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Nyheder2022april16

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Internet Blows Up With Furious Reactions About Elon Musk Trying to Buy Twitter
Tesla CEO and — richest person in the world — Elon Musk is threatening to personally take over Twitter after buying a large stake in the company, the beginning of a "hostile takeover bid," as the Washington Post put it . And unsurprisingly, users on the social media platform is having a field day over the news. Reactions were extremely mixed, to say the least, with some arguing Musk would bring s
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Ukraine Reportedly Using Facial Recognition to Send Photos of Dead Russian Soldiers to Their Mothers
In the week's most gruesome example of "two wrongs don't make a right," a new report by the Washington Post found that Ukrainian soldiers are sending photos of dead Russian soldiers to their mothers using controversial facial recognition software made by Clearview AI . The software is so good, according to WaPo , that it was even able to identify an individual whose head had been caved in by grav
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Liberation Without Victory
Kyiv is halfway normal now. Burnt-out Russian tanks have been removed from the roads leading into the city, traffic lights work, the subway runs, oranges are available for purchase. A cheerful balalaika orchestra was performing for returning refugees at the main rail station earlier this week, on the day we arrived to meet Volodymyr Zelensky, the president of Ukraine. The normality is deceiving.
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The Final Pandemic Betrayal
Photo Illustrations by Aaron Turner Lucy Esparza-Casarez thinks she caught the coronavirus while working the polls during California's 2020 primary election, before bringing it home to her husband, David, her sister-in-law Yolanda, and her mother-in-law, Balvina. Though Lucy herself developed what she calls "the worst flu times 100," David fared worse. Lucy took him to the hospital on March 20, t
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Ukraine's fight to keep educating its children | Zoya Lytvyn
The Russian invasion of Ukraine has destroyed so much — including hundreds of schools, where the country's children were forging their futures — but it has not stopped Ukrainians from pursuing knowledge and curiosity. In a deeply moving talk, education leader Zoya Lytvyn shares her first-hand experience evacuating Kyiv and takes us inside the ongoing effort to continue educating children amid wa
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James Webb telescope's coldest instrument reaches operating temperature
NASA's James Webb Space Telescope will see the first galaxies to form after the Big Bang, but to do that, its instruments first need to get cold—really cold. On April 7, Webb's Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI)—a joint development by NASA and ESA (European Space Agency)—reached its final operating temperature below 7 kelvins (minus 447 degrees Fahrenheit, or minus 266 degrees Celsius).
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First hybrid quantum bit based on topological insulators
With their superior properties, topological qubits could help achieve a breakthrough in the development of a quantum computer designed for universal applications. So far, no one has yet succeeded in unambiguously demonstrating a quantum bit, or qubit for short, of this kind in a lab. However, scientists from Forschungszentrum Jülich have now gone some way to making this a reality. For the first ti
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Team simulates collider physics on quantum computer
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory physicists Christian Bauer, Marat Freytsis and Benjamin Nachman have leveraged an IBM Q quantum computer through the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility's Quantum Computing User Program to capture part of a calculation of two protons colliding. The calculation can show the probability that an outgoing particle will emit additional particles.
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Electrostatics influence the movement of drops on surfaces
Something as simple as the motion of water drops on surfaces should actually be understood—one would think. In fact there are still numerous unanswered questions about the forces acting on a sliding droplet. A team of researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research in collaboration with colleagues from TU Darmstadt has now discovered: In addition to surface energy and viscous fricti
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Somatic mutation rates scale with lifespan across mammals
Nature, Published online: 13 April 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04618-z Whole-genome sequencing is used to analyse the landscape of somatic mutation in intestinal crypts from 16 mammalian species, revealing that rates of somatic mutation inversely scale with the lifespan of the animal across species.
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Earliest record of a candidate aurora found in Chinese annals
A celestial event mentioned in an ancient Chinese text turns out to be the oldest known reference to a candidate aurora, predating the next oldest one by some three centuries, according to a recent study by Marinus Anthony van der Sluijs, an independent researcher based in Canada, and Hisashi Hayakawa from Nagoya University. This finding was recently published in the journal Advances in Space Rese
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MAGIC telescopes observe nova explosion
Light on, light off—this is how one could describe the behavior of the nova, which goes by the name RS Ophiuchi (RS Oph). Every 15 years or so, a dramatic explosion occurs in the constellation of the Serpent Bearer. Birthplaces of a nova are systems in which two very different stars live in a parasitic relationship: A white dwarf, a small, burned-out and tremendously dense star—a teaspoon of its m
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Seeing more deeply into nanomaterials: New 3D imaging tool achieves highest resolution yet
From designing new biomaterials to novel photonic devices, new materials built through a process called bottom-up nanofabrication, or self-assembly, are opening up pathways to new technologies with properties tuned at the nanoscale. However, to fully unlock the potential of these new materials, researchers need to "see" into their tiny creations so that they can control the design and fabrication
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Flexible quantum sieve filters the fuel of starship Enterprise
Deuterium, the heavy brother of hydrogen, is considered a promising material of the future because of its wide range of applications—in science, for energy generation, or in the production of pharmaceuticals. However, the extraction of deuterium from its natural isotope mixture has so far been complex and expensive. With a porous material developed at the Technische Universität Dresden, this could
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New COVID-19 nasal spray outperforms current antibody treatments in mice
Current antibody treatments block SARS-CoV-2 by binding to one of three binding sites on the spike protein. A new protein-based antiviral binds to all three sites on the spike protein, making it more effective than current therapies. The new therapy also is low-cost, easy to manufacture, does not require complicated supply chains with extreme refrigeration and potentially could be self-administere
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New polymer materials make fabricating optical interconnects easier
Researchers have developed new polymer materials that are ideal for making the optical links necessary to connect chip-based photonic components with board-level circuits or optical fibers. The polymers can be used to easily create interconnects between photonic chips and optical printed circuit boards, the light-based equivalent of electronic printed circuit boards.
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Physics models better define what makes pasta 'al dente'
Achieving the perfect al dente texture for a pasta noodle can be tough. Noodles can take different times to fully cook, and different recipes call for different amounts of salt to be added. To boot, sometimes noodles will stick to each other or the saucepan.
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Thermophotovoltaic efficiency of 40%
Nature, Published online: 13 April 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04473-y Two-junction TPV cells with efficiencies of more than 40% are reported, using an emitter with a temperature between 1,900 and 2,400 °C, for integration into a TPV system for thermal energy grid storage.
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A swarm of 85,000 earthquakes at the Antarctic Orca submarine volcano
Volcanoes can be found even off the coast of Antarctica. At the deep-sea volcano Orca, which has been inactive for a long time, a sequence of more than 85,000 earthquakes was registered in 2020, a swarm quake that reached proportions not previously observed for this region. The fact that such events can be studied and described in great detail even in such remote and therefore poorly instrumented
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Nonlinear control of transcription through enhancer–promoter interactions
Nature, Published online: 13 April 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04570-y The transcriptional effect of an enhancer depends on its contact probabilities with the promoter through a nonlinear relationship, and enhancer strength determines absolute transcription levels as well as the sensitivity of a promoter to CTCF-mediated transcriptional insulation.
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Covidsjuka som pratar och sjunger smittar fler
En ny studie visar ett direkt samband mellan luftburna partiklar och överföring av covidsmitta. Mest virus i utandningsluften finns när symptomen startar – och när sjuka personer pratar eller sjunger. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
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'Extraordinary': ancient tombs and statues unearthed beneath Notre Dame Cathedral
Archaeological dig also finds body-shaped lead sarcophagus buried at the heart of the fire-ravaged monument An archaeological dig under Notre Dame Cathedral has uncovered an extraordinary treasure of statues, sculptures, tombs and pieces of an original rood screen dating back to the 13th century. The find included several ancient tombs from the middle ages and a body-shaped lead sarcophagus burie
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Elon Musk Is Fighting for Attention, Not Free Speech
I didn't wake up this morning planning to write about Twitter, and I've never woken up with the intent to write about Elon Musk. But this is the nature of Twitter: The spectacle sucks you in. Elon Musk, equal parts innovator and troll, has announced a formal bid to acquire Twitter, a platform he'd recently begun to describe as " the de facto public town square ." In the course of this line of thi
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NASA Shows Off Spacecraft Visiting $10 Quintillion Asteroid
Super Psyched NASA is hoping to launch a spacecraft to investigate a massive metal-rich asteroid called Psyche, which experts estimate to be worth an astonishing $10 quintillion — if, that is, we ever decide to mine it for resources. The spacecraft, which shares the same name as the asteroid, is scheduled to launch on a SpaceX Heavy Falcon rocket as soon as this August, an exciting mission that c
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Lawyer Accuses Johnny Depp of Being "Obsessed" With Elon Musk
Messy Divorce Hollywood star Johnny Depp's lawsuit accusing ex-wife Amber Heard of defamation is off to a wild start — including a wild crossover with the world of SpaceX and Tesla. During opening statements inside a Virginia courtroom on Monday, Heard's lawyer claimed that "Johnny Depp is obsessed with Elon Musk," which drew a visible smirk out of the "Pirates of the Caribbean" actor, the Indepe
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Putin Says Russia Is Landing on the Moon This Year
While he's not busy leading what is now being referred to as a "genocide" of the Ukrainian people, Russian president Vladimir Putin seems to be letting his imagination run wild about space exploration. During a visit of the country's Vostochny Cosmodrome on Tuesday, Putin said that "we need to successfully stand up to the challenges of space exploration," as quoted by The Moscow Times . According
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Zelensky's Prayer
T his Friday, as Passover begins, my thoughts will turn to my late grandmother. Born in Ukraine, she survived the Nazis , the only one in her immediate family to escape the guns of the génocidaires . Each year, at the beginning of the seder, she would stand from her chair, if she could, and recount the story of her flight, never explicitly drawing comparisons to the exodus from Egypt. As she fini
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Man Says His Tesla Got Stuck at 83 MPH on the Highway
Starring Keanu A Tesla Model 3 owner says he went through a terrifying experience with his vehicle last week: the car allegedly got stuck driving at 83 mph down a California freeway, KABC reports , with its main center console freezing completely. If the alarming story holds up, it'll be a reminder that no driving technology is perfect — especially as we move towards a future in which more and mo
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Elon Musk, Baloney King
You can call Elon Musk a lot of things. Agent of chaos. Savvy investor. Obsessive workaholic . But the tech-industry analyst Benedict Evans has a different suggestion. He calls Musk a "bullshitter who delivers." I'd go even further: Musk exemplifies a new kind of bullshitter, one we haven't really seen before. Call it the "bullionaire," maybe: an unusual purveyor of infantile jackassery, whose un
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New App Pays Alcoholics $5 Per Day to Not Drink
A smart new app is aiming to replace the little hit your brain's reward center gets from drugs or alcohol with a daily fiver instead. Researchers have long known that little rewards can act as instant gratification to disrupt dependency behavior, especially if gift cards or vouchers are for activities that encourage positive habits, according to the Boston Globe , which covered startup DynamiCare
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Research Funded by Vegans Claims Being Vegan May Be Healthier for Your Dog
Chow Down A nonprofit that wants people to eat less meat is funding research finding that a vegan diet is better for dogs. According to a new report published in the Guardian yesterday, a peer-reviewed study of 2,500 dogs found that vegan dogs took less medication and visited the vet less frequently than their meat-eating brethren. Researchers on the study, published in the journal PLOS One , fou
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Elon Musk Offers to Buy the Entirety of Twitter
After buying the largest single stake in social media heavyweight Twitter, Tesla and SpaceX CEO Elon Musk is now threatening to buy the entire platform's remaining shares in cash at $54.20, a surprising escalation of an already confusing mess of a saga. The news sent Twitter's stock soaring by 11 percent in premarket trading Thursday morning. Rumors of a hostile takeover have been swirling all we
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Republicans Have Sex Ed All Wrong
If you ask some ( okay, many ) conservative pundits , Democrats are " grooming " children . As in, grooming them to be abused by pedophiles. Some Republicans have even accused Democrats of being pedophiles themselves . The grooming charges lump together concerns that kids are being introduced too early to sexually explicit material, to the existence of transgender people, and to non-heterosexual
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Uber Criticized for Charging Surge Pricing for Riders Escaping Mass Shooting
Safety First Fear not, citizens. In a mass shooting event, Uber is there to carry you to safety — for the low cost of surge pricing, of course. We wish that had come from a dystopian novel, but that's exactly what happened before Uber finally shut off surge pricing after the horrific NYC subway shooting yesterday, in which 10 people were shot and 23 were injured , causing major transit disruption
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Absolute Unit! The Largest Comet Ever Spotted Is Headed Our Way
NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has made a spectacular new observation: what appears to be the largest comet ever discovered, at an astonishing 80 miles across, making it about the width of Vermont. The space rock, dubbed C/2014 UN271 (Bernardinelli-Bernstein), is screaming towards our solar system at 22,000 miles per hour — but it will only get within a billion miles from the Sun by the year 2031,
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Have We Already Ruined Our Next COVID Summer?
Almost exactly 12 months ago, America's pandemic curve hit a pivot point. Case counts peaked—and then dipped, and dipped, and dipped, on a slow but sure grade, until, somewhere around the end of May, the numbers flattened and settled, for several brief, wonderful weeks, into their lowest nadir so far. I refuse to use the term hot vax summer (oops, just did), but its sentiment isn't exactly wrong
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If we can farm metal from plants, what else can we learn from life on Earth? | James Bridle
There is so much intelligence on this planet other than ours. Realising that will be key to adapting to climate breakdown For the past couple of years, I've been working with researchers in northern Greece who are farming metal. In a remote, beautiful field, high in the Pindus mountains in Epirus, they are experimenting with a trio of shrubs known to scientists as "hyperaccumulators": plants whic
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Will Elon Musk Go Full Future-of-Civilization on Twitter?
Elon Musk, when he wants to, can be quite philosophical—as in February, when he gave a long speech about his vision for the future from his growing SpaceX spaceport in South Texas. "It is very important—essential—that, over the long term, we become a multi-planet species, and ultimately even go beyond the solar system, and bring life with us," Musk said, standing in front of a prototype of a gian
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Startup Says You Can Talk to Your Dead Relatives, for a Fee
Emulator Magic It's not exactly heaven, and neither of you would actually be there in person — but now, there's a universe where you and your loved ones can live forever. As long as you pay for the privilege, of course. As VICE reports, VR video game company Somnium Space has created metaverse similar to those created by Meta and others, with the goal of allowing you to meet up your dead relative
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Valneva approved to be UK's sixth Covid vaccine
Medicines regulator says it is first in world to approve Valneva product A Covid-19 vaccine developed by the French pharmaceutical company Valneva has been given regulatory approval by the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency, bringing the total number of jabs approved for use in the UK to six. As the Covid pandemic swept the world, scientists began developing vaccines against it,
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The Amazon Union Exposes the Emptiness of 'Woke Capital'
The workers who won a union election at an Amazon warehouse on Staten Island earlier this month did something miraculous: They defeated a well-funded and implacable anti-union campaign run by the nation's second-largest employer, a corporation with almost unlimited financial resources, without the aid of a major union . The battle isn't over—the union will still have to go through the difficult p
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Guy Tries to Sell Twitter Founder's First Tweet NFT for $48M, Gets Top Bid of Just $280
Oops Things didn't quite go according to plan when Israeli crypto entrepreneur Sina Estavi tried to sell an NFT of Twitter founder Jack Dorsey's inaugural tweet. In March 2021, Estavi bought exclusive rights to the 2006 tweet for a cool $2.9 million . Then last week, he announced he was looking to part ways with the tweet for the hefty sum of $48 million. But there's one problem: the auction, whi
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Elon Musk Gets Sued Over Twitter Shenanigans
Oops, He Did It Again Billionaire Tesla and SpaceX CEO Elon Musk is making waves in a major company's structure by throwing a bunch of money and chaos magic at it. It isn't the first time. A new report published yesterday in Business Insider says Twitter stakeholder Marc Bain Rasella is suing Musk. Rasella says if Musk had made his giant stake in Twitter public sooner, other stakeholders would've
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Microfossils may be evidence life began 'very quickly' after Earth formed
Scientists believe specimen shows life existed earlier than is widely assumed – increasing chances of life elsewhere Scientists believe they have found evidence of microbes that were thriving near hydrothermal vents on Earth's surface just 300m years after the planet formed – the strongest evidence yet that life began far earlier than is widely assumed. If confirmed, it would suggest the conditio
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Facebook Whistleblower Warns That Zuckerberg Wants to Fill Your House With Microphones
She's Back The Facebook whistleblower is back — and this time, she's implicating the Metaverse. In a new interview with Politico , former Facebook product manager Frances Haugen said that she sees Meta CEO Mark Zuckerberg's vision for his company's Metaverse as just another excuse to increase the company's already significant surveillance of users. "I'm super concerned about how many sensors are
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Scientists Are Studying The Psychology of "A**holes"
Assholes — we all have them, and we all know one when we see one. But what makes an asshole an asshole? To get to the root of this age old question, psychology researchers at the University of Georgia worked to quantify which personality traits make someone an "asshole" — and their findings aren't exactly surprising. In a press release about their research, published in the journal Collabra: Psyc
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NASA Scientist Fights Off Tears Over Impending Disaster
Future Generations NASA's Peter Kalmus, a climate scientist at the agency's jet propulsion lab in California, chained himself to a JP Morgan Chase bank last week to protest government inaction on climate change. Kalmus posted video of the day's events on Twitter yesterday . The clip shows Kalmus giving an impassioned speech while gesturing with his free hand, his left being handcuffed to the door
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Gilbert Gottfried Was More Than Just a Funny Voice
Gilbert Gottfried, who died yesterday at 67 of complications from muscular dystrophy, was probably best known as the voice of Iago the parrot in Disney's Aladdin , as the Aflac-commercial duck, or for any number of projects that put his brazen, just-shy-of-whiny voice front and center. As a comedian, he was often characterized as "offensive," given that a lot of his most high-profile (and, at tim
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Zuckerberg Dogpiled Over Plans to Monetize the Metaverse
Mega Cut Mark Zuckerberg's social media giant formerly known as Facebook has announced plans to monetize its, uh, work-in-progress Metaverse — and creators are extremely irate at how large a cut the company intends to take. Earlier in the week, as CNBC reported , Facebook — which has officially rebranded as Meta — announced that it's letting some Horizon Worlds creators sell assets in its Metaver
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The Post-villain Era of Animation
Few characters are as strikingly memorable as a classic Disney villain. Sleeping Beauty 's haughty sorceress, Maleficent; The Little Mermaid 's operatically campy sea witch, Ursula; The Lion King 's melodramatically evil Scar—each one so charismatic they tend to obscure their movie's protagonist. (Quick: What is the princess's name in Sleeping Beauty ?) But despite their prominence in classic fil
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A Christian Response to Suffering
One of the things I've discovered in my middle years is just how many lives are marked by wounds: terribly painful, life-altering, haunting, and impossible to make sense of. Some of them are visible on the surface; many of them are hidden in shadows. Some are carried alone. In this Easter season, I've been deeply moved by Nicholas Wolterstorff's Lament for a Son , an expression of his profound gr
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Ah Yes, Of Course Elon Musk Hid "420" in His Offer to Buy Twitter
Blaze It The man simply cannot be stopped. Even while making the oh-so-serious offer to buy Twitter outright for a whopping $43 billion, Tesla and SpaceX CEO Elon Musk may still be trolling — as evidenced by the $54.20 per share cost he outlined in his bombastic SEC filing . As many noted online, the appearance of that particular number makes it still sort of seem like he's shitposting. " Adding
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The Subway-Crime Death Spiral
In March, as reports of sickening crimes in the New York City subway filled local and national news, Mayor Eric Adams promised to get tough on criminals and tamp down on the incidents. Yet a prolific but little-watched vlogger was skeptical. Harkening back to the bad old days of crime in the 1980s, this was, the man said on YouTube, the "same old shit again." "He can't stop no fuckin' crime in no
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Have We Lost Patience for Prestige TV?
P eople who respect the integrity of television as an art form tend to be horrified by the Netflix feature that lets viewers speed up what they're watching. Yet I recently found myself unable to resist the "1.5x" button as I caught up with one of the most acclaimed shows on TV. AMC's Better Call Saul , the Breaking Bad spin-off that debuted to record cable viewership in 2015 and will begin airing
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Antikythera Mechanism photos: See the world's first computer
Sponge divers pulled the first fragments of what became known as the Antikythera Mechanism from a Roman-era shipwreck in 1901 off the coast of the Greek island Antikythera. Ever since the discovery, scientists and historians have continued to look for more artifacts from the shipwreck while also piecing together the story of what is often considered the world's first computer.
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YouTuber Meets His Creepy Robot Double and Freaks Out
Double Trouble Ever wanted to meet your doppelgänger? For an unspecified large sum of money, you can have one made — if you dare. British vlogger Tom Scott, known for initially being sponsored by VPN companies only to declare in a 2019 video that many of the companies are lying to customers , decided that his robot double could shill for yet another VPN company much better than he could. To achie
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NASA Accidentally Posts Bikini Picture
Ctrl-Z Whoops! Unless NASA was trying to show off an unusual new astronaut uniform, it was probably an accident that the US space agency sent out a tweet today featuring a model in a pink two-piece bikini, alongside a Bloomberg story about retail giant Shein. After the eyebrow-raising post, Ars Technica senior editor Eric Berger speculated that NASA had been hacked. After they deleted their post,
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Tourists on Space Station Say They're Discussing Private Moon Mission
To the Moon The first-ever all-civilian mission to the International Space Station is well underway — and several days into the extremely expensive journey, the group of space tourists are already yearning to go even further, price be damned. When asked during a Wednesday livestreamed event — which involved a group of kids at NASA's Space Center in Houston asking the space tourists a slew of ques
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Brazilian Military Faces Stiff Questions About Purchase of Penis Implants
Brazil is hard up for an explanation after facing inquiry over why it keeps purchasing male enhancement products for its soldiers. As The Guardian reports , Brazilian president Jair Bolsonaro has, uh, come under scrutiny after it was revealed that the country's military not only ordered a bunch of Viagra for its soldiers, but an unclear number of penile implants as well. The Brazilian military in
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Researchers Gain New Understanding From Simple AI
In the last two years, artificial intelligence programs have reached a surprising level of linguistic fluency. The biggest and best of these are all based on an architecture invented in 2017 called the transformer. It serves as a kind of blueprint for the programs to follow, in the form of a list of equations. But beyond this bare mathematical outline, we don't really know what transformers are..
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Sports Are Great Because They're Pointless
" How to Build a Life " is a weekly column by Arthur Brooks, tackling questions of meaning and happiness. Click here to listen to his podcast series on all things happiness, How to Build a Happy Life . E ven though I've never lived in Chicago, I have a soft spot for the Cubs. My father grew up in the Windy City and loved the team his whole life. And I loved my dad. So, by the transitive property
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House-flipping algorithms are coming to your neighborhood
For years, Michael Maxson spent more nights in hotels than his own bed, working on speaker systems for the titans of heavy rock on global tours. When Maxson decided to settle down with his wife and their two dogs, they chose the city where stadium rock spectacles took him more often than any other: Las Vegas. After renting for several years, in 2021 he found a home he wanted to buy in Clark Count
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We Regret To Inform You That Elon Musk, Unfortunately, Knows About "Goblin Mode"
A La Mode It's bad enough that Elon Musk has become Twitter's largest shareholder — but now he's gone " goblin mode " too? In a since-deleted tweet, the Tesla and SpaceX CEO posted an uncredited meme of the "Breaking Bad" and "Better Call Saul" lawyer character Saul Goodman, with the caption: "In all fairness your honor, my client was in 'goblin mode.'" For those living in blessed ignorance, "gob
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Google Spinoff Working on Earbuds That Spy on Your Brain Signals
A Google spinoff called NextSense is working on a pair of earbuds that can record the electrical signals of the brain to study sleep and neurological conditions, Wired reports . While that may sound intrusive, the device could make studying the brain a whole lot simpler. The larger goal is to make capturing an electroencephalogram (EEG), which conventionally requires researchers to fix electrodes
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Keeping a Diary at the End of the World
When Russia invaded Ukraine, the writer and photographer Yevgenia Belorusets began to journal about her experience living in Kyiv. The resulting account, which she published online in real time, provides insight into the conflict that more straightforward news coverage has failed to capture. It is, as she put it in an interview with my colleague Gal Beckerman , "a very complex picture of reality
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Elon Musk Is Right About Twitter
It really is the closest thing we have to an online public square—and that's terrible for democracy. Let his takeover bid be a wakeup call.
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Researcher confirms hottest rock on record
If there was ever any doubt the 2011 discovery by a post-doctoral student was indeed the hottest rock on Earth, new findings from a Western-led research team are putting that uncertainty to rest.
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Two Long Years
The World Health Organization formally declared the coronavirus a global pandemic on March 11, 2020. More than two years later, the pandemic has no clear end date in sight. There have been false starts toward a sense of normalcy: the drop in cases in the summer of 2020, the race to get "shots in arms" in 2021, the few weeks of " hot vax summer ," and the end of mask mandates in many states in Mar
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Study finds genome loops don't last long in cells: Theories of how loops control gene expression may need to be revised
In human chromosomes, DNA is coated by proteins to form an exceedingly long beaded string. This "string" is folded into numerous loops, which are believed to help cells control gene expression and facilitate DNA repair, among other functions. A new study from MIT suggests that these loops are very dynamic and shorter-lived than previously thought.
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Predicting the most stable boron nitride structure with quantum simulations
Boron nitride (BN) is a versatile material with applications in a variety of engineering and scientific fields. This is largely due to an interesting property of BN called "polymorphism," characterized by the ability to crystallize into more than one type of structure. This generally occurs as a response to changes in temperature, pressure, or both. Furthermore, the different structures, called "p
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Ukraine's Lifeline
If I have a single sensory memory of combat, it's of wet socks. In Iraq and Afghanistan, when a firefight was over and I had a moment to take stock of the units I led—our casualties, our remaining ammunition—I would be so soaked in sweat that even my socks were wet. The sheer physicality of combat, and how much it takes out of you, is difficult to overstate. In one of my first firefights, three M
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Why Can't We Just Call BA.2 Omicron?
When coronavirus variants emerged in full force in late 2020, the news suddenly turned into alphanumeric soup. Remember? The U.K. variant, B.1.351, GR/501Y.V3. After this initial period of chaos, the World Health Organization came up with a sanity-preserving system that renamed those variants, respectively, Alpha, Beta, and Gamma. And down the Greek alphabet we went, until we got to Omicron. The
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The Firefighters of Ukraine
It has now been seven weeks since the start of Russia's invasion of Ukraine , and cities and villages are still bearing the brunt of Russian missiles. When apartment buildings, stores, houses, and factories are hit, members of Ukraine's State Emergency Service, including firefighters and rescue teams, rush to the scene to help any victims, mitigate the damage, and prevent the fires from spreading
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A deep-learning algorithm could detect earthquakes by filtering out city noise
Cities are loud places. Traffic, trains, and machinery generate a lot of noise. While it's a mere inconvenience much of the time, it can become a deadly problem when it comes to detecting earthquakes. That's because it's difficult to discern an approaching earthquake amid all the usual vibrations in bustling cities. Researchers from Stanford have found a way to get a clearer signal. They've creat
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AI gives algorithms the means to design biomolecules with a huge range of valuable functions
When Dr. Shiran Barber-Zucker joined the lab of Prof. Sarel Fleishman as a postdoctoral fellow, she chose to pursue an environmental dream: breaking down plastic waste into useful chemicals. Nature has clever ways of decomposing tough materials: Dead trees, for example, are recycled by white-rot fungi, whose enzymes degrade wood into nutrients that return to the soil. So why not coax the same enzy
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Two Rival Cryonics Firms Keep Stealing Each Others' Frozen Human Brains
Two of the co-founders of a Russian cryonics company called KrioRus are fighting over the ownership of dozens of frozen brains, The Daily Beast reports, a confounding disagreement that could end in disaster — that is, if the remains of the company's numerous clients aren't already a total write off. In September, KrioRus founder Valerija Udalova took hold of a number of the company's cryonic tank
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There's still a way to reach global goal on climate change
If nations do all that they've promised to fight climate change, the world can still meet one of two internationally agreed upon goals for limiting warming. But the planet is blowing past the other threshold that scientists say will protect Earth more, a new study finds.
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Using quantum vibration properties between molecules to speed up reactions between compounds
A pair of researchers, one with the Southern University of Science and Technology, the other the Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, has developed a means for using quantum vibration properties between molecules to speed up reactions between compounds. In their paper published in the journal Nature Chemistry, Huilin Pan and Kopin Liu describe how they used vibrations in certain types of me
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We've Never Seen a Carbon-Removal Plan Like This Before
Updated at 3:45 p.m. on April 13, 2022. The world's biggest tech companies are getting serious about carbon removal, the still-nascent technology wherein humanity can pull heat-trapping carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere. Yesterday, an alliance of prominent Silicon Valley companies—including Google, Meta, Shopify, and the payment company Stripe—announced that it is purchasing $925 million in ca
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Scientists Unravel How the Tonga Volcano Caused Worldwide Tsunamis
In August 1883, a mountainous island in Indonesia named Krakatau, or Krakatoa, self-destructed. Episodic volcanic eruptions crescendoed in an explosion that sent debris 80 kilometers high and smothered 800,000 square kilometers of Earth's surface in corrosive ash. As much of the island blasted apart and splashed into the sea, a tsunami rose up and slammed into the nearby islands of Java and… So
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Young and depressed? Try Woebot! The rise of mental health chatbots in the US
Schools are encouraging students to use mental health chatbots to address a surge in depression and anxiety. Critics worry they're a Band-Aid solution unsupported by evidence Fifteen-year-old Jordyne Lewis was stressed out. The high school sophomore from Harrisburg, North Carolina, was overwhelmed with schoolwork, never mind the uncertainty of living in a pandemic that has dragged on for two long
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iPhone maker Pegatron halts Shanghai production due to Covid lockdown
Operations stopped in Chinese cities of Shanghai and Kunshan as global supply chains feel pinch of Beijing's zero-Covid measures Key iPhone maker Pegatron has halted operations at two subsidiaries in the Chinese cities of Shanghai and Kunshan, as global supply chains feel the pinch of Beijing's strict zero-Covid measures. The business hub of Shanghai has become the heart of China's biggest Covid-
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'Can you hear me now?' Study reveals why voices are raised on video calls
Scientists find that as video quality deteriorates, people speak louder and alter gestures to compensate From frozen screens to the oblivious person on mute, the trials and tribulations of video calls became familiar challenges as the pandemic forced workers to communicate from their kitchen tables, makeshift offices and boxroom desks. Now scientists have revealed why we often end up raising our
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Vitamin K2 repairs nerve cells via mitochondrial quality control loop
In a recent study published in Nutrients, a research group led by Prof. Zheng Zhiming from the Hefei Institutes of Physical Science (HFIPS) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) has found a novel function of vitamin K2: regulating mitochondrial membrane potential and alleviating oxidative stress, thus repairing mitochondrial dysfunction and inhibiting nerve cell damage caused by 6-hydroxydopami
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These plastic batteries could help store renewable energy on the grid
A new type of battery made from electrically conductive polymers—basically plastic—could help make energy storage on the grid cheaper and more durable, enabling a greater use of renewable power. The batteries, made by Boston-based startup PolyJoule , could offer a less expensive and longer-lasting alternative to lithium-ion batteries for storing electricity from intermittent sources like wind and
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Researchers create miniature wide-angle camera with flat metalenses
Researchers have designed a new compact camera that acquires wide-angle images of high-quality using an array of metalenses—flat nanopatterned surfaces used to manipulate light. By eliminating the bulky and heavy lenses typically required for this type of imaging, the new approach could enable wide-angle cameras to be incorporated into smartphones and portable imaging devices for vehicles such as
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Paella that is out of this world: Spain's top chefs take space food to next level
Michelin-starred chefs see opportunities and creative challenge in catering for commercial space travel When a trio of paying customers and their astronaut chaperone were blasted off to the International Space Station, their voyage was touted as a milestone for the commercialisation of spaceflight. For the Michelin-starred Spanish chef José Andrés, however, the recently departed mission ushered i
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Real-time ultrafast humidity sensing optical sensor
The Hercules beetle native to South America has a fascinating trait of changing its shell colors depending on the external humidity conditions. This is because the inside of the beetle's shell consists of porous lattice structure with square holes. When light of particular wavelengths hits the shell, it reflects them and displays different colors; and these wavelengths change depending on the humi
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A new understanding of how COVID infects humans
The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation's National Deuteration Facility has provided deuterated cholesterol for international research to gain a better understanding of how the Spike protein of the COVID virus, SARS-Co-V-2, infects human cells through a membrane fusion mechanism.
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Researchers find 12 semidetached mass-transfer massive binaries in galaxy M31
Recently, PhD student Li Fuxing, Prof. Qian Shengbang and their colleagues from Yunnan Observatories of the Chinese Academy of Sciences discovered 12 semidetached mass-transfer massive binaries from a total of 437 eclipsing binaries in Andromeda galaxy (M31). The secondary (less massive) components filled their Roche lobes, while the more massive ones were detached from the lobes.
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OpenAI's New AI Generated Anthropomorphic Bowling Balls and We Simply Must Stan
Strike! Move over, NSFW bowling animations — there's a new weird bowling meme in town, and this one was made by computers. Using OpenAI's DALL-E2 text-to-image generator, which was just released a week ago , company market manager Adam Goldberg forced the company's superlative neural network to create images of "vibrant smiling and laughing bowling balls rolling down a bowling alley." The results
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The Parasitic Workplace
According to a lushly animated Chobani ad from last year, the future of work is agrarian and cutting-edge, folksy and modern— WWOOF meets Wakanda, perhaps. The commercial pictures a world in which farming retains a familial, salt-of-the-earth vibe despite the existence of robots so prehensile they can pick fruit. "A business is only as good as its people," a farmer narrates as workers gather arou
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The Experiment Podcast: Should We Return National Parks to Native Americans?
Listen and subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Podcasts The national-park system has been touted as " America's best idea ." David Treuer , an Ojibwe historian and the author of The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee: Native America From 1890 to the Present , says we can make that idea even better—by giving national parks back to Native Americans. This episode of The Experiment origina
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Image: Opening of Apollo 17 core sample, vacuum-sealed since 1972
A satisfying, audible "pop" marked a successful piercing of the sealed Apollo 17 sample container using the ESA designed and built piercing tool. The tool forms part of a gas sampling system with a gas extraction manifold, designed and built by Washington University St Louis, U.S..
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Space mice may offer clues to why astronauts get kidney stones
Test subjects from International Space Station may shed light on link between space travel and high incidence of painful condition When astronauts travel into space they can expect some extraordinary new experiences. But they may also face a more mundane and potentially mission-ending one: kidney stones. According to Nasa, kidney stones have been reported more than 30 times by astronauts upon ret
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Oral History
I read somewhere that people don't mind a long wait for the elevator as long as there's a mirror in the lobby. I read that scientists don't know why some girls' ponytails bounce up and down and other girls' swing from side to side. I read in a blog comment "i feel that hot chicks just like going to public events to be hot" and on some level I kind of agree. I once read that rich people have to in
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James Webb Space Telescope Reaches Operational Temperature, Just Shy of Absolute Zero
It seemed like there was a new bit of news on the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) every few days earlier this year, but we haven't heard as much from the revolutionary observatory lately. That's because it's been chilling out — literally. The telescope can't start doing science until its instruments reach the correct operating temperature. NASA now reports that Webb's coldest instrument has rea
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There's a Terrible Reason That Doing Your Taxes Costs So Much
Tax Season It's everyone least favorite and most expensive time of year — tax season — but these days it stings a little more than usual, because we now know that tax prep could be free. The government just doesn't want to do it. Democratic Senator Elizabeth Warren is on her annual crusade against tax prep companies like Intuit and H&R Block, which according to a new video by the politician spend
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Today Your Phone Became a Police Radio
You couldn't miss the sound—a piercing, atonal whine—even if your phone had been set to vibrate. Usually this repetitive blare manifests as an Amber Alert, but this morning it accompanied a push notification about an alleged criminal on the loose in New York City. Curiously, the message that flashed across scores of smartphone screens didn't use the phrase person of interest or suspect . Instead,
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Celebrity NASA Astronaut Sells NFTs to Raise Money for Ukraine
NFTs in Space Space, geopolitics , and the cryptosphere keep colliding. As Space.com reports , famed NASA astronaut Scott Kelly's first-ever non-fungible token (NFT) drop, which features artwork commemorating his record-setting 340 consecutive day run aboard the International Space Station, will be sold to raise money for Ukrainian relief charities. Kelly's NFT collection, titled " Dreams Out of
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Bioengineers visualize timing and location of fat storage in fruit flies
For the first time, researchers have visually monitored, in high resolution, the timing and location of fat storage within the intact cells of fruit flies. The new optical imaging tool from the lab of bioengineering professor Lingyan Shi at the University of California San Diego is already being used to untangle often discussed, yet mysterious, links between diet and things like obesity, diabetes
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How mobile money supercharged Kenya's sports betting addiction
Hitchhiking in the cab of a sand truck late one Saturday night in 2018, Bill Kirwa had almost forgotten about the bet. The wager he'd placed that afternoon had been a long shot: to win, he'd need to correctly pick which team was ahead, at both halftime and full time, in four soccer matches on three continents. On the road and broke, Kirwa had been so preoccupied with finding a ride home he didn't
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Genomic time machine: From sponge microbiome, insights into evolutionary past
Sponges in coral reefs, less flashy than their coral neighbors but important to the overall health of reefs, are among the earliest animals on the planet. New research from UNH peers into coral reef ecosystems with a novel approach to understanding the complex evolution of sponges and the microbes that live in symbiosis with them. With this "genomic time machine," researchers can predict aspects o
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A dusty, compact object bridging galaxies and quasars at cosmic dawn
An international effort led by astrophysicists at the Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, and the Technical University of Denmark has identified a distant object with properties that lie between those of a galaxy and those of a so-called quasar. The object can be seen as the ancestor of a supermassive black hole, and it was born relatively soon after the Big Bang. Simulations had indic
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Astronomers inspect outburst of X-ray binary Swift J1858.6−0814
Using the MeerKAT radio telescope and the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager–Large Array (AMI-LA), astronomers have conducted a radio monitoring campaign of the outburst of a recently discovered X-ray binary known as Swift J1858.6−0814. Results of these observations, presented April 4 on arXiv.org, shed more light into the nature of this source.
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Deforestation drives climate change that harms remaining forest
In a paper published today in Nature Communications, a team led by scientists from the University of California, Irvine, using climate models and satellite data, reveal for the first time how protecting tropical forests can yield climate benefits that enhance carbon storage in nearby areas.
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A $620 million hack? Just another day in crypto
The FBI said on Thursday that the Lazarus Group, a prolific hacking team run by the North Korean government, is responsible for the March 2022 hack of a cryptocurrency platform called Ronin Network. The hackers stole $620 million in the cryptocurrency Ethereum. That's an eye-catching number in almost any context. But in the Wild West environment of crypto, the Ronin hack is just one of eight mega
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A climate-focused venture firm plans to invest $350 million into carbon removal startups
The venture capital firm Lowercarbon Capital has raised a $350 million fund dedicated to carbon removal startups, in another sign of the surging interest in a space that barely existed a few years ago. The goal of the new fund, which MIT Technology Review is reporting exclusively, is to accelerate the development and scale-up of these companies, says Ryan Orbuch, a partner who recently joined the
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Searching for dark matter with a haloscope
A new paper in The European Physical Journal Plus introduces a novel method of searching for a type of dark matter known as axions; a modified version of this technique may have useful "real life" applications.
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Tear-free brushing? All you need is math
As anyone who has ever had to brush long hair knows, knots are a nightmare. But with enough experience, most learn the tricks of detangling with the least amount of pain—start at the bottom, work your way up to the scalp with short, gentle brushes, and apply detangler when necessary.
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Number of cactus species at risk projected to increase sharply due to global warming
A team of researchers affiliated with multiple entities in the U.S. and the U.K. has found that the number of cactus species at risk of extinction is likely to increase this century as a result of climate change. In their paper published in the journal Nature Plants, the group compares the current ecosystems of 408 cactus species with expected changes to those ecosystems under climate change to pr
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Naming Objects Is the Opposite of Thoughtless Consumption
For years, Kyra Sims, a New York City–based musician, never went on tour without her buddy Otto. She describes Otto as loud, funny, and reliable. Once, when a train strike left them stranded in Eastern Germany, they were forced to hitchhike at night—but Otto helped Sims keep her cool. "She was in the backseat with me, and I had one hand on her the whole time in case I needed to roll out of the ca
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Archaeological site along the Nile reveals the Nubian civilization that flourished in ancient Sudan
Circular mounds of rocks dot the desert landscape at the archaeological site of Tombos in northern Sudan. They reveal tumuli—the underground burial tombs used at least as far back as 2500 B.C. by ancient inhabitants who called this region Kush or Nubia. As a bioarchaeologist who excavates and analyzes human skeletal remains along with their related grave goods, I've been working at Tombos for more
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New inexpensive and nontoxic method for creating benzene rings
Chemical syntheses in liquids and gases take place in three-dimensional space. Random collisions between molecules have to result in something new in an extremely short time. But there is another way: on a gold surface under ultrahigh vacuum conditions, molecules lying still next to each other can be made to combine—even those that would never want to react with each other in a liquid. Researchers
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Study suggests Larsen A and B ice shelves collapsed due to atmospheric rivers
A team of researchers affiliated with multiple institutions across Europe has found evidence that suggests the collapse of the Larsen A and B ice shelves was due to the arrival of atmospheric rivers. In their paper published in the journal Communications Earth and Environment, the group describes how they tracked the movement of atmospheric rivers during the time period when the ice shelves collap
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Why we shout during video calls if the image gets blurry
If you find yourself shouting and gesticulating wildly if others can't hear you during a Zoom call, you're not alone. The more the video quality of an online meeting degrades, the louder we start talking, a new study by researchers at Radboud University and the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics finds. People also tend to change up their gestures to compensate. Their findings were publishe
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Phase transitions in the early universe and their signals
Phase transitions, such as the boiling of water or the melting of a metal, are commonplace but fascinating phenomena that spur surprises decades after decades. They often occur as the temperature of a substance is changed, through the nucleation of bubbles of the new phase, which then expands. In the end, the new phase has taken over the whole container.
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Earliest evidence of a Maya sacred calendar found in Guatemala
Researchers David Stuart from the University of Texas at Austin, Heather Hurst and Boris Beltrán from Skidmore College and independent scholar William Saturno report the earliest evidence of a Maya sacred calendar in Guatemala. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes their work, which involved sifting through painted mural fragments at the Las Pinturas pyramid
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A drug that treats alcoholism may be the next anti-anxiety medication
Disulfiram is a drug used to treat chronic alcoholism. However, studies suggest that it also inhibits chemokine receptor signaling pathways that are associated with the regulation of anxiety in rodents. Now, researchers show that disulfiram can effectively reduce anxiety without causing any of the adverse effects that are linked to other anxiolytic drugs. Thus, disulfiram could potentially become
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The Rise of Sad-Voice Sci-Fi
You've probably heard it: From Her to After Yang to Dual, indie movies are relying on flat, emotionless dialog to set a dystopian tone.
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Researchers discover yeast self-destruct pathway
The cells of some yeast species undergo what appears to be a self-destruct process following certain kinds of stress, according to a new study from researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.
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Discovery of new sensory organ for perceiving vibrational signals in leafhoppers, spittlebugs and planthoppers
Scientist from the Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Discovery (CIBD) of the Natural History Museum in Berlin, from the ZUSE-Institute Berlin and from the RWTH Aachen University have discovered a new sensory organ for perceiving vibrational signals in leafhoppers, spittlebugs and planthoppers. The discovery of this new organ offers numerous new research opportunities, as some species of leafhopp
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Silver nitrate can re-sensitize the last-line antimicrobial colistin in combination therapy against superbugs
Drug-resistant superbugs pose a huge threat to human health. Currently, colistin is regarded as the last-line antimicrobial against extensively drug resistant (XDR) bacterial infections caused by pathogens, such as Salmonella, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Shigella and Acinetobacter baumannii. Unfortunately, the efficacy of colistin has been seriously compromised
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Declining nitrogen availability found in our nitrogen-rich world
Following years of attention to surplus nitrogen in the environment, our evolving understanding has led to new concerns about nitrogen insufficiency in areas of the world that do not receive significant inputs of nitrogen from human activities. A multi-institutional team of researchers now describes the causes of declining nitrogen availability and how it affects ecosystem function.
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The nuclear receptor ERR cooperates with the cardiogenic factor GATA4 to orchestrate cardiomyocyte maturation
Nature Communications, Published online: 13 April 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-29733-3 Mature cardiac muscle requires high mitochondrial ATP production and specialized contractile proteins. Here the authors demonstrate that cardiomyocyte-specific contractile maturation involves cooperation between the nuclear receptor ERRγ and cardiogenic transcription factor GATA4, but ERRγ controls metabolic ge
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Development of metastable-phase advanced material synthesis technology
Similar to the widespread interest in graphite and diamond, there is growing interest in metastable phases, which have different physical properties than those of stable phases. However, processes to fabricate metastable-phase materials are highly limited. New findings have been published in the latest issue of Nature about the development of a new metastable-phase synthesis method, which can dras
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Spatial maps of melanoma
Melanoma is a somewhat unusual cancer — one that blooms before our very eyes, often on sun-exposed skin, and can quickly become deadly as it turns our own skin against us and spreads to other organs. Fortunately, when caught early, melanoma can often be cured by simple surgery, and there are now better treatments for advanced cases, including immunotherapies that prime a patient's immune system t
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Stalagmites reveal Australia's pre-colonial bushfire history
Like Plato's Cave, where fires reveal the portrait of an otherwise hidden reality, researchers have for the first time used a stalagmite's chemical signal to reveal the nature of Australia's historic wildfires, identifying differences before and after European settlement.
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Decoding a direct dialog between the gut microbiota and the brain
Gut microbiota by-products circulate in the bloodstream, regulating host physiological processes including immunity, metabolism and brain functions. Scientists have discovered that hypothalamic neurons in an animal model directly detect variations in bacterial activity and adapt appetite and body temperature accordingly. These findings demonstrate that a direct dialog occurs between the gut microb
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In praise of the dollar bill
"We are cashless," proclaims a sign on the gleaming glass door of the cafe I frequent. The sign predates the glossy list of covid-19 measures taped beside it, but together they present a united declaration of touchless efficiency—the promise of experiencing public space, social interaction, and consumer exchange with utmost convenience and cleanliness. Yet for all the friction that the cashless c
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Blood type may offer insights into risk of blood clot in people with cancer
A new study suggests that people with cancer and non-O blood types, such as types A, B, and AB, face an increased risk of developing venous thromboembolism (VTE), or blood clots in the veins, three months after their initial diagnosis. Scientists have long strived to understand the risk factors for VTE, the leading cause of preventable hospital deaths in the United States. Existing assessments use
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Did 'Soylent Green' get 2022 right?
Spoiler alert: In the final scene of the 1973 movie "Soylent Green" actor Charlton Heston, who plays detective Frank Thorn, is being led off on a stretcher following a gun battle when he desperately reveals the secret he wants the world to know: The nutritious wafer Soylent Green is composed of pulverized remains of human corpses.
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Stanford Engineers Have Gotten Solar Panels to Generate Electricity at Night
(Photo: Caspar Rae/Unsplash) Solar panels are an excellent alternative to more traditional energy sources, but they come with a caveat: they can only be used during the day. That is, until now. Sid Assawaworrarit, an electrical engineer and PhD candidate at Stanford University, is leading the effort to make ordinary solar panels functional at night. Assaworrarit has been successful so far. He and
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Book Review: An Urgent Plea for Mental Health Care Reform
In "Healing," former director of the National Institute of Mental Health Thomas Insel argues for a more nuanced approach to fighting serious mental illness. After interviewing patients, their families, and clinicians, Insel finds that we already have the tools for recovery — we only lack the will to use them.
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Exercise during pregnancy reduces the risk of Type-2 Diabetes in offspring
Exercising during pregnancy bestows a wealth of benefits upon a child. New research suggests that exercise may also help reduce the offspring's chances of getting type 2 diabetes. Researchers uncovered how SOD3, a key protein released by the placenta after exercise, improves the metabolic health of offspring and negates the impacts of maternal obesity and poor diets.
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Validating models for next-generation fusion facilities
The flagship fusion facility of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) could serve as the model for an economically attractive next-generation fusion pilot plant, according to recent simulations and analysis. The pilot plant could become the next U.S. step for harvesting on Earth the fusion power that drives the sun and stars as a safe and clean source of
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Extreme enhancement of carbon hydrogasification via mechanochemistry
A research team, affiliated with UNIST has come up with an innovative hydrocarbon manufacturing route, using a commercially available ball-milling device. The new method has commercial potential, as it uses natural wood-derived charcoal to produce methane (CH4), the main hydrocarbon component of natural gas.
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The Atlantic Daily: The Decisive Moment for the War in Ukraine
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox. As Russia reshuffles its strategy in Ukraine, the West is presented with a key opportunity to influence the outcome of the war, our writer argues. Vladimir Putin is not backing down. The Russian p
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Scientists identify novel approach to preventing seizures
Scientists have announced a significant advance in our understanding of epilepsy, as they have identified a potential method of preventing damaging seizure activity. Brain cells are nourished by an intricate network of capillaries that forms the so-called blood-brain barrier (BBB). Fundamentally, it is disruption to the integrity of these capillaries and the BBB that a group of scientists believe
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Does China need to rethink its zero-Covid policy? – podcast
To slow down a surge in Covid cases, last week Chinese authorities put Shanghai into lockdown. But with a population of 26 million there have been difficulties providing residents with basic necessities, and videos have appeared on social media showing protests and scrambles over food supplies. Now, authorities have begun easing the lockdown in some areas, despite reporting a record of more than
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Boris Johnson Travels With Fortuna
I f one week could somehow sum up Boris Johnson's chaotic premiership, this was it. Last Saturday, Johnson was feted after becoming the first G7 leader to travel to Kyiv since the Russian invasion . He was hailed by Volodymyr Zelensky, cheered by Ukrainians in the streets, and even grudgingly praised by his enemies at home and his critics abroad. Yet within 72 hours, he was once again facing call
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After COVID infection, is five days of isolation enough?
Is five days of isolation for people infected with COVID-19 long enough to make sure the infected person and the larger community stays safe? The short answer appears to be yes—with a few caveats. When the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said in January it was shifting its recommended isolation period for people infected with COVID-19 from 10 days down to five days, followed by five da
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Just 36% of acute stroke patients survive more than 10 years
Almost two thirds of acute stroke patients fail to survive more than a decade and have a high risk of recurrence, according to a new study. For the study, researchers analyzed data from more than 300,000 patients admitted to the hospital following a sudden stroke between 2008 and 2017 in Australia and New Zealand. The team also investigated how many years were lost to stroke by comparing a patien
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Human fetuses evolved to slow shoulder growth for easier delivery
The growth of human shoulders slows down just before birth and speeds up thereafter; this alleviates the problem of shoulder dystocia. Computed tomography was used to obtain cross-sectional representations of the clavicle in humans, chimpanzees, and Japanese macaques; the researchers then looked at different shoulder-width to birth-risk correlations between humans and the two other primates.
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Deeper Insights into Material Properties with the In situ Lab for ZEISS Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopes
ZEISS introduces an integrated solution for multi-modal in situ experiments | Automated in situ workflows for highly reproducible, precise, and reliable operator-independent data collection | High-throughput data acquisition with high-resolution creating statistically representative results | High-quality data for reliable post-processing, such as strain mapping using digital imaging correlation (
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A new toolkit to engineer safe and efficient therapeutic cells
Researchers undertook a systematic analysis of the molecular building blocks used to engineer therapeutic cells. Their work resulted in a comprehensive rule book for the design of therapeutic cells with improved specificity and safety, and for the eventual customization of cell-based therapies.
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Methane from waste should not be wasted: Exploring landfill ecosystems
Each year, humans across the globe produce billions of tons of solid waste. Roughly 70% of this refuse ends up deposited in landfills, where it slowly decays. Yet, what may seem an inert accumulation of useless debris, is in reality, a complex ecosystem, teeming with microbial activity. Vast communities of microorganisms feed on the waste, converting it into byproducts—primarily carbon dioxide (CO
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Smoking reduces wealth's tendency to increase life expectancy
A new study finds that the percentage of Americans surviving from age 65 to 85 was 19 percentage points higher for someone with at least $300,000 in wealth than for those with no assets. But there was a 37 percentage point difference between those who never smoked and current smokers.
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New, corrected research shows California migration may be returning to normal
The number of people leaving California for other states appears to have slowed during the last quarter of 2021, while the number of people moving into the state appears to be rebounding, according to new estimates released today by the nonpartisan California Policy Lab (CPL) using credit-bureau data through the end of 2021. These trends are especially pronounced in the Bay Area counties that orig
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NASA releases equity action plan to make space more accessible to all
In support of the Biden-Harris Administration's efforts to advance racial equity in the federal government, NASA has released its first-ever Equity Action Plan. The plan establishes key focus areas that will allow the agency to track progress toward improved diversity, equity, inclusion, and accessibility both internally and externally to NASA.
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Injectable stem cell assembly for cartilage regeneration
A study led by Prof. Qiuyu Zhang (Northwestern Polytechnical University), Prof. Ki-Bum Lee (Rutgers University), and Prof. Liang Kong (School of Stomatology, The Fourth Military Medical University) has established an injectable hybrid inorganic (IHI) nanoscaffold-templated stem cell assembly and applied it to the regeneration of critically-sized cartilage defects.
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Wireless camera tool could make intubation safer and easier
A new handheld, 3D-printed device with a miniature wireless camera could make intubation easier and safer. Clinicians can use a switch on the comfortable handle to adjust light from an LED near the camera, which feeds high-resolution video to one or multiple monitors. A team of Rice University bioengineering students designed the laryngoscope, which simplifies intubation for patients undergoing s
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Time Might Not Exist, Physicists Say; Causation Is the Basic Feature of Our Universe
Does time exist? The answer to this question may seem obvious: of course it does! Just look at a calendar or a clock. But developments in physics suggest the non-existence of time is an open possibility, and one that we should take seriously. How can that be, and what would it mean? It'll take a little while to explain, but don't worry: even if time doesn't exist, our lives will go on as usual. A
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Best Headphones for Sleeping in 2022
Wearing a pair of the best headphones for sleeping is one of the easiest ways to get your beauty rest. Like drinking lots of water or moderate exercise, good sleep does wonders for your health. Of course, that's easier said than done. Anxiety can keep us from falling asleep or worse, make us wake up in a cold sweat at 3 a.m. Luckily, using the power of sound can make for some of the best sleep yo
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Video: Ariane 6 cryo-arms test mimics liftoff
Europe's Spaceport in French Guiana is preparing for the arrival of Ariane 6, ESA's new heavy-lift rocket. The latest round of testing aims to validate the system of fuel lines and mechanical supporting arms that will keep Ariane 6 topped up with liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen in the critical moments before liftoff. This work is part of the final preparations of the new Ariane 6 launch complex
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Lost South American wildflower named 'extinctus' rediscovered (but still endangered)
This South American wildflower was presumed extinct — to the point that its official scientific name is Gasteranthus extinctus. But now, scientists are reporting the first confirmed sightings in 40 years. This not only means that this one little flower made it, but that an important concept in conservation biology called Centinelan extinction needs to be re-examined.
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Study finds an unexpected upside to imposter syndrome
Even many successful people harbor what is commonly called impostor syndrome, a sense of being secretly unworthy and not as capable as others think. First posited by psychologists in 1978, it is often assumed to be a debilitating problem.
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Embracing culture change on the path to digital transformation
Like many banks, National Australia Bank (NAB) decided to outsource a large part of its operations in the 1990s. "We pushed all our operations and a large part of our development capability out to third parties with the intent of lowering costs and making our operations far more process driven," says Steve Day, the chief technology officer of enterprise technology at National Australia Bank. Unfo
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Some cities, states say Big Oil should pay for climate damage
In the waning days of 2021, a grass fire broke out in Boulder County, Colorado. Fueled by extreme drought and high winds, the fire swept through the communities of Superior and Louisville. Within hours, it had destroyed more than a thousand structures—making the Marshall fire the most destructive in the state's history.
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The Atlantic Daily: Elon Musk, Bullionaire
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox. The billionaire provocateur Elon Musk wants to buy Twitter. But why? Then: Fights about the dirty dishes aren't always about the dishes. Elon Musk wants to make his position as the nation's Twitte
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Chlorinated water doesn't disrupt kids' gut bacteria
Using chlorine to treat drinking water in Dhaka, Bangladesh didn't disrupt the normal population of bacteria in the digestive tract of children, research finds. The addition of the chlorine also reduced diarrhea and antibiotic use, according to the study in Nature Microbiology . More than 2,000 children die every day around the world simply because they lack clean drinking water, according to the
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Novel role of progestin signaling in fish spermatogenesis
Cytochrome P450, family 17, subfamily A, polypeptide 1 (cyp17a1) is a critical enzyme involved in gonadal steroidogenesis, including androgen and estrogen production. Among sex steroids, androgen signaling disruption is known to cause testicular malformation and defective spermatogenesis in zebrafish. Interestingly, enhanced spermatogenesis has been observed in cyp17a1-deficient zebrafish and comm
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2 strains of tuberculosis attack lungs in totally different ways
Two strains of the bacterium that causes tuberculosis have only minor genetic differences but attack the lungs in completely different ways, researchers report. The findings could help break the cycle of rapid transmission of TB, the second-leading infectious killer in the world after COVID-19 , according to the World Health Organization. The disease mechanisms uncovered in the study could also p
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Direct synthesis of isoparaffin-rich gasoline from syngas
A research team led by Prof. Pan Xiulian and Prof. Bao Xinhe from the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics (DICP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences realized the direct synthesis of isoparaffin-rich gasoline from syngas using ZnAlOx-SAPO-11 oxide-zeolite (OXZEO) catalysts.
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When social irresponsibility goes viral
Branding is everything in marketing and the public perception of a company and its products and services. If consumers engage with a brand, if they love a brand, they are likely to be repeat customers and moreover will often be evangelical in their representation of a brand to other people whether in the online or offline world.
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There are racial disparities in how much sleep people get
When it comes to how many hours people sleep each day, a new study finds increasingly persistent racial and ethnic disparities. Using data collected by the National Health Interview Survey from 2004 to 2018, researchers found that the proportion of people who reported sleeping fewer than 7 hours per day increased significantly over the 15-year period, and it was significantly higher among Black p
18h
5G technology is about much more than just connecting people
Thank you for joining us on "The cloud hub: From cloud chaos to clarity." 5G-powered digitization promises to accelerate connectivity-led transformation in an increasingly hyperconnected world, ushering in a new range of possibilities for both individuals and enterprises. The transformative approach of 5G is pushing for an open standards, disaggregated, and cloud and edge-based approach for build
19h
Why some places on Earth actually lack nitrogen
Excess nitrogen is an issue in some places, but lack of the element is also an issue elsewhere, research shows. Since the mid-20th century, research and discussion has focused on the negative effects of excess nitrogen on terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. However, new evidence indicates that the world is now experiencing a dual trajectory in nitrogen availability, with many areas experiencing a
20h
Goodnight, Moon
Nature, Published online: 15 April 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01017-2 A change of scene.
22h
Schneider Shorts 15.04.2022 – Jessus Has Risen!
Schneider Shorts 15.04.2022 – a resurrected career of a French biologist, a Spanish martyr saint takes revenge on two more apostate sinners, a limitless indulgence for sins past, present and future for a cancer cheater in Texas, Elsevier's half-hearted exorcism of a Greek antivaxxer, papers to get rid of, and a self-righteous Italian diva in Zürich waving another sockpuppet.
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Energy-burning brown fat less active in boys with obesity
Researchers performed MRI scans to measure BAT activity in 26 boys between the ages of eight and 10. They studied the BAT tissue in the neck before and after one hour of exposure to a cold suit set at a temperature of 18 degrees Celsius. The patient sample included 13 boys with a normal BMI and the same number again with obesity, in the first study of its kind in children.
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Hybrid quantum bit based on topological insulators
With their superior properties, topological qubits could help achieve a breakthrough in the development of a quantum computer designed for universal applications. So far, no one has yet succeeded in unambiguously demonstrating a quantum bit, or qubit for short, of this kind in a lab. Scientists have now succeeded in integrating a topological insulator into a conventional superconducting qubit.
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Divide and conquer: Mars rovers could be superseded by swarms of two-wheeled robots
Skoltech scientists have proposed a concept for a modular Mars exploration rover. Leveraging the power of cooperative robotics, the new system first described in an Acta Astronautica paper consists of four two-wheeled robots that can operate independently or combine in various constellations. According to the study, that approach will enable longer exploration missions that gather more information
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Urban street networks that encourage encounters among strangers could build familiarity
Do better spatial networks make for better neighbors? There is evidence that they do, according to Paige Bollen, a sixth-year political science graduate student at MIT. The networks Bollen works with are not virtual but physical, part of the built environment in which we are all embedded. Her research on urban spaces suggests that the routes bringing people together or keeping them apart factor si
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Elon Musk Doesn't Seem to Have Much of a Plan for Twitter
Tesla CEO Elon Musk took to the stage at this year's TED conference in Vancouver, Canada, to address the gigantic elephant in the room: his bid to buy the entirety of Twitter . It's been a chaotic couple of days, with Musk announcing he would join Twitter's board after becoming the company's largest shareholder — but then pulling out a single day later after suggesting sweeping changes he'd make
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Open sharing of biotechnology research: Transparency versus security
As biotechnology advances, the risk of accidental or deliberate misuse of biological research like viral engineering is increasing. At the same time, 'open science' practices like the public sharing of research data and protocols are becoming widespread. An article examines how open science practices and the risks of misuse interface and proposes solutions to the problems identified.
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Looking back on climate extremes in 2021
In China, the year 2021 was marked by a series of highly unusual weather events, including record cold conditions in January, freak dust storms in spring and severe flooding in Zhengzhou in July.
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Key signaling pathway in immune cells could be new Alzheimer's target
Inhibiting an important signaling pathway in brain-resident immune cells may calm brain inflammation and thereby slow the disease process in Alzheimer's and some other neurodegenerative diseases, suggests a new study. The findings point to the possibility of new therapeutic strategies against neurodegenerative diseases, which are relatively common in older adults and so far have no effective, dise
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How to balance biodiversity goals with limited economic resources
In 2019, a landmark report gave the world its first report card on biodiversity loss. There was one crystal clear conclusion: human actions threaten more species with global extinction than ever before. Now, a research team has reviewed combining conservation with practical economic tools using a case study of Colombia, South America, a high priority but underfunded country for biodiversity conser
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Nova outbursts are apparently a source for cosmic rays
The MAGIC telescopes have observed the nova RS Ophiuchi shining brightly in gamma rays at extremely high energy. The Gamma rays emanate from protons that are accelerated to very high energies in the shock front following the explosion. This suggests that novae are also a source of the ubiquitous cosmic radiation in the universe which consists mainly of protons rich in energy, which race through sp
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Key characteristics of immune cells in ovarian cancer
Researchers want to improve their understanding of the immune environment in ovarian cancer in hopes of making immunotherapy an option for these patients. Researchers now report on key characteristics of immune cells in ovarian cancer and identify cell types important for mediating an immune response.
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Giant stars undergo dramatic weight loss program
Astronomers have found a slimmer type of red giant star for the first time. These stars have undergone dramatic weight loss, possibly due to a greedy companion. The discovery is an important step forward to understanding the life of stars in the Milky Way — our closest stellar neighbors.
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Best Routers for Comcast 2022
Routers for Comcast are compatible with the Xfinity protocols and offer the coverage and speeds you need to run and enhance the performance of your devices. There's no one router that's perfect for everyone. Your internet package, number of devices connected to the router, and home build and layout all affect performance and, ultimately, the router that will work best for you. There are many thir
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Bio-Rad Introduces Anti-Cemiplimab Antibodies
Bio-Rad Laboratories, Inc. (NYSE: BIO and BIOb), a global leader of life science research and clinical diagnostic products, today introduced a range of antibodies that are specific to cemiplimab (Libtayo) and inhibit the binding of the drug to its target, human programmed death receptor-1 (PD-1).
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Cloud-based digital platforms will power the future of work in manufacturing
Thank you for joining us on "The cloud hub: From cloud chaos to clarity." Thank you for joining us on "The cloud hub: From cloud chaos to clarity." As manufacturers increase investments in digital technologies to meet the demands of the changing environment, there is a realization that technology must be coupled with an empowered workforce to ensure the successful execution of an organization's s
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Syngenta's cloud-first strategy for digital farming, Agile and DevOps, and employee wellbeing
Thank you for joining us on "The cloud hub: From cloud chaos to clarity." Watch Christian Bayer, global head of ERP, data and analytics platforms, Syngenta, in conversation with Dinesh Rao, EVP and global head of enterprise package application services, Infosys, in a series that discusses a cloud-first strategy for digital farming, Agile and DevOps, and employee wellbeing. Click here to continue.
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Deaths from alcohol jumped by a huge amount in 2020
Alcohol-related deaths rose in 2020, shooting up 25% over alcohol-related deaths in 2019. "There are multiple reasons why people were drinking more and why we're now seeing additional morbidity and mortality related to alcohol," says Margie Skeer , an associate professor of public health and community medicine at Tufts University School of Medicine. In a recent study , researchers from the Nation
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Researchers Create Microbial Treatment to Protect the Gut from Antibiotics
(Photo: Pawel Czerwinski/Unsplash) If you've ever undergone a surgical procedure (or even experienced something as "mild" as strep throat), you've probably been prescribed antibiotics. These handy little medications are vital to protecting the body from complete bacterial overrun, but like most things, they come with a slew of possible side effects: nausea, diarrhea, and fungal infections to name
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Factors including extreme winds, topography and vegetation influenced the severity of burns from Oregon's devastating 2020 megafires
In a new study examining burn patterns from the 2020 Labor Day fires, researchers studied the influence of weather, topography, vegetation and other factors on burn severity in areas where the fires killed more than 75% of the trees. Their research confirms that extreme winds over the Labor Day holiday were the primary driver of the destructive force of the fires yet demonstrates how forest vegeta
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How important is data privacy in mergers and acquisitions?
Thank you for joining us on "The cloud hub: From cloud chaos to clarity." Data privacy and security must be built into the data, technology, and governance mechanisms underpinning a mergers and acquisitions deal, rather than being an afterthought. This can promote increased customer confidence, improved regulatory approval rates, and a healthy balance sheet. Click here to continue.
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Open sharing of biotechnology research—transparency versus security
As biotechnology advances, the risk of accidental or deliberate misuse of biological research like viral engineering is increasing. At the same time, "open science" practices like the public sharing of research data and protocols are becoming widespread. An article publishing April 14th in the open access journal PLOS Biology by James Smith and Jonas Sandbrink at the University of Oxford, UK, exam
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Circulating tumor cells shed light on lung cancer's return
Researchers have identified a process to study the actions and vulnerabilities of circulating tumor cells responsible for cancer recurrence in patients with non-small cell lung cancer. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a devastating disease and the leading cause of American cancer deaths . Even patients suitable for tumor removal have a 50% mortality rate. The researchers took tumor fragments
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Laser trailblazer: US Navy conducts test of new laser weapon system
The ground-based laser system homed in on the red drone flying by, shooting a high-energy beam invisible to the naked eye. Suddenly, a fiery orange glow flared on the drone, smoke poured from its engine and a parachute opened as the craft tumbled downward, disabled by the laser beam.
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Your mental health may impact your chances of breakthrough COVID
A new study has shown that people who are vaccinated against SARS-CoV-2, and have a history of certain psychiatric conditions, have a heightened risk of COVID-19 — a finding that may be related to impaired immune response as well as risky behaviors associated with some disorders.
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About 1 in 4 adults has an often-missed liver disorder linked to higher heart disease risk
It is estimated that about one in four adults worldwide has an abnormal build-up of fat in the liver, called non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). NAFLD can lead to permanent liver damage, and heart disease is the leading cause of death in people with fatty liver disease. Because NAFLD is often missed in routine medical screening, the new scientific statement raises awareness and understandin
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For climate change mitigation, bipartisan politics can work
In an increasingly polarized nation, cooperation across party lines is key to sustained climate mitigation in the United States, according to a new CIRES study. To sustain climate progress over decades, bipartisan cooperation on solutions like renewable energy or emissions reduction will be necessary, the authors say.
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Daily briefing: Cave-dwelling fish have regional accents
Nature, Published online: 14 April 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01084-5 Groups of blind Mexican fish that communicate using clicks appear to be developing cave-specific accents. Plus, the impact of COP26 pledges, and how machine learning is helping mathematicians.
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Research finds pandemic adversely impacts already stressed national forests
Many human experiences were uniquely altered during the COVID-19 pandemic including a significant rise in the number of people seeking outdoor recreation options during quarantine. In a series of studies looking at this trend, researchers at the University of New Hampshire found a dramatic increase during the pandemic of visitors to the parks and protected areas of New England that resulted in sig
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A new solution for wastewater remediation
Synthetic dyes are used across a wide variety of industries and constitute a serious concern when it comes to water pollution. These dyes are not only toxic, but they also persist in the environment for a long time without degradation. Most approaches to removing synthetic dyes from water are based on adsorption—a phenomenon where a chemical molecule becomes bonded to the surface of a substrate ca
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Achieving higher performance with potassium ion battery
Supercapacitors are emerging as alternatives to lithium-ion batteries, offering higher power densities and longer lifetimes (number of cycles where capacity is maintained). A supercapacitor is like a cross between a battery (with high energy storage) and a regular capacitor (with high power discharge).
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Erosion by the Upper Ebro is decelerating and could eventually stop
How are fluvial valleys formed? Why do rivers cut valleys? Which mechanisms control the rate of fluvial incision? These are universal questions in Geomorphology about river erosion, and researchers from the Centro Nacional de Investigación sobre la Evolución Humana (CENIEH) have addressed them through a comprehensive study centering on the upper course of the Ebro River where it runs through the z
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AMD Ryzen 7 5800X3D Review: AMD Retakes the Gaming Throne
Today, AMD is launching its Ryzen 7 5800X3D eight-core CPU at $449. The new chip is both a straightforward improvement over the 5800X and a bigger deal than it might seem. The "3D" in the model name refers to the additional 64MB of vertically-mounted L3 cache (V-Cache) that AMD has attached on top of the CPU die. The new chip features 96MB of L3 cache in total and a slightly lower clock speed com
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Best Samsung Soundbars of 2022
Samsung's TVs and smartphones get the lion's share of attention when it comes to the company's portfolio of consumer technology, so it's easy to forget about the best Samsung soundbars. This large, diverse series has the same premium look, feel, and features as the company's other gear, and make a perfect complement to any TV used as part of a home theater system. Soundbars have become an essenti
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How mechanical stimuli trigger cellular signalling
Breathing, seeing, hearing — the family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is involved in a variety of physiological processes and is also the cause of diverse diseases. Some members of the GPCR family respond to mechanical stimuli. Researchers have now achieved a milestone on the way to understanding the mechanism by which this receptor class is activated. They were able to describe the stru
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HIV: The antibodies of 'post-treatment controllers'
A very small percentage of people with HIV-1, known as 'post-treatment controllers' (PTCs), are able to control their infection after interrupting all antiretroviral therapy. Understanding the fundamental mechanisms that govern their immune response is essential in order to develop HIV-1 vaccines, novel therapeutic strategies to achieve remission, or both. A recent study investigated the humoral i
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Colon cancer: How mutation of the APC gene disrupts lymphocyte migration
In patients with familial adenomatous polyposis, a genetic disease predisposing to colon cancer, mutations of the APC gene induce the formation of intestinal polyps, but also reduce immune system activity. In a new study, researchers describe the mechanisms that modify the structure of T lymphocytes and hinder their migration towards the tumors to be destroyed. This discovery provides new perspect
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Motivating public engagement for at risk groups: The case of refugees
COVID-19 can be more perilous for some people than others. The higher risk is caused not only by more possibilities to contract the virus, but also by negative public opinion toward those blamed unfairly for spreading sickness. This is the case for refugees, which spurred "Refugees to the Rescue? Motivating Pro-Refugee Public Engagement During the COVID-19 Pandemic," an article written among other
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Chemical synthesis: Golden wedding for molecules
Chemical syntheses in liquids and gases take place in three-dimensional space. Random collisions between molecules have to result in something new in an extremely short time. But there is another way: on a gold surface under ultrahigh vacuum conditions, molecules lying still next to each other can be made to combine – even those that would never 'want' to react with each other in a liquid. Researc
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'Forever chemicals' linked to higher diabetes risk for women
High concentrations of PFAS, a group of so-called "forever chemicals," are associated with increased risk to diabetes in women in midlife, according to new research The risk is similar to the risks cigarette smoking and being overweight pose, the study shows. PFAS are ubiquitous in our environment—in our rivers, in our clothes, and seeping through the cooking utensils in our kitchens. The finding
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Role of manganese in soil carbon and climate change
While most people think first of atmospheric carbon emissions from fossil fuels when considering climate change, the planet's soil actually stores more carbon and could become a major source of carbon release or a mitigation tactic in the years ahead. Just how soils store carbon, when and how much they release to the atmosphere, and how to get them to absorb more is the subject of intense research
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How mechanical stimuli trigger cellular signaling
Breathing, seeing, hearing—the family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is involved in a variety of physiological processes and is also the cause of diverse diseases. As has now been discovered by a team of scientists led by Professor Ines Liebscher from Leipzig University, some members of the GPCR family respond to mechanical stimuli. In collaboration with Chinese research groups, they have
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Ranking nanodevice functionality methods
As the demand for nanodevices grows so too does the need to improve the functionality of such devices, which is vulnerable to changes in the charge distribution, energy levels or conformation. Hence the desire to assess the three current charge control methods: gating by electro-chemicals, doping by pendant groups and doping by annealed motifs.
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Smallest earthquakes ever detected in micron-scale metals
On the micrometer scale deformation properties of metals change profoundly: The smooth and continuous behavior of bulk materials often becomes jerky due to random strain bursts of various sizes. The reason for this phenomenon is the complex intermittent redistribution of lattice dislocations (which are line-like crystal defects responsible for the irreversible deformation of crystalline materials)
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How did public transportation affect COVID's spread?
Cities with high-usage public transportation systems displayed higher per capita COVID incidence at the beginning of the pandemic, a new study shows. The findings held true when researchers accounted for other factors, such as education, poverty levels, and household crowding. The association continued to be statistically significant even when the model was run without data from transit-friendly
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"Fearless" climbers: how the amygdala mediates fear
Rock climbing, both in a specialized gym and outdoors on natural rock formations, is a very popular hobby here in Southern California. Some people find it exhilarating and enjoyable, while others are simply terrified. Like with any athletic venture, climbers assess risk before embarking on new routes, and may quell their fears with the knowledge […]
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Homeschooling surge continues despite schools reopening
The coronavirus pandemic ushered in what may be the most rapid rise in homeschooling the U.S. has ever seen. Two years later, even after schools reopened and vaccines became widely available, many parents have chosen to continue directing their children's educations themselves.
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Tandem catalysis improves selective oxidation of methane to oxygenates
Selective oxidation of methane (CH4) to value-added chemicals with both high catalytic activity and selectivity under mild conditions remains challenging. Due to the low activity of oxygen and the overoxidation of the oxygenates, selective oxidation of CH4 to oxygenates with O2 or O2/H2 suffers from low catalytic activity and low oxygenates selectivity. Moreover, the high loading of noble metals f
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Study of luxury brand digital retailing during COVID-19
Luxury brands represent an important part of the global economy, albeit one that is generally accessible only to a small proportion of the world population. Research into the world of digital retailing in this realm has always been sparse in the marketing and business literature. As such, it is difficult to visualize the norms that have changed in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic and its so-calle
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Survivalist Redeems His Brother | Naked and Afraid
Stream Naked and Afraid on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/naked-and-afraid #NakedAndAfraid #Discovery #Survival Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discover
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Satellites improve national reporting of greenhouse gases
With the climate crisis continuing to tighten its grip, nations around the world are making efforts to reduce emissions of climate warming gases. To track action, countries report their greenhouse gas emissions to the UNFCCC—the body responsible for driving global action to combat climate change. While accurate and consistent reporting is crucial, very few countries exploit Earth observation satel
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Many folks over 50 haven't prepped to age in place
The vast majority of people over 50 say it's important that they keep living in their current homes for as long as possible, but a new poll shows many of them haven't planned or prepared for "aging in place." In addition, a sizable percentage might have a hard time paying for in-home help. The pandemic's toll on older adults, especially those in nursing homes and other long-term care facilities,
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Measuring costs and benefits of citizen science
It's never been easy to accurately measure the impact of any scientific research, but it's even harder for citizen science projects, which don't follow traditional methods. Public involvement places citizen science in a new era of data collection, one that requires a new measurement plan.
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Zebrafish 'social gene' may reveal autism clues
A mutation in a gene called EGR1 snuffs out common social behavior in zebrafish and disrupts dopamine signaling from certain neurons in the brain, which can affect mood and social behavior. Zebrafish are social creatures. When they see another member of their species, they'll orient towards them and swim closer, much like a human at a cocktail party turning to face someone who's telling a joke ov
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The Download April 14 2022: Kenya's mobile gambling problem and earthquake algorithms
This is today's edition of The Download , our weekday newsletter that provides a daily dose of what's going on in the world of technology. How mobile money supercharged Kenya's sports betting addiction Mobile money has mostly been hugely beneficial for Kenyans. But it has also turbo-charged the country's sports betting sector. Since the middle of the last decade, experts and public figures across
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NASA to Test Giant Centrifuge for Space Launches
Given the number of exploding rocket videos on the internet, it should come as no surprise that getting to space is hard. It takes a lot of energy to break free of Earth's gravity, and that currently means strapping our precious cargo to what is essentially a tube full of explosives. A company called SpinLaunch made waves a few months ago with a successful test of its centrifuge-based kinetic lau
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To reckon with theft of Indigenous land, change place names
Addressing place names in national parks could be a starting point for reckoning with the country's history of dispossessing Indigenous nations from their lands. The new paper in the journal People and Nature reveals that derogatory names are only the tip of the iceberg—violence in place names can take many forms. The study quantifies the scale of the problem in US national parks and puts the mov
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Immunceller rustas för att bättre bekämpa cancer
Immunterapi håller på att bli en framgångsrik metod för att behandla cancer. Forskare har nu utvecklat förstärkta CAR-T-celler som hjälper immunförsvaret att attackera cancerceller. Förhoppningen är att den nya tekniken ska förbättra behandlingen av solida tumörer. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
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Stjärna upptäckt från universums urtid
Forskare har kunnat urskilja en stjärna som befinner sig 28 miljarder ljusår bort från oss. Det är ett nytt avståndsrekord vad gäller observationer av enskilda stjärnor från tidiga universum. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
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Membrane marker selection for segmenting single cell spatial proteomics data
Nature Communications, Published online: 14 April 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-29667-w Cell segmentation of single-cell spatial proteomics data remains a challenge and often relies on the selection of a membrane marker, which is not always known. Here, the authors introduce RAMCES, a method that selects the optimal membrane markers to use for more accurate cell segmentation.
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Dissecting extracellular and intracellular distribution of nanoparticles and their contribution to therapeutic response by monochromatic ratiometric imaging
Nature Communications, Published online: 14 April 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-29679-6 Detailed quantification of nanoparticle distribution in tumor tissues can provide the prediction of drug delivery efficacy and therapeutic outcome. Here the authors develop a pH/light dual responsive monochromatic ratiometric-imaging nanoparticle which can quantify extracellular and intracellular nanoparticle d
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Deep learning enhanced Rydberg multifrequency microwave recognition
Nature Communications, Published online: 14 April 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-29686-7 Rydberg atoms are sensitive to microwave signals and hence can be used to detect them. Here the authors demonstrate a Rydberg receiver enhanced by deep learning, Rydberg atoms acting as antennae, to receive, extract, and decode the multi-frequency microwave signal effectively.
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A pair of non-Mendelian genes at the Ga2 locus confer unilateral cross-incompatibility in maize
Nature Communications, Published online: 14 April 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-29729-z Unilaterial cross-incompatibility (UCI) systems are regulated by a male-female gene pair that are genetically linked, but no pair of the male and female determinants has been isolated so far. Here, the authors report the cloning of a pair of pectin methylesterases encoding genes at the Ga2 locus confer UCI in m
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Chromosome evolution and the genetic basis of agronomically important traits in greater yam
Nature Communications, Published online: 14 April 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-29114-w While greater yam provides food and income security for millions of people around the world, there are limited genomic resources available. Here, the authors report a chromosome-scale assembly of the greater yam genome as well as quantitative trait loci associated with anthracnose resistance and tuber traits.
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Mental replays enable flexible navigation
Nature, Published online: 14 April 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01035-0 While rats pause to eat or rest during navigation tasks, neuronal sequences in the brain are replaying routes around moving obstacles, allowing the animals to reach their goals even in changing environments.
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Scientists develop indoor-active photocatalyst for antiviral coating against various COVID variants
A photocatalyst made using a combination of titanium dioxide (TiO2) and copper oxide (CuxO) nanoclusters inactivates various variant types of novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2. In a recent breakthrough, scientists in Nara Medical University, Kanagawa Institute of Industrial Science and Technology, and Tokyo Institute of Technology have developed this antiviral photocatalyst, which has been proven to be
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Expanding drought leaves western US scrambling for water
Tumbleweeds drift along the Rio Grande as sand bars within its banks grow wider. Smoke from distant wildfires and dust kicked up by intense spring winds fill the valley, exacerbating the feeling of distress that is beginning to weigh on residents.
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Fler fall av covid-19 efter exponering för PFAS?
Under pandemins första år var det 19 procent fler bekräftade fall av covid-19 i Ronneby än i grannkommunen Karlshamn. Detta slog forskare vid Lunds universitet fast efter en epidemiologisk studie som slutfördes under hösten 2021. Samtidigt poängterar de att det inte går att påvisa att det är miljökatastrofen i Kallinge som är orsaken bakom. Nu inleds fler studier för att ta reda på mer.
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Inte mer antibiotika vid digitala besök
E-besök är en vanlig form av digitala läkarbesök, där patienten fyller i ett frågeformulär på nätet och därefter kommunicerar med en läkare via chatt. Det har hittills saknats forskning för hur e-besöken påverkar läkarens vårdbeslut, men en ny avhandling har nu utvärderat den digitala vårdkedjan i svensk sjukvård.
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Skeptical Science New Research for Week #15 2022
Let's do it again, only not the bad part "Hard won experience" is another way of describing our collision of early enthusiasm and thoughtless habituation around fossil hydrocarbon fuels and— after a little over 200 years— finally thinking it all through. We can also be excused for our early ignorance about the ultimate effects of "only a trace gas," although that ticket has expired. Now that we'r
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The latest IPCC report has a lot to say about carbon fee and dividend
This is a re-post from the Citizens' Climate Lobby Blog In the third installment of its Sixth Assessment Report (the first two volumes covered climate change causes and impacts ), the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has summarized the latest scientific research relating to climate change mitigation. While the second volume released just over a month ago touched a bit on carbon fe
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New IPCC report: Only political will stands in way of meeting the Paris targets
This is a re-post from Yale Climate Connections In the just-released third installment of its Sixth Assessment Report (the first two volumes covered climate change causes and impacts ), the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) summarizes the latest scientific research on efforts to mitigate climate change. Written by 278 authors from 65 countries, the new report can be summarized in o
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Does China need to rethink its zero-Covid policy?
To slow down a surge in Covid cases, last week Chinese authorities put Shanghai into lockdown. But with a population of 26 million there have been difficulties providing residents with basic necessities, and videos have appeared on social media showing protests and scrambles over food supplies. Now, authorities have begun easing the lockdown in some areas, despite reporting a record of more than 2
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Genomic time machine in sea sponges
Sponges in coral reefs, less flashy than their coral neighbors but important to the overall health of reefs, are among the earliest animals on the planet. New research examines coral reef ecosystems with a novel approach to understanding the complex evolution of sponges and the microbes that live in symbiosis with them. With this 'genomic time machine,' researchers can predict aspects of reef and
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Act of sabotage determines mammalian embryonic development
Alternative splicing is a fundamental biological process that allows cells to make many different types of mRNAs and proteins from a limited number of genes. For many animals, including humans, it is a feature that is essential for the development of complex cells such as muscles or neurons. A new study finds evidence that the regulation of alternative splicing, which rarely goes wrong in healthy
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Physics models better define what makes pasta al dente
Researchers examined how pasta swells, softens, and becomes sticky as it takes up water. They combined measurements of pasta parameters, such as expansion, bending rigidity, and water content to solve a variety of equations to form a theoretical model for the swelling dynamics of starch materials. The team observed how the noodles come together when lifted from a plate by a fork. This provided the
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Edible, fluorescent silk tags can suss out fake medications
Recent developments such as the explosion of online pharmacies and supply chain issues have made it easier for counterfeiters to profit from fake or adulterated medications. Now, researchers have created edible tags with fluorescent silk proteins, which could be placed directly on pills or in a liquid medicine. The codes within the tags can be read by a smartphone app to verify the source and qual
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COVID-19 therapy: Better in combination than alone
There is a steadily growing arsenal of drugs for COVID-19. Researchers have studied the mechanisms of action of antiviral and anti-inflammatory drugs. Their findings show that treatment effects were best with combination therapy involving both types of drugs. This treatment regimen also had the additional benefit of increasing the time window available for antibody therapy.
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Total economic burden of MS in United States is more than $85 billion
The estimated cost of multiple sclerosis (MS) reached $85.4 billion in 2019 in the United States, according to a new report. In addition, when researchers compared people with MS to people without MS they found that excess medical costs represent 74% of the overall economic burden of MS. The excess medical cost per person was $65,612 that year.
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Rotating blue laser light reveals unimagined dynamics in living cells
When cities transform into a colorful world of lights as darkness falls, it's often only possible to estimate their contours, which depending on the perspective can draw the attention to key details or trivia. In fluorescence microscopy, biological cells are marked with fluorescent dyes and excited to luminesce in specific areas by optical switches- like a city at night. However, this light is usu
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