Search Posts

Nyheder2021september28

Tegn abonnement på BioNyt!

Vil du hjælpe med at udpege vigtigste nyheder? DO YOU WANT TO HELP CHOOSE THE MOST IMPORTANT SCIENCE NEWS? Email: bionyt@gmail.com Phone-sms: (45)21729908

People who 'can't fit into jeans they wore aged 21' risk developing diabetes
Study shows people with normal BMI can achieve remission of type 2 diabetes by losing 10-15% weight People risk developing type 2 diabetes if they can no longer fit into the jeans they were wearing when they were 21, according to one of the world's leading experts on the disease. And if people discovered they could no longer fit into the same-sized trousers then they were "carrying too much fat",
1d
Antibodies in breast milk remain for 10 months after Covid infection – study
Exclusive: Researchers believe such antibodies could be used to treat people with severe coronavirus Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Breastfeeding women who have been infected with Covid-19 continue to secrete virus-neutralising antibodies into their milk for up to 10 months, data suggests. Besides emphasising the important role breastfeeding could play in helping to
2d
Gibraltar cave chamber discovery could shed light on Neanderthals' culture
Researchers find space in Gorham's Cave complex that has been closed off for at least 40,000 years Researchers excavating a cave network on the Rock of Gibraltar have discovered a new chamber, sealed off from the world for at least 40,000 years, that could shed light on the culture and customs of the Neanderthals who occupied the area for a thousand centuries . In 2012, experts began examining Va
1d
If You're Under 40 You're Gonna See Some Horrible Stuff, Scientists Say
Lost Generation Children born this year are going to live their lives on a drastically different planet than any generations that came before them. Thanks to the largely unmitigated progression of global climate change, upcoming generations will be forced to endure several times more ecological disasters and dangerous bouts of extreme weather, according to research published in the journal Scienc
13h
Nazis Exposed After Their Web Host Gets Hacked
Extremists Unmasked Nazis and other far-right extremists are starting to face the consequences of their roles in the spread of hate speech, violence, and racism online now that their details were released following a massive hack on the web host Epik. Some, like former Florida real estate agent Joshua Alayon who also paid for websites like "theholocaustisfake.com" and "whitesencyclopedia.com," ha
1d
The message from Israel is clear: Covid booster shots should be standard | David O'Connor
A third dose of the vaccine provides significant protection, but that should not mean those who are unvaccinated go without David O'Connor is professor of pathology and laboratory medicine at the University of Wisconsin In the summer, Israel began offering third doses of the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine to the over-60s. It was the first country to start administering "booster shots", to people vaccina
1d
'Bare' super-earths offer clues to evolution of hot atmospheres
A group of astronomers from the Astrobiology Center, the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, the University of Tokyo, and other institutes, discovered two rocky super-Earth exoplanets lacking thick primordial atmospheres in very close orbits around two different red dwarf stars. These planets provide a chance to investigate the evolution of the atmospheres of hot rocky planets.
1d
Festival Goers Did So Many Drugs That Their Pee Harmed Local Fish
MDMEels Attendees at the 2019 Glastonbury music festival must have collectively taken an unfathomable amount of party drugs — because when scientists analyzed water from the nearby River Whitelake, they found high enough concentrations of MDMA and cocaine to harm local wildlife. In the weeks following the festival, scientists found 104 times more MDMA downstream from the site than upstream of it,
7h
In Guatemala, archaeologists uncover hidden neighborhood in ancient Maya city
Scientists have been excavating the ruins of Tikal, an ancient Maya city in modern-day Guatemala, since the 1950s—and thanks to those many decades spent documenting details of every structure and cataloguing each excavated item, Tikal has become one of the best understood and most thoroughly studied archaeological sites in the world.
20h
Scientific team uncovers additional threat to Antarctica's floating ice shelves
Glaciologists at the University of California, Irvine and NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory have examined the dynamics underlying the calving of the Delaware-sized iceberg A68 from Antarctica's Larsen C ice shelf in July 2017, finding the likely cause to be a thinning of ice melange, a slushy concoction of windblown snow, iceberg debris and frozen seawater that normally works to heal rifts.
1d
New membrane to make fresh water
Scientists at Sandia National Laboratories and their collaborators have developed a new membrane, whose structure was inspired by a protein from algae, for electrodialysis that could be used to provide fresh water for farming and energy production.
1d
Cracking open strong field quantum electrodynamics
A newly published theoretical and computer modeling study suggests that the world's most powerful lasers might finally crack the elusive physics behind some of the most extreme phenomena in the universe—gamma ray bursts, pulsar magnetospheres, and more.
12h
The Largest Autocracy on Earth
Danielle Del Plato I n 1947 , Albert Einstein, writing in this magazine , proposed the creation of a single world government to protect humanity from the threat of the atomic bomb. His utopian idea did not take hold, quite obviously, but today, another visionary is building the simulacrum of a cosmocracy. Mark Zuckerberg, unlike Einstein, did not dream up Facebook out of a sense of moral duty, or
1d
Glastonbury: drug traces from on-site urination could harm rare eels
Scientists found dangerous levels of MDMA in nearby River Whitelake after the festival Scientists have found what they called environmentally damaging levels of illegal drugs in the river running through Glastonbury festival owing to public urination on the site. Researchers measured levels of illegal drugs in the river before, during and after the last Glastonbury festival, in 2019, comparing le
1d
CDC Director: 'Walk, Don't Run' to Get Your Booster
Editor's Note: This article is part of our coverage of The Atlantic Festival. Learn more and watch festival sessions here . For some of us, booster shots have finally arrived. But they've charted quite a meandering course to get here. First, last month, President Joe Biden announced that most Americans would be able to nab third doses of mRNA vaccines eight months after their second shots. Then,
1d
Race to the bottom: the disastrous blindfolded rush to mine the deep sea
One of the largest mining operations ever seen on Earth aims to despoil an ocean we are only barely beginning to understand A short bureaucratic note from a brutally degraded microstate in the South Pacific to a little-known institution in the Caribbean is about to change the world. Few people are aware of its potential consequences, but the impacts are certain to be far-reaching. The only questi
1d
Covid has wiped out years of progress on life expectancy, finds study
Pandemic behind biggest fall in life expectancy in western Europe since second world war, say researchers The Covid pandemic has caused the biggest decrease in life expectancy in western Europe since the second world war, according to a study. Data from most of the 29 countries – spanning most of Europe, the US and Chile – that were analysed by scientists recorded reductions in life expectancy la
2d
After Splitting From Elon Musk, Grimes Says She's Starting a "Lesbian Space Commune"
Unless you've been living under a rock — or a beautiful corner of the internet blissfully unaware of Elon Musk news — you probably know that musician Claire "Grimes" Boucher broke up with her billionaire SpaceX CEO partner of three years recently. "We are semi-separated but still love each other, see each other frequently and are on great terms," Musk told Page Six on Friday. Now, Grimes says she
13h
Bitcoin Mining Company Buys Entire Coal Power Plant
A Pennsylvania-based holding company called Stronghold Digital Mining bought an entire coal power plant in Venango County, Pennsylvania over the summer to power 1,800 mining computers, NBC News reports . The plant is now burning about 600,000 tons of coal a year, a troubling return to a highly polluting form of energy and raising red flags among environmental advocates. "These miners don't just n
1d
Hamster Trades Cryptocurrencies, Outperforms Warren Buffett
Spin the Wheel Hamsters are typically boring (though adorable) pets parents buy their kids in lieu of a dog or cat. However, one hamster is making waves on the Internet for his savvy crypto trading — and he's even got a modest following on Twitch. Mr. Goxx is a Germany-based hamster who has been trading cryptocurrencies since June, according to Insider . Of course, the creature isn't doing it all
2d
Elon Musk Is Officially the Richest Person on Earth Again
Richest Again SpaceX and Tesla CEO Elon Musk is yet again the world's richest person, according to Forbes' real-time billionaires list , with an estimated net worth of a staggering $201.7 billion. Amazon founder — and billionaire space competitor — Jeff Bezos slid down to second place, with an estimated net worth of $193.6 billion. Musk made significant gains in large part thanks to Tesla shares
7h
Trump May Not Have to Steal 2024
Are constitutionally committed Americans doing all they can to prevent a pro-Trump plot to pervert the 2024 election? Maybe not. But along with that question, here's another: Are constitutionally committed Americans doing all they can to prevent Donald Trump from winning the 2024 election fair and square? The Biden administration's numbers are slumping in the fall of 2021, opening the way for Rep
18h
The Lie About the Supreme Court Everyone Pretends to Believe
Justice Amy Coney Barrett is offended by those questioning the impartiality of the Supreme Court. "This Court is not comprised of a bunch of partisan hacks," she announced at a recent event at the University of Louisville's McConnell Center, named for Senator Mitch McConnell. "Judicial philosophies are not the same as political parties." For Barrett to insist on her nonpartisanship at a center na
18h
Smokers up to 80% more likely to be admitted to hospital with Covid, study says
Data also finds smokers more likely to die from disease compared with those who have never smoked Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Smokers are 60%-80% more likely to be admitted to hospital with Covid-19 and also more likely to die from the disease, data suggests. A study , which pooled observational and genetic data on smoking and Covid-19 to strengthen the evidence
1d
Five a day: UK children with healthy diet have best mental health
Study prompts experts to call for nutrition to be included in public health strategies Children who eat five or more portions of fruit and vegetables a day have the best mental health, according to the first study of its kind. Higher intake is associated with better mental wellbeing among secondary school pupils, and a nutritious breakfast and lunch is linked to emotional wellbeing in pupils acro
1d
Misinformation Is About to Get So Much Worse
Editor's Note: This article is part of our coverage of The Atlantic Festival. Learn more and watch festival sessions here . For years now, artificial intelligence has been hailed as both a savior and a destroyer. The technology really can make our lives easier, letting us summon our phones with a "Hey, Siri" and (more importantly) assisting doctors on the operating table . But as any science-fict
1d
China Cracks Down on Violent Cartoons
Violence and Pornography China has officially banned any children's cartoons and TV shows that make any mention of violence, vulgarity, or pornography, CNN reports — an escalation of an entertainment industry crackdown that's already well underway. The National Radio and Television Administration made the announcement late Friday night. TV channels must "resolutely resist bad plots" and limit bro
1d
COVID Patients Tell Doctor Coronavirus Is Fake, Then All Die
Earlier this month, Michigan pulmonologist Matthew Trunsky wrote a Facebook post about eight of his COVID-19 patients, all in critical condition, who berated him and other healthcare workers, denied proper treatment, and otherwise spouted the sort of nonsense conspiracy theories or repeatedly-debunked coronavirus misinformation that's spread as rampantly as the disease itself. Now, two weeks late
1d
Jupiter's Great Red Spot Is Changing, NASA Says
Great Red Spot NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has kept a close eye on Jupiter's Great Red Spot for more than a decade. It's a massive roiling storm, larger than the Earth in diameter, that has been observed on the surface of the planet for more than 150 years — and it's still as mysterious as ever. Now, Hubble has discovered that the average wind speeds of the Red Spot are starting to steadily inc
6h
Pinker's progress: the celebrity scientist at the centre of the culture wars
How the Harvard psychologist Steven Pinker became one of the world's most contentious thinkers On a recent afternoon, Steven Pinker, the cognitive psychologist and bestselling author of upbeat books about human progress, was sitting in his summer home on Cape Cod, thinking about Bill Gates. Pinker was gearing up to record a radio series on critical thinking for the BBC, and he wanted the world's
1d
Video Shows Church Collapsing After Being Hit by Lava
Volcano Island Shocking footage shows the moment a church collapses in a cloud of dark ashes on the Spanish island of La Palma. The island, which is home to around 85,000 inhabitants, was rocked by the eruption of the Cumbre Vieja volcano this month that's destroyed more than 500 buildings and 12 miles of roads, The Washington Post reports . The bell tower of a small church on the island succumbe
1d
Half of American Kids Have Lead in Their Blood, Doctors Say
Half of the children in the U.S. appear to have the toxic heavy metal lead in their blood, according to alarming new research. After analyzing blood tests conducted on 1.14 million children younger than the age of six, scientists saw observable levels of the toxic metal in about half, according to a massive study published in the journal JAMA Pediatrics on Monday. And that number, compared to pre
1d
Indian State Cuts Off Internet for 8.5 Million to Prevent Students Cheating on Standardized Test
Extreme Measures Millions of people in the Indian state Rajasthan had their internet access shut off by the government on Sunday for a bizarre reason: It was test day. more than 1.6 million people sat down to take the Rajasthan Eligibility Exam for Teachers (REET). And in order to keep them honest, The Register reports that the state switched the internet off so that they couldn't cheat by lookin
1d
The Nonsensical Loophole in Biden's Vaccine Mandate
President Joe Biden's new vaccine mandate for large businesses is a strange one, in that it does not actually make vaccines mandatory for the roughly 80 million Americans it's aimed at. Tucked plainly into the rule is a singular and obvious opt-out: Unlike federal employees and contractors, those in the private sector can test for the coronavirus on an at-least-weekly basis, a no-jab alternative
1d
A Support Group for the Unwoke
H elen Pluckrose is a former academic who became famous for pranking the academy. Three years ago Pluckrose, who previously researched medieval religious writing, joined with the scholars James Lindsay and Peter Boghossian to concoct some fake scientific studies on outlandish topics, such as rape culture among dogs. They loaded the papers with phrasing such as "because of my own situatedness as a
1d
Scientists Are Putting Women in Giant Waterbeds to Study Outer Space
Dry Immersion Study Researchers are studying the effects of spaceflight on the human body by placing women in waterbeds for five days. Scientists in Toulouse, France are placing 20 women in bathtub-like containers as part of the "dry immersion" study, according to a press release from the European Space Agency (ESA). The tanks have water in them but are covered with waterproof fabric to keep the
2d
In Topology, When Are Two Shapes the Same?
Sorting a collection of shapes is child's play. Circles here, squares there, triangles in their own pile. But if you take the task seriously, there's a lot more to it. In fact, one of the largest subdisciplines in mathematics — topology — is devoted exactly to this kind of endeavor, and after centuries of concerted effort, mathematicians aren't even close to finishing. Source
15h
Unusual structure of giant radio galaxy J0133−1302 detected by astronomers
Using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT), astronomers from South Africa and Poland have conducted radio observations of a giant radio galaxy (GRG) known as J0133−1302. The observational campaign revealed that the galaxy has an unusual complex structure. The finding is reported in a paper published September 17 on arXiv.org.
1d
Space Tourist Toilet Issues Were So Bad That They Set Off an Alarm
Waste Management Challenges One of the more compelling storylines to emerge from SpaceX's Inspiration4 launch involves the Crew Dragon spacecraft's toilet . It all started when rumors began circulating earlier last week that there was an issue with the capsule's waste management system during the mission. SpaceX's founder Elon Musk later admitted that the crew " had some challenges" with the toil
2d
A Film Crew Is Launching to the International Space Station Next Week
Movie Magic The director and lead actress of what will become the first feature-length fictional film shot in space are set to blast off next week, on October 5. The movie, titled "The Challenge, " is about a surgeon who finds herself dispatched to the International Space Station in order to save a cosmonaut's life, according to the NYT . The plan, as it stands right now, is to send actress Yukia
8h
Tiles Fly Off SpaceX Starship Prototype During Testing
Blasting Tiles SpaceX's latest orbital Starship prototype, dubbed S20, experienced a bit of a mishap during a venting test on Monday: the pressure caused numerous of the hexagonal heat shield tiles to violently pop off. "Headed tank vent knocked off a few tiles," SpaceX CEO Elon Musk confirmed in a Monday evening tweet , responding to another Twitter user posting a GIF of the heat shield tiles br
9h
So-Called Alternative Medicine for Cancer
Edzard Ernst's new book on alternative medicine for cancer addresses cancer prevention, treatment, and palliative care. It is an invaluable, accessible guide to the evidence for each modality. The post first appeared on Science-Based Medicine .
22h
Amazing! New Tesla Autopilot Update Will Avoid Crashing Into Emergency Vehicles
Emergency Crash Tesla's self-driving software may have a problem that recently culminated in an investigation by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration: its cars seem to keep ramming into stationary emergency response vehicles while Autopilot was turned on. According to the regulator, there were at least 11 crashes since January 2018 resulting in 17 injuries and one death. At least th
1d
Zen stones naturally placed atop pedestals of ice: A phenomenon finally understood
Like a work of art enshrined in a museum, some stones end up on a pedestal of ice in nature, with no human intervention. This "Zen stone" phenomenon, named after the stacked stones in Japanese gardens, appears on the surface of frozen lakes, Lake Baikal (Russia) in particular. These structures result from the phenomenon of sublimation, which causes a body, in this case ice, to change from solid to
1d
How 'wonder material' graphene became a national security concern
UK and China are racing to develop forms of the super-strength technology that has potential aerospace and weaponry uses A large shed on an unassuming industrial estate beside Swansea's River Tawe does not at first glance seem vital to the UK's national security. The facility, run by a small company called Perpetuus , sits beside a mortuary and a parcel depot. Earlier this month, the company, whi
1d
Should scientists run the country?
Covid has put academics like Chris Whitty and Patrick Vallance at the heart of government, but smart politicians are essential too How many lives would have been saved in the pandemic if the UK government had truly " followed the science "? The question is unanswerable but hardly academic. We cannot accurately quantify how many lives were lost by the politically driven delays to lockdown in the f
1d
Covid can infect cells in pancreas that make insulin, research shows
Results of two studies may explain why some people develop diabetes after catching the virus Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Covid-19 can infect insulin-producing cells in the pancreas and change their function, potentially explaining why some previously healthy people develop diabetes after catching the virus. Doctors are increasingly concerned about the growing num
6h
Elon Musk Compliments Crypto-Trading Hamster
Mad Skillz Mr. Goxx, a Germany-based hamster, has been busy making deals and trading cryptocurrencies inside his "Goxx Box," a small enclosure that allows the rodent to buy and sell by running on his wheel and slipping through "Decision Tunnels." It's a fun stunt that has amused some of the biggest names in crypto, including Tesla CEO Elon Musk. "Hamster has mad skillz!!" Musk mused on Twitter to
9h
Police Sue Tesla for Self-Driving Car That Injured Five Officers
Occupational Hazard Five Texas cops filed a lawsuit against Tesla on Monday over a crash seemingly caused by the car's semiautonomous Autopilot mode. Back in February, the cops had pulled over another car when the Model X crashed into their vehicles at 70 miles per hour, pushing the cars into the officers and injuring them. Now, Insider reports that the police have accused Tesla of false advertis
10h
A technique to create sub-10-nm graphene nanoribbons from squashed carbon nanotubes
Graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) are narrow and long strips of graphene with widths below 100 nm. GNRs that have smooth edges, a sizable bandgap and high charge carrier mobility could be highly valuable for a wide range of electronic and optoelectronic applications. So far, however, engineers have not yet introduced a method to prepare these useful components on a large scale.
15h
Dynamic twists and loops can enable DNA to modulate its function
When people think of DNA, they visualize a string-like double helix structure. In reality, the DNA double helix in cells is supercoiled and constrained into loops. This supercoiling and looping are known to influence every aspect of DNA activity, but how this happens has not been clear.
20h
The Climate Projection for 500 Years From Now Is Unbelievably Bad
Planning Ahead With climate change, we tend to worry about the present (are hurricanes getting worse?) and the medium-term future (what will the planet be like in the year 2100?) Look a few hundred more years down the road, though, and the world will likely appear totally alien. By the year 2500, the Amazon may become a barren hellscape and the midwestern United States could turn into a tropical
1d
How Clinton's 'Basket of Deplorables' Taught Germany a Lesson
In the final days of Germany's election campaign, the center-left Social Democrats appeared to focus their final message to voters on one idea: respect. The message was plastered across the country on vibrant red posters and featured in the closing campaign speech of the party's candidate for chancellor, Olaf Scholz, who pledged that a Germany under his leadership would recognize the contribution
1d
'Impossible' Particle Discovery Adds Key Piece to the Strong Force Puzzle
This spring, at a meeting of Syracuse University's quark physics group, Ivan Polyakov announced that he had uncovered the fingerprints of a semi-mythical particle. "We said, 'This is impossible. What mistake are you making?'" recalled Sheldon Stone, the group's leader. Polyakov went away and double-checked his analysis of data from the Large Hadron Collider beauty (LHCb) experiment… Source
1d
Study demonstrates the robust storage of qubits in ultracold polar molecules
Molecules have a very intricate and rich structure, which allows them to rotate and vibrate freely. As a result, they have an almost limitless space in which computer scientists could encode quantum information. In addition to their vast internal space, molecules are capable of long-range interactions and could thus be entangled to other separate molecules.
1d
The Messy Post-Roe Legal Future Awaiting America
America now faces the very real possibility that in just a few months' time, the Supreme Court will interpret the U.S. Constitution to no longer protect the right to abortion. On September 1, S.B. 8 —the most stringent abortion ban since before Roe v. Wade —took effect in Texas. Completely ignoring the protections of Roe , the Supreme Court refused to intervene. Though the Court's decision was pr
1d
Research reveals potential of an overlooked climate change solution
Earlier this month, President Biden urged other countries to join the U.S. and European Union in a commitment to slashing methane emissions. Two new Stanford-led studies could help pave the way by laying out a blueprint for coordinating research on methane removal technologies, and modeling how the approach could have an outsized effect on reducing future peak temperatures.
1d
Electric Cars Have Hit an Inflection Point
This is an excerpt from The Atlantic 's climate newsletter, The Weekly Planet. Subscribe today . One theme of this newsletter is that the world's physical infrastructure will have to massively change if we want to decarbonize the economy by 2050 , which the United Nations has said is necessary to avoid the worst effects of the climate crisis. This won't be as simple as passing a carbon tax or a c
7h
Photos: The Arduous Journey of the Haitian Migrants
Since the country's devastating earthquake in 2010, which killed more than 200,000 people, tens of thousands of Haitians have fled their crisis-burdened homeland, many traveling to parts of South America. Throughout this year many more have fled, joining previous Haitian expats who have not yet found places to settle—as well as migrants and asylum seekers from many other countries—to make the cha
9h
Air pollution likely cause of up to 6m premature births, study finds
Global analysis of indoor and outdoor pollution also finds link to low birth weight Air pollution is likely to have been responsible for up to 6 million premature births and 3 million underweight babies worldwide every year, research shows. The analysis, which combines the results of multiple scientific studies, is the first to calculate the total global burden of outdoor and indoor air pollution
11h
Watch a Huge Dust Storm Swallow an Entire City
Swallowed Whole A gigantic dust storm engulfed several Brazilian cities on Sunday after the region went without rain for 100 days. Apocalyptic video footage shared to Reddit shows a massive dust storm towering over the city of São Paolo, reaching heights that seem to be several times higher than the tallest buildings. The massive dust storm, a byproduct of severe drought is an alarming sign for t
11h
Novel design may boost efficiency of on-chip frequency combs
On the cover of the Pink Floyd album Dark Side of the Moon, a prism splits a ray of light into all the colors of the rainbow. This multicolored medley, which owes its emergence to the fact that light travels as a wave, is almost always hiding in plain sight; a prism simply reveals that it was there. For instance, sunlight is a mixture of many different colors of light, each bobbing up and down wit
16h
Climate change warning from collapsed ancient cities
Why did some ancient Khmer and Mesoamerican cities collapse between 900-1500CE while their rural surrounds continued to prosper? Intentional adaptation to climate changed conditions may be the answer, suggests a new study, which offers lessons for today.
16h
Does pollution make thunderstorms more severe?
A team of atmospheric scientists from around the nation is descending on the Houston, Texas, area for the next 14 months to seek answers to a vexing question: Do tiny specks of soot, dust, smoke, and other particles suspended in Earth's atmosphere help determine the severity of thunderstorms? The knowledge gained may make weather forecasts more accurate and provide crucial data for improving predi
1d
Consent Is About More Than Sex
For many people over the past year and a half, every social event—hugging a relative, eating with a friend—has become a complex and sometimes-awkward dance. They've determined their safety needs and wants, then verbalized them to others. They've had to ask permission for more things, after considering other people's comfort and boundaries. Whether people have realized it or not, everyday pandemic
1d
Taking the guesswork out of genetic engineering: STAMPScreen pipeline helps streamline genetic studies in mammalian cell
Today's genetic engineers have a plethora of resources at their disposal: an ever-increasing number of massive datasets available online, highly precise gene editing tools like CRISPR, and cheap gene sequencing methods. But the proliferation of new technologies has not come with a clear roadmap to help researchers figure out which genes to target, which tools to use, and how to interpret their res
1d
'A great loss': tributes pour in for pioneering PNG female doctor who died from Covid
Naomi Kori Pomat, the first female doctor in her province, died in country's first government-confirmed death of a health worker from virus Tributes have poured in for a doctor in Papua New Guinea's Western Province who died last week, in the country's first death of a healthcare worker from Covid-19 confirmed by the government. Dr Naomi Kori Pomat, 60, the director for curative health services a
2d
What Finally Brought R. Kelly Down
For the past six weeks in a Brooklyn courtroom, witnesses have shared stories of rape, violence, entrapment, humiliation, and manipulation by the R&B singer R. Kelly. These tales would be called shocking if many of them had not already circulated in the public eye—in rumors, reports , and documentaries —at least since Robert Kelly married an underage Aaliyah in 1994. The last time he faced prosec
9h
Optical chip protects quantum technology from errors
In today's digital infrastructure, the data-bits we use to send and process information can either be 0 or 1. Being able to correct possible errors that may occur in computations using these bits is a vital part of information processing and communication systems. But a quantum computer uses quantum bits, which can be a kind of mixture of 0 and 1, known as quantum super-position. This mixture is v
14h
Conservationists say rocket launch site could push endangered southern emu-wren to extinction
An Adelaide firm's plans for permanent facilities at Whaler's Bay on the Eyre Peninsula could wipe out prime habitat, environment group warns Get our free news app ; get our morning email briefing Conservationists say a plan to build a permanent rocket launch facility at Whaler's Bay in South Australia could push threatened bird species to extinction. Southern Launch, an Adelaide-based startup, o
1d
Dark skies ordinance to dim Pittsburgh's light pollution
For decades, the stars in our night sky have been blotted out by artificial light—from streetlamps, residential houses, businesses, construction sites, vehicles, billboards and so on. The glow they emit misdirects light up towards the sky, obscuring much of the Milky Way.
16h
Starwatch: catch a glimpse of the Andromeda galaxy as nights draw in
Vast collection of a trillion stars is farthest celestial object that can be seen with the unaided eye As the nights continue to draw in, we can put those darker evenings to good use. It is the beginning of observing season, and for stargazers in the northern hemisphere, there is a celestial jewel to track down: the Andromeda galaxy. Continue reading…
2d
New warm mini-Neptune exoplanet detected by TESS
Using NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS), an international team of astronomers has detected a new warm mini-Neptune alien world transiting a bright M-dwarf star. The newly found exoplanet, designated TOI-1201b, is estimated to be about six times more massive than the Earth. The finding is detailed in a paper published September 20 on arXiv.org.
16h
New way to simulate hydrogen storage efficiency of materials
Hydrogen energy has the potential to be a key measure to meet the United Nations net zero emissions target, but its industrial use has been hindered by the difficulty in its storage and handling. Hydrogen becomes a gas at a very low temperature (-252°C), which makes its storage at room temperature challenging. The interaction between hydrogen and its storage material is simply too weak to persist
1d
Plant compound may protect bees from deadly virus that makes them lose their way home
Around the world, honeybees are dying in large numbers. This die-off is in part because of a deadly virus that can kill bees or impair their ability to return to the hives after foraging. But in a study published September 28 in the journal iScience, researchers show that a cheap and naturally occurring chemical compound could prevent or reverse the effects of the virus in bees. Bees that were fed
14h
More diverse ant colonies raise more offspring
Ant colonies with a higher degree of genetic diversity thrive better than those that consist of individuals with more similar genetic backgrounds. This is the conclusion of an experimental study in which researchers compared various colonies of the common black ant with one another.
10h
Researchers and citizen scientists complete first-ever global Weddell seal count
A research team led by the University of Minnesota Twin Cities has completed a first-ever global population estimate of Weddell seals in Antarctica, showing that there are significantly fewer seals than previously thought. Documenting the seals' population trends over time will help scientists better understand the effects of climate change and commercial fishing.
1d
The pandemic is testing the limits of face recognition
At first glance, JB, an artist based in Los Angeles, perhaps doesn't look much like the picture on their driver's license. For one thing, the ID photo is from a few years ago. Hair that was once long and dark is now buzzed and bleached. And there's the fact that JB is transgender and has been taking testosterone for over two years, which has led to changing facial features, thicker eyebrows, and
19h
Pulling methane out of the atmosphere could slow global warming—if we can figure out how to do it
Pulling methane out of the atmosphere has the potential to help slow global warming in the next few decades—but researchers are still trying to figure out if it's really feasible. Methane is a powerful greenhouse gas, and human activities like natural-gas extraction and agriculture have more than doubled its concentration since the preindustrial era. Removing some methane from the atmosphere, or
1d
Carolyn Shoemaker obituary
American astronomer, leading asteroid hunter and co-discoverer of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9, which crashed into Jupiter Carolyn Shoemaker was a housewife with no science degree when, aged 51, she started searching for comets and asteroids with her astrogeologist husband, Gene Shoemaker . By the time of her death at the age of 92 from a fall, she had established herself as one of the leading hunters o
1d
'We Didn't Need Money. We Needed Paper Cranes.'
Darby Northington and his mom and younger brother had almost made it to school. They'd gotten a late start that morning; it was the beginning of the year at P.S. 234, an elementary school just north of the World Trade Center, where Darby was in third grade, and everyone was still getting into a new routine. They were about to cross Chambers Street when a plane flew directly overhead. When Darby t
18h
Peyton and Eli Manning Can't Save the NFL
Chalk up one more anomaly to These Unprecedented Times: Something genuinely weird is happening on an NFL broadcast. For this season of its marquee Monday Night Football program, ESPN is airing an additional broadcast featuring the brothers and retired Super Bowl–winning quarterbacks Peyton and Eli Manning. The "Manning-cast," as sports media have affectionately dubbed it, has the hangout feel of
7h
The Philosopher Who Took Happiness Seriously
Denise Bellon / AKG images In Memoirs of a Dutiful Daughter , Simone de Beauvoir remembers that as a child, she imagined her best friend, Élisabeth "Zaza" Lacoin, dying, and her schoolteacher announcing that Zaza had been called away to God. In that case, de Beauvoir thought, "Well … I should die on the spot. I would slide off my seat and fall lifeless to the ground." In her novel Inseparable , b
18h
Fleeing a war zone is traumatic – so is what happens next – podcast
Many asylum seekers and refugees have had to flee their homes in extremely distressing circumstances. A lucky few make it to a safe country such as the UK – but what happens next? As Britain begins its commitment to take in 20,000 people fleeing Afghanistan, we look at the psychological impacts of trying to start again in a new country. Anand Jagatia speaks to Afraa, who was forcibly displaced fr
18h
Gain-of-Function Research: All in the Eye of the Beholder
The pandemic has shined a light on a type of high-risk research that seeks to understand viruses by increasing their ability to spread or cause disease in humans. The work warrants special regulation, scientists say, but the research community is deeply divided on precisely which experiments are riskiest.
1d
Därför stängdes inte Sveriges skolor under coronapandemin
Trots att Sverige hade flest bekräftade fall av covid-19 av åtta länder i en studie var det bara här som grundskolan hölls öppen. Det främsta skälet, menar forskarna, är den svenska konstitutionen med självständiga myndigheter. En forskargrupp vid Göteborgs universitet har analyserat hur åtta europeiska länder hanterade frågan om att stänga – eller inte stänga – grundskolan under coronapandemins
21h
'Magnet training' at the LHC
When the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) begins Run 3 next year, operators aim to increase the energy of the proton beams to an unprecedented 6.8 TeV. This means the thousands of superconducting magnets, whose fields direct the beams around their trajectory, need to grow accustomed to much stronger currents after a long period of inactivity during LS2. This is done through an ongoing "magnet training"
15h
Asteroid sample brought back to Earth gets close-up look
In December 2020, Japan's Hayabusa2 spacecraft swung by Earth to drop off a cache of rock samples taken from a near-Earth asteroid called Ryugu. Asteroids like Ryugu are thought to represent the ancient building blocks of the solar system, and scientists have been eager to get a closer look at the returned samples.
1d
Soft pressure sensor breakthrough solves field's most challenging bottleneck
Medical sensing technology has taken great strides in recent years, with the development of wearable devices that can track pulse, brain function, biomarkers in sweat and more. However, there is one big problem with existing wearable pressure sensors: Even the slightest amount of pressure, something as light as a tight long sleeve shirt over a sensor, can throw them off track.
9h
Vaccine Data for Kids Under 5 Are Coming 'Before the End of the Year'
Editor's Note: This article is part of our coverage of The Atlantic Festival. Learn more and watch festival sessions here . The vaccine timeline for young kids is looking a little more solid. This morning, Pfizer submitted data to the FDA showing that its COVID-19 vaccine is effective and safe for children ages 5 to 11. And this afternoon, the company's CEO, Albert Bourla, said that trial results
5h
Identical twins carry a persistent epigenetic signature of early genome programming
Nature Communications, Published online: 28 September 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25583-7 The mechanisms underlying how monozygotic (or identical) twins arise are yet to be determined. Here, the authors investigate this in an epigenome-wide association study, showing that monozygotic twinning has a characteristic DNA methylation signature in adult somatic tissues.
13h
N95 respirators could offer robust protection from wildfire smoke
N95 respirators offer the best protection against wildfire smoke and other types of air pollution, performing better than synthetic, cotton and surgical masks. N95s were so effective in the lab experiments that the researchers estimate their widespread use could reduce hospital visits attributable to wildfire smoke by 22% to 39%.
1d
The pandemic problems that boosters won't solve
The US booster program is about to get underway, after the CDC backed additional shots for a large swath of the American public. The agency now recommends that people aged 65 years and older, adults in long-term care, and those over 50 with underlying medical conditions get a third Pfizer-BioNTech shot. (Those whose first shot was Johnson & Johnson or Moderna will have to wait a little longer.) F
1d
Is climate change altering the marine food web?
Climate change is redistributing biodiversity globally, and distributional shifts of organisms often follow the speed and direction of environmental changes. Research by scientists at Stony Brook University's School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences (SoMAS) reveals that this phenomenon is affecting where large marine mammals are distributed relative to their prey species, which could have importa
12h
Remember That Deepfake Cheerleader Story? Turns Out It Was Probably Nonsense
Fake Deepfake Earlier this year, a sordid story broke about a Pennsylvania mom who allegedly created deepfakes to frame her daughter's cheerleading rivals . It had all the hallmarks of a juicy, viral story of the modern world: sex, drugs, and the dark implications of a rapidly advancing technology. In fact, it almost seemed too salacious to be true… and that's because it probably was. This all st
12h
We must fight gender inequality in healthcare research | Letter
Less is known about women's health than men's – that's because research on the former is underfunded, says Silvia Hummel Jessica Nordell raises several important issues facing women and people from ethnic minorities in accessing quality healthcare ( The bias that blinds: why some people get dangerously different medical care, The long read, 21 September ). Another important factor is that less is
13h
When Did Humans Start Experimenting With Alcohol and Drugs?
Humans constantly alter the world. We fire fields, turn forests into farms, and breed plants and animals. But humans don't just reshape our external world—we engineer our internal worlds, and reshape our minds. One way we do this is by upgrading our mental "software," so to speak, with myths, religion, philosophy and psychology. The other is to change our mental hardware —our brains. And we do th
2d
Children who eat more fruit and veggies have better mental health
New research finds that children who eat more fruit and veg have better mental health. The study is the first to investigate the association between fruit and vegetable intakes, breakfast and lunch choices, and mental wellbeing in UK school children. The research team studied data from almost 9,000 children in 50 schools. They found that the types of breakfast and lunch eaten by both primary and s
15h
New Zealand kea can use touchscreens but can't distinguish between real and virtual worlds
Study finds the intelligent endangered alpine parrot can be trained to use electronic devices with their tongues Vote now in the Guardian/BirdLife Australia 2021 bird of the year poll The kea, an endangered New Zealand parrot, is clever enough to use touchscreens but don't appear to be able to tell the difference between the real and virtual worlds, according to a new study. Researchers taught si
1h
This Amazing GIF Shows a Million Individual Neurons Firing in a Mouse's Brain
The brain is the center of every human being's world, but many of its inner workings are yet mysterious. Slowly, scientists are pulling back the veil. Recently, for example, researchers have created increasingly intricate maps of the brain's connections . These maps, called connectomes, detail every cell and synapse in small areas of the brain—but the maps are static. That is, we can't watch the
1d
Bird poop reveals that when birds migrate, their gut bacteria change
The trillions of bacteria living in our guts play a crucial role in our ability to digest food and fight off disease. All other animals also have communities of bacteria living inside them, that scientists call microbiomes, and learning about them can help scientists put together a more complete picture of how those animals interact with the world. In a new study in the journal Molecular Ecology,
21h
Researchers identify mutations of Delta, Delta Plus variants
Using bioinformatics tools and programming, researchers identified five specific mutations that are far more prevalent in Delta Plus infections compared to Delta infections, including one mutation, K417N, that is present in all Delta Plus infections but not present in nearly any Delta infections. The findings provide important clues to researchers about the structural changes to the virus recently
8h
The Prestige TV Show That Didn't Need to Be Made Into a Movie
Whether you call it a spin-off, a prequel, or a companion film, The Many Saints of Newark is inescapably tied to David Chase's HBO show, The Sopranos , which is still one of the greatest television series ever made. Who Made Tony Soprano , the movie's poster blares, with its actual title in a far smaller font underneath. Written by Chase and Lawrence Konner and directed by the Sopranos mainstay A
11h
The Blurry Line Between Magical Realism and Magical Thinking
Editor's Note: Read Sanjena Sathian's new short story, " The Missing Limousine ." " The Missing Limousine " is a new short story by Sanjena Sathian. To mark the story's publication in The Atlantic , Sathian and Oliver Munday, the design director of the magazine, discussed the story over email. Their conversation has been lightly edited for clarity. Oliver Munday: Your story, " The Missing Limousi
13h
Technological breakthrough in energy-efficient particle accelerators
At Technische Universität Darmstadt, the world's first operation of a multi-turn superconducting linear accelerator with significant energy recovery succeeded. The experiment at the university's electron linear accelerator (S-DALINAC) proved that a substantial saving of accelerator power is possible.
15h
How SNPs can be used to detect disease pathways
Researchers at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign have developed a new computational tool that can identify pathways related to diseases, including breast and prostate cancer, using single-nucleotide polymorphisms. SNPs, which refer to mutations in a person's DNA, are the most common type of genetic variation among people. The researchers hope that the tool can help them discover new path
22h
Living retinas totally outdo engineering
The structure of our retinas is miles ahead of anything human engineering can achieve so far, report researchers. If you wanted to design the most perfect, low-energy, light-detecting device for a future camera or a prosthetic retina , you'd reach for something called "efficient coding theory," to set out the array of sensors. Or you could just look at a mammalian retina. In a pair of papers on r
3h
Plasmodium falciparum evolving to escape malaria rapid diagnostics in Africa
A major tool against malaria in Africa has been the use of rapid diagnostic tests, which have been part of the 'test-treat-track' strategy in Ethiopia, the second most-populated country in Africa. But researchers studying blood samples from more than 12,000 individuals in Ethiopia now estimate these tests missed nearly 10% of malaria cases caused by the parasite Plasmodium falciparum, the most com
4h
BlockFi Is a $3 Billion Startup That Lets You Earn Compound Interest on Crypto
By now it's obvious cryptocurrencies are not a fad. In fact, with the world crypto market now worth over $2 trillion , a lot of financial advisors are telling younger clients to allocate anywhere from 1 to 5 percent of their portfolios to crypto. And the good news is that now there's actually a smart way to do it thanks to a trailblazing crypto startup called BlockFi . Founded in 2017 by Zac Prin
5h
Past suffering can affect future praise
Researchers have discovered that people tend to give more praise to someone for their good deeds as an adult after discovering that person has also had to overcome adversity or suffering earlier in life, such as abuse and neglect as a child.
5h
Reducing salt in bread without sacrificing taste
Most people in the U.S. consume too much salt; adult Americans typically eat twice the daily amount recommended by dietary guidelines. Bread may not seem like an obvious culprit; however, due to high consumption and relatively high salt content, baked goods are a major source of sodium in the diet. A new study from the explores ways to reduce sodium in bread without sacrificing taste and leavening
5h
Sea Slugs Can Be Solar-Powered
Studying sea slugs in the group Sacoglossa can mean being on the receiving end of some very imaginative emails. Sidney K. Pierce, of the University of South Florida, retired a few years ago. "But to this day," he told me, "I get questions from little kids in their science classes" who have stumbled upon the marvelous mollusks—and want to know if they could help "end world hunger." The answer, Pie
6h
Magnetic stimulation of the brain can improve episodic memory, study finds
The ability to form episodic memories declines with age, certain dementias, and brain injury. However, a new study shows that low frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation delivered over the left prefrontal cortex of the brain can improve memory performance by reducing the power of low frequency brain waves as memories form.
7h
Past suffering can affect future praise, study says
A team of researchers from the University of Missouri has discovered that people tend to give more praise to someone for their good deeds as an adult after discovering that person has also had to overcome adversity or suffering earlier in life, such as abuse and neglect as a child. Philip Robbins, an associate professor and chair of the Department of Philosophy in the MU College of Arts and Scienc
8h
Nacre inspires the toughest glass ever made
Researchers have developed a stronger and tougher glass, inspired by nacre in the inner layer of mollusk shells, according to a new study. Instead of shattering upon impact, the new material has the resiliency of plastic and could be used to improve cell phone screens in the future, among other applications. "Nature is a master of design." While techniques like tempering and laminating can help r
9h
There Might Be a Mars-Like Planet Hiding in the Outer Solar System
Nobody has found Planet Nine yet, but at least we've almost figured out where to look. Image: NASA If the 21st century has taught us any astronomical lessons, it's that counting planets is hard. In 2000, there were nine planets, and now there are eight, but that might not last. Astronomers have been on the hunt for a theorized ninth planet in the extreme outer solar system, and now a study sugges
9h
Sinking 'marine snow' aids oceans in locking up CO2
New research sheds light on how oceans absorb carbon dioxide. Oceans absorb carbon dioxide from the atmosphere through microscopic algae that carry out photosynthesis and then sink to the deep sea when they die. This sinking enhances the degradation processes, researchers have now discovered. Oceans play a key role in the global carbon dioxide balance . This is because billions of tiny algae live
9h
What is cancer?
Cancer malignancies are uncontrolled growths that spread. Learn how cancers form, the signs and symptoms of cancer and how cancers are treated.
9h
Living retina achieves sensitivity and efficiency engineers can only dream about
'Efficient coding theory' describes the most perfect, low-energy way to design a light-detecting device for a future camera or prosthetic retina. Or you could just look at a mammalian retina that's already organized this way. In a pair of papers on retinal structure, a team of neurobiologists has shown that the rigors of natural selection and evolution shaped our retinas to capture noisy data just
10h
Climate risk to European fisheries and coastal communities [Sustainability Science]
With the majority of the global human population living in coastal regions, correctly characterizing the climate risk that ocean-dependent communities and businesses are exposed to is key to prioritizing the finite resources available to support adaptation. We apply a climate risk analysis across the European fisheries sector to identify the…
10h
Defective myelination in an RNA polymerase III mutant leukodystrophic mouse [Neuroscience]
RNA polymerase (Pol) III synthesizes abundant short noncoding RNAs that have essential functions in protein synthesis, secretion, and other processes. Despite the ubiquitous functions of these RNAs, mutations in Pol III subunits cause Pol III-related leukodystrophy, an early-onset neurodegenerative disease. The basis of this neural sensitivity and the mechanisms of…
10h
Voltage sensor movements of CaV1.1 during an action potential in skeletal muscle fibers [Cell Biology]
The skeletal muscle L-type Ca2+ channel (CaV1.1) works primarily as a voltage sensor for skeletal muscle action potential (AP)-evoked Ca2+ release. CaV1.1 contains four distinct voltage-sensing domains (VSDs), yet the contribution of each VSD to AP-evoked Ca2+ release remains unknown. To investigate the role of VSDs in excitation–contraction coupling (ECC),…
10h
Inequality in mortality between Black and White Americans by age, place, and cause and in comparison to Europe, 1990 to 2018 [Economic Sciences]
Although there is a large gap between Black and White American life expectancies, the gap fell 48.9% between 1990 and 2018, mainly due to mortality declines among Black Americans. We examine age-specific mortality trends and racial gaps in life expectancy in high- and low-income US areas and with reference to…
10h
FAD-dependent C-glycoside-metabolizing enzymes in microorganisms: Screening, characterization, and crystal structure analysis [Microbiology]
C-glycosides have a unique structure, in which an anomeric carbon of a sugar is directly bonded to the carbon of an aglycone skeleton. One of the natural C-glycosides, carminic acid, is utilized by the food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries, for a total of more than 200 tons/y worldwide. However, a…
10h
Glycocalyx crowding with mucin mimetics strengthens binding of soluble and virus-associated lectins to host cell glycan receptors [Biochemistry]
Membrane-associated mucins protect epithelial cell surfaces against pathogenic threats by serving as nonproductive decoys that capture infectious agents and clear them from the cell surface and by erecting a physical barrier that restricts their access to target receptors on host cells. However, the mechanisms through which mucins function are still…
10h
An L1 retrotransposon insertion-induced deafness mouse model for studying the development and function of the cochlear stria vascularis [Neuroscience]
Dysregulation of ion and potential homeostasis in the scala media is the most prevalent cause of hearing loss in mammals. However, it is not well understood how the development and function of the stria vascularis regulates this fluid homeostasis in the scala media. From a mouse genetic screen, we characterize…
10h
Structural basis for isoform-specific inhibition of human CTPS1 [Biochemistry]
Cytidine triphosphate synthase 1 (CTPS1) is necessary for an effective immune response, as revealed by severe immunodeficiency in CTPS1-deficient individuals [E. Martin et al.], [Nature] [510], [288–292] ([2014]). CTPS1 expression is up-regulated in activated lymphocytes to expand CTP pools [E. Martin et al.], [Nature] [510], [288–292] ([2014]), satisfying increased demand…
10h
USP15 antagonizes CRL4CRBN-mediated ubiquitylation of glutamine synthetase and neosubstrates [Cell Biology]
Targeted protein degradation by the ubiquitin–proteasome system represents a new strategy to destroy pathogenic proteins in human diseases, including cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. The immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs) thalidomide, lenalidomide, and pomalidomide have revolutionized the treatment of patients with multiple myeloma (MM) and other hematologic malignancies, but almost all patients
10h
The missing enzymatic link in syntrophic methane formation from fatty acids [Microbiology]
The microbial production of methane from organic matter is an essential process in the global carbon cycle and an important source of renewable energy. It involves the syntrophic interaction between methanogenic archaea and bacteria that convert primary fermentation products such as fatty acids to the methanogenic substrates acetate, H2, CO2,…
10h
Choroid plexus volumetrics and brain inflammation in multiple sclerosis [Immunology and Inflammation]
The infiltration of autoreactive encephalitogenic adaptive immune cells into the central nervous system (CNS) and pursuant inflammation of the brain and spinal cord are thought to be critical events in initiating and perpetuating disease activity in the human autoimmune disorder multiple sclerosis (MS) (1). Immune cell trafficking into the CNS…
10h
The Latest Advancements in VR Sex Are Here in One Convenient Bundle
Adult video content has been around for decades, but there's never been a better, more bounteous, or exciting time to explore its technological limits. The most exciting things in the industry are now happening in virtual reality , and it can be pretty intimidating if you're trying to find a good way to begin exploring the frontiers of VR sex. Unless, of course, you're familiar with the KIIROO Ti
10h
Antidepressants slow cancer growth in mice
Classic antidepressants could help improve modern cancer treatments, according to a new study that shows they slowed the growth of pancreatic and colon cancers in mice. When combined with immunotherapy, the antidepressants even stopped the cancer growth long-term. In some cases the tumors disappeared completely, researchers foybd. The findings will now be tested in human clinical trials. Serotoni
11h
Caffeine doesn't affect breast cancer risk for postmenopausal women
A study of nearly 80,000 postmenopausal women in the US finds that there is no association between caffeine consumption from coffee and tea and invasive breast cancer. The average age when US women reach menopause, 51, also happens to coincide with the age group—50- to 64-year-olds—that has the highest reported caffeine consumption. In addition to that, the average age of breast cancer diagnosis
11h
Unbreakable glass inspired by seashells
Scientists develop stronger and tougher glass, inspired by the inner layer of mollusk shells. Instead of shattering upon impact, the new material has the resiliency of plastic and could be used to improve cell phone screens in the future, among other applications.
11h
Targeting a rare secondary cancer in children
Known as pediatric radiation-induced high-grade gliomas (RIGs), this specific type of brain tumor is caused by cranial radiation therapy for other cancers, most often brain cancers. They account for nearly 4% of all childhood brain tumor deaths, but there have not been many studies on RIGs and how to treat them.
11h
'SOFA' triage protocol disadvantages Black COVID patients
A patient assessment protocol called SOFA, or sequential organ failure assessment, may disadvantage Black patients seeking emergency room care for COVID-19, research finds. During the worst of the COVID-19 pandemic, overwhelmed doctors and nurses in some places have had to make agonizing decisions about which patients should receive scarce health care resources. Some hospitals have contemplated u
11h
Will Sullivan
Staff Writer is a staff writer and editor at Inside Science focusing on physics and space. He majored in mathematics and minored in music at Swarthmore College. When he isn't writing about science, he can be found running long distances, playing music with friends, and watching science fiction and horror movies. Author social media Twitter
12h
Cosmopolitan morality trades off in-group for the world, separating benefits and protection [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
Global cooperation rests on popular endorsement of cosmopolitan values—putting all humanity equal to or ahead of conationals. Despite being comparative judgments that may trade off, even sacrifice, the in-group's interests for the rest of the world, moral cosmopolitanism finds support in large, nationally representative surveys from Spain, the United Kingdom,…
12h
A largely invariant marine dissolved organic carbon reservoir across Earth's history [Evolution]
Marine dissolved organic carbon (DOC), the largest pool of reduced carbon in the oceans, plays an important role in the global carbon cycle and contributes to the regulation of atmospheric oxygen and carbon dioxide abundances. Despite its importance in global biogeochemical cycles, the long-term history of the marine DOC reservoir…
12h
Physical processes controlling the rifting of Larsen C Ice Shelf, Antarctica, prior to the calving of iceberg A68 [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
The sudden propagation of a major preexisting rift (full-thickness crack) in late 2016 on the Larsen C Ice Shelf, Antarctica led to the calving of tabular iceberg A68 in July 2017, one of the largest icebergs on record, posing a threat for the stability of the remaining ice shelf. As…
12h
Sustainable-use protected areas catalyze enhanced livelihoods in rural Amazonia [Sustainability Science]
Finding new pathways for reconciling socioeconomic well-being and nature sustainability is critically important for contemporary societies, especially in tropical developing countries where sustaining local livelihoods often clashes with biodiversity conservation. Many projects aimed at reconciling the goals of biodiversity conservation and social aspirations within protected areas (PAs) have fail
12h
Eocene animal trace fossils in 1.7-billion-year-old metaquartzites [Evolution]
The Paleoproterozoic (1.7 Ga [billion years ago]) metasedimentary rocks of the Mount Barren Group in southwestern Australia contain burrows indistinguishable from ichnogenera Thalassinoides, Ophiomorpha, Teichichnus, and Taenidium, known from firmgrounds and softgrounds. The metamorphic fabric in the host rock is largely retained, and because the most resilient rocks in the…
12h
False discovery rate control in genome-wide association studies with population structure [Genetics]
We present a comprehensive statistical framework to analyze data from genome-wide association studies of polygenic traits, producing interpretable findings while controlling the false discovery rate. In contrast with standard approaches, our method can leverage sophisticated multivariate algorithms but makes no parametric assumptions about the unknown relation between genotypes and phenotype….
12h
Individual choices and universal rights for drinking water in rural Africa [Economic Sciences]
More than 500 million rural Africans lack safe drinking water. The human right to water and United Nations Sustainable Development Goal SDG6.1 promote a policy shift from building water infrastructure to sustaining water services. However, the financial calculus is bleak with the costs of "safely managed"' or "basic" water services…
12h
Urbanization extends flight phenology and leads to local adaptation of seasonal plasticity in Lepidoptera [Evolution]
Urbanization is gaining force globally, which challenges biodiversity, and it has recently also emerged as an agent of evolutionary change. Seasonal phenology and life cycle regulation are essential processes that urbanization is likely to alter through both the urban heat island effect (UHI) and artificial light at night (ALAN). However,…
12h
Bacteria hinder large-scale transport and enhance small-scale mixing in time-periodic flows [Applied Physical Sciences]
Understanding mixing and transport of passive scalars in active fluids is important to many natural (e.g., algal blooms) and industrial (e.g., biofuel, vaccine production) processes. Here, we study the mixing of a passive scalar (dye) in dilute suspensions of swimming Escherichia coli in experiments using a two-dimensional (2D) time-periodic flow…
12h
Trust in scientists in times of pandemic: Panel evidence from 12 countries [Political Sciences]
This article analyzes the specific and critical role of trust in scientists on both the support for and compliance with nonpharmaceutical interventions (NPIs) during the COVID-19 pandemic. We exploit large-scale, longitudinal, and representative surveys for 12 countries over the period from March to December 2020, and we complement the analysis…
12h
Directional thermal channeling: A phenomenon triggered by tight packing of heat sources [Applied Physical Sciences]
Understanding nanoscale thermal transport is critical for nano-engineered devices such as quantum sensors, thermoelectrics, and nanoelectronics. However, despite overwhelming experimental evidence for nondiffusive heat dissipation from nanoscale heat sources, the underlying mechanisms are still not understood. In this work, we show that for nanoscale heat source spacings that are below…
12h
Inverse heavy enzyme isotope effects in methylthioadenosine nucleosidases [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Heavy enzyme isotope effects occur in proteins substituted with 2H-, 13C-, and 15N-enriched amino acids. Mass alterations perturb femtosecond protein motions and have been used to study the linkage between fast motions and transition-state barrier crossing. Heavy enzymes typically show slower rates for their chemical steps. Heavy bacterial methylthioadenosine nucleosidases…
12h
Tropical forests as key sites of the "Anthropocene": Past and present perspectives [Social Sciences]
Tropical forests are on the front line of climate change and human sustainability challenges, being key environments in discussions of the "Anthropocene" and some of the most threatened land-based habitats on the face of the Earth. However, while it has been acknowledged that 21st-century anthropogenic alterations to tropical forests have…
12h
Deficiency of PARP-1 and PARP-2 in the mouse uterus results in decidualization failure and pregnancy loss [Physiology]
Miscarriage is a common complication of pregnancy for which there are few clinical interventions. Deficiency in endometrial stromal cell decidualization is considered a major contributing factor to pregnancy loss; however, our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of decidual deficiency are incomplete. ADP ribosylation by PARP-1 and PARP-2 has been linked…
12h
Volcanically driven lacustrine ecosystem changes during the Carnian Pluvial Episode (Late Triassic) [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
The Late Triassic Carnian Pluvial Episode (CPE) saw a dramatic increase in global humidity and temperature that has been linked to the large-scale volcanism of the Wrangellia large igneous province. The climatic changes coincide with a major biological turnover on land that included the ascent of the dinosaurs and the…
12h
Propagation of waves in high Brillouin zones: Chaotic branched flow and stable superwires [Engineering]
We report unexpected classical and quantum dynamics of a wave propagating in a periodic potential in high Brillouin zones. Branched flow appears at wavelengths shorter than the typical length scale of the ordered periodic structure and for energies above the potential barrier. The strongest branches remain stable indefinitely and may…
12h
IP3R-driven increases in mitochondrial Ca2+ promote neuronal death in NPC disease [Neuroscience]
Ca2+ is the most ubiquitous second messenger in neurons whose spatial and temporal elevations are tightly controlled to initiate and orchestrate diverse intracellular signaling cascades. Numerous neuropathologies result from mutations or alterations in Ca2+ handling proteins; thus, elucidating molecular pathways that shape Ca2+ signaling is imperative. Here, we report that…
12h
Midbrain dopaminergic innervation of the hippocampus is sufficient to modulate formation of aversive memories [Neuroscience]
Aversive memories are important for survival, and dopaminergic signaling in the hippocampus has been implicated in aversive learning. However, the source and mode of action of hippocampal dopamine remain controversial. Here, we utilize anterograde and retrograde viral tracing methods to label midbrain dopaminergic projections to the dorsal hippocampus. We identify…
12h
Culturing patient-derived malignant hematopoietic stem cells in engineered and fully humanized 3D niches [Applied Biological Sciences]
Human malignant hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) reside in bone marrow (BM) niches, which remain challenging to explore due to limited in vivo accessibility and constraints with humanized animal models. Several in vitro systems have been established to culture patient-derived HSPCs in specific microenvironments, but they do not fully…
12h
Correction for Roell et al., A synthetic C4 shuttle via the {beta}-hydroxyaspartate cycle in C3 plants [Corrections]
PLANT BIOLOGY Correction for "A synthetic C4 shuttle via the β-hydroxyaspartate cycle in C3 plants," by Marc-Sven Roell, Lennart Schada von Borzyskowski, Philipp Westhoff, Anastasija Plett, Nicole Paczia, Peter Claus, Urte Schlueter, Tobias J. Erb, and Andreas P.M. Weber, which published May 17, 2021; 10.1073/pnas.2022307118 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A….
12h
A shared mechanistic pathway for pyridoxal phosphate-dependent arginine oxidases [Biochemistry]
The mechanism by which molecular oxygen is activated by the organic cofactor pyridoxal phosphate (PLP) for oxidation reactions remains poorly understood. Recent work has identified arginine oxidases that catalyze desaturation or hydroxylation reactions. Here, we investigate a desaturase from the Pseudoalteromonas luteoviolacea indolmycin pathway. Our work, combining X-ray crystallographic, biochem
12h
A revised action spectrum for vitamin D synthesis by suberythemal UV radiation exposure in humans in vivo [Environmental Sciences]
Action spectra are important biological weighting functions for risk/benefit analyses of ultraviolet (UV) radiation (UVR) exposure. One important human benefit of exposure to terrestrial solar UVB radiation (∼295 to 315 nm) is the cutaneous synthesis of vitamin D3 that is initiated by the photoconversion of 7-dehydrocholesterol to previtamin D3. An…
12h
Pre-Columbian fire management and control of climate-driven floodwaters over 3,500 years in southwestern Amazonia [Anthropology]
In landscapes that support economic and cultural activities, human communities actively manage environments and environmental change at a variety of spatial scales that complicate the effects of continental-scale climate. Here, we demonstrate how hydrological conditions were modified by humans against the backdrop of Holocene climate change in southwestern Amazonia. Paleoecological…
12h
Tropical islands of the Anthropocene: Deep histories of anthropogenic terrestrial-marine entanglement in the Pacific and Caribbean [Social Sciences]
Islands are useful model systems for examining human–environmental interactions. While many anthropogenic effects visible in the archaeological and paleoecological records are terrestrial in nature (e.g., clearance of tropical forests for agriculture and settlement; introduction of nonnative flora and fauna), native peoples also relied heavily on marine environments for their subsistence…
12h
Anthropogenic impacts on Late Holocene land-cover change and floristic biodiversity loss in tropical southeastern Asia [Ecology]
Southern China and Southeast Asia witnessed some of their most significant economic and social changes relevant to human land use during the Late Holocene, including the intensification and spread of rice agriculture. Despite rice growth being associated with a number of earth systems impacts, how these changes transformed tropical vegetation…
12h
Historical socioecological transformations in the global tropics as an Anthropocene analogue [Physical Sciences]
Large, low-density settlements of the tropical world disintegrated during the first and second millennia of the CE. This phenomenon, which occurred in South Asia, Southeast Asia, and Mesoamerica, is strongly associated with climate variability and extensive landscape transformation. These profound social transformations in the tropical world have been popularized as…
12h
A 5,000-year vegetation and fire history for tierra firme forests in the Medio Putumayo-Algodon watersheds, northeastern Peru [Anthropology]
This paper addresses an important debate in Amazonian studies; namely, the scale, intensity, and nature of human modification of the forests in prehistory. Phytolith and charcoal analysis of terrestrial soils underneath mature tierra firme (nonflooded, nonriverine) forests in the remote Medio Putumayo-Algodón watersheds, northeastern Peru, provide a vegetation and fire…
12h
Anthropogenic transitions from forested to human-dominated landscapes in southern Macaronesia [Ecology]
The extinction of iconic species such as the dodo and the deforestation of Easter Island are emblematic of the transformative impact of human colonization of many oceanic islands, especially those in the tropics and subtropics. Yet, the interaction of prehistoric and colonial-era colonists with the forests and forest resources they…
12h
Human impacts and Anthropocene environmental change at Lake Kutubu, a Ramsar wetland in Papua New Guinea [Environmental Sciences]
The impacts of human-induced environmental change that characterize the Anthropocene are not felt equally across the globe. In the tropics, the potential for the sudden collapse of ecosystems in response to multiple interacting pressures has been of increasing concern in ecological and conservation research. The tropical ecosystems of Papua New…
12h
Photoprotection during iron deficiency is mediated by the bHLH transcription factors PYE and ILR3 [Plant Biology]
Iron (Fe) is an essential micronutrient whose availability is limiting in many soils. During Fe deficiency, plants alter the expression of many genes to increase Fe uptake, distribution, and utilization. In a genetic screen for suppressors of Fe sensitivity in the E3 ligase mutant bts-3, we isolated an allele of…
12h
Mapping social exclusion in STEM to men's implicit bias and women's career costs [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
Why are women socially excluded in fields dominated by men? Beyond the barriers associated with any minority group's mere numerical underrepresentation, we theorized that gender stereotypes exacerbate the social exclusion of women in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) workplaces, with career consequences. Although widely discussed, clear evidence of these…
12h
Late Pleistocene/Early Holocene sites in the montane forests of New Guinea yield early record of cassowary hunting and egg harvesting [Anthropology]
How early human foragers impacted insular forests is a topic with implications across multiple disciplines, including resource management. Paradoxically, terminal Pleistocene and Early Holocene impacts of foraging communities have been characterized as both extreme—as in debates over human-driven faunal extinctions—and minimal compared to later landscape transformations by farmers and herders….
12h
Large herbivores suppress liana infestation in an African savanna [Ecology]
African savannas are the last stronghold of diverse large-mammal communities, and a major focus of savanna ecology is to understand how these animals affect the relative abundance of trees and grasses. However, savannas support diverse plant life-forms, and human-induced changes in large-herbivore assemblages—declining wildlife populations and their displacement by livestock—may…
12h
The vicious circle of high academic achievement
For some teenagers, the new school year means reuniting with their friends. For others, it means an increase in anxiety and in the pressure to succeed and get good grades. According to researchers at the University of Ottawa, this can lead to perfectionism and, in turn, to anxiety and depression.
12h
Memetics and neural models of conspiracy theories
Multitude of conspiracy theories people believe in all over the world is astonishing. They actually accompany each significant event: a catastrophe, assassination, death of a famous person or, currently, the COVID-19 pandemic. Because the formation of a distorted image of reality is so widespread this topic has been dealt with by numerous scientists. Various studies, articles and books using psych
12h
The Atlantic Daily: What Comes After Cancellation
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox. What happens after someone is canceled? Cancel culture is a murky term. As my colleague Anne Applebaum argues, the mob justice it can sometimes refer to is real, but the phrase is too broad and ha
12h
The Missing Limousine
Editor's Note: Read an interview with Sanjena Sathian about her writing process. W atching The Bachelor was supposed to make life easier. I started getting into it a year or so after I began working at my brother's salon. I had a regular stable of clients, but none was particularly in love with me. The problem was not my skill—I am talented at hair removal and competent at mani-pedis. The problem
13h
Tweaking alloy microchemistry for flawless metal 3D printing
In the last few decades, metal 3D printing has spearheaded the efforts in creating custom parts of intricate shapes and high functionality. But as additive manufacturers have included more alloys for their 3D printing needs, so have the challenges in creating uniform, defect-free parts.
13h
An Actual Hamster is Making Bank With Cryptocurrency
Crypto is absolutely lousy with memes: meme stocks, memes about stocks, and, inevitably, stonks. You've probably heard of Dogecoin by now, unless you have been off-world for several years (and in that case, how was the weather?). Based on the wildly popular shiba inu meme, business shibe is the mascot of Dogecoin, perhaps the best known of the B-list cryptocurrencies. But now, there is a living,
13h
Devastating barrier island storms can help wildlife thrive
A new methodology for quantifying landscape changes on barrier islands shows storms that can devastate human infrastructure also create opportunities for coastal wildlife to thrive. "Our goal for this project was to develop a method to quantify land cover changes from natural processes and storms on barrier islands," says Beth Sciaudone, a research assistant professor of civil, construction, and
13h
Algae sex could save corals from climate change
A little more sexy time for symbionts could help coral reefs survive the trials of climate change, researchers report. And that, in turn, could help us all. Researchers already knew the importance of algae known as dinoflagellates to the health of coral as the oceans warm, and have now confirmed the tiny creatures not only multiply by splitting in half, but can also reproduce through sex. "Most s
13h
Risk of airborne transmission of avian influenza from wild waterfowl to poultry negligible
Research by Wageningen Bioveterinary Research (WBVR) has shown that the risk of airborne transmission of high pathogenic avian influenza virus from infected wild birds is negligible. The research looked specifically at the airborne movement of particles from wild waterfowl droppings in the vicinity of poultry farms during the risk season for avian influenza (October to March). It also considered t
14h
Joining proteins together with rigid links
Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI are the first to have joined two proteins together by means of a free-standing, rigid link. The structural element holds the two protein molecules together at a defined distance and angle, much the way a barbell handle connects two weights. This type of linkage could help, for example, to develop so-called virus-like particles for vaccines. The resear
14h
Structural characterization offshore Newfoundland
Geologists completed research characterizing the complex geological evolution of the Orphan Basin, offshore Newfoundland and Labrador, using an extensive database of newly available, modern 2D and 3D broadband seismic reflection data. These data allow geologists to visualize and understand the subsurface.
14h
Antidepressants inhibit cancer growth in mice
Classic antidepressants could help improve modern cancer treatments. They slowed the growth of pancreatic and colon cancers in mice, and when combined with immunotherapy, they even stopped the cancer growth long-term. In some cases the tumors disappeared completely, researchers have found. Their findings will now be tested in human clinical trials.
14h
Cosmic impact destroyed a biblical city in Jordan Valley
In the Middle Bronze Age (about 3600 years ago or roughly 1650 BCE), the city of Tall el-Hammam was ascendant. Located on high ground in the southern Jordan Valley, northeast of the Dead Sea, the settlement in its time had become the largest continuously occupied Bronze Age city in the southern Levant, having hosted early civilization for a few thousand years. At that time, it was 10 times larger
14h
Tracking muscle activity with clothes on your back
Bioelectrical sensors on the skin can be used to measure electrical signals in the body, like heart activity and muscle contraction. While that provides valuable information for clinicians, current bioelectrical sensor technology can be ineffective, uncomfortable, expensive, and difficult to manufacture.
14h
Tree health linked to birds' response to climate change
New Research from Oxford University has revealed that shifts in the timing of egg laying by great tits in response to climate change vary markedly between breeding sites within the same woodland and that this variation is linked to the health of nearby oak trees.
14h
The opioid crisis isn't the same in every place
New research highlights communities most at risk for opioid overdose deaths and most in need of services. Few if any communities in the United States have escaped the opioid crisis, and in 2020, opioid overdose deaths rose sharply across the entire country. But the opioid crisis plays out differently from place to place and over time. In some states, the crisis is more profound in rural communiti
14h
There's no place like home…to track blood pressure
Adults with elevated blood pressure who had not been diagnosed with high blood pressure found that monitoring their blood pressure at home was more acceptable than going to a kiosk, clinic or using a 24-hour wearable monitoring device. Adults were more likely to record the minimum number of measurements with at-home or clinic-based blood pressure monitoring versus going to a kiosk. Adults found th
14h
Load-bearing entanglements in polymer glasses
The role of entanglements can determine the mechanical properties of glass polymer blends. In a new report now published on Science Advances, Cynthia Bukowski and a research team in polymer science and biomolecular engineering at the University of Massachusetts and the University of Pennsylvania, U.S., developed a combined method of experiments and simulations to quantify the role of entanglements
14h
Study of great tits, oak trees and caterpillars reveals complexity of climate change
A trio of researchers at the University of Oxford has found that studying the interrelationships between great tits, oak trees and caterpillars in Wytham Woods, in Oxfordshire, England, near Oxford, has revealed some of the complexities involved in studying changes wrought by global warming. In their paper published in the journal Nature Climate Change, Ella Cole, Charlotte Regan and Ben Sheldon d
15h
Evaluating bacterial communities in freshwater for their ability to break down crude oil and diesel fuel
Bacteria that can consume oil or fuel have been used to help clean up spills in the ocean, but their use in freshwater has been limited by a lack of research. A Michigan Technological University professor and his students have set out to change that, studying colonies of bacteria in the Straits of Mackinac to determine what conditions they need to thrive.
15h
Changes in 300 genes could contribute to the maternal behaviour of mice
A research team from the University of Valencia and the Jaume I University of Castellón shows an increase in the expression of 197 genes in mother mice, and a decrease of 99, when compared with virgin females in contact with offspring. These results demonstrate changes related to maternity that could be related to the maternal defense behavior of the offspring against males. This work opens the do
15h
Looking for transformative travel? Keep these six stages in mind
After a cooped-up year, Americans are hungry to travel. Passport offices are overwhelmed with applications. In July, airlines scheduled and operated the highest number of flights since the pandemic began, according to the U.S. Bureau of Transportation Statistics. Record numbers of travelers visited the U.S. national parks this summer, after a nearly 28% drop due to the pandemic.
15h
Study explores remarkable negative thermal expansion seen in layered ruthenates
A formerly unnoticed monoclinic distortion in Ca2RuO4 explains its enormous negative thermal expansion (NTE) over a wide range of temperatures, discover researchers from Tokyo Tech. The work promises a different route for the design of unconventional NTE materials, with applications in engines, thermal barrier ceramics, and precision instruments, among other things.
15h
Scientists Completed the First Human Genome 20 Years Ago. How Far Have We Come, and What's Next?
If the Human Genome Project (HGP) was an actual human, he or she would be a revolutionary whiz kid. A prodigy in the vein of Mozart. One who changed the biomedical universe forever as a teenager, but ultimately has much more to offer in the way of transforming mankind. It's been 20 years since scientists published the first draft of the human genome. Since its launch in the 90s, the HGP fundament
15h
$5K Rematch – JJ Da Boss vs Nate Schaloach | Street Outlaws: Memphis
Stream Street Outlaws: Memphis on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/street-outlaws-memphis About Street Outlaws: Memphis: Street Outlaws is traveling to the toughest, meanest and wildest streets in the South, as it heads to Memphis to spotlight JJ Da Boss and his team of family and friends who have been racing together for decades. #StreetOutlawsMemphis #StreetRacing #Discovery Subs
15h
Jaw-Dropping New Images Arrive From Hubble Space Telescope
One of the perks of being a science journalist is being regularly wowed by the very best images from the world's various space agencies. This week, Hubble was the darling, and the venerable space telescope has provided us these five absolutely beautiful images of stars, galaxies, and nebulae. We'll start with an elegant barred spiral galaxy about 130 million light-years from Earth, called NGC 572
15h
Geologically vibrant continents produce higher biodiversity
Using a new mechanistic model of evolution on Earth, researchers can now better explain why the rainforests of Africa are home to fewer species than the tropical forests of South America and Southeast Asia. The key to high species diversity lies in how dynamically the continents have evolved over time.
15h
Creating order by mechanical deformation in dense active matter
Living or biological systems cannot be easily understood using the standard laws of physics, such as thermodynamics, as scientists would for gases, liquids or solids. Living systems are active, demonstrating fascinating properties such as adapting to their environment or repairing themselves. Exploring the questions posed by living systems using computer simulations, researchers at the University
15h
The first coronavirus lockdown revealed big behavioral gender differences
In a crisis, women make significantly longer phone calls and adhere more closely to governmental measures than men; men are less willing to have their mobility restricted and return to normal more quickly than women. Researchers at the Complexity Science Hub Vienna (CSH) found cliché-sounding behavioral patterns like these in data from the first coronavirus lockdown in spring 2020.
16h
Combatting antibiotic resistance in a clever way
When you become very good at one thing, that sometimes comes at the expense of something else. Such trade-offs also apply to bacteria. When becoming more resistant to one antibiotic, bacteria can sometimes become more sensitive to another. Linda Aulin, Ph.D. candidate in the pharmacology group of Coen van Hasselt now try to figure out how we can use this phenomenon to combat the emergence of antib
16h
Breakthrough quantum chemistry technique for computational design and optimisation of organic photofunctional materials
A quantum chemistry research team led by Dr. Jun Yang from the Department of Chemistry at the University of Hong Kong (HKU) has developed an extensive and widely applicable computational technique using high-level quantum chemistry algorithms to reveal complex electron and energy transfer pathways in photophysical processes. The theoretical methods and computational findings have been published on
16h
Time-temperature–integrating optical sensors based on gradient colloidal crystals
Due to their iridescent colors, opals have been considered particularly precious gemstones since antiquity. The way these stones shimmer is caused by their nanostructures. A research group led by Prof. Dr. Markus Retsch at the University of Bayreuth has produced colloidal crystals mimicking such structures, which are suitable for constructing new types of sensors. These sensors visibly and continu
16h
Butterflies and moths evolve in order to adapt to warmer urban areas
A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in Finland, Belgium and Sweden, has found that some butterflies and moths have evolved to suit the warmer conditions they find in urban areas. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes their study of data obtained from citizen-science observation databases and standardized monitoring e
16h
How team dynamics shape success for children with autism in public schools
Because of financial barriers for clinical interventions, intensive educational interventions in school settings often are the primary resource for children with autism from lower-income families. Continuity of care in school settings can require coordination, referred to as social capital, between the "team-around-the-child" (TAC) – the parents, school staff and community providers. However, ineq
16h
Simple steps improve digital learning
"One thing that can get lost in digital teaching is the process of building social relationships. This network building normally takes place during coffee breaks, shared lunch and in the queue at the toilet or coffee machine," says Gunhild Marie Roald, an associate professor in NTNU's Department of Education and Lifelong Learning.
16h
Microscopic metavehicles powered by nothing but light
Researchers from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have succeeded in creating tiny vehicles powered by nothing but light. By layering an optical metasurface onto a microscopic particle, and then using a light source to control it, they succeeded in moving the tiny vehicles in a variety of complex and precise ways—and even using them to transport other objects.
16h
Researchers explore what drives animal infanticide
At the end of the 1970s, infanticide became a flashpoint in animal behavioral science. Sociobiologist Sarah Hrdy, then a Harvard Ph.D. student, shared her observation in her published thesis that whenever a new langur male entered an established colony, infants would either begin to disappear or show evidence of wounds. Hrdy concluded this was done to eliminate the progeny of rivals and free up no
16h
Grain size discovery boosts sorghum potential
Researchers at The University of Queensland are optimistic that the value and versatility of one of the world's top crops will be improved following the discovery of genes which could increase the grain size of sorghum.
16h
Watching and analyzing T cells attacking cancer cells in real time
Immuno-oncology is a promising new field of research that involves boosting the capacity of a patient's own immune system to attack cancer cells. It has already proven to be effective in treating certain types of cancer, and scientists are now testing an array of molecules to expand the range of potential applications. These tests require a variety of instruments, each of which, perform a specific
16h
How new leaders build or lose trust over time
The goal of any new leader is to quickly establish a high level of trust and credibility with the team. After all, numerous studies have shown that trust in leadership is linked to higher individual and team performance. However, that might not be the best strategy for long-term success, according to a new study from Olin Business School at Washington University in St. Louis.
16h
Learning helps tobacco hawkmoths to select a nectar source and oviposition site more efficiently
Max Planck researchers have gained new insights into the learning ability of tobacco hawkmoths. In two recent publications, they report that learning odors does not only play a role in foraging, but that female moths are also influenced by previously learned odors when choosing a host plant to lay their eggs. In this context, a single deposited egg on a certain plant is sufficient for the moth's c
16h
Artificial intelligence brings better hurricane predictions
Hurricane Ida was among the most intense and damaging hurricanes in Louisiana's history. The violent storm rose to a Category 1 hurricane on Friday, August 27. It then climbed another two categories in two days, jumping from Category 3 to 4 in only an hour.
16h
Capturing light: New ergonomic photodetector for the trillion-sensor era
Light-to-frequency conversion circuits (LFCs) are often used to overcome setbacks faced by conventional ultra-low power light sensors. However, use of LFCs can lead to chip area wastage and poor performance of photosensors. Researchers have now developed a highly photosensitive LFC with improved chip area economy, high tuneability, and superior compatibility with flexible electronics. This novel p
16h
The magic of biochar
Ensuring a steady food supply is a problem in many regions of Africa—and the strong population growth will only exacerbate it in the future. Yet the agricultural sector could definitely produce greater yields. Experts estimate that current harvests are 20 to 60 percent lower than they could be.
16h
Big fires demand a big response: Lessons from the 1910 'Big Burn'
Over two days in the summer of 1910, wildfires roared across the bone-dry forests of the inland Northwestern U.S., the Rockies, and parts of British Columbia. Whole towns burned. The blazes scorched 3 million acres of forest, an area the size of Connecticut, and left behind a legacy that profoundly changed how the U.S. managed wildfires—and ultimately how fires behave today.
16h
The indigenous population of ancient Sicily were active traders
How should we relate to the traditional historiography on ancient Sicily? The prevailing view has been that the indigenous population had neither territory, power nor economic resources. But with the aid of interdisciplinary methods, a new thesis shows that trade was a big part of the economy for the inhabitants of the settlement of Monte Polizzo.
16h
Study: Generational divide over climate action a myth
Older people are just as likely as younger people to recognize the need for action on climate change and to say they're willing to make big sacrifices to protect the environment, suggesting claims of a generational divide over the future of the planet may be exaggerated, according to a new UK study marking the publication of the book Generations by Professor Bobby Duffy.
16h
New insights into the formation of faeces
New research from Flinders University has uncovered further details on how the guinea pig gut forms solid fecal pellets, providing potential insights that could help in the management of human bowel issues.
16h
Keep Your Cannabis Secure, Safe, And Organized With 15% Off Stori
Cannabis is increasingly accepted as a way to support both mental and physical health . Yet often the products to store and sort your various strains and methods feel like they belong in a dorm room, not an adult's house. The Stori Cannabis Storage System offers cannabis storage and treatment that's practical and stylish, and right now, you can save 15% on it for our VIP Sale. Easy To Sort Rated
16h
Additional threat to Antarctica's floating ice shelves
Ice melange, a slushy mixture of snow and ice chunks, can heal large rifts in Antarctica's ice shelves. Researchers found that a thinning of ice melange may have enabled a Delaware-sized iceberg to break off from the Larsen C ice shelf in 2017. A new article has the scientists' analysis of the dynamics behind large iceberg calving events.
16h
New approach to breast cancer prevention
Researchers suggest that advances in breast cancer prevention research have resulted in new and innovative opportunities to modify breast cancer risk and potentially reduce breast cancer incidence and mortality.
16h
Crayfish get more interesting at bigger parties
In many North American lakes, a tiny clawed creature has become a big bully. The invasive rusty crayfish roams lakebeds, snapping up snails, bivalves, and water plants, cutting off food supplies for native crayfish and other animals. And when they're feeling saucy, some mount daring raids on fish eggs, reducing sport-fish populations.
16h
Male giraffes are more socially connected than females
Although female giraffes have closer 'friends' than male giraffes, male giraffes have more 'acquaintances' than females, according to new research. The study demonstrates that giraffes form a complex multilevel society that is driven by differences in the social connections among individuals, which could have conservation implications for the endangered giraffes.
16h
Passage of recreational cannabis laws leads to some rise in use but not for all demographics
The U.S. is seeing an increased use of cannabis resulting from its legalization for recreational purposes. The findings showed that passage of the laws led to a rise in the odds of past-year and past-month cannabis use among individuals of Hispanic, Other and non-Hispanic whites compared to the period prior to enacting laws for recreational use. However, legalization did not lead to use more frequ
16h
Daily briefing: Mentors, beware survivorship bias
Nature, Published online: 27 September 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02647-8 Those who give scientific- and academic-career advice should be wary of survivorship bias. Plus, junior naturalists discover an ancient giant penguin, and why the world must work with Kabul on immunizations.
16h
Fossilized Footprints Push Back Date of Human Arrival in Americas
Scientists believe that the first beings we could call modern humans emerged in Africa some 300,000 years ago. Over the millennia, Homo sapiens expanded across the world but didn't reach North America until around 13,000 years ago, or that used to be the prevailing wisdom. A discovery of preserved human footprints in White Sands National Park in New Mexico has pushed that timeline back by thousan
17h
Light Beads Microscopy To Image Brain Activity
The current estimate is that the average human brain contains 86 billion neurons. These neurons connect to each other in a complex network, involving 100 trillion connections. The job of neuroscientists is to map all these connections and to see how they work – no small task. There are multiple ways to approach this task. At first neuroscientists just looked at the brain and described its macrosc
17h
Covid car parks to galactic lockdown: fascinating but futile quarantine ideas
Whether atomic priesthoods, 50ft concrete spikes or burying astronauts in concrete, humanity's attempts to keep free from infection are examined in Until Proven Safe In January 2020, just a few days before the first Covid-19-infected passengers landed in the United States on a flight from Wuhan, preparations were already being made in a converted car park in Omaha, Nebraska. By complete coinciden
18h
Fleeing a war zone is traumatic – so is what happens next
Many asylum seekers and refugees have had to flee their homes in extremely distressing circumstances. A lucky few make it to a safe country such as the UK – but what happens next? As Britain begins its commitment to take in 20,000 people fleeing Afghanistan, we look at the psychological impacts of trying to start again in a new country. Anand Jagatia speaks to Afraa, who was forcibly displaced fro
18h
From gold to Bitcoin and beyond
Nature, Published online: 28 September 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02615-2 An economist envisions a mostly cashless future, which could make finance more inclusive.
19h
Self-regulated co-assembly of soft and hard nanoparticles
Nature Communications, Published online: 28 September 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25995-5 Colloidal self-assembly enables bottom-up manufacture of materials with designed hierarchies and functions. Here the authors develop a facile method to construct multidimensional colloidal architectures via the association of soft block copolymer micelles with simple unvarnished hard nanoparticles.
19h
Assembly defects of human tRNA splicing endonuclease contribute to impaired pre-tRNA processing in pontocerebellar hypoplasia
Nature Communications, Published online: 28 September 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25870-3 Mutations within subunits of the tRNA splicing endonuclease complex (TSEN) are associated with pontocerebellar hypoplasia (PCH). Here the authors show that tRNA intron excision is catalyzed by tetrameric TSEN assembled from inactive heterodimers, and provide evidence that modulation of TSEN stability may co
19h
Design principles of collateral sensitivity-based dosing strategies
Nature Communications, Published online: 28 September 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25927-3 Collateral sensitivity-based antibiotic treatments may have the potential to limit the emergence of antimicrobial resistance. Here, the authors use mathematical modelling to study the effects of pathogen- and drug-specific characteristics for different treatment designs on bacterial population dynamics and
19h
Cryo-EM structure of the sodium-driven chloride/bicarbonate exchanger NDCBE
Nature Communications, Published online: 28 September 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25998-2 The mechanisms involved in SLC4-mediated ion transport are still under debate. Here, the authors present a cryoEM structure of the Sodium-driven Chloride/Bicarbonate Exchanger NDCBE, which – together with computational modeling and mutagenesis – reveals molecular determinants of ion transport by SLC4.
19h
Superlubric polycrystalline graphene interfaces
Nature Communications, Published online: 28 September 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25750-w Achieving ultra-low friction at macroscopic scales is highly desirable. In this work molecular dynamics simulations of graphitic contacts incorporating corrugated grain boundaries reveal an unusual non-monotonic variation of friction with normal load and temperature due to dynamic buckling effects.
19h
Gut bacteria identified in colorectal cancer patients promote tumourigenesis via butyrate secretion
Nature Communications, Published online: 28 September 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25965-x Several bacteria in the gut microbiota have been associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) but it is not completely clear whether they have a role in tumourigenesis. Here, the authors show enrichment of 12 bacterial taxa in two cohorts of CRC patients and that two Porphyromonas species accelerate CRC onset th
19h
National AMR-handlingsplan syltet under COVID-19
Med coronapandemien lidt på afstand mener professor og overlæge Hans Jørgen Kolmos, at det er tid til, at sundhedsministeren genoptager arbejdet med en opdatering af den nationale handlingsplan for antimikrobiel resistens (AMR), som i næste udgave bør skele til hygiejne, specifikke antibiotika og økonomi.
19h
In Sharply Lower Air Pollution Limits, WHO Follows the Science
Air pollution levels that seem low are linked to dangerous health outcomes such as low birth weight, respiratory problems, heart disease, and Alzheimer's. Now, the WHO is tightening its recommended limits for almost every pollutant, reflecting an overwhelming scientific consensus on how to protect health.
20h
NYC to hire forecaster, beef up warnings after Ida flooding
New York City is planning to hire a private weather forecaster, install more drainage features and issue earlier and more aggressive warnings to residents under a new plan to respond to heavy rainfall like the deadly deluge Hurricane Ida dropped on the city earlier this month.
22h
Fossila djurspår från "fel" tid fick sin lösning
Hur kan det finnas gångar från djur i kvartsit, när bergarten bildades miljontals år innan det fanns djur på jorden? Nu har forskare från Naturhistoriska rikmuseet löst gåtan. Djur som rör sig på mjukt underlag lämnar spår. Jättelika dinosauriers fotavtryck eller små maskars vindlande grävgångar berättar om forna tiders djur, hur de rörde sig, hur de sökte föda, hur de åt, hur de förhöll sig till
22h
18K years ago, people were nabbing cassowary eggs
As early as 18,000 years ago, people in New Guinea may have collected cassowary eggs near maturity and then raised the birds to adulthood, research finds. The scientists used eggshells to determine the developmental stage of the ancient embryos/chicks when the eggs cracked. "This behavior that we are seeing is coming thousands of years before domestication of the chicken ," says Kristina Douglass
1d
Alex Moore (Princeton, AMNH): Restoration Ecology in Coastal Wetland Ecosystems
http://www.iBiology.org Dr. Alex Moore provides an introduction to coastal wetlands, including the functional role they play in our world, as well as the many ways that these ecosystems are used for economic and recreational activities. Dr. Moore discusses the traditional approach to restoring coastal wetlands, and the ways that these efforts can fall short of restoring functional capacity in coa
1d
This Multivitamin Uses Mushrooms To Help Boost Your Immune System
Thanks to the global pandemic, people have been looking for alternative ways to boost their immunity. And as it turns out, one of the best kept secrets is mushrooms. A study released from Pennsylvania State University found that mushrooms contain unusually high amounts of antioxidants known as ergothioneine and glutathione, which protect cells from a variety of diseases including Alzheimer's, can
1d
Case of anthrax in wildlife in the Namib Desert: Infected zebra most likely causes death of three cheetahs
Anthrax is an infectious bacterial disease endemic in some parts of Africa. It affects people, livestock as well as wildlife. Using GPS telemetry data, a team of scientists reconstructed a special case of anthrax infection in Namibia: Three free-ranging cheetahs in the Namib Desert died within 24 hours after feeding on a mountain zebra that tested positive for the disease. The zebra is the first d
1d
Amazonian protected areas benefit both people and biodiversity
Highly positive social outcomes are linked to biodiversity efforts in Amazonian Sustainable-Use Protected Areas, according to new research. The study investigated the social consequences of living both inside and outside Sustainable-Use Protected Areas containing aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems in Brazil's state of Amazonas. Researchers used data from more than 80 local semi-subsistence communi
1d
Watch a Raven Attack a Google Coffee Delivery Drone
Angry Birds A raven in Canberra, Australia, decided it was fed up with a local business sending coffee to a customer in the area via a delivery drone. A video shows the bird attacking a drone belonging to Wing, a company owned by Google's parent company Alphabet, forcing it to make a rapid descent — perhaps nature rightfully exerting control over Canberra skies. Aerial Attack The Australian raven
1d
This Discreet Website Makes Treating Erectile Dysfunction Easy and Affordable
If you're suffering from side effects of erectile dysfunction, you're not alone. For many men, achieving and maintaining a strong erection can be difficult. Information out of the Cleveland Clinic estimates that 1 in 10 men will struggle with ED at some point in their lifetime . So if you're one of the men who's been affected by erectile dysfunction, you need to know about Viking Man Erectile Dys
1d
Teens who die by gun suicide may not show red flags first
Teens who die by gun suicide don't display typical suicidal behaviors, according to a new study that points to the need for strong gun safety measures in homes where teenagers live. The study found that adolescent firearm suicides fell into three categories based on data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Violent Death Reporting System (NVDRS). The first group was the
1d
Quentin Bone obituary
My friend Quentin Bone, who has died aged 89, was an outstanding marine zoologist whose publications on how fish swim made him a leader in this field while still in his 30s. His 1966 paper comparing and contrasting details of fine structure, innervation and performance of the two very different sorts of muscle that drive a fish through water, became a citation classic. His jointly authored Biolog
1d
Male giraffes have more social connections than females
Although female giraffes have closer "friends" than male giraffes, males have more "acquaintances" than females, according to a new study. The findings demonstrate that giraffes form a complex multilevel society that is driven by differences in the social connections among individuals, which could have conservation implications for the endangered giraffes. "The degree to which an animal is connec
1d
Benefits of early intervention in autoimmune diseases
Complex autoimmune diseases affecting various organ systems remain one of the greatest medical challenges in spite of immense advances in treatment. In particular, the diffuse symptoms at the early stage of complex autoimmune diseases make it hard to diagnose the condition early on, which in turn delays treatment. A team of researchers has now demonstrated that treatment can be extremely effective
1d
Detecting dementia in the blood
Researchers want to image proteins with unprecedented precision — and thus gain insights into the molecular pathogenesis of Alzheimer's. This should pave the way for an earlier diagnosis of the dementia disorder via a simple blood test. A successful pilot study has now been completed.
1d
Record in materials research: X-ray microscopy with 1000 tomograms per second
Tomoscopy is an imaging method in which three-dimensional images of the inside of materials are calculated in rapid succession. Now a team has achieved a new record: with 1000 tomograms per second, it is now possible to non-destructively document very fast processes and developments in materials on the micrometer scale, such as the burning of a sparkler or the foaming of a metal alloy for the prod
1d
Researcher leaves Wistar Institute as he retracts a Nature paper
A group of researchers at the Wistar Institute in Philadelphia have retracted a paper in Nature for data discrepancies and inconsistencies — as well as missing data. And one of the corresponding authors has left the institution, Retraction Watch has learned. The paper, "IspH inhibitors kill Gram-negative bacteria and mobilize immune clearance," was published in … Continue reading
1d
Discovery of mechanics of drug targets for COVID-19
Researchers have discovered the working mechanism of potential drug targets for various diseases such as cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, and even COVID-19. The findings uncover the inner workings of cell receptors that are involved in cancer progression and inflammatory diseases.
1d
Negative COVID vaccine feelings aren't set in stone
Vaccination behavior and attitudes among adults changed in the early months of this year, with more people reporting they intended to get vaccinated, according to a new study. Researchers looked at data from January 6 to March 29 of 2021. While one of the most encouraging findings was that the percentage of Americans who had received at least one vaccine dose or definitely intended to get the jab
1d
New mechanism of parasitoid wasps in avoiding intraspecific competition
Parasitic wasps are natural enemies for effective control over the population of pests in nature. Hence, they are extensively used as green agents of pest control in agriculture and forestry. There are a diversity of parasitic wasps, which have assorted parasitic habits. In general, parasitism can be divided into three types: solitary parasitism, gregarious parasitism and synparasitism. Superparas
1d
Bacteria can boost fitness of their host
Microorganisms can increase their host's ability to adapt to the environment and reproduce—evolutionary biologists are now studying the underlying molecular mechanisms. A research team headed by Dr. Fabian Staubach and Yun Wang from the Institute of Biology I at the University of Freiburg has now studied the relationship of Gluconobacter bacteria and Drosophila melanogaster fruit flies. They have
1d
Watching SARS-CoV-2 spread in animal models in real time
A version of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19 disease, has been successfully modified to glow brightly in cells and animal tissues, providing a real-time way to track the spread and intensity of viral infection as it happens in animal models, researchers at Texas Biomedical Research Institute (Texas Biomed) report in the journal The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).
1d
Delta 8 Carts Near Me: Top 15 Brands to Buy From
Vape pens have been around for a while now and have replaced cigarettes and other tobacco products for some people. There are numerous types of vape options, including CBD and other hemp-derived products. One of the newest, up-and-coming vape products is Delta 8. Top 15 Delta 8 Brands to Buy From 1. Everest 2. Skyhio 3. 3Chi 4. QWIN 5. Eighty Six 6. CannaAid 7. Delta Effex 8. The Hemp Doctor 9. D
1d
Physicists demystify magic: bona fide topological Mott insulator discovered in twisted bilayer graphene model
Imagine stacking two sheets of graphene—the 2D form of graphite, or the pencil at your hand—in which the carbon atoms form a hexagonal lattice and twist the top sheet out of alignment with the sheet below, yielding a periodic arrangement of atoms named moiré pattern. Do you know that at a twisted angle of about 1°—people now call it the 'magic' angle—the system could exhibit very exotic behaviors
1d
Reducing tropical cyclone impacts: The double benefit of climate protection through both limiting and delaying global warming
Increasing global warming from currently one to two degrees Celsius by mid-century might lead to about 25 percent more people put at risk by tropical cyclones, a new study finds. Already today, hurricanes and typhoons are among the most destructive natural disasters worldwide and potentially threaten about 150 million people each year. Adding to climate change, population growth further drives tro
1d
Hungry or full: It comes down to the atomic details
A protein – measuring just a few nanometers in size – acts as a molecular switch with a crucial role in determining whether we feel hungry or full. By determining of the protein's 3D structure, researchers were able to visualize the molecular structures of the hormones with which this protein — melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R) — interacts.
1d
When accidents happen, drones weigh their options
Flying cars, drones, and other urban aerial mobility vehicles have real potential to provide efficient transportation and delivery solutions, but what happens if a drone delivering cheeseburgers breaks down over a city park or in the middle of a crowded street? Researchers developed a method to measure vehicles' ability to recover and complete its mission safely.
1d
Taking the guesswork out of genetic engineering
If necessity is the mother of invention, frustration is the father. When scientists kept running into aggravating problems with the existing tools and methods they were using to perform genetic engineering experiments, they decided to make better ones. They teamed up and created an integrated pipeline called STAMPScreen that combines novel algorithms, a new gene cloning technique, and powerful nex
1d
NASA Revamps Plans for Commercializing Human Spaceflight
GMT259_21_34_For ESA_Thomas Pesquet_1019_DEXTRE – night pictures NASA is moving forward with its vision of an "orderly transition" for US human space flight, from the current regime of heavy reliance on NASA sponsorship into one "where NASA is one of many customers of a low-Earth orbit (LEO) commercial human space flight enterprise." Opening the ISS for commercial business is high up on the list.
1d
VW Software Conveniently Helps Drivers Cheat Emissions Tests, Again
(Photo:Eduard Kiiko/Unsplash) European Union legal advisors have determined software that's currently present in Volkswagen and Porsche vehicles once again constitutes a "defeat device" that cheats emission tests. The software, which is said to lower the pollutants leaving a car's exhaust pipe at certain temperatures and altitudes, allegedly exists to protect engines—but in reality, it's tricking
1d
3 rules for better work-life balance | Ashley Whillans
Have you answered a work email during an important family event? Or taken a call from your boss while on vacation? According to behavioral scientist and Harvard Business School professor Ashley Whillans, "always-on" work culture is not only ruining our personal well-being — but our work, as well. She shares which bad habits are stopping us from getting what we need out of our free time and three
1d
Reducing tropical cyclone impacts: Climate protection through limiting and delaying global warming
Increasing global warming from currently one to two degrees Celsius by mid-century might lead to about 25 percent more people put at risk by tropical cyclones, a new study finds. Already today, hurricanes and typhoons are among the most destructive natural disasters worldwide and potentially threaten about 150 million people each year. Adding to climate change, population growth further drives tro
1d
Monkeys control single prosthetic fingers with brain implant
In a first, a computer that could fit on an implantable device has interpreted brain signals for precise, high-speed, multi-finger movements in primates. The advance represents a key step toward giving those who have lost limb function more natural, real-time control over advanced prostheses—or even their own hands. "This is the first time anyone has been able to control multiple fingers precisel
1d
Stress testing avocados
Nature, Published online: 27 September 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02619-y Savannah Braden monitors how fruits ripen and rot to reduce food waste.
1d
Genetics show global fisheries management should re-think tiger sharks
A tiger shark's life history is one painted with broad brush strokes. These sharks are generalists of the boldest kind. Found in tropical and subtropical seas worldwide, they live in a range of ocean habitats from shallow coastal waters to mysterious depths far offshore. Their diet is equally unfussy and has become the stuff of legend, its menu of marine mammals, fish, seabirds and other sharks pe
1d
0.75 Gbit/s key distribution with mode-shift keying chaos synchronization
Information encryption is one of the core technologies of cyberspace security. The algorithm encryption has a risk of exhaustive attack due to the algorithm determinacy. Quantum key distribution based on quantum no-cloning principle promises unconditional security and still has challenges: key rate is limited by the single-photon detector and distribution channel is hardly compatible with optical
1d
Non-line-of-sight reconstruction with signal-object collaborative regularization
Non-line-of-sight (NLOS) imaging aims at recovering obscured objects from multiple scattered light. It has recently received widespread attention due to its potential applications such as autonomous driving, rescue operations, and remote sensing. In real applications, lasers or other light sources are used to illuminate a visible wall, the scattered light from which reaches the hidden object and i
1d
Revealing the molecular mechanism of nucleolar RNA
A research group led by Prof. Guang Shouhong from the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, collaborating with Prof. Feng Xuezhu from the First Affiliated Hospital of USTC, revealed the nucleolar RNA interference based on Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) as model organism. The study was published in Nuclear Acids Research.
1d
Perfecting and extending the near-infrared imaging window
The deep-rooted beliefs that light absorption and scattering are totally harmful to fluorescence catching urge most researchers to chase a perfect window with minimal photon absorption and scattering for bioimaging. Due to the generally accepted less photon scattering, the fluorescence bioimaging in the second near-infrared window (NIR-II) gives admirable image quality, especially when deciphering
1d
Farmers get smaller share of what we pay for food
Farmers are getting less of what we pay for food, research from 61 countries around the world finds. The new study in Nature Food examines how much of what consumers pay for food goes to farmers around the world, compared to the rest of the food value chain (FVC), which includes processing, packaging, transportation, and supermarket or restaurant sales beyond the farm gate. The researchers estima
1d
Half a Million in Gold! Best Haul of the Year | Bering Sea Gold
Stream Bering Sea Gold on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/bering-sea-gold About Bering Sea Gold: In Nome, Alaska, the gold rush is on. Driven by gold fever and sometimes desperate need, miners pilot their ragtag dredges and dive with hoses to suck up gold from the bottom of the frigid, unpredictable Bering Sea. #BeringSeaGold #Discovery #Gold Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/
1d
Video: NASA's Artemis astronaut Victor Glover
As we look forward to the Artemis program to the Moon and even one-day crewed missions to Mars, accessing resources like water will be crucial for humans to survive on other worlds. We sat down with Victor Glover, NASA Crew-1 astronaut, to talk about NASA's Artemis program, what it would be like to be on the Moon one day, and how technology from the Moon to Mars Ice & Prospecting Challenge could h
1d
Remote infrared radiation technology measures thickness of ice on prawns
DTU and Royal Greenland have collaborated on a new technology that can measure the thickness of the ice glaze on frozen prawns. This is important to know so that the prawns stay fresh and consumers get the right quantity of prawns. The solution is based on terahertz waves, and the technology can be used to measure the thickness of innumerable materials.
1d