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Firm raises $15m to bring back woolly mammoth from extinction
Scientists set initial sights on creating elephant-mammoth hybrid, with first calves expected in six years Ten thousand years after woolly mammoths vanished from the face of the Earth, scientists are embarking on an ambitious project to bring the beasts back to the Arctic tundra. The prospect of recreating mammoths and returning them to the wild has been discussed – seriously at times – for more
6h
Facts about tardigrades
Tardigrades, often called water bears or moss piglets, are near-microscopic animals that are almost indestructible and can even survive in outer space.
2h
Edmond Fischer (1920–2021)
Nature, Published online: 13 September 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02485-8 Nobel-winning biochemist who discovered a ubiquitous cell-regulatory mechanism.
10h

LATEST

Fully vaccinated people account for 1.2% of England's Covid-19 deaths
ONS figures show 51,281 Covid deaths between January and July, with 458 dying at least 21 days after second dose Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage People who were fully vaccinated accounted for just 1.2% of all deaths involving Covid-19 in England in the first seven months of this year. The figures, published by the Office for National Statistics (ONS), have been seize
7h
Scientists Debut Magnet Powerful Enough to Lift an Aircraft Carrier
Massive Magnets Scientists in France have finally received one of their latest and most impressive tools in the effort to create nuclear fusion: a really big honkin' magnet . Researchers at the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) debuted the first part of the magnet on Thursday when they received it from its American manufacturer, according to The Associated Press . When fully
22h
Elon Musk Adopts Shiba Inu, Causing Cryptocurrency Mayhem
Woki Floki Flame Tesla and SpaceX CEO Elon Musk has officially adopted a furry companion friend named Floki — and, of course, the internet is aflame. But not just because Musk got a dog. Floki is a Shiba Inu, the face of the alternative cryptocurrency Dogecoin , Musk's much beloved crypto. And, hands to our hearts, that's one cute puppy. A picture uploaded by Musk shows the little one napping whi
5h
George Church Has Raised $15M to Bring an Elephant-Mammoth Hybrid to Life. Could It Actually Work?
A biotech startup helmed by provocative Harvard geneticist George Church has secured $15 million in funding to bring back woolly mammoths — or at least something genetically similar — to the Arctic tundra where they first went extinct roughly 10,000 years ago. "Technologies discovered in pursuit of this grand vision — a living, walking proxy of a woolly mammoth — could create very significant opp
5h
Scientists Create 3,000 TB Simulation of the Universe You Can Download
No Man's Sky Researchers have created what they say is the largest computer simulation of the universe, and have made the data available for anyone to download for free. An international team associated with the Center for Computational Astrophysics created the virtual universe using ATERUI II, the world's most powerful astronomical supercomputer, according to a press release by the organization
2h
Woman Accused of Stealing Cryogenically Preserved Human Bodies
Accusations are flying in a bizarre spat involving stolen cryogenically frozen human remains, according to a report by Russian tech website Rubase . Valeria Udalova, the CEO of a Russian cryogenics company, allegedly attempted to abscond with several frozen bodies after a disagreement between her and founder Danila Medvedev, Rubase reports. According to British tabloid The Times , Udalova is Medv
1h
Are Pandemic Hospitalization Numbers Misleading Us?
At least 12,000 Americans have already died from COVID-19 this month, as the country inches through its latest surge in cases. But another worrying statistic is often cited to depict the dangers of this moment: The number of patients hospitalized with COVID-19 in the United States right now is as high as it has been since the beginning of February. It's even worse in certain places: Some states,
1h
How long do black carbon particles linger in the atmosphere?
There's a stubborn, heat-absorbing particle that floats along in Earth's atmosphere: It initially doesn't like water, it absorbs light, and it takes its time moving on. Black carbon in the atmosphere tends to linger until it finally absorbs enough water to fall from the sky. In the meantime, black carbon absorbs the sun's energy and heats up surrounding air, creating a radiative effect.
5h
Drop in atmospheric CO2 caused cooling during the age of the dinosaurs
Exciting new research has revealed that a drop in atmospheric carbon dioxide caused a dramatic cooling 133 million years ago, when dinosaurs roamed the world. Better understanding of the effects of past fluctuations in atmospheric CO2 are critical to understand how heat moves around the globe, which also controls how much ice can build up in polar regions.
7h
A horrifying new AI app swaps women into porn videos with a click
The website is eye-catching for its simplicity. Against a white backdrop, a giant blue button invites visitors to upload a picture of a face. Below the button, four AI-generated faces allow you to test the service. Above it, the tag line boldly proclaims the purpose: turn anyone into a porn star by using deepfake technology to swap the person's face into an adult video. All it requires is the pic
11h
Using acoustics to conceal and simulate objects
When listening to music, we don't just hear the notes produced by the instruments, we are also immersed in its echoes from our surroundings. Sound waves bounce back off the walls and objects around us, forming a characteristic sound effect—a specific acoustic field. This explains why the same piece of music sounds different when played in an old church or a modern concrete building.
5h
High-throughput method of identifying novel materials
Coupling computer automation with an ink-jet printer originally used to print T-shirt designs, researchers at Caltech and Google have developed a high-throughput method of identifying novel materials with interesting properties. In a trial run of the process, they screened hundreds of thousands of possible new materials and discovered one made from cobalt, tantalum, and tin that has tunable transp
8h
Rain fell on Greenland's ice sheet for the first time ever known. Alarms should ring | Kim Heacox
Climate scientists believe that if Greenland continues to rapidly melt, tens of millions of people around the world could face yearly flooding and displacement by 2030 Many people believed he couldn't do it. Ski across the Greenland ice sheet, a vast, unmapped, high-elevation plateau of ice and snow? Madness. But Fridtjof Nansen, a young Norwegian, proved them wrong. In 1888, he and his small par
10h
Vaccinating teenagers against Covid is priority, says UK epidemiologist
Neil Ferguson says immunity levels falling behind other countries that have jabbed 12- to 15-year-olds Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The scientist whose modelling was instrumental to the UK going into its first lockdown has backed vaccinating teenagers as a priority. Prof Neil Ferguson, from Imperial College London, and a member of the Scientific Advisory Group for
12h
Hidden Compartment on SpaceX Spacecraft Contains Emergency Duct Tape
Storage Wars Ahead of this week's all-civilian mission to space , Netflix has released "Countdown: Inspiration4 Mission to Space" — a docuseries showcasing the astronauts' preparation for their three-day journey. The series provides a glimpse into the rigorous prep needed for SpaceX missions. And now, eagle-eyed Reddit users noticed something interesting in the third episode: a single roll of wha
3h
Apple Co-Founder Steve Wozniak Is Launching His Own Space Company
Privateer Space Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak is launching a space company called Privateer — but that's about as much as we know about the venture. The reveal leaves us with more questions than answers, but we may soon know more. In a cryptic tweet , Wozniak announced that "a Private space company is starting up, unlike the others." The tweet included a link to a YouTube video announcement that
3h
What the Never Trumpers Want Now
Many of the conservatives and Republicans appalled by Donald Trump's presidency clutched a hope through the bewildering years: Someday this would all be over and politics would return to normal. But normal has not returned. Those elected Republicans who stood for legality when Trump tried to overturn the 2020 election found themselves party pariahs in 2021, on their way to being out of politics a
6h
Most Hollywood Writers' Rooms Look Nothing Like America
I. "You Can Hear a Pin Drop" Carl Winslow, the protagonist of the '90s sitcom Family Matters , wore his badge with honor. On the show, about a middle-class Black household in Chicago, Winslow (played by Reginald VelJohnson) loved being a police officer almost as much as he hated seeing the family's pesky neighbor, Steve Urkel (Jaleel White), popping up in his home. Carl was a quintessential TV-si
10h
Ivermectin frenzy: the advocates, anti-vaxxers and telehealth companies driving demand
Health authorities have warned there's no proof for Ivermectin's use to treat Covid-19. Still groups are touting the drug as the way out of the pandemic At the top of a Florida-based telehealth website that promises "quality meds with fast shipping", above a menu of skin care products, erectile dysfunction medications and hair loss treatments, sits a bright orange banner with bold lettering: "LOO
10h
NHS England announces large-scale trial of potential early cancer test
More than 100,000 volunteers aged between 50 and 77 sought to take part in Galleri blood screening The NHS has launched the world's largest trial of a potentially gamechanging blood test that aims to detect more than 50 types of cancer before symptoms appear. More than 100,000 volunteers are being sought to provide blood samples at mobile test clinics in regions across England from Monday to asse
15h
Scientists identify key conditions to set up a creative 'hot streak'
Researchers use AI to reveal runs of artistic success are commonly preceded by an experimental phase Whether it is the director Márta Mészáros or the artist Jackson Pollock, those in creative careers often experience a particular burst of success. Now researchers have used artificial intelligence to reveal such "hot streaks" are commonly preceded by an experimental phase followed by a focus on on
11h
Cows 'potty-trained' in experiment to reduce greenhouse gas emissions
Calves taught to use toilet area with rewards and mild punishments, limiting ammonia release A herd of cows has been "potty-trained" in an experiment that scientists say could pave the way for more environmentally friendly farms. Waste from cattle farms often contaminates soil and waterways and contributes to greenhouse gas emissions and the acidification of soil. For this reason, toilet-training
5h
The Journey to Define Dimension
The notion of dimension at first seems intuitive. Glancing out the window we might see a crow sitting atop a cramped flagpole experiencing zero dimensions, a robin on a telephone wire constrained to one, a pigeon on the ground free to move in two and an eagle in the air enjoying three. But as we'll see, finding an explicit definition for the concept of dimension and pushing its boundaries has…
4h
Researchers are toilet-training cows to reduce ammonia emissions caused by their waste
On a farm where cows freely relieve themselves as they graze, the accumulation and spread of waste often contaminates local soil and waterways. This can be controlled by confining the cows in barns, but in these close quarters their urine and feces combine to create ammonia, an indirect greenhouse gas. In an article published on September 13 in the journal Current Biology, researchers show that co
5h
Booster Bandits Are Walking a Fine Line
Americans have been getting booster shots for months now. By the end of April, when less than one-third of the country was fully vaccinated, at least one person had already reportedly gamed the system . It was taboo and took some finagling to pull off—IDs shuffled, erroneous vaccine cards presented—but through the spring and summer, the most shot-happy Americans found a way. Now a third jab is do
5h
Pulsar timing arrays take us closer to figuring out supermassive black holes
Galaxies host supermassive black holes, which weigh millions to billions times more than the sun. When galaxies collide, pairs of supermassive black holes at their centers also lie on the collision course. It may take millions of years before two black holes slam into each other. When the distance between them is small enough, the black hole binary starts to produce ripples in space-time, which ar
8h
The World Needs a Pandemic Plan B
T here is never a good time for a pandemic, but the coronavirus may have hit the world at the worst possible moment. In the decade before the virus, China had grown more dictatorial and assertive; populist nationalists held power in the United States, India, and Brazil; geopolitical tensions were heightened, not just between Beijing and Washington but within the West itself; and the very notion o
10h
There's a Morse Code Message Hidden in Photo of SpaceX Tourists
Ad Astra The all-civilian crew of this week's historic Inspiration4 SpaceX flight recently put on their custom tailored spacesuits to pose for a photo. And, it turns out, SpaceX hid a little Easter egg in the background of the shot. Internet sleuths at the SpaceXLounge subreddit discovered the hidden message written out in Morse code: "Ad astra." While that is indeed the name of of the 2019 sci-f
2h
Finally, a Private Spaceflight With a Billionaire You've Never Heard Of
The glass window on SpaceX's Dragon capsule is a new feature. It juts out from the small spacecraft like a half-formed soap bubble, still attached to a plastic wand, offering an unimpeded view of the Earth below and the stars beyond. On previous flights , the same spot was reserved for docking hardware so that the capsule could join up with the International Space Station. But SpaceX's newest cre
7h
'China's Dr Fauci': How Dr Zhang Wenhong became the face of Beijing's Covid battle
Expert's clever analogies and frank messages to public have won him respect – and millions of followers Early last year, as Covid-19 began to disrupt livelihoods in Shanghai, local media struggled to persuade the public to stay at home. Then they turned to an infectious diseases expert, Dr Zhang Wenhong, who also heads up Shanghai's expert panel on Covid-19. "You're bored to death at home, so the
10h
Photographing the Microscopic: Winners of Nikon Small World 2021
Nikon has announced the winners of the 2021 Small World Photomicrography Competition and has once again shared some of the winning and honored images with us. The contest invites photographers and scientists to submit images of all things visible under a microscope. More than 1,900 entries were received from 88 countries in 2021, the 47th year of the competition.
3h
Food scientists find key to perfectly smooth chocolate
The best kind of chocolate is creamy, smooth and melts in your mouth, not in your hands. Now University of Guelph food scientists say they have found a way to create that perfect chocolate that simplifies the traditional "tempering" process of repeatedly heating and cooling chocolate.
5h
Success of past rewilding projects shows path to restoring damaged ecosystems
Concept is now widely accepted after initial controversy around projects such as Yellowstone wolves – though opposition remains Scientists raise £15m to bring mammoth back from extinction The news that scientists are planning to bring back woolly mammoths to the Arctic tundra, by splicing DNA from Asian elephants with that of their extinct ancestors, has raised a few eyebrows in the world of cons
1h
The Secret to a Fight-Free Relationship
Photographs by Victor Llorente F or decades, when Liz Cutler's husband, Tom Kreutz, did something that bothered her, Cutler would sometimes pull out a scrap of paper from the back of her desk drawer. On it she would scribble down her grievances: maybe Kreutz had stayed late at work without giving her a heads-up, or maybe he'd allowed their kids to do something she considered risky. The list was C
5h
Cosmic concrete developed from space dust and astronaut blood
Transporting a single brick to Mars can cost more than a million British pounds—making the future construction of a Martian colony seem prohibitively expensive. Scientists at The University of Manchester have now developed a way to potentially overcome this problem, by creating a concrete-like material made of extra-terrestrial dust along with the blood, sweat and tears of astronauts.
6h
Pandemic tech left out public health experts. Here's why that needs to change.
Exposure notification apps were developed at the start of the pandemic, as technologists raced to help slow the spread of covid. The most common system was developed jointly by Google and Apple , and dozens of apps around the world were built using it—MIT Technology Review spent much of 2020 tracking them . The apps, which run on ordinary smartphones and rely on Bluetooth signals to operate, have
9h
First observation of high-harmonic generation in robust, refractory metals
The generation of high harmonics from metals opens a link between solid and plasma harmonics. High-harmonic generation (HHG) is the field of creating high-frequency photons from low-frequency lasers. HHG is the cornerstone of nonlinear optics, with applications in spectroscopy, attosecond science and so on. In this study, researchers used titanium nitride to achieve HHG in refractory metals for th
5h
'A very cruel exit': UK's aid cuts risk rapid return of treatable diseases
£200m project to eliminate avoidable blindness and disfigurement in Africa ends after funding is prematurely axed A chandelier sparkling in the background, the grandeur of Downing Street gleaming behind him, Boris Johnson looks into the camera and speaks with solemnity. He is marking World Neglected Tropical Diseases Day, he says, to raise awareness of these "terrible afflictions … which impose a
15h
Study provides basis to evaluate food subsectors' emissions of three greenhouse gases
A new, location-specific agricultural greenhouse gas emission study is the first to account for net carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide emissions from all subsectors related to food production and consumption. The work, led by University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign atmospheric sciences professor Atul Jain, could help identify the primary plant- and animal-based food sectors contributing to
5h
Neuroplasticity: how to use anxiety to improve your life
Anxiety is an inevitable feature of our lives. Our brains need stress in order to thrive, but neither too much nor too little. By harnessing neuroplasticity — the brain's ability to adapt to new situations — we can use anxiety to improve our lives. The following is an excerpt from Good Anxiety: Harnessing the Power of the Most Misunderstood Emotion . Copyright (C) 2021 by Wendy Suzuki, PhD. Repri
7h
How to Install Windows 11 Home With a Local Account
Microsoft doesn't want end users to have local accounts any longer, and it's removed the ability to create one by default in Windows 11 Home. An earlier work-around that had users hit Alt-F4 during a certain part in the installation process no longer works, but there are new workarounds end-users can deploy to enable the option to set up Windows 11 Home without an internet connection. Microsoft h
6h
Scientists Create 'Coldest Temperature Ever' by Dropping Experiment From a Building
As far as we can tell from modern science, there's no upper limit to temperature. There sure is a lower limit, though. We call that absolute zero, measured as -273.15 °C (-459.67 °F). Scientists have yet to reach that limit in any experiment, but they're getting close. A team of physicists in Germany has gotten closer than ever before, reaching a temperature of 38 trillionths of a degree from abs
8h
Does overhearing your spouse's work calls put you on edge? Me too. I found out why | Sophie Brickman
A couples therapist told me: 'It can be very shocking to encounter a person you're unfamiliar with, especially if we don't like that version' "Daddy, you workin'?" my two-year-old daughter asks throughout the day, as my husband saunters around the living room in a fugue state conducting back-to-back business calls, AirPods locked and loaded, eyes fixed to the middle distance. Charlotte turned one
10h
Quasars as the new cosmic standard candles
In 1929, Edwin Hubble published observations that galaxies' distances and velocities are correlated, with the distances determined using their Cepheid stars. Harvard astronomer Henrietta Swan Leavitt had discovered that a Cepheid star varies periodically with a period that is related to its intrinsic luminosity. She calibrated the effect, and when Hubble compared those calculated values with his o
8h
'It's just that layer of security': UK parents mostly welcome 12-15s getting Covid jabs
Avoiding disruption to education and being able to travel are valued alongside the health benefits, with schools seen as risky environments Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The UK's four chief medical officers have decided that children aged 12 to 15 years olds can be offered Covid vaccinations. All children of this age group will be offered a first vaccine immediatel
4h
Scientists explore the creation of artificial organelles
Cells have small compartments known as organelles that perform complex biochemical reactions. These compartments have multiple enzymes that work together to execute important cellular functions. Researchers at the Center for Soft and Living Matter within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS, South Korea) have successfully mimicked these nano-scale spatial compartments to create "artificial mitocho
5h
Hoax Press Release Claims Walmart Will Accept Litecoin, Causing Spike and Then Crash
Fake Press Release Prices for cryptocurrency Litecoin briefly spiked before crashing back down after a fake press release circulated claiming that said the giant retailer Walmart would be accepting the altcoin. The press release boasted that Walmart would begin accepting Litecoin as a form of payment from customers, according to CNBC . But Walmart later confirmed that the apparent announcement wa
25min
A Huge Number of Environmental Activists Are Getting Murdered
Horrifying Record A stunning report from an international non-profit group found that a record amount of environmental activists were murdered last year. A horrifying 227 environmental and land rights activists were killed worldwide in 2020, according to the report from Global Witness . That's an average of more than four people per week — and even worse, the report cautions that that number is "
25min
Scientists claim that overeating is not the primary cause of obesity
A perspective article challenges the 'energy balance model,' which says weight gain occurs because individuals consume more energy than they expend. According to the authors, 'conceptualizing obesity as a disorder of energy balance restates a principle of physics without considering the biological mechanisms underlying weight gain.' The authors argue for the 'carbohydrate insulin model,' which exp
37min
Researchers design sensors to rapidly detect plant hormones
Researchers from the Disruptive and Sustainable Technologies for Agricultural Precision (DiSTAP) interdisciplinary research group of the Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART), MIT's research enterprise in Singapore, and their local collaborators from Temasek Life Sciences Laboratory (TLL) and Nanyang Technological University (NTU), have developed the first-ever nanosensor to e
58min
Socio-economic status of children can influence microorganisms in their digestive tract
Findings suggest that a family's socio-economic status (SES) may influence children's composition of gut microbiome — the mix of microscopic organisms within the digestive tract. SES includes economic resources such as education, income and occupation, and are reflected in living conditions, nutrition and psychosocial stress, according to the study, which focused on the education levels of mother
1h
Astronomers spot the same supernova three times — and predict a fourth sighting in 16 years
An enormous amount of gravity from a cluster of distant galaxies causes space to curve so much that light from them is bent and emanated our way from numerous directions. This 'gravitational lensing' effect has allowed astronomers to observe the same exploding star in three different places in the heavens. They predict that a fourth image of the same explosion will appear in the sky by 2037. The s
1h
6 feet may not be enough to avoid infectious aerosols indoors
Indoor distances of two meters—about six and a half feet—may not be enough to sufficiently prevent transmission of airborne aerosols, researchers report. Eighteen months ago, stickers began to dot the floors of most shops, spaced about six feet apart, indicating the physical distance required to avoid the COVID-19 virus an infected person may shed when breathing or speaking. "Airborne infection c
2h
500-million-year-old fossil fills in 'Cambrian explosion' puzzle
Researchers have found a rare, 500-million-year-old "worm-like" fossil called a palaeoscolecid, which is an uncommon fossil group in North America. Many scientists consider the "Cambrian explosion"—which occurred about 530-540 million years ago—as the first major appearance of many of the world's animal groups in the fossil record. Like adding pieces to a giant jigsaw puzzle, each discovery datin
2h
The Atlantic Announces NBCUniversal News Group as Exclusive Media Partner of The Atlantic Festival
The Atlantic is announcing a collaboration with NBCUniversal News Group to be the exclusive media partner of The Atlantic Festival , its annual live event gathering the most influential voices on the ideas shaping a changing nation. The Atlantic Festival is happening virtually from September 22–24 and September 27–30, and for the second year all events are free to attend. Audience registration is
3h
Compound hazards pose increased risk to highly populated regions in the Himalayas
Most of the research concerned with hazards like flooding, landslides, or wildfires describes only one hazard at a time, but the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's latest assessment report states that anthropogenic climate change is increasing the likelihood of compound hazards—events where more than one hazard interact with multiplicatively destructive consequences. A recent study has fo
3h
Balancing food security and nitrogen use
Environmental targets to limit excess nitrogen require the large-scale deployment of dedicated nitrogen mitigation strategies to avoid a strong increase in the risk of food insecurity. Without these measures, the amount of dietary energy available to people would be greatly reduced, which would in turn lead to high food prices and an increase in the number of undernourished people.
3h
Clever wild boar brings rescue party to save young from a trap
Researchers observe in a series of photos an unexpected rescue of two young wild boars from a trap. The whole rescue took less than half an hour thanks to a clever adult female wild boar. Aside from the fact of the rescue, there are signs that the rescuer was exhibiting and acting out of empathy for the captives. There is a danger in attributing human-like motivations to animal behavior. We have
3h
Publisher investigating all of an author's papers following reporting by Retraction Watch
Less than two weeks after Retraction Watch reported that an abstract from 2019 included what appeared to be text from plagiarism detection software, the publisher has subjected the paper to an expression of concern and is investigating all of the lead author's papers. The paper,"Identification of Selective Forwarding Attacks in Remote locator Network utilizing Adaptive … Continue reading
3h
Tongue-in-cheek award with cult status for cinema air study
The Ig Nobel Prizes honor scientific achievements that "should first make people laugh and then make them think". The spoof prizes, first awarded by the US journal Annals of Improbable Research in 1991, have long since acquired cult status among scientists. This year's chemistry award recognizes a study that proves the connection between the air in cinemas and different age ratings. The study was
3h
Tests reveal four squirrel personality traits
A new study is the first to document personality, or consistent behavior over time, in golden-mantled ground squirrels. The study in the journal Animal Behaviour found the squirrels show personality for four main traits: boldness, aggressiveness, activity level, and sociability. While the golden-mantled ground squirrel is under no conservation threat, the findings suggest that understanding how a
4h
Inhaled vaccine shields mice from bacterial pneumonia
An inhaled vaccine protects mice against several strains against Klebsiella pneumoniae , a bacterium that can cause pneumonia in hospital settings, according to a new study. There are currently no FDA-licensed vaccines for the prevention or treatment of the infection, and a drug-resistant strain of the bacteria is responsible for at least 7,900 cases and 520 deaths each year in the United States.
4h
Pioneering method of assessing rewilding progress applied for the first time
Scientists from the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv), the Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) and Rewilding Europe have developed a new way of evaluating rewilding progress. Its ground-breaking application across seven of Rewilding Europe's operational areas has revealed both positive impact and challenges to upscaling. The practical tool can help to inform de
4h
Crop-eating moths will flourish as climate warms
Climate change in this century will allow one of the world's costliest agricultural pests, the diamondback moth, to both thrive year-round and rapidly evolve resistance to pesticides in large parts of the United States, Europe and China where it previously died each winter, according to a study by U.S. and Chinese researchers.
4h
Genetic resource could be used to protect farm-raised kuruma shrimp from disease
New research from the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) and Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology has resulted in a useful genetic resource on the kuruma shrimp. These are one of the largest species of prawn (females can reach 27cm in length) and are found throughout the Indian and Pacific Oceans. In Japan, they're considered a delicacy and have bee
4h
Ett simmande urtida huvud
Den är som hämtad ur en science fictionfilm. Djuret som kanadensiska paleontologer har hittat i bergsmassiven i British Colombia ser ut som ett litet rymdskepp – en halv meter stor sköld som simmade runt i världshaven för en halv miljard år sedan. Spela videon ovan för att se hur det jagade.
4h
Women less likely to win major research awards
Nature, Published online: 13 September 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02497-4 Although the gap is narrowing, prestigious prizes are still more likely to go to men, finds an analysis of gender bias in the world's top science awards.
5h
Wisdom of Daoism: why Yin-Yang is so much more than a tattoo
Daoism is the philosophy that there is a right way to live life, and it involves finding and following the "Dao", or path, to our life and also the universe. Yin-Yang is the symbol that represents difference yet unity in life. It is not a conflict or struggle but shows that nothing in life is solely either this or that. When things in life feel wrong, or if you get that gut feeling that you are o
5h
A smart bra for better heart health | Alicia Chong Rodriguez
Could an everyday clothing item help protect your health? In this quick talk, TED Fellow Alicia Chong Rodriguez introduces us to a smart bra designed to gather real-time data on biomarkers like heartbeat, breath and temperature. Learn how this life-saving gadget could help close the gender gap in cardiovascular research — and, finally, usher women's health care into the 21st century.
5h
Toward better space health: Understanding the effects of microgravity on P-glycoprotein
Deep space is most likely going to be humanity's final frontier, and space travel will undoubtedly become much more common in the future. However, space is a very hostile environment not only because of the technical difficulties that entail going there, but also because of the detrimental effects that constant microgravity has on the human body. Some examples of these are bone loss, muscle atroph
5h
Better in pairs: Proteins can help one another bind to DNA
Scientists from Tokyo Metropolitan University have uncovered a unique mechanism where two transcription factors stabilize each other's binding to DNA in fission yeast. They found that Atf1 and Rst2 help each other stably bind when they were close enough together. They both help transcribe a gene that deals with glucose poor environments but belong to entirely independent activation pathways. New i
5h
CuPID CubeSat will get new perspective on Sun-Earth boundary
When you help build a satellite the size of a shoebox, you learn pretty much everything about it, says Emil Atz, a Ph.D. candidate in Mechanical Engineering at Boston University. You learn how to write a proposal to fund it, how to place the screws that hold it together, how to test each instrument to ensure it functions properly.
5h
Män verkar sova sämre under månens första faser
Mäns sömn verkar påverkas mer än kvinnors av månens cykel. En studie som genomförts av forskare vid Uppsala universitet visar att många män sover sämre under månens första faser medan kvinnornas sömn i stort sett inte påverkades alls. Tidigare studier om månens cykel och sömn har delvis visat motstridiga resultat. En del har visat på ett sammanhang, medan andra inte kunnat se någon sådan koppling
5h
Poll: Older adults are missing out on health savings account benefits
Most older adults don't use tax-advantaged savings accounts to save for future health expenses, a new poll of people age 50 to 80 suggests. Those who do are more likely to have high incomes and education levels, and to be in good health and under Medicare eligibility age. At the same time, 18% of people age 50 to 80 are not at all confident that they'll have enough money to pay their share of hea
5h
Experts weigh in on Hurricane Ida and deadly flash floods in New York City
On August 29, the 16th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, Hurricane Ida made landfall in Louisiana as a Category 4 storm. More than 1 million people across the state were left without power, including the entire city of New Orleans. The storm then moved to the Northeast, where it brought record-setting windspeeds and rainfall. In New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Maryland, at least 10 tornadoes ripped
5h
The pathway for producing ethylene
New research lays out the chemical steps used by a naturally occurring enzyme to convert a common chemical compound into ethylene—a plant hormone important for fruit ripening and an industrial chemical used in the production of plastics and textiles. A paper describing the research by scientists at Penn State appears online Aug. 12 in the journal Science.
5h
American Muslims are at high risk of suicide, linked to Islamophobia
This year, 9/11 holds a dual significance for Americans across the country. It not only marks the 20th anniversary of the tragic events and lives lost since Sept. 11, 2001, but also National Suicide Prevention Awareness Week. For American Muslims who are both victims of increased rates of Islamophobic violence and survivors of suicide attempts, this juxtaposition is especially stark.
5h
Why cities around Wisconsin are feeling the heat
While Wisconsin may be known for its "frozen tundra," an increase in hot, humid summer days is bringing attention to Wisconsin's urban heat islands and their impact on human health. A heat island is an urban area that experiences higher temperatures than the surrounding rural areas because of buildings, roads, and general infrastructure absorbing heat and emitting that heat back into the environme
6h
Study provides evidence for 'new physics'
Is the Standard Model of particle physics incorrect at key points? Recently there has been an increase in experimental observations that deviate from the predictions of this widely accepted physical theory. A current study by the University of Bonn now provides even stronger evidence for the existence of "new physics." The final version of the paper is now published in the journal Physics Letters
6h
Media beautifies the image of coronavirus
According to a study by the Instituto de Radio Televisión Española and the UAB conducted during the COVID-19 lockdown, black and white images of SARS-CoV-2 make the virus seem more infectious. The results, published on PLoS ONE, demonstrate that color and three-dimensional images of SARS-CoV-2 in the media has favored the perception of the virus as a beautiful, but not quite realistic or contagiou
6h
Detecting fish, mammals, and birds from a single water sample
In times of exacerbating biodiversity loss, reliable data on species occurrence are essential, in order for prompt and adequate conservation actions to be initiated. This is especially true for freshwater ecosystems, which are particularly vulnerable and threatened by anthropogenic impacts. Their ecological status has already been highlighted as a top priority by multiple national and internationa
6h
The world's languages may be so similar because of how humans talk about language
The languages of the world are all unique, but also share important similarities. These mostly lie in the grammatical elements each of the approximately 7000 human languages contain, the word parts and rules that speakers can use to build a sentence. Traditionally, linguists either assume that the explanation for these similarities is that all people are born with a blueprint for these grammatical
6h
2 Gold Divers Have Oxygen Trouble! | Bering Sea Gold
Stream Bering Sea Gold on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/bering-sea-gold About Bering Sea Gold: In Nome, Alaska, the gold rush is on. Driven by gold fever and sometimes desperate need, miners pilot their ragtag dredges and dive with hoses to suck up gold from the bottom of the frigid, unpredictable Bering Sea. #BeringSeaGold #Discovery #Diving Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.l
6h
How genetic islands form among marine molluscs
Usually, the individuals of a population of marine species that have the potential to disperse over long distances all share a similar genetic composition. Yet every now and then, at small, localized sites, small groups of genetically different individuals suddenly appear within populations for a short period of time. A new study explains how this chaotic formation of genetic islands can occur in
6h
Electrifying the Future: Toyota Puts Over $13 Billion Into Battery Technology
The world's largest car manufacturer by volume has been sluggish in its efforts to electrify compared to competitors. But Toyota has just announced a huge investment in battery technology that may be a sign it's shifting course. Although Toyota's Prius hybrid was the first electrified vehicle to really hit the mainstream, the company failed to capitalize on its early lead. It still doesn't sell a
6h
Fruit fly discovery could lead to new ways to treat diabetes
Researchers have discovered a hormone in fruit flies that can help us better understand how human metabolism is regulated. The findings could pave the way for treating diseases such as obesity and diabetes. Hormones are chemical messengers that signal to organs what to do while getting them to work together. Hormonal imbalances can lead to countless diseases and are partly responsible for the fac
6h
"The Unwritten Rules of Black TV"
"Since its invention, television has shaped this country's self-image. To the extent that we share notions of 'normal,' 'acceptable,' 'funny,' 'wrong,' and even 'American,' television has helped define them. For decades, Black writers were shut out of the rooms in which those notions were scripted, and even today, they must navigate a set of implicit rules established by white executives––all whi
7h
Textbook wording may sap certainty about climate
Textbook wording that portrays climate change information as uncertain can influence how middle and high school students feel about the information, a study suggests. The study has implications for how teachers can prepare students to face misinformation about climate change . "I thought students' knowledge or social norms surrounding climate change would buffer them from misinformation," says st
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Fler vill ha svåra hälsobesked via 1177.se
Många fler än tidigare vill få svåra hälsobesked först via journaler på nätet, visar en studie. Men många inom vården är skeptiska till att patienter får ta del av till exempel en cancerdiagnos, innan en läkare hunnit ta kontakt. Enligt studien får cirka två procent av patienterna svåra besked först via Journalen på webbtjänsten 1177.se. Studien visar att mångdubbelt, 17,7 procent, vill ta emot s
7h
Filling the gaps in the SuperDARN archive
When solar wind slams into Earth's magnetic field, the impacts ripple down through the planet's ionosphere, the outer shell of the atmosphere full of charged particles. A global array of high-frequency radars known as the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) tracks ionospheric plasma circulation from the ground, giving researchers insights into the interactions between solar wind, the magn
7h
Sexit underlättar samtal med unga om sexuell ohälsa
Både besökare och personal vid ungdomsmottagningar ser fördelar med en rutin för skriftliga frågor i ett formulär. Det gör det lättare att fånga upp besökare som har erfarenhet av, eller riskerar, sexuellt överförbara infektioner, oplanerad graviditet eller sexuellt våld. Metoden heter Sexit. Unga som grupp löper en ökad risk för sexuell ohälsa i form av sexuellt överförbara sjukdomar, oplanerade
8h
These are the world's first mushroom multi gummies—here's how they help
Wouldn't it be nice if there was a single multi-vitamin that could adapt uniquely to your body's specific needs to help you achieve mind-body balance? And wouldn't it be even better if it tasted like juicy, ripened, wild raspberries? There may not be a multi-vitamin that can do it all, but there sure is a multi-mushroom gummy that can. Meet WonderDay Mushroom Gummies , the first mushroom multi gu
8h
Dumpster diving in the VAERS database to find more COVID-19 vaccine-associated myocarditis in children
"Dumpster diving" is a term used to describe studies using data from the Vaccine Adverse Events Reporting System database by authors, almost always antivaxxers, who don't understand its limitations. Last week, non-antivax doctors who should know better fell into this trap when they promoted their study suggesting that COVID-19 mRNA vaccines are more dangerous to children than the disease. The pos
8h
Using Solar Power to Make Ammonia
Ammonia is the second most produce industrial chemical in the world. It is used for a variety of things , but mostly fertilizer: About 80% of the ammonia produced by industry is used in agriculture as fertilizer. Ammonia is also used as a refrigerant gas, for purification of water supplies, and in the manufacture of plastics, explosives, textiles, pesticides, dyes and other chemicals. In 2010 the
8h
Bringing together the powers of electrochemistry and flow technology
The combination of electrochemistry and flow technology holds much promise for the sustainable production of valuable chemicals, such as biobased feedstocks. Researcher Yiran Cao has explored electrochemical organic synthesis in flow, and especially continuous-flow microreactors, a new and exciting field that presents several challenges. Cao defended his Ph.D. thesis on Tuesday 7 September.
8h
Antennas searching for extraterrestrials threatened by wildfire
The Allen Telescope Array, an ensemble of 42 antennas used in the search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI), is once again threatened by wildfires. The scientists and engineers normally on-site have been evacuated as a precautionary measure, and in response to an order from the Shasta County Sheriff's Office.
8h
Baking greener bread after COVID
In the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, we must not squander the clean energy gains that were made through reduced human activity and economic downturn during the periods of lockdown and beyond. That is the message from recent research published in the International Journal of Global Warming.
8h
Genomic study shows abnormal DNA methylation in lead-exposed dogs
Epigenetics is the study of changes in gene activity which are not caused by changes in DNA sequences. DNA methylation—the addition of methyl groups to DNA—is the most well-known epigenetic modification. Lead exposure is known to cause epigenetic changes, and understanding these changes will help to more completely understand the impact and consequences of lead toxicity. This is especially importa
8h
Daily briefing: Adults with sickle-cell disease are being left behind
Nature, Published online: 10 September 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02498-3 Medical advances have slashed the death rate for children with sickle-cell disease in the US — but mortality for adults has grown steadily worse. Plus, CRISPR-like enzymes have been found in microbes, and a fossil predator was a giant 'swimming head'.
8h
CTCF knockout in zebrafish induces alterations in regulatory landscapes and developmental gene expression
Nature Communications, Published online: 13 September 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25604-5 CTCF is as an architectural protein involved in 3D genome folding; however its contribution to animal development has not been well characterized. Here the authors show that CTCF is not only pivotal for 3D chromatin structure and enhancer-promoter interactions in zebrafish, but it is also essential for cont
10h
Understanding the onset of hot streaks across artistic, cultural, and scientific careers
Nature Communications, Published online: 13 September 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25477-8 Despite their ubiquitous nature across a wide range of creative domains, it remains unclear if there is any regularity underlying the beginning of successful periods in a career. Here, the authors develop computational methods to trace the career outputs of artists, film directors, and scientists and explor
10h
Loss of polycomb repressive complex 1 activity and chromosomal instability drive uveal melanoma progression
Nature Communications, Published online: 13 September 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25529-z The molecular underpinnings driving uveal melanoma (UM) progression are unknown. Here the authors show that loss of Polycomb Repressive Complex 1 triggers chromosomal instability, which promotes inflammatory signaling and migration in UM.
10h
Contact tracing is an imperfect tool for controlling COVID-19 transmission and relies on population adherence
Nature Communications, Published online: 13 September 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25531-5 Evaluations of the UK's contact tracing programme have shown that it has had limited impact on COVID-19 control. Here, the authors show that with high levels of reporting and adherence, contact tracing could reduce transmission, but it should not be used as the sole control measure.
10h
Impact of global cooling on Early Cretaceous high pCO2 world during the Weissert Event
Nature Communications, Published online: 13 September 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25706-0 Modelling and sea surface temperature proxy data from the Weddell Sea document a 3–4 °C drop coinciding with the Early Cretaceous Weissert Event. Temperature data worldwide confirm a 3.0 °C global mean surface cooling, equivalent to a ~40% drop in atmospheric pCO2, favouring local polar ice.
10h
Hypoxia regulates overall mRNA homeostasis by inducing Met1-linked linear ubiquitination of AGO2 in cancer cells
Nature Communications, Published online: 13 September 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25739-5 Met1-linked linear ubiquitination (M1-Ubi) is catalyzed by linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex (LUBAC). Here the authors show that Ago2 protein is M1-Ubi modified by LUBAC complex under hypoxia condition leading to less association of miRNA target mRNAs to Ago2 protein and de-repression of miRNA targets
10h
Genetic variations of DNA bindings of FOXA1 and co-factors in breast cancer susceptibility
Nature Communications, Published online: 13 September 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25670-9 The identification of transcription factors (TFs) whose binding sites are affected by risk genetic variants remains crucial. Here, the authors develop a statistical framework to analyse ChIP-seq and GWAS data, identify 22 breast cancer risk-associated TFs and a core TF-transcriptional network for FOXA1 and
10h
Lessons on Toxic Dust from 9/11 Are Too Often Unheeded
The World Trade Center dust plume consisted of a dangerous mixture of cement dust, asbestos, and other pollutants. Two decades later, those who were exposed to these toxins are facing respiratory diseases and cancer. Despite the clear consequences, recent disasters show we haven't learned the lesson.
11h
Space tourism: What's on offer
A few minutes of weightlessness, or a few days. A short hop above the Earth's atmosphere, or a journey to the Moon and back… the era of space tourism is upon us, and—for those who can pay—it comes with many options.
12h
The Problem with Depression Doping – Facts So Romantic
If we medically insulate, or precipitously shield, emerging adults from introspection and struggle, from the work of figuring out life's big questions, it could prevent them from effectively coping with depression later in life. Illustration by TarikVision / Shutterstock Mental health is not what you'd call an "exact science." For example, if two highly trained mental health providers meet privat
13h
Jordstrålning och Currylinjer
Currylinjer är centralt inom jordstrålning. Jordstrålning är en icke-elektro­magnetisk strålning som enligt anhängarna finns över hela Jorden. Strålningen anses vara starkare längs stråk som bildar rutmönster med några meters sida. … Continued Inlägget dök först upp på Vetenskap och Folkbildning .
14h
Starwatch: Algol's orbiting stars add twinkle to Medusa's eye
Perseus phenomenon is best observed over several nights with reference to neighbouring stars Autumn in the northern hemisphere is a good time of the year to see Perseus in the evening sky. But rather than simply searching out the constellation, how about watching the star Algol change in brightness? Continue reading…
15h
Crypto Fanatics Are Taking Out Loans to Buy More Crypto
Crypto Lender Cryptocurrency enthusiasts seem to reach new heights of incredibly questionable and risky financial behavior each day. One recent example comes from the rise of lenders doling out loans to cryptocurrency addicts who, in turn, use it to buy more crypto. Similarly to a bank, crypto lenders take deposits to fund loans that leverage crypto as the collateral, according to The Wall Street
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