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Extremely Deadly Virus Spreading in India
The state government of Kerala in India is currently scrambling to fight an outbreak of the extremely deadly Nipah virus after it killed a 12-year-old boy on Sunday. The Nipah virus is considered to be one of the deadliest to ever infect humans, CBS News reports . The last time there was a Nipah outbreak in India, it killed 17 of the 18 patients who were infected. The disease is far less contagio
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SpaceX Lifts Massive Starship Booster Onto Launchpad
Mounting Super Heavy SpaceX is hoisting its first flightworthy Super Heavy booster prototype onto its orbital launch pad at the company's testing facilities in South Texas. Today's mounting puts Starship and Super Heavy's sheer scale into perspective. As seen in live footage courtesy of NASASpaceFlight , the mammoth structure dubbed Booster 4 absolutely dwarfed the human workers getting it mounte
12h
New superconducting magnet breaks magnetic field strength records, paving the way for fusion energy
It was a moment three years in the making, based on intensive research and design work: On Sept. 5, for the first time, a large high-temperature superconducting electromagnet was ramped up to a field strength of 20 tesla, the most powerful magnetic field of its kind ever created on Earth. That successful demonstration helps resolve the greatest uncertainty in the quest to build the world's first f
19h
Water in bedrock is sustaining trees across country
You can't squeeze water from a rock. But tree roots can—and they're doing it more frequently than scientists previously thought, with a new study finding that bedrock is a regular source of water for trees across the United States, not just an emergency reserve during droughts.
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Why the ACLU Flip-Flopped on Vaccine Mandates
Getty; Adam Maida / The Atlantic Updated at 12:50 p.m. ET on September 8, 2021. A dozen years ago , a deadly virus was spreading around the world, and authorities in New York issued a mandate that all health-care workers in the state get vaccinated. The American Civil Liberties Union objected. Forced vaccination against the H1N1 flu, the ACLU wrote at the time , "was not warranted." The organizat
22h
After 9/11, the U.S. Got Almost Everything Wrong
O n the Friday after 9/11 , President George W. Bush visited the New York City site that the world would come to know as Ground Zero. After rescue workers shouted that they couldn't hear him as he spoke to them through a bullhorn, he turned toward them and ad-libbed. "I can hear you," he shouted. "The whole world hears you, and when we find these people who knocked these buildings down, they'll h
15h
MIT Announces "Major Advance" in Fusion Power
Mega Magnet A team of MIT scientists says that it's successfully cleared what could be the greatest technological hurdle between us practical nuclear fusion power. The researchers managed to get a new superconducting electromagnet to generate a magnetic field of 20 tesla — that's the unit that measures a magnet's strength — which an MIT press release says is the strongest of its kind ever generat
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How Delta Beat Biden
Updated at 1:40 p.m. on September 8, 2021. Joe Biden's "mission accomplished" moment came on the Fourth of July. Standing behind a lectern adorned with the presidential seal, he peered out at the hundreds of maskless guests drinking beer and eating pulled pork on the South Lawn of the White House. "Thanks to our heroic vaccine effort, we've gained the upper hand against this virus," Biden said. "
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The Nicest Man in Stand-Up
Lauren Tamaki O nce the limousine door closed , a dozen of Nate Bargatze's closest friends and family members began reciting their favorite jokes from the sold-out show he'd just finished in Reno, Nevada. There was the one about never asking a fitness junkie for advice on losing weight, lest they warn you about eating too much fruit. ("Let's get to that point, all right?" Bargatze had said. "I do
20h
Amazon Throws Tantrum, Calls Out SpaceX for Breaking FCC Rules
Amazon and SpaceX are each trying to gain the upper hand in the race to establish a constellation of internet-beaming satellites. And while SpaceX has a lot more to show in terms of actual progress — the Elon Musk-led company has already sent more than 1,700 satellites into orbit where they're beaming down usable internet, while Amazon's Kuiper Systems constellation still only exists on paper — t
10h
German Covid super-spreader event driven by poor ventilation, study finds
Low-grade ventilation system at indoor carnival in Gangelt leading factor in outbreak among partygoers Airborne viruses recycled through a low-grade ventilation system likely created Germany 's first super-spreader event of the Covid-19 pandemic, a CSI-style analysis of a carnival celebration has found. The event at the town hall of Gangelt, a municipality on the border with the Netherlands, was
17h
UK decision on Covid vaccine boosters expected on Thursday
Javid also says decision imminent on jabs for 12- to 15-year-olds, and children would be allowed final say on whether to have it Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The UK's vaccines watchdog is expected to decide on Thursday about a Covid booster vaccine programme, with ministers hopeful that approval for vaccinations for 12- to 15-year-olds could follow imminently. The
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Scientists must be protected from anti-vaxxer abuse | Letter
When Dr Andrew Hill 's team questioned the efficacy of ivermectin, the reaction from the anti-vaccination movement was shocking Dr David Bauer reports that the anti-vaccination movement is distorting his scientific results ( As a virologist I'm shocked my work has been hijacked by anti-vaxxers, 7 September ). My Covid-19 research team is also experiencing serious problems. Recently, our results q
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Study: Space Station Drinking Water Is Teeming With Bacteria
Colonizing Space If you've ever eyed the drinking water on an airplane with suspicion, just imagine having to put your trust in the water supply out in space, where astronauts typically drink recycled urine . Now, a new study published in the Nature journal npj Biofilms and Microbiomes on Monday found that the International Space Station's drinking water is teeming with bacterial colonies . In pa
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OpenAI Shuts Down GPT-3 Bot Used To Emulate Dead Fiancée
Last week, the AI development company OpenAI, famous for its shockingly-sophisticated text-generating algorithm GPT-3 , sent notice to a developer who'd created a customizable chatbot informing him that he was no longer allowed to use their tech. Indie game developer Jason Rohrer created the chatbot last year as a pandemic project, he told The Register . He programmed the base chatbot, named Sama
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26 Brilliant Movies That Critics Were Wrong About
Moviegoing is at a strange, tenuous moment. With pandemic fears still circulating, and many studios still delaying their films' release dates , not everyone is comfortable going back to theaters yet. But this is also a time of extraordinary at-home accessibility for cinema, with many thousands of titles available to stream, or digitally rent and buy, every day. So I've returned to a topic that su
21h
Wonderland Abandoned: The Swift Fall of "Europe's Biggest Theme Park"
Wonderland Eurasia, billed as "Europe's biggest theme park," opened in Ankara, Turkey, in March 2019. Political turmoil, uneven ride quality, and a lack of attendance caused the massive park to close its doors permanently after less than a year of operation. According to an AFP story , the park's abandoned dinosaur statues now piled in fields tell a "tale of grand ambition, waste and troubles fac
12h
Double-lined white dwarf binary detected by astronomers
An international team of astronomers has detected a new peculiar binary as part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The newly found object, designated SDSS J133725.26+395237.7, is a nearby double-lined system consisting of two white dwarfs. The finding is reported in a paper published August 26 on the arXiv pre-print server.
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Graphene valleytronics: Paving the way to small-sized room-temperature quantum computers
Valleytronics is an emerging field in which valleys—local minima in the energy band structure of solids—are used to encode, process, and store quantum information. Though graphene was thought to be unsuitable for valleytronics due to its symmetrical structure, researchers from the Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, India, have recently shown that this is not the case. Their findings may pave t
18h
America's Forever War Must Go On
A nnouncing the completion of America's withdrawal from Afghanistan, President Joe Biden declared an end to the post-9/11 "forever war." Ahead of the anniversary of the September 11 attacks that prompted the original invasion, Biden highlighted how, "if you're 20 years old today, you've never known an America at peace." Despite the president's spin, you still won't. American forces have left Afgh
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Researchers discover how plants can respond to threats
Plants are constantly exposed to adverse environmental influences and attacks, for example from pest infestation. An international team of researchers led by Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf (HHU) has now described a central part of the signal mechanism used by plants to respond to threats and thus initiate a defense response in unaffected parts of the plant. In the current edition of the jour
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Ancient teeth reveal surprising diversity of Cretaceous reptiles at Argentina fossil site
Where skeletons are rare, isolated teeth can flesh out our understanding of ancient reptile-dominated ecosystems, according to a study published September 8, 2021 in the open-access journal PLoS ONE by Ariana Paulina-Carabajal of INIBIOMA (Instituto de Investigaciones en Biodiversidad y Medioambiente) and CONICET (Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas), Argentina, and colleagu
13h
Karen Miga Fills In the Missing Pieces of Our Genome
In 1990, an international team of scientists began an ambitious attempt to sequence the human genome. By 2001 the Human Genome Project (HGP) had prepared a rough draft, and in April 2003, the draft sequence was declared finished. But Karen Miga, a geneticist now at the University of California, Santa Cruz and the associate director of the UCSC Genomics Institute, knew that while the work might…
14h
Lithium-ion batteries just made a big leap in a tiny product
A materials company in Alameda, California, has spent the last decade working to boost the energy stored in lithium-ion batteries, an advance that could enable smaller gadgets and electric vehicles with far greater range. Sila has developed silicon-based particles that can replace the graphite in anodes and hold more of the lithium ions that carry the current in a battery. Now the company is deli
15h
Gases in Milky Way are not homogeneously mixed, contrary to previous models
In order to better understand the history and evolution of the Milky Way, astronomers are studying the composition of the gases and metals that make up an important part of our galaxy. Three main elements stand out: the initial gas coming from outside our galaxy, the gas between the stars inside our galaxy—enriched with chemical elements –, and the dust created by the condensation of the metals pr
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Bitcoin Dudes Buy Cruise Ship for Crypto Utopia, Immediately Bungle Everything
On a Boat Drama raged in the high seas as a collective of libertarian crypto bros' proposed utopia — a seafaring community of ships and floating pods in the shape of the Bitcoin symbol — fell apart. In The Guardian 's investigation into the bizarre project, in which wealthy crypto enthusiasts bought a discounted cruise ship, named it the Satoshi in honor of Bitcoin's pseudonymous creator, and set
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University orders PhD supervisor to retract paper that plagiarized his student
A researcher at the University of Newcastle in Australia plagiarized a former student's thesis, according to a summary of a university investigation obtained by Retraction Watch. Andy Eamens, who at least until recently was an agronomy researcher at Newcastle, published a paper in 2019 that included work by Kate Hutcheon, whose PhD work he supervised, … Continue reading
21h
How 3 new technologies can bring us closer to 100% renewable energy
In recent decades the cost of wind and solar power generation has dropped dramatically. This is one reason that the U.S. Department of Energy projects that renewable energy will be the fastest-growing U.S. energy source through 2050 . However, it's still relatively expensive to store energy. And since renewable energy generation isn't available all the time – it happens when the wind blows or the
13h
SpaceX Tourists' Mission Simulation Included Life-Threatening Situation
Space Training Next week, SpaceX is about to make history by sending the first all-civilian crew into Earth's orbit for a three day joyride . But while the crew of four didn't have to go through years of NASA astronaut training, they were still put through the ringer ahead of their journey into space. As Axios reports , that included a grueling 30-hour simulation that mimicked a near-disaster — a
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Scientists see evidence of first-order phase change in nuclear matter
New evidence suggests that protons and neutrons go through a "first-order" phase transition—a kind of stop-and-go change in temperature—when they "melt." This is similar to how ice melts: Energy first increases the temperature, and then, during the transition, the temperature stays steady while the energy transforms a solid to a liquid. Only when all the molecules are liquid can the temperature in
11h
Transport noise linked to increased risk of dementia, study finds
Large survey involving two million adults found links between road and rail traffic and Alzheimer's in particular Exposure to noise from road traffic and railways is associated with an increased risk of dementia, according to the largest study of its kind. Research has consistently linked transport noise to health conditions including heart disease, diabetes and obesity, but studies on transport
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Läkaren: "Mycket oroande utveckling för barnen"
Oron över smittspridningen bland barn ökar. Regeringen borde ha väntat med att släppa på restriktionerna till att barn och unga vaccinerats, menar barnläkaren och professorn i immunologi Petter Brodin. – Det är väldigt olyckligt att man släpper alla restriktioner nu, säger han.
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The Atlantic Daily: Kids Are In For Another Messy School Year
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox. Cornell Watson / The New York Times / Redux Another strange school year begins. Then: One of the buzziest book releases of the year is here. Like a toddler to a set of blocks, the Delta coronaviru
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Environmental conditions of early humans in Europe
Understanding the environmental conditions under which early humans dispersed out of Africa is important for understanding the factors that affected human evolution. This is a topical question that remains debated. A recent study prepared in collaboration with researchers from the University of Helsinki and the Universities of Granada, Tarragona, Zaragoza, Barcelona, Salamanca, Madrid and Tübingen
19h
A Startup Is Selling Jetpacks to an "Undisclosed Military Customer"
Jetpack Sale California-based startup JetPack Aviation is selling two of its jetpack units, for $400,000 apiece, to an "undisclosed military customer in South-East Asia," New Atlas reports . The model, called the JB-12, features three small jet turbines on each side, allowing for redundancy if anything goes wrong. It weighs in at a whopping 105 pounds and is capable of accelerating its wearer to
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What happens when your prescription drug becomes the center of covid misinformation
By the time Joe Rogan mentioned ivermectin as one ingredient in an experimental cocktail he was taking to treat his covid infection, the drug was a meme. In the days and weeks leading up to the hugely popular podcaster's revelation, the drug had already become a flashpoint in the covid culture wars. Ivermectin isn't some new or experimental drug: in addition to its use as an anti-parasite treatme
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Low risk of catching Covid in public toilets, study finds
Australian National University researchers find no evidence of airborne transmission for pathogens such as Covid in public bathrooms Follow our Australia news live blog for the latest updates Vaccine rollout tracker ; get our free news app ; get our morning email briefing Covid-19 has seen many plans go down the toilet, but an Australian-led study shows public loos pose little risk of catching th
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Museum collections predict species abundance in the wild
Museum collections of plants and critters—small mammals, fish, insects and amphibians—are a good reflection of most species' relative abundance in the wild, finds a surprising new study by University of Vermont researchers and international scientists, who analyzed 1.4 million field observations and 73,000 museum records of over 22,00 species.
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Late Neanderthals used complex tool-making techniques
Neanderthals living in the Swabian Jura more than 45,000 years ago used sophisticated techniques with many different production strategies to make stone tools. The Heidenschmiede site has yielded many stone tools and by-products of the toolmaking process.
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Meetings suck. Can we make them more fun?
Three weeks ago, Mark Zuckerberg was chatting with host Gayle King on the television show CBS This Morning . Instead of sitting in a studio or using a videoconferencing app, however, the two of them were talking to each other in virtual reality. Zuckerberg was on prime time to introduce Horizons Workroom , a Facebook app that connects users to a virtual-reality space via the company's headset, Oc
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Netflix's SpaceX docuseries misses the mark on Inspiration4
The new Netflix docuseries about SpaceX's Inspiration4 mission can't help but feel unfinished, precisely because the mission will not even launch until September 15 (from Kennedy Space Center in Florida). Inspiration4 is set to be the first all-civilian mission into orbit—meaning there won't be trained astronauts who hail from a national astronaut corps. We're talking private citizens, taking a p
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Forest edges in the tropics increase carbon emissions
The deforestation of the tropical rainforests is progressing unstoppably. According to scientists at the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ), these forests are becoming fragmented at a higher rate than expected. By analyzing high-resolution satellite data, they were able to measure even the smallest piece of tropical forest and, for the first time, study the changes in tropical fragm
13h
Migrating birds choose routes with the best wind and uplift conditions
Researchers at the Max Planck Institute of Animal Behavior and University of Konstanz in Germany have identified how large land birds fly nonstop for hundreds of kilometers over the open ocean—without taking a break for food or rest. Using GPS tracking technology, the team monitored the global migration of five species of large land birds that complete long sea crossings. They found that all birds
18h
Overwork comes at a cost – in particular in a pandemic | Ahona Guha
In early 2020, we snapped into crisis mode to respond to emerging disaster. Now, 18 months on, some are reaching their limit Tasmanian premier Peter Gutwein has just reduced his work commitments to focus on his health and has handed over several portfolios to colleagues. "Basically, after working 46 days straight, which culminated in the finalisation and delivery of the budget, it's as simple as
4h
Understanding aurora formation with ESA's cluster mission
Earth's aurorae form when charged particles from the magnetosphere strike molecules in the atmosphere, energizing or even ionizing them. As the molecules relax to the ground state, they emit a photon of visible light in a characteristic color. These colliding particles—largely electrons—are accelerated by localized electric fields parallel to the local magnetic field occurring in a region spanning
18h
Stimulus payments increased spending among low-income populations in the US
The coronavirus pandemic disrupted the U.S. economy, yet the dynamics of micro-level consumer spending among low-income populations are not well understood. A study published in PLoS ONE by Song Gao at University of Wisconsin, Madison, United States and colleagues suggests the stimulus program largely curbed the post-lockdown spending declines and stimulated spending following pandemic-related inc
13h
NASA Helicopter Marks 6 Months on Mars, Is Still Flying High
Isn't it great when the news comes back better than expected? Six months into its daunting "30-day" proof-of-concept Mars excursion, Ingenuity is still sitting pretty and flying high. NASA has just made a few announcements on Ingenuity, and it's all good news, so let's dive right into ExtremeTech's early September Ingenuity/Perseverance mission briefing! There's even a bunch of dusty, orange Mart
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How do I overcome chronic indecision and make progress with my life? | Leading questions
Whatever you chose will change who you become, and you cannot predict how in advance, writes advice columnist Eleanor Gordon-Smith How do I overcome chronic indecision and make progress with my life? Important decisions which usually involve either a time commitment or considerable investment evoke feelings of anxiety and a fear that I will make the wrong choice. I will often ruminate over the pr
5h
Scientists unravel the mysteries of irreversibility in electrochromic thin films
Electrochromic (EC) materials, among the key "green" technological components for sustainability and energy savings, have piqued the interest of academia and industry alike. Tungsten oxide (WO3) is an extensively researched EC material that is widely used in today's smart windows. One popular EC approach is the reversible insertion of small ions into electrode materials. Thin films of WO3 can ther
18h
Langmuir wave motion observed in the most intense radio sources in the sky
The sun routinely produces energetic electrons in its outer atmosphere that subsequently travel through interplanetary space. These electron beams generate Langmuir waves in the background plasma, producing type III radio bursts that are the brightest radio sources in the sky (Suzuki and Dulk, 1985). These solar radio bursts also provide a unique opportunity to understand particle acceleration and
19h
Using frog foam as an antiseptic delivery system
A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in the U.K. has found that the foam produced by a certain kind of frog can be used as an antiseptic delivery system. In their paper published in the journal Royal Society Open Science, the group describes their study of the foam and the many ways they tested its usefulness.
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After 10,000 years of inbreeding, endangered flightless parrots from New Zealand are in surprisingly good genetic health
Before humans made their way to New Zealand, the critically endangered flightless parrot known as the kākāpō likely numbered in the hundreds of thousands. By 1995, their numbers had dwindled to just 51 birds, including 50 isolated on tiny Stewart Island and a single male, known as Richard Henry, all alone on the mainland. Today, those numbers have grown to about 200 individuals.
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A game changer in IT security
The key to a successful cybersecurity strategy is knowing what you need to protect. Here's the proof: half of companies surveyed by MIT Technology Review Insights and Palo Alto Networks have experienced a cyberattack originally from an unknown, unmanaged, or poorly managed digital asset, and another 19% expect to experience one eventually. Without a full inventory of internet-connected assets, or
19h
Is the nature of academic research changing?
An analysis in Learned Publishing indicates that the number of academic research articles using surveys and questionnaires has dramatically risen in the past 20 years; however, the quality of some of these articles (and therefore the research) may be in doubt.
18min
In search of a marvellous meat-free treat? I have found the perfect fungus
I thought these delicacies were just a well-kept Croatian secret, but it seems 'the chicken of the woods' has been growing nearer to home all the time I have an excellent mushroom supplier in Croatia. Her name is Meri and she is well into her 70s. It's really good gear she gets me, I promise you. I would put you in touch, but I want to keep this precious source to myself. These aren't magic mushr
1h
The Man Who Seduced the World with Whale Songs – Issue 105: Whale Songs
It's been more than 50 years since biologist Roger Payne brought whale song into the lives of millions via the popular album, Songs of the Humpback Whale . At the time, commercial whaling had decimated global whale populations, and Payne's record helped spark the anti-whaling movement, the haunting songs of the humpbacks its unofficial anthem. In the late 1960s, Payne was a senior scientist at th
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The Whale Who Will Come Soon – Issue 105: Whale Songs
The beachfront narrows to an ocherous ribbon, belted by blue, above and below. After a while, a handful of shearwaters appear in the air above the Cat Balou. The birds flash around us; like knife-thrower tricks at a circus. Diving through the water, each is crowned in a diadem of bubbles. The shearwaters come from Antarctica, like the humpbacks, and also Siberia, South America, and Japan; they ar
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No Species Is an Island – Issue 105: Whale Songs
The following is adapted from a speech Roger Payne gave at this year's Interspecies Internet conference. His remarks have been lightly edited for clarity. Because I am involved with the Cetacean Translation Initiative , or Project CETI, I receive criticism for spending time and treasure trying to translate what I refer to as WhaleSpeak. My accusers complain that the needs of humans should always
5h
The Hard Problem of Consciousness Has an Easy Part We Can Solve – Facts So Romantic
Our General Resonance Theory of consciousness, a framework with a panpsychist foundation, may, at least in theory, provide more complete answers to the full array of questions the hard problem of consciousness poses. Image by Illustration Forest / Shutterstock How does consciousness arise? What might its relationship to matter be? And why are some things conscious while others apparently aren't?
5h
How confined protons migrate
Protons in aqueous solution can usually migrate very quickly — much faster compared to other ions. However, this only applies when they are in a space greater than two nanometers, as a new study shows. In confined spaces the so-called Grotthuss mechanism no longer works, in which protons diffuse faster than ions.
6h
Emoji are proposed as a powerful way for patients and doctors to communicate
Emoji could particularly enhance interaction with young children, people with disabilities, and patients who speak other languages, a physician and others argue in a new commentary. The opportunity exists for medical societies and physician committees to proactively shape emoji that best represent their fields, then work with the standards-setting body for emoji to get them approved and put into p
6h
Under loading ceramics self-heal cracks by forming kink-bands
Ceramics are resilient to heat and extreme environments but they are fragile and crack easily. Researchers have discovered a self-healing mechanism within a type of ceramics, called MAX phases. They have shown that these engineered ceramics form natural faults or kink-bands during loading that can not only effectively stop cracks from growing, but can also close and heal them, thereby preventing c
6h
Water-repellent nanomaterial inspired by nature
Researchers have created a new nanomaterial that repels water and can stay dry even when submerged underwater. The discovery could open the door to the development of more efficient water-repellent surfaces, fuel cells and electronic sensors to detect toxins.
6h
NASA's James Webb Space Telescope Finally Has a Launch Date
Final Countdown NASA has finally assigned an official launch date for the James Webb Space Telescope, the next generation orbital observatory that experts say will bring about a whole new era of astronomical observations and research. The big day — which is about as official as any space mission that's already 14 years behind schedule can get — will be December 18, Agence France-Presse reports .
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Exploring the genetic ma(i)ze: Functional genomics can help molecular breeding of maize
For centuries, the vast physical diversity of maize, the most popular cereal grain crop globally, has fascinated biologists and plant breeders alike. Early breeders selected the maize variants with good, preferrable traits and propagated them for a long time to develop "true breeding" or inbred lines that show the same favorable features, for instance, the desired kernel color or size, for generat
11h
Scientists investigate macrocyclic peptides as new drug templates
Thanks to our understanding of molecular biology, we have made tremendous progress in medicine, with scientists shedding light on the molecular mechanisms of several diseases. However, despite knowing how these diseases occur and develop within cells, some remain untreatable due to the inability of currently available drugs to reach their targets. One such example of an unreachable drug target is
11h
Developing digital twins for improved hurricane prediction
More than half of the U.S. population lives in coastal watershed counties or parishes. Coastal communities along the Gulf of Mexico are among the most heavily populated—also a region where high concentrations of energy resources have made it a national hub for many large-scale carbon-to-capture storage facilities.
11h
New research on electrical signal transduction in tomato plants
Electrical signals commonly occur in plants in response to various environmental changes and have a dominant function in plant acclimation. Recently, a research team from Zhejiang University in China published new findings on electrical signal transduction during herbivory or wounding in tomato plants. The study can be found in the open access journal Frontiers of Agricultural Science and Engineer
12h
Understanding coronavirus variants
With the emergence of new SARS-CoV-2 variants such as beta and delta, people are not only getting a refresher course on the Greek alphabet, but also experiencing confusion and anxiety about what the variants mean for public health. A new article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, asks scientists to weigh in on the changing coronavirus l
12h
Using electricity to give chemistry a boost
Metal organic frameworks (MOFs) are a promising class of materials that have many applications as catalysts, sensors and for gas storage. Widely studied over the past two decades, MOFs are typically produced using chemical processes that require high heat and high pressure.
12h
Opportunities and limits of AI in climate modeling
Earth system models are the most important tools for quantitatively describing the physical state of Earth, and—for example, in the context of climate models—predicting how it might change in the future under the influence of human activities. How the increasingly used methods of artificial intelligence (AI) can help to improve these forecasts and where the limits of the two approaches lie has now
12h
85% of laying hens have broken keel bones
Large eggs appear to fracture the keel bones of laying hens quite often, research in Denmark finds. A modern laying hen produces roughly 320 eggs a year. In other words, being a hen bred for the food industry is a full-time job. In fact, the egg laying appears to be such a strain on Danish as well as foreign hens that it results in bone fractures. New research from the University of Copenhagen sh
12h
Blizzard Dropped True Ultrawide Support From Diablo II: Resurrected Because It Breaks the Game
Gamers of a certain age will remember fondly all the hours spent playing Diablo II, which originally launched in 2000. Here we are 20 years later, and the remastered version is almost ready for release. However, fans of ultrawide monitors won't have as much to celebrate. After nerfing 21:9 ultrawide support in the last phase of the beta, Blizzard has now explained the reason : true ultrawide supp
12h
NAD+ supplementation reduces neuroinflammation and cell senescence in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease via cGAS-STING [Neuroscience]
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive and fatal neurodegenerative disorder. Impaired neuronal bioenergetics and neuroinflammation are thought to play key roles in the progression of AD, but their interplay is not clear. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) is an important metabolite in all human cells in which it is pivotal for…
12h
Ancestral polymorphisms shape the adaptive radiation of Metrosideros across the Hawaiian Islands [Evolution]
Some of the most spectacular adaptive radiations begin with founder populations on remote islands. How genetically limited founder populations give rise to the striking phenotypic and ecological diversity characteristic of adaptive radiations is a paradox of evolutionary biology. We conducted an evolutionary genomics analysis of genus Metrosideros, a landscape-dominant, incipient…
12h
Fast and nonuniform dynamics of perisaccadic vision in the central fovea [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
Humans use rapid eye movements (saccades) to inspect stimuli with the foveola, the region of the retina where receptors are most densely packed. It is well established that visual sensitivity is generally attenuated during these movements, a phenomenon known as saccadic suppression. This effect is commonly studied with large, often…
12h
Absolute quantification of tumor antigens using embedded MHC-I isotopologue calibrants [Immunology and Inflammation]
Absolute quantification measurements (copies per cell) of peptide major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) antigens are necessary to inform targeted immunotherapy drug design; however, existing methods for absolute quantification have critical limitations. Here, we present a platform termed SureQuant-IsoMHC, utilizing a series of pMHC isotopologues and internal standard-triggered targeted mass spec
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Koala moms pass deadly virus to their joeys
Mother koalas are transferring a deadly virus, called koala retrovirus, to their joeys, a new study shows. The virus can cause immune depletion and cancer. It also predisposes koalas to chlamydia and other diseases and was having a large effect on wild koala populations across Queensland and New South Wales, says Keith Chappell, associate professor at the University of Queensland's School of Chem
13h
This material makes beautiful, potentially useful rainbows
A new study explains the science behind microscale concave interfaces, structures that reflect light to produce beautiful and potentially useful optical phenomena. "It is vital to be able to explain how a technology works to someone before you attempt to adopt it. Our new paper defines how light interacts with microscale concave interfaces," says engineering researcher Qiaoqiang Gan, who notes th
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These 'Superhuman' Supplements Are Designed to Boost Men's Energy, Immunity, and Focus
Every man wants to be the sharpest, healthiest, most energized possible version of themselves. Unfortunately, you're probably failing at it, at least in the diet department. But don't stress. Most of us are in the same boat. According to the Journal of Nutrition , most Americans do not meet federal dietary recommendations, and you're probably one of them. If what you're eating doesn't fulfill the
14h
Whiter teeth, without the burn
Most people would like to flash a smile of pearly whites, but over time teeth can become stained by foods, beverages and some medications. Unfortunately, the high levels of hydrogen peroxide in dentists' bleaching treatments can damage enamel and cause tooth sensitivity and gum irritation. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces have developed a gel that, when exposed to n
14h
A fable of ancient Greece: when the mythic universe became a rational machine
Worldviews change and, with them, the way we see ourselves and our place in the universe. The transition from myth to science as an explanation for the workings of nature took place in pre-Socratic Greece, beginning around 550 BCE. At that time, the Earth was believed to be the center of the universe. The first mechanical model of the cosmos is attributed to Anaximander. Corrections to that model
15h
Menthol cigarette ban could save 650,000 lives by 2060
Banning menthol flavors in cigarettes could reduce smoking by 15% by having smokers giving up tobacco products altogether or switching to e-cigarettes and other nicotine vaping products, new research suggests. That could mean 16,250 fewer tobacco-related deaths per year by 2060, according to a new study. The report supports the April 2021 announcement from the US Food and Drug Administration of i
15h
Wild radishes pass on defense tricks to protect their young
Wild radishes and other plants can also go to impressive lengths to protect their young. In a new study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , researchers show that wild radish plants turn on different anti-predator genes during key phases of their lives in response to predation from caterpillars. Moreover, the plants can also pass these "on-demand" defensive strategies on to th
15h
Drought–more than temperature–governs diversity of life on Earth
Scientists have long believed that temperature—especially freezing cold—limits diversity of plant species as they proliferate out from the tropics and adapt to colder regions nearer the poles. The idea that temperature alone is behind the pattern of decreasing diversity is dubbed the tropical conservatism hypothesis.
15h
Free-flight training could boost parrot conservation
A training technique that parrot owners have practiced for decades is now being used to establish new bird flocks in the wild. While many parrot owners clip their birds' wings to reduce their flight abilities, free-flight involves training an intact parrot to come when called, follow basic commands, recognize natural dangers, and otherwise safely fly in open areas. In a new paper in Diversity 202
16h
New tool reveals genetic influence of some sex-biased diseases, including lupus
Many human diseases can differ between males and females in their prevalence, manifestation, severity or age of onset. Examples include Lupus, where more than 80% of patients are females; Alzheimer's disease, where females have higher incidence and tend to suffer quicker cognitive decline; and COVID-19 infections that are frequently more severe in males.
16h
Tornado detection: bringing Stone Age tech into the 21st century
Tornado detection still relies heavily on human spotters calling in when they see a tornado. As a result, people often only have a few minutes to find shelter. A new method of listening for tornadoes provides fewer false positives and may give earlier warning. Meteorology has advanced significantly in recent decades. The weatherman is surprisingly good at telling you what will happen in the comin
16h
Firefighter exposure to wildfire smoke compounds varies depending on duties
Every summer, wildfires rage across the western U.S., and wildland firefighters are tasked with putting them out. But in the process, they inhale smoke and all the compounds in it, which can be harmful at high amounts. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology have evaluated the presence of particulate matter and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) around firefighters act
16h
Using DNA sequencing data to quantify T cell fraction and therapy response
Nature, Published online: 08 September 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03894-5 A robust, cost-effective technique based on whole-exome sequencing data can be used to characterize immune infiltrates, relate the extent of these infiltrates to somatic changes in tumours, and enables prediction of tumour responses to immune checkpoint inhibition therapy.
16h
Tunable self-assembled Casimir microcavities and polaritons
Nature, Published online: 08 September 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03826-3 Gold nanoflake pairs form by self-assembly in an aqueous ligand solution and offer stable and tunable microcavities by virtue of equilibrium between attractive Casimir forces and repulsive electrostatic forces.
16h
Transmembrane transport in inorganic colloidal cell-mimics
Nature, Published online: 08 September 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03774-y Hollow colloidal capsules, each with a single micropore, act as artificial cell-like structures that can capture and release payloads such as solid particles or bacteria from the external environment.
16h
Positive allosteric mechanisms of adenosine A1 receptor-mediated analgesia
Nature, Published online: 08 September 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03897-2 MIPS521, a positive allosteric modulator of the adenosine A1 receptor, has analgesic properties in a rat model of neuropathic pain through a mechanism by which MIPS521 stabilizes the complex between adenosine, receptor and G protein.
16h
Cells of the human intestinal tract mapped across space and time
Nature, Published online: 08 September 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03852-1 Cells from embryonic, fetal, paediatric and adult human intestinal tissue are analysed at different locations along the intestinal tract to construct a single-cell atlas of the developing and adult human intestinal tract, encompassing all cell lineages.
16h
Unextractable fossil fuels in a 1.5 °C world
Nature, Published online: 08 September 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03821-8 A global energy system model finds that planned fossil fuel extraction is inconsistent with limiting global warming to 1.5 °C, because the majority of fossil fuel reserves must stay in the ground.
16h
Interface nano-optics with van der Waals polaritons
Nature, Published online: 08 September 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03581-5 This Review discusses the state of the art of interface optics—including refractive optics, meta-optics and moiré engineering—for the control of van der Waals polaritons.
16h
Large metallicity variations in the Galactic interstellar medium
Nature, Published online: 08 September 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03780-0 The metallicity of the interstellar medium measured towards 25 stars relatively near the Sun shows large variations, suggesting that infalling pristine gas is not efficiently mixed in the interstellar medium.
16h
A roadmap for the Human Developmental Cell Atlas
Nature, Published online: 08 September 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03620-1 This Perspective outlines the Human Developmental Cell Atlas initiative, which uses state-of-the-art technologies to map and model human development across gestation, and discusses the early milestones that have been achieved.
16h
High-fidelity laser-free universal control of trapped ion qubits
Nature, Published online: 08 September 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03809-4 Laser-free universal control of two trapped-ion qubits using a combination of radiofrequency and microwave magnetic fields achieves some of the highest fidelities ever reported for two-qubit maximally entangled states.
16h
Bioaccumulation of therapeutic drugs by human gut bacteria
Nature, Published online: 08 September 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03891-8 An analysis of the interactions between 15 drugs and 25 gut bacterial strains shows that bioaccumulation of drugs within bacterial cells is another mechanism through which gut microorganisms can alter drug availability and efficacy.
16h
Hybrid light–matter states formed in self-assembling cavities
Nature, Published online: 08 September 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02376-y Tiny flakes of metal suspended in a solution have been observed to self-assemble into pairs separated by a narrow gap — offering a tunable system for studying combinations of light and matter known as polaritons.
16h
Pollination advantage of rare plants unveiled
Nature, Published online: 08 September 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02375-z An analysis of plant–pollinator interactions reveals that the presence of abundant plant species favours the pollination of rare species. Such asymmetric facilitation might promote the coexistence of species in diverse plant communities.
16h
Kolesterolnivån sjunker hos covid-patienter
En forskargrupp i Malmö har avslöjat en koppling mellan högt kolesterol och hur sjuk man blir av coronaviruset. Sedan utbrottet av covid-19-pandemin har forskarvärlden försökt kartlägga coronavirusets natur, värdinteraktioner, smittvägar och varför vissa grupper drabbas så olika av viruset. Marité Cárdenas, forskare på Biofilms forskningscentrum för biologiska gränsytor vid Malmö universitet, und
16h
Coral cryopreservation for breeding key to survival
Flash-frozen sperm collected from corals in Florida and Puerto Rico was used to fertilize coral eggs from hundreds of miles away in Curaçao. The juvenile corals raised from this trans-Caribbean coupling demonstrate the reproductive compatibility of coral colonies that would otherwise be too far apart to produce offspring in the wild and they represent the largest wildlife population ever raised fr
16h
Novel AR film developed to maximize the transmission of infrared light
High refractive index of the substrate material often leads to serious reflection on the surface of infrared optical elements, which will greatly reduce the transmittance of infrared light. To maximize the transmission of infrared light, antireflection (AR) film needs to be plated on the surface of infrared substrate. Sol-gel technology is an effective method for preparing high temperature resista
16h
Larmet: Kolreserven måste bli kvar i marken
Målsättningen med Parisavtalet är att begränsa den globala uppvärmningen till långt under 2 grader jämfört med förindustriella nivåer. Länderna som står bakom avtalet ska i stället sträva efter att hålla nere temperaturökningarna till 1,5 grader. Ändå står fossila bränslen fortfarande för 81 procent av den globala energiproduktionen. Enligt en ny studie, publicerad i tidskriften Nature, blir det a
16h
A sci-fi vision of life in 2041 | Chen Qiufan
Sci-fi writer Chen Qiufan doesn't fear a dystopian future. Instead, he believes developments in artificial intelligence will make all of our lives better, healthier and safer. He takes us on a tour of the next 20 years of AI and shares some astonishing predictions for the advancements in science and technology that could await us. "For every future we wish to create, we must first learn to imagine
16h
Liten förståelse för fibromyalgi inom vården
Varannan patient känner rädsla för att söka vård. Och majoriteten upplever att vårdpersonal inte vet hur fibromyalgi påverkar deras liv, och inte har någon hjälp att ge. Det visar en studie från Röda Korsets högskola. Fibromyalgi är ett smärtsyndrom, som ungefär 200 000 personer, övervägande kvinnor, i Sverige lider av. Ny forskning visar att en av tre med fibromyalgi upplever bemötandet inom sve
16h
Hyundai Goes All-In on Hydrogen With Its 'Trailer Drone' and More
Between the grim outlook reported by the IPCC's Sixth Assessment Report last month and frequent reports of extreme weather events all over the world, the climate crisis feels like it's getting more dire by the week. Accordingly, calls for action are intensifying, and companies and governments are scrambling for solutions. Renewables are ramping up , innovative energy storage technologies are bein
17h
Two Boats Collide! | Deadliest Catch
Stream Full Episodes of Deadliest Catch: discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/deadliest-catch Discovery ► https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch/ #DeadliestCatch #Discovery #SummerBay Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://
17h
Listen In On Master Lectures With 90% Off Knowable's Audio Learning Platform
While podcasts can be fun and educational, they're not going to dig deep into topics that are most important to you. The Knowable Audio Learning Platform can give you those detailed classes you're craving when you need something substantial to listen to. Valued at $600, a lifetime subscription is now on sale for just $59.99. Audio-First Learning Knowable is unique in that it's an audio-first lear
17h
Autophagy in major human diseases
In a consensus article, Federico Pietrocola, at the Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, KI, and colleagues explore the pathophysiological relevance of autophagy in human illnesses, while highlighting the therapeutic potential of autophagy-centered strategies in the clinic. This article represents a remarkable collective effort by the international autophagy community, serving a guide for basi
17h
How climate change is affecting cultural heritage
It is not just the environment and the economy that are threatened by a warmer climate, but also culture and traditions around the word. Researchers at Lund University in Sweden and the University of Queensland in Australia have mapped what little is known about how climate change is eroding local knowledge and cultural heritage.
17h
Natural killer cells coordinate wound healing
Natural killer cells do not just kill cancer cells or cells infected with viruses, they also mediate a trade-off between wound healing and bacterial defense in skin wounds. If the healing process is accelerated, the immune defense is weakened, researchers at the University of Zurich have now shown. This has relevance in treating skin injuries and in tackling antibiotic-resistant germs.
17h
Game changer: The first Olympic games in the cloud
Hosted at an unprecedented time due to the coronavirus pandemic, the 2020 Summer Olympics (branded as Tokyo 2020, held in 2021, and officially called Games of the XXXII Olympiad) will be remembered for not just the extraordinary performances of the athletes, but also for being one of the most technologically advanced Games ever hosted. Cloud technology was used for the first time at the Olympics
18h
Rare earth war: can the U.S. even compete with China?
Rare earth elements are metals used for creating consumer electronics, rechargeable batteries, renewable energy, and military-grade weapons. Having lost its hegemony to China, the U.S. is looking at ways to restart mining operations. America's only rare earth mine, Mountain Pass, has been selling all its output to China. Even though rare earth elements helped shape modern society into what it is
18h
Citizen Astronomer Detects Ancient Failed Star With Unexpected Properties
Photo: IPAC/Caltech We tend to think of planets and stars as very different things, but the border between very large planets and very small stars is surprisingly hazy. Astronomers have spotted about 2,000 so-called "brown dwarfs," objects that are dozens of times larger than Jupiter, but not quite large enough to kick off a sustained fusion reaction. Now, we're discovered one that could teach us
18h
Stretching the capacity of flexible energy storage
Some electronics can bend, twist and stretch in wearable displays, biomedical applications and soft robots. While these devices' circuits have become increasingly pliable, the batteries and supercapacitors that power them are still rigid. Now, researchersreport a flexible supercapacitor with electrodes made of wrinkled titanium carbide — a type of MXene nanomaterial — that maintained its ability
18h
Biomechanics of the kick-start motion in competitive swimming
Researchers from the Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences at the University of Tsukuba have analyzed the "kick-start" technique used by swimmers when beginning a race. On the basis of force and velocity measurements, the team showed that both the vertical and horizontal forces exerted by the athletes' hands on the front of the starting platform helped the swimmers achieve proper form. This work ma
18h
Bättre minne hos Alzheimersjuka som ätit omega-3
Alzheimersjuka som ätit omega-3 fettsyror i början av sjukdomsförloppet presterar bättre i minnestest. Det visar en studie från Örebro universitet. Forskarna har undersökt effekten av omega-3 fettsyror – med hjälp av minnestester och prover från ryggmärgsvätska. Studien är den första som samlar in data om just dessa biomarkörer från människor med Alzheimers sjukdom, enligt Yvonne Freund-Levi, for
18h
The world in a bottle
Nature, Published online: 08 September 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02430-9 A place to call your own.
18h
Rocket flight to sharpen NASA's study of the sun
It's best not to look directly at the sun unless you're one of NASA's sun-observing instruments. And even then, doing so will cause some damage. Exposure to the sun degrades light sensors of all kinds, from the retinas in the human eye to instruments aboard NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory satellite, or SDO. Fortunately, with periodic calibrations, the latter can continue transmitting high-qualit
18h
High-energy shape memory polymer could someday help robots flex their muscles
When stretched or deformed, shape memory polymers return to their original shapes after heat or light is applied. These materials show great promise for soft robotics, smart biomedical devices and deployable space structures, but until now they haven't been able to store enough energy. Now, researchers have developed a shape memory polymer that stores almost six times more energy than previous ver
19h
New study puts focus on early symptoms of Huntington's disease
Psychiatric and cognitive symptoms emerge at an early stage in Huntington's disease. However, research so far has mainly focused on movement impairment, a symptom associated with the more advanced stages of the disease. A new study now shows that the emotional brain – the limbic system – is affected earlier in the course of the disease, and should therefore be given more attention in the developme
19h
Officials leading hurricane response need 'risk literacy'
New research shows that the most numerate officials were almost twice as likely as less numerate ones to provide additional evacuation times to their coastal communities during a hurricane. Less numerate ones, on the other hand, gave their communities less advance warning, and when they finally did issue evacuations, over-evacuated tens of thousands more people.
19h
IT security starts with knowing your assets: Europe, the Middle East, and Africa
Cyberattacks know no geographical boundaries. In the past two years alone, the University Hospital Brno in the Czech Republic suffered a cyberattack during the covid-19 pandemic, forcing the medical facility to reroute patients and postpone surgery; South Africa's major electricity supplier, City Power, fell victim to a ransomware attack, leaving many of Johannesburg's residents without power; an
19h
IT security starts with knowing your assets: Asia-Pacific
On the best of days, securing the networks, devices, and data of NTUC Enterprise is no easy task. The Singapore-based cooperative consists of nine business units, from food services to insurance, and serves more than 2 million customers in nearly 1,000 locations. When the 2020 coronavirus pandemic hit, it forced many of NTUC's employees to work from home, often on unsecured networks and personal
19h
Variants of Interest
The World Health Organization and medical experts are keeping an eye on new variants as the pandemic simmers on. The post first appeared on Science-Based Medicine .
19h
COVID vax elicits response in 90% of weakened immune systems
COVID-19 vaccination elicited antibody responses in nearly nine out of 10 people with weakened immune systems, although their responses were only about one-third as strong as those mounted by healthy people, a study finds. The study, published in the Annals of Internal Medicine , looked at people taking immunosuppressive medications to treat chronic inflammatory diseases such as inflammatory bowe
19h
Scientists develop films with tunable elongation and fracture for various uses
Elastic polymers, or 'elastomers,' have various applications, including in car tires and shock absorbers, and their properties are governed by the density of cross-linked polymer chains. However, these properties are usually not modifiable, leading to excessive synthesis requirements. Now, scientists have come up with a novel elastomer film whose elasticity can be 'tuned' in a post-preparation man
19h
Chemotherapy drug puts young children with cancer at high risk of hearing loss
A chemotherapy drug known to cause hearing loss in children is more likely to do so the earlier in life children receive it, new UBC research has found. Cisplatin is a life-saving treatment for many children with cancer, but the study shows that the hearing of very young children is impacted early during treatment and is affected to a greater extent than that of older children.
19h
Schizophrenia study suggests advanced genetic scorecard cannot predict a patient's fate
Researchers found that a tool commonly used in research for evaluating a person's genetic risk for a disease, called a polygenic risk score, was no better at predicting the outcome of a schizophrenia patient's disease over time than written reports. The results raise important questions about the use of polygenic risk scores in real-world, clinical situations, and also suggest that a doctor's writ
19h
Do couples over-think the decision to have kids?
The view of one's own fertility and having children has significantly changed in the last 60 years. In a new study, researchers engaged with more than one hundred Swedes between the ages of 17–90 to discuss how they regard fertility and family formation.
19h
Insect protein has great potential to reduce the carbon footprint of European consumers
The use of insects as food for humans and animals has both the potential to reduce European consumers' carbon footprint and contribute to reducing incentives for continued soybean cultivation in the Amazon rainforest. However, when compared to feeding insects to farm animals, the direct human consumption of insects has the biggest potential to reduce our consumption-based carbon footprint.
19h
Why science needs strong mentors
Nature, Published online: 08 September 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02440-7 Scientist mentors describe how supporting junior colleagues alongside many other responsibilities is a true labour of love.
19h
ALMA: New receivers achieve first light, set record for observational capabilities
A new set of receivers installed on antennas at the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) have achieved first light. With it, they set a new record for the longest wavelengths visible with the radio array. The achievement has opened a window on the universe previously inaccessible at the telescope, thanks to an international team of engineers, including engineers from the National Ra
19h
Hybrid working: How to make it a success
Flexibility has become a key element in the world of work. Even before the pandemic hit, many jobs were designed to provide greater choice about how, when and where they could be done.
19h
How BASIS grew into the BioWatch system
Less than a month after 9/11, 14 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) employees received calls at their homes at 1 a.m. on a Saturday morning (Oct. 6, 2001) and were asked to report to the Lab within three hours, without being told where they were going or when they would return.
20h
Crisis communication and the COVID-19 pandemic
Clear communication with the public about COVID-19 vaccines is important because vaccination remains the best way to prevent the spread of the virus, according to Texas A&M University crisis communications expert Timothy Coombs.
20h
Chandra resumes science operations
NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has successfully resumed observations after recovery from a problem involving one of its science instruments, the Low Energy Transmission Grating (LETG). The LETG is used to measure the intensity of X-rays at different energies.
20h
Short on Evidence, Dubious Therapies Turn to the Tongue
Despite the limited evidence, myofunctional therapy and tongue-tie surgeries are increasingly promoted as a treatment for the many ailments attributed to poor tongue posture in adults. Especially concerning, some experts say, is the claim that the therapy is an alternative treatment for sleep apnea.
22h
Känslohjärnan – en nyckel i kampen mot Huntingtons sjukdom
Psykiska och kognitiva symtom kommer tidigt vid Huntingtons sjukdom och är ofta de svåraste symtomen i sjukdomen, vittnar berörda. Ändå har forskningen, i sin jakt på behandling, främst fokuserat på sjukdomens rörelsestörningar, ett senare symtom. Ny forskning visar att känslohjärnan påverkas tidigare i sjukdomsförloppet och därför bör ges mer fokus vid utvecklingen av nya behandlingar.
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In George Orwell's "Animal Farm" the key propaganda slogan was , "Four legs good, two legs bad". What propaganda slogans are you hearing today in real society? Or think we may hear in the near future?
George Orwell was a futurist and novelist. He wrote two of the most influential books about the dangers of future society. Orwell's masterpieces "1984" and "Animal Farm" are considered classic literature today. Both books discuss the use of propaganda in the future. Is any of that coming true today or looks like it is coming soon? submitted by /u/Extremely-Bad-Idea [link] [comments]
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A modification of the linear sieve, and the count of twin primes
We introduce a modification of the linear sieve whose weights satisfy strong factorization properties, and consequently equidistribute primes up to size $x$ in arithmetic progressions to moduli up to $x^{10/17}$. This surpasses the level of distribution $x^{4/7}$ with the linear sieve weights from well-known work of Bombieri, Friedlander, and Iwaniec, and which was recently extended to $x^{7/12}$
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Act Fast And Get These Top eLearning Bundles For $15 Each
For just a few days, you can get our top eLearning bundles for just $15. Whether you're looking to invest , code, or hack, these courses will fit the bill. The Complete Cryptocurrency Investment Bundle Created by blockchain experts, such as Blockchain Institute of Technology certified lecturer George Levy, this bundle starts with the basics of how cryptocurrency works and how investors profit fro
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