Search Posts

Nyheder2021september07

Tegn abonnement på BioNyt!

Vil du hjælpe med at udpege vigtigste nyheder? DO YOU WANT TO HELP CHOOSE THE MOST IMPORTANT SCIENCE NEWS? Email: bionyt@gmail.com Phone-sms: (45)21729908

As a virologist I'm shocked my work has been hijacked by anti-vaxxers | David LV Bauer
A news interview I did was re-edited and misquoted by online conspiracy theorists. My advice is: get the vaccine David LV Bauer is head of the RNA virus replication laboratory at the Francis Crick Institute in London As a virologist, I've spent the past year or more studying the novel coronavirus that has upended all our lives. Communicating our work to the public and speaking to the media is an
14h

LATEST

Third person dies in Japan after taking contaminated Moderna coronavirus vaccine
A 49-year-old man died the day after taking his second shot of the vaccine, though authorities said a causal link has not been identified See all our coronavirus coverage A third man has died in Japan after receiving an injection from one of three batches of Moderna vaccines since identified as contaminated, though authorities say no causal link has yet been found. The 49-year-old man had his sec
17h
You Can Never Forget Michael K. Williams
First comes a whistled tune—"The Farmer in the Dell," delivered with extra menace. Then the sight of him—Omar Little, played by Michael K. Williams, stalking the streets of Baltimore in a billowing duster concealing a shotgun. Omar was the most indelible character on The Wire , one of TV's greatest dramas, and the show was most viewers' introduction to Williams, a captivating screen presence who
6h
Novel imaging method reveals a surprising arrangement of DNA in the cell's nucleus
If you open a biology textbook and run through the images depicting how DNA is organized in the cell's nucleus, chances are you'll start feeling hungry; the chains of DNA would seem like a bowl of ramen: long strings floating in liquid. However, according to two new studies—one experimental and the other theoretical—that are the outcome of the collaboration between the groups of Prof. Talila Volk
1d
Freshwater ecosystems at risk due to glyphosate use
A series of recent research papers from a McGill-led team has found that the herbicide glyphosate—commonly sold under the label Roundup—can alter the structure of natural freshwater bacterial and zooplankton communities. Notably, the researchers found that for zooplankton, aquatic concentrations of 0.1 mg/L glyphosate were sufficient to cause diversity loss.
6h
It's Time For A Flu Shot. Here's What You Need To Know
With all the talk about COVID-19 vaccines and boosters, it's easy to forget that there's another respiratory virus poised to strike. We tackle questions about why a flu vaccine matters now. (Image credit: Cristina Spanò for NPR)
13h
Europe Should Drop the Act on Afghanistan
The only thing worse than the American foreign-policy establishment glossing over 20 years of failure and defeat to blame Joe Biden for the loss in Afghanistan is the myopia of the British and European establishments joining in. Ever since the Taliban suddenly returned to power weeks ago, we in Europe have been treated to an almost daily diet of indignation from generals, politicians, diplomats,
13h
The Plan to Stop Every Respiratory Virus at Once
Updated at 3:00 p.m. ET on September 7, 2021 When London vanquished cholera in the 19th century, it took not a vaccine, or a drug, but a sewage system. The city's drinking water was intermingling with human waste, spreading bacteria in one deadly outbreak after another. A new comprehensive network of sewers separated the two. London never experienced a major cholera outbreak after 1866. All that
5h
Animals 'shapeshifting' in response to climate crisis, research finds
Warm-blooded animals are changing beaks, legs and ears to adapt to hotter climate and better regulate temperature Animals are increasingly "shapeshifting" because of the climate crisis, researchers have said. Warm-blooded animals are changing their physiology to adapt to a hotter climate, the scientists found. This includes getting larger beaks, legs and ears to better regulate their body tempera
7h
Ohio judge reverses court order forcing hospital to treat Covid patient with ivermectin
Judge cites lack of 'convincing evidence' that drug is effective, siding with hospital that refused to administer medication An Ohio judge has reversed a court order that forced a local hospital to treat a Covid-19 patient with the anti-parasitic drug ivermectin. Related: Military doctors shore up exhausted health teams in US south amid Covid surge Continue reading…
7h
No 10 not ruling out 'firebreak' lockdown if Covid cases rise
Government denies plan for October half-term lockdown but says option remains open if NHS overwhelmed Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Downing Street has not ruled out a "firebreak" lockdown as a last resort if the NHS were to be overwhelmed by Covid cases in England, but denied there were plans for one during October's half-term school holiday. With deaths within 28
9h
The Search for America's Atlantis
Illustrations by Studio Hosego Editor's note: This article is part of a new series called " Who Owns America's Wilderness? " Like apparitions , California's Channel Islands sometimes vanish in the morning fog. Even on mist-free days, when their golden cliffs can be glimpsed from the mainland, few people seem to take much note of them. Despite their proximity, the islands are seldom visited by Cal
11h
UK orders national security review of graphene firm's takeover by Chinese scientist
Watchdog to look at potential takeover of Wales-based Perpetuus Group by Dr Zhongfu Zhou or Taurus International Business secretary Kwasi Kwarteng has ordered a national security review of a takeover by a Chinese academic of a small Welsh manufacturer of graphene – the thinnest and lightest "supermaterial" known. In a rare move, Kwarteng instructed the Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) to r
17h
Scientists Puzzled by Mysterious Radio Wave Source Inside Our Galaxy
Radio Orchestra Using the Australian Square Kilometer Array Pathfinder (ASKAP), an extremely sensitive radio radio telescope, a team of astronomers have discovered a mysterious radio signal emanating not far from the center of our own Milky Way galaxy, ScienceAlert reports . "We have presented the discovery and characterization of ASKAP J173608.2-321635: a highly-polarized, variable radio source
5h
Russian Space Chief Invites Elon Musk to His House
Tea Time Dmitry Rogozin, the director-general of Russian state space corporation Roscosmos, is keen on spending some quality time with members of the exclusive space billionaires club. In a rare interview with CNN — according to the outlet, his first Western media interview since becoming Roscosmos chief — the eccentric director general extended a personal invitation to SpaceX CEO Elon Musk. Rogo
6h
SpaceX Rocket for First All-Tourist Spaceflight Rolls to Launchpad
Roll Out The SpaceX rocket destined to launch the first all-tourist crew into orbit made its way to the launchpad facilities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center over the weekend, as spotted by keen-eyed space enthusiasts on Reddit. If all goes well, the launch will mark a milestone for private spaceflight, allowing those who can afford it to spend considerable time in Earth's orbit — and not just seve
7h
Inmates Treated With Ivermectin Without Their Knowledge
The doctor at an Arkansas jail is being investigated for treating inmates who had COVID-19 with ivermectin — and lying to them about it. In case you don't recognize the name, ivermectin is the anti-parasite drug that can be used to treat human conditions including head lice, scabies, and trichuriasis, but is more commonly known as a horse de-wormer . Lately, it's become the new hydroxychloroquine
2h
Elon Musk Mocks Jeff Bezos' Attempt to Develop Immortality Tech
Amazon and Blue Origin founder Jeff Bezos is reportedly pouring millions into a mysterious anti-aging research startup in Silicon Valley — efforts that are already earning him derision from space competitor and fellow billionaire Elon Musk. The startup, called Altos Labs, is looking into ways to reverse aging in human cells. That type of work has shown some promise , but is still in its very earl
1h
Chinese Probe Returns to Moon From Deep Space, for Unknown Purpose
Rear View The Chang'e-5 orbiter, one of the spacecraft from China's lunar sample return mission of the same name from last year, just changed course and seems to be heading back toward the Moon. After ferrying the Moon rocks to Earth, the Chang'e-5 orbiter shipped right back out toward a Lagrange point where the gravitational pull from Earth and the Sun are equal but opposite. But after a roughly
2h
Scientist Warns About Alien Viruses From Other Planets
If we were ever to encounter an alien world full of extraterrestrial life, we would likely see a lot more than just human-sized aliens. Any environment capable of supporting life would do so on the backs of countless extraterrestrial microbes and, as Arizona State University astrobiologist and cosmologist Paul Davies warns, extraterrestrial viruses as well. "Viruses actually form part of the web
4h
One Lab's Quest to Build Space-Time Out of Quantum Particles
The prospects for directly testing a theory of quantum gravity are poor, to put it mildly. To probe the ultra-tiny Planck scale, where quantum gravitational effects appear, you would need a particle accelerator as big as the Milky Way galaxy. Likewise, black holes hold singularities that are governed by quantum gravity, but no black holes are particularly close by — and even if they were… Sourc
4h
Hubble discovers hydrogen-burning white dwarfs enjoying slow aging
The prevalent view of white dwarfs as inert, slowly cooling stars has been challenged by observations from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. An international group of astronomers have discovered the first evidence that white dwarfs can slow down their rate of aging by burning hydrogen on their surface.
1d
Did dark magic conjure up the British Empire?
An unremarkable stone circle in Mudchute Park is said to have a wild and dark history. Legend has it that this is where John Dee used magic to conjure up the British Empire. As incredible as that sounds, local geography provides some circumstantial evidence. The mysterious stone circle informally known as the Mudchute Omphalos, with the gleaming towers of the Docklands financial district in the b
9h
How Netflix Made Americans Care About the Most European of Sports
Jason Fulford and Tamara Shopsin A s recently as June , I had never heard of Daniel Ricciardo. The fault was mine, not his: Ricciardo is a world-famous Formula 1 race-car driver with millions of Instagram followers and a zillion-watt smile, whereas I am from the United States—a nation traditionally standoffish to international sports, and to anything that seems suspiciously European. F1 and most
10h
Classroom Time Isn't the Only Thing Students Have Lost
Last December, I stood bundled up outside my car on a side street in West Baltimore, holding a "Thinking of you" card. I was also carrying the feelings of triumph and relief teachers typically have around the holiday season: elated at making it through the grind-it-out months of the fall, and ready for a much-needed break. Yet heavy on my mind was one student. She'd been so quiet in virtual class
11h
Ninth-grade ethnic studies helped students for years, researchers find
A ninth-grade ethnic studies class has a remarkably prolonged and strong positive impact on students, increasing their overall engagement in school, probability of graduating and likelihood of enrolling in college, according to a new study of a curriculum offered at the San Francisco Unified School District (SFUSD).
1d
New filtering method promises safer drinking water, improved industrial production
A team of scientists at the Tufts University School of Engineering has developed a new filtering technology. Inspired by biology, it could help curb a drinking water-related disease that affects tens of millions of people worldwide and potentially improve environmental remediation, industrial and chemical production, and mining, among other processes.
1d
UK vaccine advisers 'acted like medical regulators', over Covid jabs for children
Prof Neil Ferguson says JCVI was conservative in rejecting use of vaccines already approved by MHRA Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The UK's vaccine advisory group behaved like a medical regulator in rejecting calls for all children aged 12-15 to be offered Covid jabs despite that not being its role, Prof Neil Ferguson has said. Last week the Joint Committee on Vacci
1d
The Trump Suburban Squirm
Turn down Republican-base enthusiasm by baiting candidates into distancing themselves from Donald Trump. Turn off swing voters by reminding them of candidates' connections to the former president. The hot move for Democrats in Virginia and New Jersey this fall isn't the Nae Nae or the Electric Slide. It's the Trump suburban squirm. Terry McAuliffe, the former Democratic National Committee chair a
12h
Physicists engineer new property out of 'white' graphene
Ultrathin materials made of a single layer of atoms have riveted scientists' attention since the discovery of the first such material—graphene—about 17 years ago. Among other advances since then, researchers including those from a pioneering lab at MIT have found that stacking individual sheets of the 2D materials, and sometimes twisting them at a slight angle to each other, can give them new prop
8h
Singapore Deploys Multiple Robot Cops to Police Public Areas
Meet Xavier Officials in Singapore have unleashed two new robot cops, both known as Xavier, that are now patrolling the streets and looking for signs of trouble. The two autonomous robots are primarily looking for "bad social behavior," Reuters reports . Singapore's Home Team Science and Technology Agency (HTSTA) announced the start of the program on Sunday, saying that the Xaviers are programmed
5h
Cold classical Kuiper Belt objects
The Kuiper Belt is a disk of small icy bodies, thought to be remnants of the early Solar System, that circles the Sun from the orbit of Neptune (about 30 astronomical units, AU, from the Sun) to about 50 AU. KBOs orbit at significant inclination angles with respect to the plane of the planetary orbits. Those called classical KBOs orbit within a specific range of distances from Neptune, and a subgr
8h
Prenatal gene test Nifty under international scrutiny amid links to Chinese military
Five countries are assessing the BGI Group test amid regulatory concerns about genetic data being sent abroad Health regulators in five countries are examining a prenatal test that collects the DNA of women and foetuses for research after it emerged the test's manufacturer has links to China's military. Some doctors and clinics that promoted and sold the test, marketed under the brand name Nifty,
21h
The Writer Who Saw All of This Coming
T hree years after the release of her novel Fates and Furies —a literary bisection of marriage and privilege that was praised variously by President Barack Obama and Amazon (yes, Amazon ) as the best book of 2015—Lauren Groff was sitting in a lecture theater at Harvard University, thinking about medieval nuns. She wasn't in the market for a new book. She usually has a dozen or so different concep
6h
Creating a non-radiating source of electromagnetism
An international team of researchers has developed a way to create non-radiating sources of electromagnetism. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the group describes their technique and how well it worked when they tested a model based on their ideas.
9h
Did you solve it? The magic of the Borromean rings
The solution to today's puzzle Earlier today I set the following puzzle, inspired by the Borromean rings (left), which are three interlocking loops with the property that when you remove any one of them, the other two are no longer linked. In the puzzle everything falls apart when one element is removed. Continue reading…
1d
The Lead of Apple's Secretive Car Project Just Left to Join Ford
Empty Seats Apple's secretive self-driving car project has been served its next big blow, putting an already troubled project on even thinner ice. The project's lead Doug Field is leaving to join Ford as its chief advanced technology and embedded systems officer, Bloomberg reports . Field has a packed résumé. The automotive veteran was also crucial in helping Tesla launch its blockbuster sedan, t
51min
Contactless and spatially structured cooling by directing thermal radiation
Everyone knows what it's like to be out on a cold and cloudless winter night when the skies are studded with stars. In the open, the cold is all too keenly felt. But in a forest, under the protective cover of the trees, it is less so. The reason for this difference is thermal radiation, which is emitted by the body and, depending on the nature of the surroundings, may be replaced by a smaller amou
10h
Mars Missions Can Only Last 4 Years Due to Radiation
Mars from Hubble: Astronomers took advantage of a rare close approach by Mars in 2001. When the Red Planet was just 43 million miles away, Hubble snapped this picture with the WFPC2. It has a surface resolution of just 10 miles. This is the best image we've gotten of Mars that didn't involve sending a robot there. As the world once again sets its sights on the moon, it can seem like continuing on
9h
Exploring quantum gravity and entanglement using pendulums
When it comes to a marriage with quantum theory, gravity is the lone holdout among the four fundamental forces in nature. The three others—the electromagnetic force, the weak force, which is responsible for radioactive decay, and the strong force, which binds neutrons and protons together within the atomic nucleus—have all merged with quantum theory to successfully describe the universe on the tin
6h
Living sensors probe mysteries of the gut
Research into the human gut and the microbes key to its work—the gut microbiome—has boomed over the last decade or so because scientists have learned that the overall system has a much larger impact on our bodies than previously thought. Imbalances of chemicals produced in the gut, for example, have been linked to diseases including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's, and even hyperactivity in kids. Mean
8h
The oddly interesting history of boredom
This article was originally published on our sister site, Freethink. Freethink has partnered with the Build for Tomorrow podcast, to go inside new episodes each month. Subscribe here to learn more about the crazy, curious things from history that shaped us, and how we can shape the future. In a world suffused with mobile technology, we're often warned that our impulse to distract ourselves at eve
1d
Why does the sound of running water make us want to pee?
The long-running series in which readers answer other readers' questions on subjects ranging from trivial flights of fancy to profound scientific and philosophical concepts Why do many of us have the tendency to want, or need, to pee when we hear running water? Is this equal between female and male, and does age affect the phenomenon? David Cockayne, Cheshire Post your answers (and new questions)
11h
'The point is ambition': are we ready to follow Netflix into space?
The ambitious new look at SpaceX's first all-civilian flight, the streaming platform's first real-time docuseries, takes reality television to space The rise of commercial space travel is here, and for the vast majority who cannot afford its millions-plus price tag, streaming platforms are here to capture it. Starting this week, Netflix will air the first two installments of Countdown: Inspiratio
16h
Hydrogen-burning white dwarfs enjoy slow aging
Could dying stars hold the secret to looking younger? New evidence suggests that white dwarfs could continue to burn hydrogen in the final stages of their lives, causing them to appear more youthful than they actually are. This discovery could have consequences for how astronomers measure the ages of star clusters.
1d
Michael K. Williams on Being Typecast
Michael K. Williams was known most famously for his portrayal of Omar Little on HBO's The Wire . Other roles included Chalky White on Boardwalk Empire —also within the HBO family—as well as Professor Marshall Kane on NBC's Community . In 2018, The Atlantic 's marketing team and HBO joined forces for a series called Question Your Answers , a collection of short films meant to challenge our certain
5h
Urgent need for new approach to combat global grassland degradation
Global grasslands are a source of biodiversity and provide a host of benefits to humans, including food production, water supply, and carbon storage. But their future looks bleak without action to halt their degradation and promote their restoration, according to the authors of a new paper published in the journal Nature Reviews Earth & Environment.
8h
These Advanced Dog Vitamins Are Formulated to Help Your Pets as They Age
Thanks to a variety of advancements in veterinary care and dietary habits, dogs are not just living better, but also longer. In 2020, nearly 50-percent of American dog owners had a dog age 7 or older. While dogs living longer is obviously a good thing, owners are now being forced to deal with more age-related issues than ever before. However, getting older doesn't have to be unduly hard on your p
8min
How do pathogens evolve novel virulence activities, and why does it matter?
Understanding how pathogens evolve is a fundamental component of learning how to protect ourselves and our world from pests and diseases. Yet we are constantly underestimating pathogen evolution, such as in the case of the COVID-19 pandemic, which some believed had been conquered until the arrival of the Delta variant. Similarly, we are often a step or two behind plant pathogens, which is why the
1h
When the Climate Crisis Becomes Unignorable
Every week, our lead climate reporter brings you the big ideas, expert analysis, and vital guidance that will help you flourish on a changing planet. Sign up to get T he Weekly Planet , our guide to living through climate change, in your inbox . In retrospect, last week was an interlude. Hurricane Ida had made landfall in Louisiana as a violent Category 4 storm over the weekend, displacing thousa
1h
Research delves into role of turkeys to Ancestral Pueblo peoples
Research recently published by adjunct assistant professor Cyler Conrad from the Department of Archaeology at The University of New Mexico examines the importance of turkeys to the Ancestral Pueblo people and how they have managed the birds for more than 1,600 years. Evidence of turkeys and various methods of enclosing them is evident in the ancient pueblos all over New Mexico and surrounding area
2h
New data gained on double perovskite oxides
The Journal of Alloys and Compounds has published an article coauthored by the Institute of Solid State Chemistry and Mechanochemistry (the Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences), the Donostia International Physics Centre, and the HSE Tikhonov Moscow Institute of Electronics and Mathematics on the characteristics of cubic double perovskite oxides. To date, experimental measurements of the
2h
Natural archive reveals Atlantic tempests through time
Atlantic hurricanes don't just come and go. They leave clues to their passage through the landscape that last centuries or more. Rice University scientists are using these natural archives to find signs of storms hundreds of years before satellites allowed us to watch them in real time.
2h
Coyotes studied as stand-ins for endangered ferrets
By testing easier-to-study coyotes, researchers from the Cornell Wildlife Health Lab at the College of Veterinary Medicine, in collaboration with the Cheyenne River Sioux tribe, have identified a range of lethal diseases threatening black-footed ferrets—one of the most endangered animals in North America.
2h
New powerful laser passes field test
A powerful experimental laser developed by the European Southern Observatory (ESO), TOPTICA Projects and other industry partners passed a key test last month at the Allgaeuer Volkssternwarte Ottobeuren observatory in Germany. The adaptive-optics laser has important additional capabilities compared to existing systems. It is to be installed at the European Space Agency's (ESA) Optical Ground Statio
2h
Scientists develop AI to predict the success of startup companies
A study in which machine-learning models were trained to assess over 1 million companies has shown that artificial intelligence (AI) can accurately determine whether a startup firm will fail or become successful. The outcome is a tool, Venhound, that has the potential to help investors identify the next unicorn.
2h
Massive and rapid predominantly volcanic CO2 emission during the end-Permian mass extinction [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
The end-Permian mass extinction event (∼252 Mya) is associated with one of the largest global carbon cycle perturbations in the Phanerozoic and is thought to be triggered by the Siberian Traps volcanism. Sizable carbon isotope excursions (CIEs) have been found at numerous sites around the world, suggesting massive quantities of…
2h
UV and bacteriophages as a chemical-free approach for cleaning membranes from anaerobic bioreactors [Engineering]
Anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) for wastewater treatment has attracted much interest due to its efficacy in providing high-quality effluent with minimal energy costs. However, membrane biofouling represents the main bottleneck for AnMBR because it diminishes flux and necessitates frequent replacement of membranes. In this study, we assessed the feasibility of…
2h
The endogenous circadian system worsens asthma at night independent of sleep and other daily behavioral or environmental cycles [Physiology]
Asthma often worsens at night. To determine if the endogenous circadian system contributes to the nocturnal worsening of asthma, independent of sleep and other behavioral and environmental day/night cycles, we studied patients with asthma (without steroid use) over 3 wk in an ambulatory setting (with combined circadian, environmental, and behavioral…
2h
Two-dimensional fractal nanocrystals templating for substantial performance enhancement of polyamide nanofiltration membrane [Chemistry]
In this study, we report the emergence of two-dimensional (2D) branching fractal structures (BFS) in the nanoconfinement between the active and the support layer of a thin-film-composite polyamide (TFC-PA) nanofiltration membrane. These BFS are crystal dendrites of NaCl formed when salts are either added to the piperazine solution during the…
2h
FGF-2-dependent signaling activated in aged human skeletal muscle promotes intramuscular adipogenesis [Medical Sciences]
Aged skeletal muscle is markedly affected by fatty muscle infiltration, and strategies to reduce the occurrence of intramuscular adipocytes are urgently needed. Here, we show that fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) not only stimulates muscle growth but also promotes intramuscular adipogenesis. Using multiple screening assays upstream and downstream of microRNA (miR)-29a…
2h
Membranes for olefin-paraffin separation: An industrial perspective [Physical Sciences]
In the next decade, separation science will be an important research topic in addressing complex challenges like reducing carbon footprint, lowering energy cost, and making industrial processes simpler. In industrial chemical processes, particularly in petrochemical operations, separation and product refining steps are responsible for up to 30% of energy use…
2h
High-impact innovations for high-salinity membrane desalination [Engineering]
Reducing the cost of high-salinity (>75 g/L total dissolved solids) brine concentration technology would unlock the potential for vast inland water supplies and promote the safe management of concentrated aqueous waste streams. Impactful innovation will target component performance improvements and cost reductions that yield the highest impact on system costs,…
2h
Engineering Li/Na selectivity in 12-Crown-4-functionalized polymer membranes [Applied Physical Sciences]
Lithium is widely used in contemporary energy applications, but its isolation from natural reserves is plagued by time-consuming and costly processes. While polymer membranes could, in principle, circumvent these challenges by efficiently extracting lithium from aqueous solutions, they usually exhibit poor ion-specific selectivity. Toward this end, we have incorporated host–guest…
2h
Interaction-based ion selectivity exhibited by self-assembled, cross-linked zwitterionic copolymer membranes [Engineering]
Water filtration membranes with advanced ion selectivity are urgently needed for resource recovery and the production of clean drinking water. This work investigates the separation capabilities of cross-linked zwitterionic copolymer membranes, a self-assembled membrane system featuring subnanometer zwitterionic nanochannels. We demonstrate that selective zwitterion–anion interactions simultaneousl
2h
Tunable membranes incorporating artificial water channels for high-performance brackish/low-salinity water reverse osmosis desalination [Chemistry]
Membrane-based technologies have a tremendous role in water purification and desalination. Inspired by biological proteins, artificial water channels (AWCs) have been proposed to overcome the permeability/selectivity trade-off of desalination processes. Promising strategies exploiting the AWC with angstrom-scale selectivity have revealed their impressive performances when embedded in bilayer membr
2h
Bottom-up synthesis of graphene films hosting atom-thick molecular-sieving apertures [Engineering]
Incorporation of a high density of molecular-sieving nanopores in the graphene lattice by the bottom-up synthesis is highly attractive for high-performance membranes. Herein, we achieve this by a controlled synthesis of nanocrystalline graphene where incomplete growth of a few nanometer-sized, misoriented grains generates molecular-sized pores in the lattice. The density…
2h
Zeolite-like performance for xylene isomer purification using polymer-derived carbon membranes [Engineering]
Polymers of intrinsic microporosity (PIMs) have been used as precursors for the fabrication of porous carbon molecular sieve (CMS) membranes. PIM-1, a prototypical PIM material, uses a fused-ring structure to increase chain rigidity between spirobisindane repeat units. These two factors inhibit effective chain packing, thus resulting in high free volume…
2h
Pentiptycene-based ladder polymers with configurational free volume for enhanced gas separation performance and physical aging resistance [Chemistry]
Polymers of intrinsic microporosity (PIMs) have shown promise in pushing the limits of gas separation membranes, recently redefining upper bounds for a variety of gas pair separations. However, many of these membranes still suffer from reductions in permeability over time, removing the primary advantage of this class of polymer. In…
2h
Whole-blood metabolomics of dementia patients reveal classes of disease-linked metabolites [Biochemistry]
Dementia is caused by factors that damage neurons. We quantified small molecular markers in whole blood of dementia patients, using nontargeted liquid chromatography–mass spectroscopy (LC-MS). Thirty-three metabolites, classified into five groups (A to E), differed significantly in dementia patients, compared with healthy elderly subjects. Seven A metabolites present in plasma,…
2h
Blood pressure, executive function, and network connectivity in middle-aged adults at risk of dementia in late life [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
Midlife blood pressure is associated with structural brain changes, cognitive decline, and dementia in late life. However, the relationship between early adulthood blood pressure exposure, brain structure and function, and cognitive performance in midlife is not known. A better understanding of these relationships in the preclinical stage may advance our…
2h
MAX mutant small-cell lung cancers exhibit impaired activities of MGA-dependent noncanonical polycomb repressive complex [Medical Sciences]
The MYC axis is disrupted in cancer, predominantly through activation of the MYC family oncogenes but also through inactivation of the MYC partner MAX or of the MAX partner MGA. MGA and MAX are also members of the polycomb repressive complex, ncPRC1.6. Here, we use genetically modified MAX-deficient small-cell lung…
2h
Hairless regulates heterochromatin maintenance and muscle stem cell function as a histone demethylase antagonist [Cell Biology]
Skeletal muscle possesses remarkable regenerative ability because of the resident muscle stem cells (MuSCs). A prominent feature of quiescent MuSCs is a high content of heterochromatin. However, little is known about the mechanisms by which heterochromatin is maintained in MuSCs. By comparing gene-expression profiles from quiescent and activated MuSCs, we…
2h
Lipids modulate the BH3-independent membrane targeting and activation of BAX and Bcl-xL [Biochemistry]
Regulation of apoptosis is tightly linked with the targeting of numerous Bcl-2 proteins to the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM), where their activation or inhibition dictates cell death or survival. According to the traditional view of apoptotic regulation, BH3-effector proteins are indispensable for the cytosol-to-MOM targeting and activation of proapoptotic and…
2h
Mitochondria-localized AMPK responds to local energetics and contributes to exercise and energetic stress-induced mitophagy [Physiology]
Mitochondria form a complex, interconnected reticulum that is maintained through coordination among biogenesis, dynamic fission, and fusion and mitophagy, which are initiated in response to various cues to maintain energetic homeostasis. These cellular events, which make up mitochondrial quality control, act with remarkable spatial precision, but what governs such spatial…
2h
Ethnic studies increases longer-run academic engagement and attainment [Social Sciences]
Increased interest in anti-racist education has motivated the rapidly growing but politically contentious adoption of ethnic studies (ES) courses in US public schools. A long-standing rationale for ES courses is that their emphasis on culturally relevant and critically engaged content (e.g., social justice, anti-racism, stereotypes, contemporary social movements) has potent…
2h
Superconductivity-driven ferromagnetism and spin manipulation using vortices in the magnetic superconductor EuRbFe4As4 [Physics]
Magnetic superconductors are specific materials exhibiting two antagonistic phenomena, superconductivity and magnetism, whose mutual interaction induces various emergent phenomena, such as the reentrant superconducting transition associated with the suppression of superconductivity around the magnetic transition temperature (Tm), highlighting the impact of magnetism on superconductivity. In this s
2h
Prediction of arrhythmia susceptibility through mathematical modeling and machine learning [Physiology]
At present, the QT interval on the electrocardiographic (ECG) waveform is the most common metric for assessing an individual's susceptibility to ventricular arrhythmias, with a long QT, or, at the cellular level, a long action potential duration (APD) considered high risk. However, the limitations of this simple approach have long…
2h
Inherent stochasticity during insulator-metal transition in VO2 [Applied Physical Sciences]
Vanadium dioxide (VO2), which exhibits a near-room-temperature insulator–metal transition, has great potential in applications of neuromorphic computing devices. Although its volatile switching property, which could emulate neuron spiking, has been studied widely, nanoscale studies of the structural stochasticity across the phase transition are still lacking. In this study, using in…
2h
Quantitative evaluation of the feasibility of sampling the ice plumes at Enceladus for biomarkers of extraterrestrial life [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Enceladus, an icy moon of Saturn, is a compelling destination for a probe seeking biosignatures of extraterrestrial life because its subsurface ocean exhibits significant organic chemistry that is directly accessible by sampling cryovolcanic plumes. State-of-the-art organic chemical analysis instruments can perform valuable science measurements at Enceladus provided they receive sufficient…
2h
Membrane science emerging as a convergent scientific field with molecular origins and understanding, and global impact [Physical Sciences]
Membrane separations science concerns the selective transport of chemical species across molecularly designed barriers that are effectively two-dimensional. This interdisciplinary field has become the focus of many scientific communities in recent years, including researchers in supramolecular chemistry, materials science, environmental science, polymer science (chemistry and physics), colloid and
2h
The vitellogenin receptor functionality of the migratory locust depends on its phosphorylation by juvenile hormone [Developmental Biology]
Vitellogenin receptor (VgR) plays a pivotal role in ovarian vitellogenin (Vg) uptake and vertical transmission of pathogenic microbes and Wolbachia symbionts. However, the regulatory mechanisms of VgR action as an endocytic receptor and translocation from oocyte cytoplasm to the membrane remain poorly understood. Here, by using the migratory locust Locusta…
2h
Hydrodynamic nonlinear response of interacting integrable systems [Physics]
We develop a formalism for computing the nonlinear response of interacting integrable systems. Our results are asymptotically exact in the hydrodynamic limit where perturbing fields vary sufficiently slowly in space and time. We show that spatially resolved nonlinear response distinguishes interacting integrable systems from noninteracting ones, exemplifying this for the…
2h
Individualistic culture increases economic mobility in the United States [Economic Sciences]
Where an individual grows up has large implications for their long-term economic outcomes, including earnings and intergenerational mobility. Even within the United States, the "causal effect of place" varies greatly and cannot be fully explained by socioeconomic conditions. Across different nations, variation in growth and mobility have been linked to…
2h
Rising nonmarital first childbearing among college-educated women: Evidence from three national studies [Social Sciences]
Levels of nonmarital first childbearing are assessed using recent administrations of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1997 Cohort; the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health; and the National Survey of Family Growth. Results confirm that the higher a woman's educational attainment, the less likely she is to…
2h
Local- and regional-scale racial and ethnic disparities in air pollution determined by long-term mobile monitoring [Sustainability Science]
Disparity in air pollution exposure arises from variation at multiple spatial scales: along urban-to-rural gradients, between individual cities within a metropolitan region, within individual neighborhoods, and between city blocks. Here, we improve on existing capabilities to systematically compare urban variation at several scales, from hyperlocal ( 10…
2h
Cultural similarity among coreligionists within and between countries [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
Cultural evolutionary theories suggest that world religions have consolidated beliefs, values, and practices within a superethnic cultural identity. It follows that affiliation with religious traditions would be reliably associated with global variation in cultural traits. To test this hypothesis, we measured cultural distance between religious groups within and between countries,…
2h
Relative mobility of screw versus edge dislocations controls the ductile-to-brittle transition in metals [Engineering]
Body-centered cubic metals including steels and refractory metals suffer from an abrupt ductile-to-brittle transition (DBT) at a critical temperature, hampering their performance and applications. Temperature-dependent dislocation mobility and dislocation nucleation have been proposed as the potential factors responsible for the DBT. However, the origin of this sudden switch from toughness…
2h
Interspecies activation correlations reveal functional correspondences between marmoset and human brain areas [Neuroscience]
The common marmoset has enormous promise as a nonhuman primate model of human brain functions. While resting-state functional MRI (fMRI) has provided evidence for a similar organization of marmoset and human cortices, the technique cannot be used to map the functional correspondences of brain regions between species. This limitation can…
2h
Identifying asymptomatic spreaders of antimicrobial-resistant pathogens in hospital settings [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Antimicrobial-resistant organisms (AMROs) can colonize people without symptoms for long periods of time, during which these agents can spread unnoticed to other patients in healthcare systems. The accurate identification of asymptomatic spreaders of AMRO in hospital settings is essential for supporting the design of interventions against healthcare-associated infections (HAIs). However,…
2h
Correction for Huidobro et al., Fresnel drag in space-time-modulated metamaterials [Corrections]
APPLIED PHYSICAL SCIENCES Correction for "Fresnel drag in space–time-modulated metamaterials," by Paloma A. Huidobro, Emanuele Galiffi, Sébastien Guenneau, Richard V. Craster, and J. B. Pendry, which was first published November 25, 2019; 10.1073/pnas.1915027116 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 116, 24943–24948). The authors wish to note the following: "The Lorentz transformation…
2h
Correction for Reynolds et al., Matriliny reverses gender disparities in inflammation and hypertension among the Mosuo of China [Corrections]
ANTHROPOLOGY Correction for "Matriliny reverses gender disparities in inflammation and hypertension among the Mosuo of China," by Adam Z. Reynolds, Katherine Wander, Chun-Yi Sum, Mingjie Su, Melissa Emery Thompson, Paul L. Hooper, Hui Li, Mary K. Shenk, Kathrine E. Starkweather, Tami Blumenfield, and Siobhán M. Mattison, which was first published…
2h
p62 condensates are a hub for proteasome-mediated protein turnover in the nucleus [Cell Biology]
The ability to selectively degrade cellular components ranging from proteins to large complexes and organelles is essential for cellular quality control. Failure leads to accumulation of unwanted material that gives rise to neurodegeneration, cancer, and infectious diseases (1). Two main degradative pathways have evolved: the ubiquitin–proteasome system (UPS) and autophagy….
2h
Correction for O'Sullivan et al., Dissociating antibacterial from ototoxic effects of gentamicin C-subtypes [Corrections]
CELL BIOLOGY Correction for "Dissociating antibacterial from ototoxic effects of gentamicin C-subtypes," by Mary E. O'Sullivan, Yohan Song, Robert Greenhouse, Randy Lin, Adela Perez, Patrick J. Atkinson, Jacob P. MacDonald, Zehra Siddiqui, Dennis Lagasca, Kate Comstock, Markus E. Huth, Alan G. Cheng, and Anthony J. Ricci, which was first published…
2h
Correction to Supporting Information for Ponmalar et al., Correlated protein conformational states and membrane dynamics during attack by pore-forming toxins [SI Correction]
BIOPHYSICS AND COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY Correction to Supporting Information for "Correlated protein conformational states and membrane dynamics during attack by pore-forming toxins," by Ilanila I. Ponmalar, Ramesh Cheerla, K. Ganapathy Ayappa, and Jaydeep K. Basu, which was first published June 12, 2019; 10.1073/pnas.1821897116 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 116, 12839–12844). The…
2h
Koala retrovirus genetic diversity and transmission dynamics within captive koala populations [Microbiology]
Koala populations are currently in rapid decline across Australia, with infectious diseases being a contributing cause. The koala retrovirus (KoRV) is a gammaretrovirus present in both captive and wild koala colonies that presents an additional challenge for koala conservation in addition to habitat loss, climate change, and other factors. Currently,…
2h
Engineered SARS-CoV-2 receptor binding domain improves manufacturability in yeast and immunogenicity in mice [Engineering]
Global containment of COVID-19 still requires accessible and affordable vaccines for low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Recently approved vaccines provide needed interventions, albeit at prices that may limit their global access. Subunit vaccines based on recombinant proteins are suited for large-volume microbial manufacturing to yield billions of doses annually, minimizing…
2h
Assisted gene flow using cryopreserved sperm in critically endangered coral [Applied Biological Sciences]
Assisted gene flow (AGF) is a conservation intervention to accelerate species adaptation to climate change by importing genetic diversity into at-risk populations. Corals exemplify both the need for AGF and its technical challenges; corals have declined in abundance, suffered pervasive reproductive failures, and struggled to adapt to climate change, yet…
2h
Correction to Supporting Information for Weiler et al., mTOR target NDRG1 confers MGMT-dependent resistance to alkylating chemotherapy [SI Correction]
MEDICAL SCIENCES Correction to Supporting Information for "mTOR target NDRG1 confers MGMT-dependent resistance to alkylating chemotherapy," by Markus Weiler, Jonas Blaes, Stefan Pusch, Felix Sahm, Marcus Czabanka, Sebastian Luger, Lukas Bunse, Gergely Solecki, Viktoria Eichwald, Manfred Jugold, Sibylle Hodecker, Matthias Osswald, Christoph Meisner, Thomas Hielscher, Petra Rübmann, Philipp-Niklas P
2h
Why TikTok is poised to change how we speak
Is TikTok changing how we speak? A linguist weighs in on the platform's effect on language trends. Nicole Holliday ( @mixedlinguist on Twitter) co-hosts the Slate podcast " Spectacular Vernacular ," where she recently discussed the "TikTok language rabbit hole." "Linguistic change doesn't tend to be top down…" Largely characterized as a Gen Z phenomenon, TikTok is a social app with more than 100
3h
Special materials let tiny critters deliver big pain
Ant mandibles, spider fangs, and scorpion sting tips are made of special materials that deliver sharpness for penetrating prey that the limited forces of their small muscles don't otherwise allow, research shows. That knowledge won't ease the pain of puncture in human skin, but it may be useful for designing new precision cutting tools, says Robert Schofield, a researcher in the physics departmen
3h
Is your water safe? New method could tell
Most Americans take safe, clean drinking water for granted, not realizing that what's flowing from their faucets likely contains many potentially harmful chemicals. A recent study by the non-profit Environmental Working Group revealed that most of us regularly consume water polluted by chemical compounds that could cause a host of health problems, including cancer. Current regulations focus on on
3h
Switzerland Covers Glacier With Giant Blankets to Keep It From Melting
Glacier Blanket A giant glacier on Mount Titlis in Switzerland has shrunk drastically in recent decades, thanks to global warming. Officials from a local skiing resort are now trying to slow the melting by throwing giant fleece blankets over the glacier, covering a cumulative area just over a million square feet, or around 14 soccer fields, according to Reuters . The goal is to insulate the vulne
3h
Scientists simulate step in hepatitis B viral infection to help develop therapies targeted at capsid disassembly
With up to 2.4 million U.S. cases and over 250 million chronic cases globally, hepatitis B infection persists despite the availability of a vaccine. Vaccines work by immunizing the body against a virus to prevent infection; however, there is no cure for individuals who do become infected (for example, at birth). Hepatitis B infection can lead to liver damage and even cancer, posing a threat to pub
3h
Educational workshops may bolster women's empowerment
Researchers at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health and the University of Ibadan, Nigeria, led a randomized control trial in Ibadan, Nigeria, to evaluate educational programs to empower women by working with couples in three critical areas: Spousal relations, and financial and reproductive decision-making.
3h
What If We Taught Robots the Tardigrade Two-Step?
microscopic life form on white ground. (Photo: dottedhippo/Getty Images) (Photo: dottedhippo/Getty Images) Regular readers will know I turn into a starry-eyed idiot when new tardigrade news breaks . There's just so much to love about them. Is it gauche to be a biologist and have a favorite animal? The adorkable and insanely tanky tardigrade might be mine. They sit at the junction of biology and p
4h
Now Anyone Can Invest in Real Estate Thanks to This Innovative Online Platform
Just like everything else in this world of ours, real estate investing has historically had two different sets of rules. There are the rules that regular people have to abide by, and then the special set of rules for ultra-wealthy investors. However, changing laws and advancing tech has leveled the real estate playing field. Thanks to platforms like DiversyFund, everyday investors can now diversi
4h
Theory of canine mind: can dogs understand human intent?
Theory of mind describes humans' ability to attribute mental states to other people. Evidence suggests that some animals might possess limited forms of theory of mind, including apes, birds, and dogs. A new study suggests that dogs are able to tell the difference when someone withholds a treat unintentionally versus intentionally. When you accidentally step on a dog's tail, does she realize that
4h
Simple creation of a super multi-element catalyst homogeneously containing 14 elements
A joint research group has successfully developed a "nanoporous super multi-element catalyst" that contains 14 elements which are mixed uniformly at the atomic level and used as a catalyst. This catalyst was found to show excellent properties as an electrode material for water electrolysis due to the multi-element superposition effect (cocktail effect). The researchers are expecting it will be dev
5h
Avocados change belly fat distribution in women, controlled study finds
An avocado a day could help redistribute belly fat in women toward a healthier profile, according to a new study. One hundred and five adults with overweight and obesity participated in a randomized controlled trial that provided one meal a day for 12 weeks. Women who consumed avocado as part of their daily meal had a reduction in deeper visceral abdominal fat.
5h
The history of insects living on the open ocean tracked with the history of the currents they ride
The open oceans are harsh and hostile environments where insects might not be expected to thrive. In fact, only one insect group, ocean skaters, or water striders, has adapted to life on the open seas. How these insects evolved to conquer the high seas, however, was not known. Now, a study of the genetics of skaters provides a clue. The answer has to do with when major currents in the eastern Paci
5h
Seven personality and behavior traits identified in cats
Researchers have developed a new comprehensive questionnaire for surveying feline personality and behavior. A dataset of more than 4,300 cats representing 26 breed groups revealed seven personality and behavior traits, with significant differences observed between breeds.
5h
New Bionic Arm Lets Amputees Feel Touch, Retrofits to Existing Prosthetics
We've come a long, long way from hooks and peg legs: Scientists from the Lerner Research Institute at the Cleveland Clinic have developed bionic arms that can directly interface with the motor and sensory neurons of amputees, affording a truly unprecedented degree of control and sensory fidelity. Even cooler, they did it with commercially available hardware retrofitted to existing prosthetics. Th
5h
Viruses, even alien ones, are delicate things | Letter
The Sars-CoV-2 virus cannot keep going beyond about two metres from its host, writes Martin Yuille Prof Paul Davies's headline-grabbing proposal of an invasion by alien viruses ( Viruses may exist 'elsewhere in the universe', warns scientist, 6 September ) may well raise a scientific eyebrow or two. We can be confident that living cells emerged before viruses (on any planet) because viruses are,
5h
Multi-purpose 'mini-CRISPR' is like a tiny Swiss Army knife
Bioengineers have repurposed a "non-working" CRISPR system to make a smaller version of the genome engineering tool. Its diminutive size should make it easier to deliver into human cells, tissues and the body for gene therapy. The common analogy for CRISPR gene editing is that it works like molecular scissors, cutting out select sections of DNA. Stanley Qi likes that analogy, but thinks it's time
6h
Corals roll with the punches
Corals may be able to cope with climate change in the coming decades better than previously thought — but will still struggle with rapidly intensifying rates of climate change.
6h
Making catalytic surfaces more active to help decarbonize fuels and chemicals
Electrochemical reactions that are accelerated using catalysts lie at the heart of many processes for making and using fuels, chemicals, and materials—including storing electricity from renewable energy sources in chemical bonds, an important capability for decarbonizing transportation fuels. Now, research at MIT could open the door to ways of making certain catalysts more active, and thus enhanci
6h
Evidence for how a key transcription factor manages access to DNA
CTCF is a transcription factor that has been a research target due to its role in regulating a critical oncogene called MYC. Scientists at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital have found direct evidence that CTCF governs chromatin accessibility, the process of opening tightly spooled DNA so that genes can be expressed. The findings were published in Genome Biology.
6h
AI-fueled software reveals accurate protein structure prediction
"The dream of predicting a protein shape just from its gene sequence is now a reality," said Paul Adams, Associate Laboratory Director for Biosciences at Berkeley Lab. For Adams and other structural biologists who study proteins, predicting their shape offers a key to understanding their function and accelerating treatments for diseases like cancer and COVID-19.
6h
Why people resist disaster preparedness spending
If the New Orleans region had invested more aggressively in disaster preparedness instead of disaster relief, the total cost of Hurricane Katrina could have been just $7 billion. That's compared to the estimated $125 billion to $170 billion economic fallout the storm—the most costly US natural disaster to date—caused, says Michael Bechtel, associate professor of political science and director of
6h
HPV vaccines will reduce cancer, but not until 2045
Vaccinations against human papillomavirus (HPV), a major cause of throat and back of mouth cancers, are expected to yield significant reductions in the rates of these cancers in the US, but not until after 2045. HPV is the most common sexually transmitted infectious virus worldwide. HPV infections are often silent, and while most infections clear, some are chronic and can trigger cancers includin
6h
Developmental genetics of color pattern establishment in cats
Nature Communications, Published online: 07 September 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25348-2 Intricate color patterns are a defining aspect of morphological diversity in the Felidae. Here the authors apply morphological and single-cell gene expression analysis to fetal skin of domestic cats to identify when, where, and how, during fetal development, felid color patterns are established.
6h
Your three brains
The "triune brain" model dates back to the 1960s. The three brains reflect the evolutionary progress of humankind from primitive to intelligent. Sometimes the interactions between the brains can be surprising. Your reptilian brain, explained | Robert Sapolsky | Big Think youtu.be The " triune brain " model dates back to the 1960s, when it was first introduced by neuroscientist Paul MacLean. The i
7h
The Best Compost Bins for Beginners to Experts
Composting is a way to biocycle, or recycle organic material, and nourish your garden — and compost bins are all you really need to do it, and begin to change your home's carbon footprint for the better. I n recent years, the composting movement is gaining momentum, from suburban backyards and rural areas to urban apartment blocks. There are even avenues for composting if you don't have a roomy y
7h
'You're not geriatric at 35': women on the eggs, embryos and sperm storage limit increase
The rise to a 55-year limit has been welcomed, but some have concerns about the impact on children The 10-year storage limit for freezing embryos, eggs and sperm will be replaced with a right for individuals or couples to keep them for up to a maximum of 55 years. While being a welcome change for many, there are concerns about whether the process is affordable for all and the impact on children o
7h
Tea time gets flavor boost from thin film, impure water
Getting your day started sometimes feels like it requires magic, but making a good cup of tea requires a little science. In Physics of Fluids, researchers from ETH Zurich describe how they applied the science of rheology to the seemingly quaint purpose of improving the quality of a cup of black tea.
7h
How to stop languishing and start finding flow | Adam Grant
Have you found yourself staying up late, joylessly bingeing TV shows and doomscrolling through the news, or simply navigating your day uninspired and aimless? Chances are you're languishing, says organizational psychologist Adam Grant — a psychic malaise that has become all too common after many months of the pandemic. He breaks down the key indicators of languishing and presents three ways to es
7h
Turn It Off It's on Fire! | Street Outlaws: Memphis
Stream Street Outlaws: Memphis on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/street-outlaws-memphis About Street Outlaws: Memphis: Street Outlaws is traveling to the toughest, meanest and wildest streets in the South, as it heads to Memphis to spotlight JJ Da Boss and his team of family and friends who have been racing together for decades. #StreetOutlawsMemphis #StreetRacing #Discovery Subs
8h
Gene Therapies Are Almost Here, But Healthcare Isn't Ready for Sky-High Prices
Zolgensma —which treats spinal muscular atrophy , a rare genetic disease that damages nerve cells, leading to muscle decay—is currently the most expensive drug in the world. A one-time treatment of the life-saving drug for a young child costs $2.1 million . While Zolgensma's exorbitant price is an outlier today, by the end of the decade there'll be dozens of cell and gene therapies, costing hundr
8h
Starlink, Elon Musk, and the promise (and perils) of Internet from space
Elon Musk said of his space Internet venture: "Starlink will effectively reach the 3-4 percent hardest to reach customers, or people who have no connectivity." And even though the product is still being tested, they've found political backers in Washington DC, where interest in expanding broadband is at an all time high. In this documentary, we take a hard look at that promise, and at the state o
8h
The Spatial Mouse Atlas: New insights into cell fate
High-resolution gene expression maps have been combined with single-cell genomics data to create a new resource for studying how cells adopt different identities during mammalian development. The Spatial Mouse Atlas is the result of a collaboration between researchers at EMBL's European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI), the Babraham Institute, the Cambridge Stem Cell Institute, the Cancer Resea
8h
New method makes it easier to predict algae blooms
Toxic algae can pose serious problems. Mussels become poisonous and aquaculture can be wiped out. But despite the monitoring of algae and toxins, it is very difficult to forecast when an algal bloom will occur. Now a research team at the University of Gothenburg in co-operation with Oslo University has discovered a way to improve the ability to predict toxic algae blooms.
8h
Investors turn to suburbs in Helsinki, with varying results
One- and two-room-flats are being built in Myyrmäki, and family apartments in Myllypuro. The difference is explained above all by various planning and land transfer requirements, says researcher Johanna Lilius. The revival of housing estate neighborhoods can become expensive for older residents.
8h
Student collaboration provides new insights into high-quality drinking water at lower cost
Extensive purification is required to produce reliable and tasty drinking water. Purification consists of a series of processes, and water softening is an important step in water treatment. Currently, most water softening processes use a specific type of softening reactor, known as liquid-solid fluidised (LSF) bed reactors. It is estimated that millions of cubic meters of water per year are soften
8h
Study illuminates origins of lung cancer in never smokers
A genomic analysis of lung cancer in people with no history of smoking has found that a majority of these tumors arise from the accumulation of mutations caused by natural processes in the body. This study describes three molecular subtypes of lung cancer in people who have never smoked. These insights will help unlock the mystery of how lung cancer arises in people who have no history of smoking
8h
Inga lungskador hos unga efter corona
Att coronaviruset kan leda till långtidseffekter, så kallad långtidscovid, har blivit allt tydligare under pandemin. Bland annat har långtidssjuka drabbats av försämrad lungkapacitet. Men nu visar en svensk och en tysk studie att coronaviruset inte tycks ge långsiktiga lungproblem hos barn och unga vuxna. –En mycket positiv nyhet, säger Erik Melén, professor i pediatrik.
8h
COVID-19 awareness may reduce demand for wildlife products in Asia
People in certain parts of Asia with a higher self-reported awareness of the COVID-19 pandemic may be up to 24% less likely to consume wildlife products in the future, according to a survey of 5,000 individuals published in Nature Ecology & Evolution. These findings suggest that communicating disease risks—especially those associated with wildlife consumption—could have dual benefits for infectiou
8h
Abba: Who actually likes them?
It may have been almost 40 years since their last single, but Abba are now back in the charts with two new songs—I Still Have Faith in You and Don't Shut Me Down. The new songs form part of a ten-track album that will be released in November.
9h
Bird malaria spreading via global hotspots
Bird species around the globe are suffering and dying from a type of malaria and, while these strains are not infectious to humans, they're spreading quickly through global transmission hotspots.
9h
Extreme views are widespread in classrooms in England
Schools across England lack the resources and training to teach pupils how to reject and discuss dangerous extremist views and ideologies according to a major new study by UCL researchers and commissioned by education charity SINCE 9/11.
9h
Photoluminescence control by hyperbolic metamaterials and metasurfaces
In a new publication from Opto-Electronic Advances, researchers led by Professor Andrei V. Lavrinenko and Dr. Pavel N. Melentiev from the DTU Fotonik-Department of Photonics Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby, Denmark and the Nanoplasmonics and Nanophotonics Group, Institute of Spectroscopy RAS, Moscow, Russia discuss photoluminescence control by hyperbolic metamaterials and meta
9h
The Aging ISS
The International Space Station (ISS) is getting old. Construction started on the station in 1998 and it can been continuously occupied since November 2000. Construction took 10 years, 30 missions, 15 space agencies, and 15 countries to complete. The lifespan of the modules that make up the ISS was originally set at 15 years, but this has been extended to 30 years, with the ISS commissioned throu
10h
Daily briefing: These tuna species are no longer endangered
Nature, Published online: 06 September 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02446-1 Tuna conservation is working — but Komodo dragons are endangered, says Red List. Plus, freak cold snaps are linked to Arctic warming and why we write letters of recommendation for ourselves.
10h
Undervisningen i programmering för ytlig
I skolan får elever experimentera och lära sig hur man bygger och kodar föremål, men de får ingen generell förståelse för hur programmerade vardagsföremål är uppbyggda och fungerar. 2018 infördes programmering som ett nytt innehåll i grundskolans läroplan. Det kopplades till flera ämnen – matematik, teknik, slöjd och samhällskunskap – för att eleverna skulle få en bred förståelse i vad programmer
11h
Introducing two sites that claim to sell authorships on scientific papers
Two years ago, we reported on a website based in Russia that claimed to have brokered authorships for more than 10,000 researchers. (Apparently, neither our coverage nor a cease-and-desist letter from Clarivate Analytics had any effect on the site's operations.) And now, we bring you news of what look like two very similar sites — … Continue reading
12h
Transport in helical Luttinger liquids in the fractional quantum Hall regime
Nature Communications, Published online: 07 September 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25631-2 Previous work has shown that helical domain walls can form between states of different spin-polarization during a ferromagnetic spin transition in the fractional quantum Hall regime. Here, the authors study the transport through a single helical domain wall and find strong deviations from a simplified theor
12h
Transcriptional network involving ERG and AR orchestrates Distal-less homeobox-1 mediated prostate cancer progression
Nature Communications, Published online: 07 September 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25623-2 Distal-less homeobox 1 (DLX1) is reported as a prostate cancer (PCa) diagnostic biomarker, but the mechanism for its upregulation in PCa is unclear. Here the authors show that ERG, AR and FOXA1 transcriptionally regulates DLX1 expression in PCa, and the inhibition of this ERG/AR transcriptional circuitry wi
12h
Different historical generation intervals in human populations inferred from Neanderthal fragment lengths and mutation signatures
Nature Communications, Published online: 07 September 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25524-4 Historical interbreeding between Neanderthals and humans should leave signatures of historical demographics in modern human genomes. Analysing the size distribution of Neanderthal fragments in non-African genomes suggests consistent differences in the generation interval across Eurasia, and that this could
12h
Ferroelectric phase-transition frustration near a tricritical composition point
Nature Communications, Published online: 07 September 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25543-1 Phase transition brings a plethora of exotic phenomena and intriguing effects such as spin and charge frustration. However, the phase transition order is not always explicit. Here, the authors discover phase transition frustration near a tricritical composition point in ferroelectric Pb(Zr,Ti)O3.
12h
Efficient access to aliphatic esters by photocatalyzed alkoxycarbonylation of alkenes with alkyloxalyl chlorides
Nature Communications, Published online: 07 September 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25628-x Aliphatic esters are essential constituents of biologically active compounds but their preparation from readily available olefins remains challenging. Here the authors show a strategy to access aliphatic esters from olefins through a unique photocatalyzed alkoxycarbonylation reaction.
12h
In situ inorganic conductive network formation in high-voltage single-crystal Ni-rich cathodes
Nature Communications, Published online: 07 September 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25611-6 Single-crystal Ni-rich cathodes suffer from side reactions with the electrolyte and slow Li-ion transport during high-voltage cycling. Herein, a Li1.4Y0.4Ti1.6(PO4)3 coating is applied to facilitate the Li-ion transport and improve the cycling life of the cell.
12h
Bio-inspired poly-DL-serine materials resist the foreign-body response
Nature Communications, Published online: 07 September 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25581-9 Implantation-caused foreign-body response is a commonly encountered issue and can result in failure of implants. Here, the authors demonstrate that a highly water soluble, biocompatible, and easily accessible poly-DL-serine hydrogel can mitigate foreign-body response.
12h
Proximity proteomics identifies PAK4 as a component of Afadin–Nectin junctions
Nature Communications, Published online: 07 September 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25011-w PAK4 is a kinase involved in cell-cell junctions, though the identify of the local protein network involving PAK4 is unclear. Here, the authors performed proximity proteomic analysis on mammalian PAK4 and find that PAK4 is associated with Afadin-dependent junctions, and report putative PAK4 phosphorylation
12h
Så tänker gymnasieelever om religion
I sociala medier sprids desinformation om religion, men här finns också igenkänning. Nyhetsmedier, film och tv-serier ger däremot ofta en stereotyp bild. Gymnasieelevers möte med religion beskrivs i en ny avhandling. I sin avhandling har religionssociologen och gymnasieläraren Anna Wrammert undersökt hur gymnasieelever med olika etnisk och religiös bakgrund reflekterar kring möten med religion i
12h
Dispatches from a world aflame
Nature, Published online: 07 September 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02426-5 From California's deadliest blaze to a new planetary fire regime, how wildfires are reshaping our climate-changed planet.
13h
Storbritannien tillåter test av crispr-förändrat vete
Den brittiska regeringen har godkänt ett flerårigt fältförsök med genförändrat vete. Med hjälp av gensaxen crispr har forskare vid forskningsinstitutet Rothamsted Research norr om London slagit av en gen hos vetet. Resultatet är att vetet då bildar mindre mängder av aminosyran asparagin.Vid bakning och rostning omvandlas asparagin till det cancerframkallande ämnet akrylamid.
13h
Tredje dos vaccin till äldre anser expertgrupp
Äldre och viss vårdpersonal bör få en tredje dos vaccin mot covid-19. Det anser Vetenskapsakademins expertgrupp. Även ungdomar mellan 12 och 15 år bör vaccineras om smittspridningen av coronaviruset ökar. I sin rapport sammanfattar Vetenskapsakademins expertgrupp om covid-19 internationella resultat om vaccinernas skyddseffekt och beskriver speciellt sårbara grupper som man anser bör prioriteras,
14h
Climate crisis could double frequency of extreme regional summer droughts in Europe
The ongoing climate crisis has already had drastic global impacts. For example, droughts have become critical high-impact hydro-meteorological hazards worldwide. In Europe, the consequences of the climate crisis have been severe, with droughts having caused considerable social, economic, and environmental costs already, especially in the years 2003, 2010, and 2018.
14h
Science Goes Viral
Joe Schwarcz has done it again! His new book is not only packed with good science-based information, but is highly entertaining. The post first appeared on Science-Based Medicine .
15h
Why swearing is more complicated than you think – podcast
Recently a study from Aston University revealed that the F-word had overtaken bloody to become Britain's most popular swear word for the first time. Shivani Dave speaks to emeritus professor of psychology Timothy Jay of Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts to find out why people swear and whether or not there are any benefits to using swear words – especially as we move back into public spaces s
18h
Why swearing is more complicated than you think
Recently a study from Aston University revealed that the F-word had overtaken bloody to become Britain's most popular swear word for the first time. Shivani Dave speaks to emeritus professor of psychology Timothy Jay of Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts to find out why people swear and whether or not there are any benefits to using swear words – especially as we move back into public spaces su
18h

Leave a Reply