blackstone CEO Stephen Schwartzman told CNN that he believes shortages in the gas and oil industry will lead to a social crisis in nations throughout the world . He worries that this will impact long-standing political institutions as well. "You're going to get very unhappy people around the
1d
Facebook Hardware Devs Reportedly Skeptical of Metaverse
During today's announcement, Facebook revealed that it's rebranding itself as "Meta " — a huge play to virtual and augmented reality technologies, in an effort to replace users' reality wholesale. In a tech demo, Facebook execs showed off impressive augmented reality versions of their own physical bodies — credit where credit is due — in the form of uncanny renderings that had an impressive amoun
18min
Space Toilet No Longer Oozes Human Pee, SpaceX Proclaims
SpaceX says it's managed to fix its leaky space toilet with mere days left before its next Crew Dragon spacecraft launch this Sunday — the company's fourth crewed mission to the International Space Station and fifth crewed mission into orbit. It was an odd race against time, given the stakes involved. No astronaut wants to travel into space knowing that there is human urine oozing out of the toil
23h
Gov Official Tears Apart Tesla's "Full Self-Driving" Feature
Not Enough It's no secret that Tesla's "Full Self-Driving" feature — a software suite that doesn't actually enable full self-driving — is unpopular among federal regulators. In a Tuesday interview with CNBC , National Transportation Safety Board chair Jennifer Homendy didn't beat around the bush. To her, Tesla isn't doing enough to ensure its vehicles aren't ending up crashing while "self-driving
23h
Why roots don't grow in the shade
When a plant finds itself in too much shade, it redirects its resources to reach for light. Crop yield and root development stall as the plant focuses on growing taller, striving to rise above neighboring plants to access the sun.
1d
The Blockbuster That Hollywood Was Afraid to Make
When I asked him about his film adaptation of Dune , the writer-director Denis Villeneuve quickly held up his prized copy of Frank Herbert's book, a French-translation paperback with a particularly striking cover that he's owned since he was 13. "I keep the book beside me as I'm working," Villeneuve told me cheerfully over Zoom. "I made this movie for myself. Being a hard-core Dune fan, the first
1d
How to Believe Ghost Stories
Y our aunt says she was unable to sleep a wink because her Airbnb on the Cape was haunted by a pirate. Your uncle, who survived a heart attack, claims to have a new zeal for life after talking with his deceased father in heaven. Does believing their stories mean believing in ghosts? No, it doesn't. Because a story can be true in different ways. Now is the time for ghost stories—and not just the k
4h
The Disguises We Wear Every Day
" How to Build a Life " is a weekly column by Arthur Brooks, tackling questions of meaning and happiness. Click here to listen to his new podcast series on all things happiness, How to Build a Happy Life . A pandemic Halloween raises a number of questions about masking. Do we wear our COVID masks under our Halloween masks, or over them? Has the CDC issued guidelines on which costumes can best acc
4h
A call for a methodical approach to identifying life beyond Earth
A team of space scientists at NASA has published a Perspective piece in the journal Nature calling for the establishment of a methodical approach to identifying life beyond Earth. In their paper, the group suggests the space science community begin using a "confidence of life detection" (CoLD) scale, similar in some respects to others used in the science community, such as the TRL scale NASA uses
8h
Trump Endorses His Legacy
Brazil's next presidential election is a year away, but Donald Trump already knows whom he is supporting. "President Jair Bolsonaro and I have become great friends over the past few years," the former president said in a statement on Tuesday. "He fights hard for, and loves, the people of Brazil—Just like I do for the people of the United States." Reading between the lines, Trump's support for the
4h
Call for action on TB as deaths rise for first time in decade
Tuberculosis campaigners tell G20 leaders $1bn is needed annually for vaccine research to reverse decades of underfunding A group of tuberculosis survivors are calling for more funding and action to find new vaccines, after the numbers dying of the infection rose for the first time in 10 years. In 2020, 1.5 million were killed by TB and 10 million infected , according to the World Health Organiza
10h
Innovating for the hybrid future of work
In March 2020, companies large and small, across industries, and around the world, had to pivot nearly overnight to remote work because of pandemic-related shutdowns. In fact, over a third of US workers reported working remotely during that time, including nearly three-quarters of the highest-income workers. Digital meeting and collaboration tools such as Zoom, Microsoft Teams, and Slack became c
6h
The Revolution Will Be Improvised
T he word transformative appears five times in the White House's announcement of a $1.75 trillion framework for tackling climate change and bolstering the social safety net. The word historic shows up another 12 times. But if Democrats are truly reshaping American government with President Joe Biden's "Build Back Better" agenda, they're doing it on the fly. The recent frenzied days of negotiation
2h
For less than $10, anyone can now get up close and explore single cells in VR
While often thought of as being limited to expensive hardware for dedicated gamers, virtual reality (VR) has become a lot more affordable in recent years with entry-level hardware—such as Google Cardboard—costing less than $10. With this headset, anyone with a smartphone can place their device into the headset and view VR content through its large screen.
14h
Advances in pH and phosphate monitoring enhance safety in nuclear fuel recycling
Picture a scenario in which a highly toxic substance, like dissolved nuclear fuel, is being recycled in a reprocessing plant. Until now, workers inside the plant had very limited information about what's in the solution to inform next steps. But that's changing, thanks to the innovative work led by two interns at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Now, without opening, sampling, or othe
8h
Daylight saving time could be bad for our health – should we get rid of it? – podcast
The clocks go back in the UK this Sunday and many will welcome the extra hour in bed. But research suggests that changing the time like this could be bad for the body. Anand Jagatia speaks to the Guardian's science correspondent Linda Geddes and chronobiologist Prof Till Roenneberg about how daylight saving time affects our biology – and whether we should get rid of it permanently Continue readin
11h
Reality TV's Absurd New Extreme
At a posh bar somewhere in the U.K., a devil is on a date with a statue. The two sip their drinks and make stilted conversation. "I moved to New York to pursue modeling," the devil says, her horns protruding from the top of her head, her cherry-red cheeks stretching with her mouth as she smiles. "Ooh, I did a bit of modeling myself!" her flint-skinned date replies. The two don't find much else to
4h
Professor examines new developments in mapping tribal displacement
The history of indigenous displacement and land dispossession is a long, troubled and still incomplete history of the United States. It's been widely reported that since 1776, the year America was founded, the U.S. has seized more than one billion acres of land that was home to hundreds of nations of American Indians. Yet many Americans are only vaguely familiar with how this situation came to be.
3h
The Glasgow climate talks will fall short. Here are other ways to accelerate progress.
Thousands of delegates will amass in Glasgow, Scotland, in the coming days for the annual UN climate conference, where they'll spend two weeks squabbling over a lengthy list of action items that add up to a single question: How much faster will the world move to prevent catastrophic warming this century? If history is any clue, it won't be by much. After 25 such summits over the last three decade
11h
Getting NASA data to the ground with lasers
NASA launches satellites, rovers, and orbiters to investigate humanity's place in the Milky Way. When these missions reach their destinations, their science instruments capture images, videos, and valuable insights about the cosmos. Communications infrastructure in space and on the ground enables the data collected by these missions to reach Earth. Without ground stations to receive it, the extrao
1d
Researchers map best conditions for forage fishes in the Chesapeake
Big fish eat smaller fish, but only if there are smaller fish to eat. A new study led by researchers at William & Mary's Virginia Institute of Marine Science maps the conditions most suitable for key species of forage fishes in the Chesapeake Bay, offering guidance for any future efforts to protect or restore the habitat required to yield sufficient prey for predatory fishes such as striped bass.
1d
Meet Starlab, a Private Space Station That Could Fly by 2027
(Image: Nanoracks> With the rise in commercial space exploration comes a new intergalactic destination: a private space station called Starlab. It's being developed via a partnership between Voyager Space, Nanoracks, and Lockheed Martin, and they announced late last week that they're planning on having Starlab operational by 2027. Starlab will be the first free-flying commercial space station. Th
1d
New DMCA Exemptions Guarantee a De Facto Right to Repair
The S20 Ultra's giant camera assembly, courtesy of iFixit. It stands to reason that if you own something, you should be able to tear it apart, tinker with it, and (hopefully) repair it. However, the great importance ascribed to copyright in US law makes that difficult. However, new copyright exemptions have gone into effect today that could help promote the right-to-repair movement, but hardware
5h
Thousands of Space Rocks Follow Jupiter Everywhere
Imagine Jupiter and its little asteroids as cosmic Halloween decor on the solar system's front stoop. The planet itself—swirly, stormy, the largest in the solar system—is the pumpkin, while the tiny asteroids that accompany it are kind of like funky-shaped gourds, one cluster in front and the other behind . The pumpkin and these gourds have been on display like this for billions of years, strung
15min
Luke Skywalker, Paul Atreides, and the Very Special Boys of Sci-Fi
A desert planet. An empire spanning the galaxy. A young boy burdened to be its savior. The 1965 novel Dune 's influence on Star Wars is obvious, but Frank Herbert's work has echoed throughout all of modern science-fiction storytelling. With the director Denis Villenueve's big-budget, star-studded epic now giving it a proper film adaptation , how does 2021's Dune play more than a half century afte
15min
Researchers develop a new way to control and measure energy levels in a diamond crystal
Physicists and engineers have long been interested in creating new forms of matter, those not typically found in nature. Such materials might find use someday in, for example, novel computer chips. Beyond applications, they also reveal elusive insights about the fundamental workings of the universe. Recent work at MIT both created and characterized new quantum systems demonstrating dynamical symme
24min
Researchers set 'ultrabroadband' record with entangled photons
Quantum entanglement—or what Albert Einstein once referred to as "spooky action at a distance"— occurs when two quantum particles are connected to each other, even when millions of miles apart. Any observation of one particle affects the other as if they were communicating with each other. When this entanglement involves photons, interesting possibilities emerge, including entangling the photons'
24min
Scientists identify G-Exos as a nanocarrier for miRNA transfer to stimulate neural differentiation of stem cells
Differentiation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) into functional neural cells is of tremendous significance to treat neural diseases. However, the limited neural differentiation of BMSCs remains a major challenge. Recent studies suggest that miRNAs may play a crucial role in regulating the neural differentiation of stem cells as effective signaling molecules. Due to their uniq
30min
New species of human ancestor named: Homo bodoensis
Palaeoanthropologists have announced the naming of a new species of human ancestor, Homo bodoensis. This species lived in Africa during the Middle Pleistocene, around half a million years ago, and was the direct ancestor of modern humans.
52min
Sun releases significant solar flare
The Sun emitted a significant solar flare peaking at 11:35 a.m. EDT on Oct. 28, 2021. NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, which watches the Sun constantly, captured an image of the event.
1h
Cryptocurrency isn't private—but with know-how, it could be
There's probably no such thing as perfect privacy and security online. Hackers regularly breach corporate firewalls to gain customers' private information, and scammers constantly strive to trick us into divulging our passwords. But existing tools can provide a high level of privacy— if we use them correctly, says Mashael Al Sabah, a cybersecurity researcher at the Qatar Computing Research Instit
1h
The fastest way to slow climate change now | Ilissa Ocko
"Cutting methane is the single fastest, most effective opportunity to reduce climate change risks in the near term," says atmospheric scientist Ilissa Ocko. That's because, unlike carbon dioxide, methane's warming power doesn't come from a gradual buildup over time but is almost entirely from recent emissions. Ocko identifies three main sources of methane pollution which, if addressed, could drama
1h
New hydrogen storage material steps on the gas
Hydrogen is increasingly viewed as essential to a sustainable world energy economy because it can store surplus renewable power, decarbonize transportation and serve as a zero-emission energy carrier. However, conventional high-pressure or cryogenic storage pose significant technical and engineering challenges.
1h
AI isn't as smart as you think — but it could be | Jeff Dean
What is AI, really? Jeff Dean, the head of Google's AI efforts, explains the underlying technology that enables artificial intelligence to do all sorts of things, from understanding language to diagnosing disease — and presents a roadmap for building better, more responsible systems that have a deeper understanding of the world. (Followed by a Q&A with head of TED Chris Anderson)
1h
Social mobility is influenced by where ancestors lived
There are clear and enduring regional divides across Great Britain, finds an intergenerational assessment of the social mobility of British families between 1851 and 2016, carried out by University College London (UCL) researchers at the Consumer Data Research Centre (CDRC).
1h
NASA's Juno: Science results offer first 3D view of Jupiter atmosphere
New findings from NASA's Juno probe orbiting Jupiter provide a fuller picture of how the planet's distinctive and colorful atmospheric features offer clues about the unseen processes below its clouds. The results highlight the inner workings of the belts and zones of clouds encircling Jupiter, as well as its polar cyclones and even the Great Red Spot.
1h
Empirical audit and review and an assessment of evidentiary value in research on the psychological consequences of scarcity [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
Empirical audit and review is an approach to assessing the evidentiary value of a research area. It involves identifying a topic and selecting a cross-section of studies for replication. We apply the method to research on the psychological consequences of scarcity. Starting with the papers citing a seminal publication in…
2h
First-order antiferromagnetic transitions of SrMn2P2 and CaMn2P2 single crystals containing corrugated-honeycomb Mn sublattices [Applied Physical Sciences]
SrMn2P2 and CaMn2P2 are insulators that adopt the trigonal CaAl2Si2-type structure containing corrugated Mn honeycomb layers. Magnetic susceptibility χ and heat capacity versus temperature T data reveal a weak first-order antiferromagnetic (AFM) transition at the Néel temperature TN=53(1) K for SrMn2P2 and a strong first-order AFM transition at TN=69.8(3) K…
2h
Vascular KATP channel structural dynamics reveal regulatory mechanism by Mg-nucleotides [Biochemistry]
Vascular tone is dependent on smooth muscle KATP channels comprising pore-forming Kir6.1 and regulatory SUR2B subunits, in which mutations cause Cantú syndrome. Unique among KATP isoforms, they lack spontaneous activity and require Mg-nucleotides for activation. Structural mechanisms underlying these properties are unknown. Here, we determined cryogenic electron microscopy structures of…
2h
Double peroxidase and histone acetyltransferase AgTip60 maintain innate immune memory in primed mosquitoes [Microbiology]
Immune priming in Anopheles gambiae is mediated by the systemic release of a hemocyte differentiation factor (HDF), a complex of lipoxin A4 bound to Evokin, a lipid carrier. HDF increases the proportion of circulating granulocytes and enhances mosquito cellular immunity. Here, we show that Evokin is present in hemocytes and…
2h
Calcineurin regulates the stability and activity of estrogen receptor {alpha} [Cell Biology]
Estrogen receptor α (ER-α) mediates estrogen-dependent cancer progression and is expressed in most breast cancer cells. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of the cellular abundance and activity of ER-α remain unclear. We here show that the protein phosphatase calcineurin regulates both ER-α stability and activity in human breast…
2h
After California's 3rd-largest wildfire, deer returned home while trees were 'still smoldering'
While many animals have adapted to live with wildfires of the past — which were smaller, more frequent and kept ecosystems in balance across the West — it's unclear to scientists how animals are coping with today's unprecedented megafires. A team of researchers tracked a population of black-tailed deer before, during and after the 2018 Mendocino Complex Fire and found that most of the deer retur
2h
SpaceX Flexes Giant Starship-Catching "Chopsticks" for the First Time
SpaceFlex SpaceX has flexed the "Chopsticks" arm of its massive Starship-catching tower for the first time this morning at the company's testing facilities in South Texas, as spotted during a live NASASpaceflight stream . The "Mechazilla" tower, as SpaceX CEO Elon Musk likes to call it , is meant to ensure that the space company's heavy lift rocket called Starship and its accompanying Super Heavy
2h
Best Drones for Kids of Any Age
Today's drones offer more hands-on fun than your kid's favorite video game. Advances in quadcopter technology have made these flying gadgets safer and much easier to control. In fact, most are flight-ready in mere minutes. Plus, drones designed for kids provide extra layers of protection to prevent curious fingers from interacting with angry propellers. A drone with camera and phone apps turns th
2h
New results from MicroBooNE provide clues to particle physics mystery
New results from a more-than-decade long physics experiment offer insight into unexplained electron-like events found in previous experiments. Results of the MicroBooNE experiment, while not confirming the existence of a proposed new particle, the sterile neutrino, provide a path forward to explore physics beyond the Standard Model, the theory of the fundamental forces of nature and elementary par
2h
Photos: The Spirit of Halloween 2021
This year, many of the Halloween events that were canceled in 2020 because of the pandemic have returned. Although some safety measures remain in place, people appear to be greeting the spooky season with open arms once again. Collected below are photos that take a look at some scary (and fun) pre-Halloween festivities in England, New York, Hong Kong, Lebanon, Ukraine, California, Peru, and elsew
2h
Salamander size is a big part of their incredible healing
Researchers have found that a phenomenon tied to animal size helps determine whether animals heal without scarring after injury—in this case, burns. What's more, the researchers have also found a way to manipulate this feature to allow burns to heal without leaving a permanent mark. Burns not only cause disfiguring scars that mark a person for life, but the inflexible, plastic-like tissue found i
3h
Cleveland Clinic study links gut microbiome and aggressive prostate cancer
Researchers have shown for the first time that diet-associated molecules in the gut are associated with aggressive prostate cancer, suggesting dietary interventions may help reduce risk. While more research will be necessary, the study's lead author says findings from the team's analysis of nearly 700 patients may have clinical implications for diagnosing and preventing lethal prostate cancer.
3h
Stacking the deck: Layers of crystalline nanosheets enable tunable electronic properties
Researchers have obtained and characterized two-dimensional (2D) boron monosulfide (BS) nanosheets. The bandgap energy of a single BS nanosheet was greater than that of the bulk material from which it came. As additional 2D layers were stacked, the bandgap energy eventually decreased to that of the bulk material. This result reflected the tunable electronic properties of BS nanosheets, which are s
3h
New study solves energy storage and supply puzzle
Researchers have found a simple and affordable method to determine which chemicals and types of metals are best used to store and supply energy, in a breakthrough for any battery-run devices and technologies reliant on the fast and reliable supply of electricity, including smart phones and tablets.
3h
The Navy Can't Figure Out What Damaged Its Nuclear Submarine
Unknown Object The US Navy still has no idea what its submarine hit in the South China Sea earlier this month. Officials announced earlier this month that the nuclear submarine USS Connecticut had sustained damage — and its crew members had reported several injuries — after colliding with an "unknown object" in the South China Sea. Now, it sounds as though military officials still have no idea wh
3h
Is trick-or-treating safe this Halloween?
With school back in session, it's easy to feel like things are back to normal—but they're not. Parents should keep this in mind with the arrival of Halloween this weekend. More transmission of COVID is happening among kids, especially in social settings, researchers say. "We are seeing an uptick in cases locally," warns Kristen Padilla , a pediatrician at C.S. Mott Children's Hospital at the Univ
3h
Increased cognitive demands offset low-back exoskeleton advantages, research finds
In manufacturing, work-related lower-back injuries from lifting and handling heavy objects account for approximately $100 billion in medical bills annually in the United States, according to new data. Although novel ergonomic interventions such as industrial exoskeletons have shown promise in reducing the risk of musculoskeletal injuries, new research finds that the cognitive fit (where the wearer
3h
How two people controlled HIV after stopping treatment
Research has identified two distinct ways that people with HIV can control the virus for an extended period after stopping antiretroviral therapy (ART) under medical supervision. This information could inform efforts to develop new tools to help people with HIV put the virus into remission without taking lifelong medication, which can have long-term side-effects.
3h
Creating a new 'toehold' for RNA therapeutics, cell therapies, and diagnostics
Synthetic biologists have developed eToeholds — small versatile devices built into RNA that enable expression of a linked protein-encoding sequence only when a cell-specific or viral RNA is present. eToehold devices open up multiple opportunities for more targeted types of RNA therapy, in vitro cell and tissue engineering approaches, and the sensing of diverse biological threats in humans and oth
3h
Making plastic durable and degradable
Polyethylene is the most abundantly manufactured plastic in the world. Due to properties like durability, it has many diverse, and even long-term uses. Professor Stefan Mecking's team in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Konstanz has now incorporated polar groups in the material's molecular chains in order to expand its properties and simultaneously reduce the problematical persiste
3h
Climate change misinformation fools too many people, but there are ways to combat it
In recent decades, people in the UK have watched climate change shift from being an abstract threat discussed on the news to an increasingly common presence in everyday life. As the frequency and intensity of heatwaves, floods and other extreme weather events has risen, so has public concern about climate change. A 2019 poll found 80% of people were fairly or very worried, while a more recent surv
3h
Treasury minister praised for divulging his agoraphobia
Simon Clarke explained his absence from pre-budget photo op was due to condition that affects thousands in UK A minister has been praised for "leading by example" after he spoke openly about his experience of agoraphobia , a condition that leads to thousands of hospital admissions every year. Simon Clarke, the chief secretary to the Treasury, said on Wednesday he would not take part in the tradit
3h
Trapping molecules to find new physics
The Standard Model of particle physics has been extremely successful in describing how the universe works. However, there are some things that it cannot explain. Physicists have, therefore, been looking for new physics in particle accelerators such as the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. Now, a different approach is also being used: in contrast to smashing up matter at high energies, physicists want
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Daily briefing: physicists fail to find elusive 'sterile neutrinos'
Nature, Published online: 28 October 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02986-6 Despite searching for decades, researchers still haven't found any signs that the hypothetical particles exist. Plus: predatory publishers' latest scam, and how vaccinating young kids could affect the pandemic.
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Satellite images show positive impact of conservation efforts for China's coastal wetlands
Coastal wetlands support diverse and vital ecosystems central to coastal areas' biodiversity and economic vitality. However, coastal wetlands are threatened by sea level rise that can lead to flooding and land use changes that alter the way people can live or work in these areas. These impacts are large. Approximately 600 million people live less than 10 meters, approximately 33 feet, above sea le
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What are the drivers of individual climate actions in Europe?
Individual climate actions are an essential pillar for achieving the climate change mitigation goals of the Paris Agreement. The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change recognizes the importance of individual efforts and lists specific actions that citizens can take. Even with many potential actions available to citizens, progress towards the Paris Agreement lags behind the targets,
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Assessing the importance of thermogenic degassing from the Karoo Large Igneous Province (LIP) in driving Toarcian carbon cycle perturbations
Nature Communications, Published online: 28 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26467-6 The emplacement of the Karoo LIP occurred synchronously with the Toarcian crisis, which is characterized by negative carbon isotope excursions. Here the authors use carbon cycle modelling to show that thermogenic carbon released during LIP emplacement represents a plausible source for the negative excursions.
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Impacts of climate change to African indigenous communities and examples of adaptation responses
Nature Communications, Published online: 28 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26540-0 Climate change negatively impacts the livelihoods of indigenous communities across the world, including those located on the African continent. This Comment reports on how five African indigenous communities have been impacted by climate change and the adopted adaptation mechanisms.
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Specialized transendothelial dendritic cells mediate thymic T-cell selection against blood-borne macromolecules
Nature Communications, Published online: 28 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26446-x T cells are selected in the thymus, through interaction with self-antigens, to remove autoreactive cells. Here the authors show that a specialized thymic dendritic cell subset juxtaposes to microvessels, requires CX3CR1/CX3CL1 for this positioning, and has processes extruding into the blood stream to sample s
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Improvement of a synthetic live bacterial therapeutic for phenylketonuria with biosensor-enabled enzyme engineering
Nature Communications, Published online: 28 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26524-0 PKU patients have elevated phenylalanine levels which can result in neurological impairment. Here the authors utilize biosensor-based ultra-high-throughput screening to optimize PAL activity in a synthetic biotic platform for improved in vivo performance.
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Impact of intensifying nitrogen limitation on ocean net primary production is fingerprinted by nitrogen isotopes
Nature Communications, Published online: 28 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26552-w Projected declines in marine primary production are underpinned by a slowdown in nitrogen supplied to surface waters. Here the authors detail a new means to detect this slowdown and describe major shifts in the 21st century oceanic nitrogen cycle.
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Ion-dependent structure, dynamics, and allosteric coupling in a non-selective cation channel
Nature Communications, Published online: 28 October 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26538-8 NaK is a bacterial non-selective cation channel. Here, the authors use solution NMR to show that selectivity filter (SF) in NaK is dynamic, with structural differences between the Na+ and K + -bound states. The conformation of the SF is communicated to the pore-lining helices similarly as in the K + -selectiv
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The Experiment Podcast: What Does It Mean to Give Away Our DNA?
Listen and subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Podcasts Just as the Navajo researcher Rene Begay started to fall in love with the field of genetics, she learned that the Navajo Nation had banned all genetic testing on tribal land. Now she is struggling to figure out what the future of genetics might look like, and whether the Navajo and other Indigenous communities should be a
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The Atlantic Daily: What Comes Next for Kid Vaccines
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox. COVID-19 vaccines for kids could arrive as early as next week. To help you prepare, we answer five practical questions. Pfizer's vaccine for 5-to-11-year-olds has cleared the first of four hurdles
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The tech-forward rejuvenation of "underdog" cities | Irma L. Olguin Jr.
Computer skills aren't what's stopping people from breaking into the tech industry, says social entrepreneur Irma L. Olguin Jr. More often, the biggest hurdles are things like access to childcare, transportation and financial stability. In this visionary talk, Olguin Jr. introduces the work she's done to uplift and empower people in her community in Fresno, California — and shows how it can be a
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Tiden ute för klimatkompensation
Får man flyga till Teneriffa eller Cypern om man klimatkompenserar? Och är det okej att köpa oxfilé från Brasilien om mjölken vi dricker lovar nollutsläpp? Nej, det är för sent att förlita sig på klimatkompensering om vi ska nå klimatmålen, säger forskarna. Klimatkompensation innebär enkelt uttryckt att ett utsläpp av växthusgaser på ett ställe, kompenseras med en klimatpositiv insats på ett anna
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Artificial intelligence accelerates search for markers of resistance to sugarcane yellow leaf disease
Yellow leaf disease, a major sugarcane pest in Brazil, is caused by a virus resistant to thermal treatment. An infected plantation can be saved only by growing plantlets in tissue culture in the laboratory and planting them out, a time-consuming process that requires specialized infrastructure and personnel. According to a group of scientists who have long studied the problem, the most effective w
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Abdul Qadeer Khan obituary
Physicist hailed as the father of Pakistan's atomic weapons industry who confessed to smuggling nuclear secrets The father of Pakistan's atomic weapons industry and the greatest proliferator of nuclear weapons in history, Abdul Qadeer Khan , who has died aged 85 after testing positive for Covid-19, was heralded as a hero in his native country, but he left a troubling legacy for the west. Along wit
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Sustainable fashion aims to make green the new black
Fast fashion, which encourages consumers to quickly discard and replace clothing, uses significant amounts of natural, social, and creative resources and creates excessive waste. Research into sustainable fashion aims to change this.
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Deciphering the Philosophers' Stone: How Scientists Cracked a 400-Year-Old Alchemical Cipher
What secret alchemical knowledge could be so important it required sophisticated encryption? The setting was Amsterdam, 2019. A conference organized by the Society for the History of Alchemy and Chemistry had just concluded at the Embassy of the Free Mind , in a lecture hall opened by historical fiction author Dan Brown. At the conference, Science History Institute postdoctoral researcher Megan P
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Violence and mental health are likely to get worse in a warming world
Extreme weather has been the cause of some of the biggest public health crises across the world in recent years. In many cases, these have been enhanced by human-induced climate change. For instance, in 2003, high summer temperatures in Europe were believed to cause 50,000 to 70,000 excess deaths across 16 European countries.
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Directly measuring electrical properties in ultra-thin topological insulators
Physicists at Forschungszentrum Jülich have made a significant step towards the realization of new types of electronic components. Using a special four-tip scanning tunneling microscope, they were able to directly measure the extraordinary electrical properties that exist in ultra-thin topological insulators for the first time. These properties result from the fact that the electron spin is couple
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Egyptian fruit bat pups steer echolocation beams from day zero
A trio of researchers with Tel Aviv University's School of Zoology has found that newly born Egyptian fruit bats are capable of steering echolocation beams. In their paper published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B, Grace Smarsh, Yifat Tarnovsky and Yossi Yovel note also that just after birth, the pups are also able to hear the echolocation clicks produced by adults and can produc
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Study: 10 UNESCO forests emit more CO2 than they soak up
Sites containing some of the world's most treasured forests, including the Yosemite National Park and Indonesia's Sumatra rainforest, have been emitting more heat-trapping carbon dioxide than they have absorbed in recent years, a U.N.-backed report said.
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Bacterial drug resistance overcome by synthetic restructuring of antibiotics
Nature, Published online: 27 October 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02916-6 Chemical synthesis, guided by crystal structures of antibiotics bound to the bacterial ribosome, has been used to discover a class of broad-spectrum antibiotics that overcomes bacterial multidrug resistance. Biochemical and crystallographic studies reveal the mechanism of action, including how one mode of resistance is circ
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Carbon dioxide emissions rebound to nearly pre-pandemic levels
Days before the opening of the 26th Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change in Glasgow, Scotland, the latest estimates by the Carbon Monitor, an international research initiative begun during the pandemic, show that global carbon dioxide emissions as of the end of September 2021 were just 0.9 percent lower than emissions at the same time in 2019.
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Ancestors of whale sharks in Panama may come from distant waters
The world's largest fish, the whale shark (Rhincodon typus), is a plankton-loving giant that can be found alone or in groups in all tropical oceans. However, despite being a highly migratory species, little is known about how the different populations worldwide interact with each other. This lack of knowledge hinders conservation efforts aimed at protecting this endangered animal. Héctor Guzmán, a
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New method helps to understand the development of cancer and neurodegenerative diseases
Important processes take place among the subunits of the molecules that make up our cells. Defects in these processes or distortions in the subunits can lead to serious diseases. In order to better understand this microscopic world, Hungarian and German researchers have jointly developed a method that reveals changes in the structure of proteins more efficiently and accurately than before. The stu
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Smell and memory are behind all the pumpkin spice love
Two perception researchers say a key to understanding why people love pumpkin spice is the smell of it. Those notes of cinnamon, nutmeg, and ginger trigger deeply rooted cozy memories of autumn. "Pumpkin spice aromas emerge in the fall in shops and cafes, coinciding with the arrival of colorful leaves, family gatherings, and back-to-school bustle. The association that the smell has with the seaso
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On-water creation of conducting MOF nanosheets
Oil and water do not mix, but what happens where oil and water meet? Or where air meets liquid? Unique reactions occur at these interfaces, which a team of researchers based in Japan used to develop the first successful construction of uniform, electrically conductive nanosheets needed for next-generation sensors and energy production technologies.
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Låg virusnivå i avloppsvatten efter slopade restriktioner
Snart en månad efter de slopade restriktionerna är halterna av coronavirus i avloppsvattnet i Göteborg fortsatt ganska låga. Det framgår av senaste mätningarna och analyserna från Göteborgs universitet. – Det är nu effekterna skulle visa sig, men vi har relativt låga nivåer, förutsatt att deltavarianten utsöndras i avföring lika mycket som de andra varianterna, säger Heléne Norder. Hon är adjunge
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Industry must prepare now for a new world of green electricity
Industry must speed up investment in new technologies that allow manufacture of materials using renewable electricity if net zero emissions targets are to be met, research warns. The study cautions that national strategies for replacing fossil fuels with renewables need an integrated approach to energy use and material production — or risk industry being unable to use electricity produced from re
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Burning and tingling in your feet? You may have small fiber neuropathy
The number of people experiencing numbness, tingling and pain in their feet with no known cause has been increasing over the last two decades, according at a new study. Called small fiber neuropathy, the condition has different symptoms than large fiber neuropathy, which can cause weakness and balance issues. But in many cases people have both types of neuropathy.
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Nearly half of all churches and other faith institutions help people get enough to eat
Almost half of U.S. congregations participate in some kind of food distribution program. While the government's Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program was helping nearly 42 million Americans purchase groceries in mid-2021, those benefits often don't cover the full food costs of people facing economic hardship. And not everyone who needs food is eligible for those benefits.
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CO2 reduction and economic growth: Can they go hand-in-hand?
Fearing a trade-off with economic growth, countries feel discouraged to cut their CO2 emissions. But do the two really not go together? Environmental scientist Ranran Wang and her colleagues investigated the relationship between economic growth and CO2 emissions in 73 countries from 1970 to 2016. Wang: "We also identified mechanisms by which countries drove down their CO2 emissions, especially dur
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Only 27.5% of adult victims of child sexual abuse tell someone about the experience while still a child
Three researchers of the University of Malaga have just published a paper that brings to light sexual abuse experiences suffered in childhood by more than a thousand Spanish adults –according to a sample that is representative of the Spanish population in terms of age, gender, and region– evidencing the silence surrounding this type of aggression, since only 27.5% of those surveyed who said they h
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Optimal concentrations of enzymes and their substrates
Biological cells invest much of their resources into the production of enzymes, which catalyze the conversion of substrates into products. An international team of bioinformaticians and biophysicists, led by Prof. Martin Lercher from Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf (HHU), discovered that these processes are most efficient at a certain relationship between the intracellular enzyme and substrat
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How you mix cells changes the brain
Brain organoids are models of the brain made from growing stem cells like iPS cells into three-dimensional structures. They are used to study all sorts of brain-related phenomenon, including neural networks and disease development. However, a new study led by CiRA Professor Haruhisa Inoue, in collaboration with RIKEN and other organizations, shows how scientists mix the iPS cells will greatly infl
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Intriguing insect fossils preserved in amber
All fossils are time capsules. But unlike many other finds, insects encapsulated in amber are often perfectly preserved. "Frequently, their external morphology is as well conserved as if they had been sealed in synthetic resin," says LMU zoologist Professor Joachim T. Haug. He and his colleagues have now obtained new insights into the evolutionary history of insects from specimens that were trappe
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Nickel single atom and copper nanoparticles used for highly selective tandem electrocatalysis of CO2 to ethylene
The electroreduction reaction of CO2 (CO2RR) into higher-value C2+ (C≥2) products such as C2H4 provides an environmental friendly technology to realize the cyclic utilization of carbon resources, but the activity and selectivity of higher-value C2+ (C≥2) products are largely limited by the multi-electron transfer process and sluggish C-C coupling step at one single active site.
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Image: Lunar lander in Dubai
This mockup of ESA's European Lunar Logistics Lander (EL3) is currently on display at the International Astronautical Congress in Dubai.
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Starlight catching system for 4MOST is unpacked in Potsdam
With construction for 4MOST, an instrument for spectroscopic sky surveys, underway, its first major subsystem arrived at the Babelsberg campus of the Leibniz Institute for Astrophysics Potsdam (AIP) and is now being unpacked and assembled. The fiber positioning system AESOP will ensure that 4MOST's optical fibers are able to collect the maximum light of astronomical objects such as stars and galax
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Preparing for a Brutal Two Day Extraction | Naked and Afraid
Stream Naked and Afraid on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/naked-and-afraid About Naked and Afraid: What happens when you put two complete strangers – sans clothes – in some of the most extreme environments on Earth? Each male-female duo is left with no food, no water, no clothes, and only one survival item. #NakedAndAfraid #Discovery #Survival Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.l
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Novel strategy to track adulterants in milk
Researchers at the Indian Institute of Science (IISc) have developed a low-cost and effective method to detect adulterants in milk, by analyzing deposition patterns after evaporation. It was designed by Virkeshwar Kumar, a postdoctoral researcher, and Susmita Dash, Assistant Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering. In a study published in ACS Omega, the team used the method to test f
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On-water creation of conducting metal-organic–framework nanosheets
Oil and water do not mix, but what happens where oil and water meet? Or where air meets liquid? Unique reactions occur at these interfaces, which a team of researchers based in Japan used to develop the first successful construction of uniform, electrically conductive nanosheets needed for next-generation sensors and energy production technologies.
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Poor parents receiving universal payments increase spending on kids
When given cash with no strings attached, low- and middle-income parents increased their spending on their children, according to Washington State University research. The study, published in the journal Social Forces, also found that the additional funding had little impact on child-related expenditures of high-income parents.
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Mossdjuren utvecklades för 500 miljoner år sedan
Mossdjuren utvecklades 35 miljoner år tidigare än man trott. Världens hittills äldsta fossil av mossdjur har hittats i Kina. Därmed har mossdjuren sitt ursprung från samma period för drygt 500 miljoner år sedan, i den så kallade kambriska explosionen, liksom alla andra nu levande djurgrupper. Mossdjur finns idag i de flesta vattenmiljöer och bildar alltid kolonier, mellan en centimeter och en met
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Your Halloween candy faves come with environmental costs
Candy is a staple of Halloween and other American holidays, but it comes with hidden environmental costs. Halloween. Valentine's Day. Easter. Throughout the year, US stores are stocked with rotating chocolates, gummies, and hard candies. These periods of mass candy production and consumption have a profound effect on the supply chain, yet candy consumption is often absent from conversations about
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Tooth roots reveal the size of fossil primates
New formulas can calculate the body size of a primate based on the root size of its teeth. The formulas could let researchers make use of partial and incomplete fossils in order to learn how ancient primates—including human ancestors—interacted with their environment. Ashley Deutsch, graduate student at North Carolina State University and first author of a paper on the research, wanted to know if
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Report: Southeast Asia needs to boost disaster resilience
A group of scientists, led by Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) and University of Glasgow, have presented a range of disaster risk reduction strategies and policies for ASEAN, a region at risk of multiple natural hazards, which are further compounded by climate change.
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Parasitic bird embryos found to exercise in the egg to make them stronger
An international team of researchers has found that some parasitic bird embryos move around more in their eggs than other species, which makes them stronger when they hatch. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, the group describes their study of multiple types of avian embryos and what they learned about them.
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From Tarantino to Squid Game: Why do so many people enjoy violence?
Last month, more than 100 million people watched the gory Netflix show, Squid Game. Whether or not screen violence is bad for us has been extensively studied. The consensus is that it can have negative effects. But the question of why we are drawn to watch violence has received much less attention.
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What Big Oil knew about climate change, in its own words
Four years ago, I traveled around America, visiting historical archives. I was looking for documents that might reveal the hidden history of climate change—and in particular, when the major coal, oil and gas companies became aware of the problem, and what they knew about it.
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Rotfyllning bästa behandling för svårt skadade tänder
Att rädda en svårt skadad tand med rotfyllning är en åtgärd som få patienter ångrar. Av patienterna skulle 87 procent välja samma behandling igen, trots att det är vanligt med smärta och obehag runt tanden. Hälften av patienterna uppgav sig ha mild smärta eller obehag från sin rotfyllda tand under uppföljningstiden (upp till tre år) men trots detta var alltså det stora flertalet nöjda. De ångrade
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Plants from plastics: Bio-based polymers can be transformed into fertilizer
Plastics have taken the world by storm over the last century, finding applications in virtually every aspect of our lives. However, the rise of synthetic polymers, which form the basis of plastics, has contributed to many serious environmental issues. The worst of these is the excessive use of petrochemical compounds and the disposal of non-biodegradable materials without recycling; only 14% of al
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Reclaiming Coast Miwok history through indigenous interpretations of archeology
In his latest book, Assistant Professor of Anthropology Tsim Schneider examines the history of Coast Miwok and Southern Pomo peoples in California from an Indigenous perspective, uncovering stories of resilience and continued connection to culture and homelands from the 18th through 20th century, despite multiple waves of colonial intrusion.
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Layers of crystalline nanosheets enable tunable electronic properties
Boron is a versatile non-metal element, but until the last five years, chemists have only theorized about the useful properties and applications of two-dimensional (2D) boron-containing materials. In a study published this month in the Journal of Materials Chemistry A, a group led by researchers from the University of Tsukuba brought theory to life by preparing the first 2D boron monosulfide (BS)
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Solving the energy storage and supply puzzle for battery-run devices
Curtin University research has found a simple and affordable method to determine which chemicals and types of metals are best used to store and supply energy, in a breakthrough for any battery-run devices and technologies reliant on the fast and reliable supply of electricity, including smart phones and tablets.
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Study shows vaccine protects dogs against Valley fever
A possible canine vaccine for Valley fever took one giant step closer to becoming a reality thanks to a University of Arizona College of Medicine—Tucson-led study that showed the vaccine provided a high level of protection against Coccidioides posadasii, a fungus that causes Valley fever. The development of a potential canine vaccine serves as a positive harbinger of a human vaccine.
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Augmented Reality Eyewear Is The Future, And It Is Not Too Far Off
Wearable augmented reality/virtual reality (AR/VR) tech was once little more than the subject of sci-fi movies and video games, but in the past few years, they've exploded into life. It's predicted that AR/VR will completely revolutionize not just shopping and entertainment, but how we communicate, socialize, and interact with the world around us. While Facebook's Oculus and Google Glass are the
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Panda Camouflage
When thinking of highly camouflaged animals, giant pandas are probably not on the short list. Their striking black and white fur pattern, if anything, makes them stand out. This, at least, has been the conventional wisdom, but a new study shows that the panda's coloration is an effective form of camouflage. When we think of animals with camouflage we generally imagine those with dull mottled colo
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Body heat-powered sensor could detect fever in large groups
Researchers hope to make it possible to check the temperatures of large groups of people more quickly and less expensively than current methods allow. Public temperature checks have become common practice around the world during the COVID-19 pandemic. The researchers are working to harness the thermal energy generated by body heat to power a small, self-sustaining electronic device capable of det
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Natural disasters bring married couples closer, at least for awhile
Although natural disasters can cause horrific damage to homes and infrastructure, they can bring married couples closer together, at least temporarily. That's according to a first-of-its-kind study that looked at couples in the Houston area before and after Hurricane Harvey. The study, published in the journal Psychological Science , has implications for how best to help families as they navigate
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Half of space travelers experience back pain
With growing numbers of humans venturing into space, experts predict an increase in the number of people experiencing back pain. The prediction comes in a new report in the journal Anesthesiology , based on a comprehensive review of past studies measuring the effects of space travel on the spine, and exploring methods to prevent, diagnose, and treat back pain. The scientists say further study amo
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Antarctic ozone hole is 13th largest on record and expected to persist into November
The 2021 Antarctic ozone hole reached its maximum area on October 7 and ranks 13th largest since 1979, scientists from NOAA and NASA reported today. This year's ozone hole developed similarly to last year's: A colder than usual Southern Hemisphere winter lead to a deep and larger-than-average hole that will likely persist into November or early December.
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Daylight saving time could be bad for our health – should we get rid of it?
The clocks go back in the UK this Sunday and many will welcome the extra hour in bed. But research suggests that changing the time like this could be bad for the body. Anand Jagatia speaks to the Guardian's science correspondent Linda Geddes and chronobiologist Prof Till Roenneberg about how daylight saving time affects our biology – and whether we should get rid of it permanently. Help support ou
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Five climate change myths
As world leaders prepare for the COP26 climate summit from October 31, AFP Fact Check examines some common claims that question the existence of global heating caused by humans.
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The Anti-Vaccine Movement Supports Big Pharma
It's common knowledge that anti-vaxxers are dedicated to filling the coffers of Big Coffin. Simple math leads to another obvious conclusion: they also work extremely hard to enrich hospitals and Big Pharma. The post first appeared on Science-Based Medicine .
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Why AI Lags Behind the Human Brain in Computational Power – Facts So Romantic
pspn / Shutterstock Recent advances have made deep neural networks the leading paradigm of artificial intelligence. One of the great things about deep neural networks is that, given a large number of examples, they can learn how to act. This means we can get software to learn to do things that even their programmers don't know how to do. The more complicated the task is, the more powerful the neu
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Neuroscience's Existential Crisis – Issue 107: The Edge
On a chilly evening last fall, I stared into nothingness out of the floor-to-ceiling windows in my office on the outskirts of Harvard's campus. As a purplish-red sun set, I sat brooding over my dataset on rat brains. I thought of the cold windowless rooms in downtown Boston, home to Harvard's high-performance computing center, where computer servers were holding on to a precious 48 terabytes of m
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Your Brain Is Like Beethoven – Issue 107: The Edge
Prior to the rise of urban culture, the sounds of clucking hens must have been among the world's most ubiquitous annoyances. For millennia, humans have been "up with the chickens," demarcating time by the rooster's crow. But the infernal clucking of poultry must have constituted a constant din. It seems odd, then, that this obnoxious noise has found its way into a vast repertoire of music, from "
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Everyday Noises Are Making Our Brains Noisier – Issue 107: The Edge
Take a walk on a busy avenue and you hear either traffic whizzing by or creeping in a honk-laden crawl. Add the hissing of pneumatic bus brakes, distant sirens, the boom-boom of overloud car stereos, the occasional car alarm, music coming from shops you pass, the beeping of a reversing delivery truck. All are part of the fabric of city life. These sounds do not meet or exceed the generally accept
18h
Evidence of prehistoric human activity in Falkland Islands
Findings from a new study suggest that Europeans were not the first people to ever set foot on the Falkland Islands. Most of the evidence from the investigation indicates that Indigenous South Americans likely traveled to the Falkland Islands between 1275 C.E. and 1420 C.E., although earlier dates cannot be ruled out.
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Promising new antimalarial compound discovered
A discovery opens the door to the development of new drugs targeting malaria, one of the deadliest infectious diseases on the planet. The researcher teams performed a screen of soil bacteria extracts for antimalarials and identified an extremely potent inhibitor of malaria development.
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All about Eve, sophisticated AI
New AI model called EVE outperforms other AI methods in determining whether a gene variant is benign or disease-causing. When applied to more than 36 million variants across 3,219 disease-associated proteins and genes, EVE indicated more than 256,000 human gene variants of unknown significance that should be reclassified as benign or pathogenic. Used in combination with current clinical tools, EVE
21h
Twenty-four trillion pieces of microplastics in the ocean and counting
Based on a total of 8,218 pelagic microplastic samples from the world's oceans collected between 2000 and 2019, a team of scientists has developed a publicly available dataset for assessing the abundance of microplastics and their long-term trend in the world's upper oceans. The team found 24.4 trillion pieces (82,000–578,000 tons) of microplastics in the world's oceans, but the actual amount is
21h
Scientists create device that uses 'light tweezers' to trap and move viruses
A team of scientists led by Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) has created a laser-powered device that can trap and move viruses using light. The device, which has the ability to manipulate light to act as 'tweezers', would aid in the development of new approaches to disease diagnosis and the study of viruses, as the device can precisely 'move' a single virus to target a p
21h
The upside-down orbits of a multi-planetary system
When planets form, they usually continue their orbital evolution in the equatorial plane of their star. However, an international team, led by astronomers from the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland, has discovered that the exoplanets of a star in the constellation Pisces orbit in planes perpendicular to each other, with the innermost planet the only one still orbiting in the equatorial pla
22h
A novel solution to a combinatorial optimization problem in bicycle sharing systems
Bicycle sharing systems have become an attractive option to alleviate traffic in congested cities. However, rebalancing the number of bikes at each port as time passes is essential, and finding the optimal routing paths for the vehicles in charge of rebalancing constitutes a combinatorial optimization problem. Now, scientists propose an innovative algorithm that can find near-optimal solutions mor
22h
Tuneable catalysis: Solving the particle size puzzle
Chemical reactions can be studied at different levels: At the level of individual atoms and molecules, new compounds can be designed. At the level of tiny particles on the nano and micrometer scale, one can understand how catalyst materials influence chemical reactions. Now it is possible to connect all levels from the microscopic to the macroscopic level in order to describe a technologically imp
22h
Bone mineral density decreases less than expected after menopause
Bone mineral density at the femoral neck bone in postmenopausal women decreased by an average of 10% during a 25-year follow-up, according to a new study. Being the world's hitherto longest follow-up of changes in bone mineral density in postmenopausal women, the study shows that bone loss after menopause is significantly lower than has previously been assumed on the basis of earlier studies.
22h
A heart that beats (almost) like our own
Biologists have unraveled how a 'heart' in the fruit fly's head functions. The researchers discovered the fly's head-heart beats much like a human's: Its rhythmic pulses are automatically generated by a tiny muscle that runs through the middle of the fly's brain.
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Cat's meow: Robotic pet boosts mood, behavior and cognition in adults with dementia
Researchers tested the effectiveness of affordable, interactive robotic pet cats to improve mood, behavior and cognition in older adults with mild to moderate dementia. Mood and behavioral symptoms were measured along with cognition using the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE). Intervention with this robotic cat improved all mood scores over time, with significant improvements in mood and depres
22h
Flexible device could treat hearing loss without batteries
Some people are born with hearing loss, while others acquire it with age, infections or long-term noise exposures. In many instances, the tiny hairs in the inner ear's cochlea that allow the brain to recognize electrical pulses as sound are damaged. As a step toward an advanced artificial cochlea, researchers report a conductive membrane, which translated sound waves into matching electrical signa
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