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Nyheder2022april22

 

Nylon cooking bags, plastic-lined cups can release nanoparticles into liquids
Nylon cooking bags and plastic-lined cardboard cups are conveniences many people rely on, but a new study suggests that they are an underappreciated source of nanoparticles. They report that the plastic in these products release trillions of nanometer-sized particles into each liter of water that they come in contact with. That sounds like a lot, but the team notes that these levels are under the
7h
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Podd: Det farliga blodtrycket
Enligt världshälsoorganisationen WHO är högt blodtryck, eller hypertoni som det också kallas, världens dödligaste sjukdom – och detta trots att den är både behandlingsbar och går att förebygga. I Sverige räknar man med att ungefär en tredjedel av den vuxna befolkningen har högt blodtryck och trots att tillståndet går att behandla så är det bara ungefär hälften av dess som får sitt höga blodtryck d
10min
A Macron Victory Isn't Enough
We live in a time of constant upheaval and infuriating inertia. Existential threats to Western democracy abound, but nothing seems to change. With new ideas and technologies transforming the ways we live and work, much of the public seems impatient, urging on change, while the rest demands control and protection. Amid such feverish division, elections morph from battles of ideas to totemic fights
13min
Schneider Shorts 22.04.2022 – Whither David Bimler?
Schneider Shorts 22.04.2022 – genocide lectures in Russian universities, nanotechnology cheater exposed by lab member, JBC gets a new research integrity expert, pre-pandemic coronavirus research records to be destroyed, yoghurt and turmeric for COVID-19, progress in autism and cancer research, and who, pray, is David Bimler?
59min
Hips don't lie, Liam Gallagher – there's no shame in getting them fixed | Gaby Hinsliff
The singer's refusal to have replacement surgery reinforces horribly negative ideas about older bodies Psst, want to feel old? Liam Gallagher, the eternally chippy younger brother of rock, apparently now needs a hip replacement . At 49, the ex-Oasis frontman is suffering from arthritis, which he seems to be approaching with customary but misplaced stubbornness. This week it emerged that he is ref
1h
Photos of the Week: Blue Forest, Yellow Fields, Red Sea
Works of art at the Venice Biennale, recovery efforts after flooding in South Africa, a jousting tournament in England, a goose and its human in Turkey, wartime scenes from Ukraine, auditions for the Rockettes in New York City, carnival festivities in Rio de Janeiro, the running of the Boston Marathon, and much more
1h
$MEND and Ontario Institute for Cancer to research genetic biomarkers in Pancreatic Cancer
$MEND.c just last week announced a partnership with Ontario Institute for Cancer Research via its wholly owned subsidiary NetraMark Corp., the efforts of which will focus on pancreatic cancer. The project aims to identify genetic biomarkers related to pancreatic cancer and give clinicians an understanding on how to best target the disease and chose optimal medicine and treatment for patients. htt
2h
Deepest sediment core collected in the Atlantic Ocean
A team of scientists, engineers, and ship's crew on the research vessel Neil Armstrong operated by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) recently collected a 38-foot-long cylindrical sediment sample from the deepest part of the Puerto Rico Trench, nearly 5 miles below the surface.
7h
Calming overexcited neurons may protect brain after stroke
By scanning the genomes of nearly 6,000 stroke patients, researchers have identified two genes associated with recovery. Both are involved in regulating neuronal excitability, suggesting that targeting overstimulated neurons may help promote recovery in the pivotal first 24 hours.
7h
Kauai's 2018 record-setting rain caused by a series of supercell thunderstorms
A record-setting rainstorm over Kaua'i, Hawai'i in April 2018 resulted in severe flash flooding and estimated damage of nearly $180 million. The deluge damaged or destroyed 532 homes, and landslides left people along Kaua'i's north coast without access to their homes. Atmospheric scientists have now revealed that severe supercell thunderstorms were to blame.
7h
Indiana Jones was right all along: Research shows the smaller the scorpion, the deadlier
Researchers have shown that smaller species of scorpions, with smaller pincers, have more potent venoms compared to larger species with robust claws. The scientists tested the theory from Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull, which warned of the dangers of small scorpions, and that 'when it comes to scorpions, the bigger the better'. While this may have simply been a throwaway movie
7h
Breast cancer: Why metastasis spreads to the bone
When cancer cells break away from a primary tumor and migrate to other organs, this is called 'metastatic cancer.' The organs affected by these metastases, however, depend in part on their tissue of origin. In the case of breast cancer, they usually form in the bones.
7h
Uncovering the secret of ternary polymer solar cell success
A research team has used electron spin resonance spectroscopy to investigate a polymer solar cell while in operation. Molecular level comparison of the PTzBT/PC61BM system with and without added ITIC allowed them to establish the mechanism for the improvements in stability and power conversion efficiency observed when ITIC is added. It is hoped that this insight will contribute to the commercial r
7h
Uncovering the secret of ternary polymer solar cell success
A research team has used electron spin resonance spectroscopy to investigate a polymer solar cell while in operation. Molecular level comparison of the PTzBT/PC61BM system with and without added ITIC allowed them to establish the mechanism for the improvements in stability and power conversion efficiency observed when ITIC is added. It is hoped that this insight will contribute to the commercial r
7h
Dividing walls: How immune cells enter tissue
To get to the places where they are needed, immune cells not only squeeze through tiny pores. They even overcome wall-like barriers of tightly packed cells. Scientists have now discovered that cell division is key to their success. Together with other recent studies, their findings give the full picture of a process just as important for healing as for the spread of cancer.
8h
Environmental DNA reveals secret reef inhabitants
An international research team samples seawater from around the world to reveal which tropical reef fish occur where. To identify species and families, they successfully used the residual DNA shed by the animals present in the water. But not all fish can be traced in this way.
8h
New materials for storing flammable industrial gases
Engineers have just demonstrated a promising new family of materials for storing flammable gases such as acetylene. These materials are nanoporous and flexible and can be modified to improve the adsorption of small molecules at the temperature and pressure conditions required for industrial applications.
8h
First person to have Covid infection for more than a year identified in UK
Researchers at London hospitals call for urgent new treatments for persistent infections Doctors in the UK have called for urgent new treatments to clear persistent Covid infections after identifying the first person in the world known to have harboured the virus for more than a year. The patient, who had a weakened immune system, caught the virus in 2020 and tested positive for Covid for 505 day
8h
This Flying Luxury Yacht Attached to a Zeppelin Looks Downright Amazing
Lil Yachty Ever wanted to soar high over the Earth in a yacht attached to a zeppelin? If you're of the "superyacht" class, you may soon get the chance. Created by Swiss designers Guillaume Hoddé and Matthieu Ozanne, the "AirYacht" combines a 197-foot superyacht, alongside a 656-foot helium blimp to transport the luxury seafaring vessel to any destination of its well-heeled potential clients' cho
8h
NASA's Lucy mission is a 'go' for solar array deployment attempt
On April 18, NASA decided to move forward with plans to complete the deployment of the Lucy spacecraft's stalled, unlatched solar array. The spacecraft is powered by two large arrays of solar cells that were designed to unfold and latch into place after launch. One of the fan-like arrays opened as planned, but the other stopped just short of completing this operation.
9h
Is Webb at its final temperature?
The Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI) on NASA's James Webb Space Telescope is now cooled by a gaseous helium cryocooler to under 7 Kelvin. With the cooler in its final state, the Webb team is operating the MIRI instrument this week as part of seventh and final stage of the telescope alignment. When the instrument is operating, the detectors and electronics produce heat, which is balanced by the cryoc
9h
Highway death toll messages cause more crashes
Displaying the highway death toll on message boards is a common awareness campaign, but new research shows this tactic actually leads to more crashes. This new study evaluated the effect of displaying crash death totals on highway message boards (e.g., '1669 deaths this year on Texas roads'). Versions of highway fatality messages have been displayed in at least 27 US states.
9h
Melting land-based ice raises sea levels globally but can produce lowered levels locally
When a large ice sheet begins to melt, global-mean sea level rises, but local sea level near the ice sheet may in fact drop. A researcher illustrates this effect through a series of calculations, beginning with a simple, analytically tractable model and progressing through more sophisticated mathematical estimations of ice distributions and gravitation of displaced seawater mass. The paper include
9h
The Genetic Curse of Fatal Insomnia
Not being able to fall asleep when you want to is frustrating. No matter how tired we are, we all have nights when we just can't fall or stay asleep. The role of sleep in our everyday health is critical, which is no more apparent than the day after one of those sleepless nights when […]
9h
Cortisol in shelter dog hair shows signs of stress
Despite the good care, a shelter can be a stressful environment for dogs. Researchers investigated if the amount of the hormone cortisol in hair indicates the levels of stress that dogs experience before, during and after their stay in the shelter.
9h
Study reveals set of brain regions that control complex sequences of movement
In a novel set of experiments with mice trained to do a sequence of movements and 'change course' at the spur of the moment, scientists report they have identified areas of the animals' brains that interact to control the ability to perform complex, sequential movements, as well as to help the mice rebound when their movements are interrupted without warning.
9h
Key to improved green tech efficiency found in simple acid treatment
The development of new, more efficient electrochemical cells could provide a good option for carbon-free hydrogen and chemical production along with large-scale electricity generation and storage. But first, scientists must overcome several challenges, including how to make the cells more efficient and cost-effective.
9h
New Study Claims That Antidepressants Don't Lead to Better Quality of Life
Scientists still don't know exactly how depression works — and, as it turns out, we might not really know how effective antidepressants are, either. A new study published in the open-access PLOS One journal found that although lots of people take antidepressants and say that they help with their mental health, there's not much quantifiable improvement in antidepressant users' quality of life. The
9h
Best Portable Jump Starters for 2022
The best portable jump starters are a modern wonder. Ranging in size from a paperback book to a large purse, these devices store enough power to boost a run-down car battery allowing you to get home or to a repair shop. The simplest of these devices provides enough power for five or six jump-starts and can charge cell phones and other small electronic devices. Larger ones are available with featu
9h
New study examines ethics of community-engaged research from the perspective of community partners
In recent years, there's been rapid growth in the field of community-engaged research, a model of knowledge production that partners universities with community organizations to co-develop research in response to local needs. In theory, this model can advance the service mission of public universities. But there's been little follow-up research to assess the value and impacts of these projects fro
10h
Kaua'i's 2018 record-setting rain was caused by a series of supercell thunderstorms
A record-setting rainstorm over Kaua'i, Hawai'i in April 2018 resulted in severe flash flooding and estimated damage of nearly $180 million. The deluge damaged or destroyed 532 homes, and landslides left people along Kaua'i's north coast without access to their homes. In a recently published study, atmospheric scientists at the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa revealed that severe supercell thunders
10h
I Went Surfing in an Office Park
When I felt the wave lift my board and push it forward, I knew exactly what to do. I stood up, turned left, and put my weight forward to shred the surf. If this were San Diego, where I'd just been surfing, I'd see the sun rise over the beach. Instead I saw two gated hot tubs, a row of private cabanas ($370 for the day), and a photo booth selling pics for $15 a piece. This is Urbnsurf, an artifici
10h
Wearing dentures may affect a person's nutrition
Dentures may have a potentially negative impact on a person's overall nutrition, according to new research. The research team leveraged electronic dental and health records of 10,000+ patients to gain a better understanding of how oral health treatments affect individuals' overall health over time. The study found that people with dentures had a significant decline in nutrition markers. People who
10h
A Tesla Is Driving Around Australia, Completely on Solar Power
Green Tesla A team of scientists are planning to drive a Tesla 9,400 miles around Australia — a journey that'll be entirely powered by the Sun alone, Reuters reports . The solar panel technology being used during their trip could make electric cars a lot more viable, especially in remote parts of the world where access to public, grid-connected chargers isn't always guaranteed. The team is also h
10h
Harvard Scientist Says Alien Tech May Have Crashed Into the Pacific Ocean and He Wants to Find It
Phone Home One of the world's foremost believers in extraterrestrials has designed a mission to uncover an interstellar object that appears to have crashed off the coast of Papua New Guinea last decade — to determine whether or not it was made by aliens. "Our discovery of an interstellar meteor heralds a new research frontier," Harvard astronomer Avi Loeb wrote in an essay for The Debrief about a
10h
Users avoid focusing on over-stimulating animated advertising, study finds
Eye-tracking technology has been used to investigate how well users engage with animated advertisements in a mobile application. The results published in the International Journal of Internet Marketing and Advertising, reveal that users tend to avoid focusing on complex advertisements that are over-stimulating. The finding reinforces earlier evidence of a cognitive workload.
11h
Bonds from the past: A journey through the history of protein synthesis
The process of 'translation' in protein synthesis involves formation of a peptide bond between two amino acids that are attached to two distinct transfer RNAs (tRNAs). For long, scientists have been puzzled as to how these tRNAs evolutionarily lie so close to each other on the ribosome. In a new study, researchers explain how tRNA-like components act as scaffolds for peptide bond formation between
11h
Researchers demonstrate label-free super-resolution microscopy
Researchers describe a new measurement and imaging approach that can resolve nanostructures smaller than the diffraction limit of light without requiring any dyes or labels. The work is a modification of laser scanning microscopy. It represents an important advance toward a new and powerful microscopy method that could be used to see the fine features of complex samples beyond what is possible wit
11h
Sapphire fiber could enable cleaner energy and air-travel
Oxford University researchers have developed a sensor made of sapphire fibre that can tolerate extreme temperatures, with the potential to enable significant improvements in efficiency and emission reduction in aerospace and power generation.
11h
The protein that keeps the pancreas from digesting itself
Scientists report that a protein known as estrogen-related receptor gamma is critical for preventing pancreatic auto-digestion in mice. Moreover, they discovered that people with pancreatitis have lower levels of this protein in cells affected by this inflammation.
11h
Censors in China Are Having a Hard Time Silencing All the Rage Right Now
Shanghai residents have had enough amid a weeks-long lockdown. Food shortages and healthcare disruptions are not uncommon, The Guardian reports , despite the government urging the city's 25 million residents to remain positive. Censors on social media platforms are cracking down on photos and videos of sick people not getting sufficient access to healthcare, or even being mistreated by healthcare
12h
Designing the perfect piece of chocolate
We like some foods, and dislike others. Of course, the way food tastes is important, but mouthfeel, and even the sound that food makes when we bite it, also determine whether we enjoy the eating experience. Is it possible to design edible materials that optimize this enjoyment? Physicists and food researchers show that indeed it is.
12h
Pain in the neck? New surgical method could be game-changing
Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion is widely used to treat spinal disorders. The fusion involves placing a bone graft or 'cage' and/or implants where the surgically removed damaged disc was originally located to stabilize and strengthen the area. The risk factors for cage migration are multifactorial and include patient, radiological characteristics, surgical techniques and postoperative fact
12h
At Long Last, Perseverance Reaches Three Forks River Delta
After more than a year mapping the surface of Mars, NASA's Perseverance rover has finally reached the ancient Martian river delta it was built to explore. Perseverance and its companion space helicopter, Ingenuity, landed in Mars' Jezero Crater in February of 2021. Since then, the rover has carefully picked its way around the rim of Jezero, scooping up samples and mapping its surroundings as it g
12h
Earliest geochemical evidence of plate tectonics found in 3.8-billion-year-old crystal
Plate tectonics may be unique to Earth and may be an essential characteristic of habitable planets. Estimates for its onset range from over 4 billion years ago to just 800 million years ago. A new study reports evidence of a transition in multiple locations around the world, 3.8-3.6 billion years ago, from stable 'protocrust' to pressures and processes that look a lot like modern subduction, sugge
12h
Women were less likely to return to work after a severe stroke
A new study has found that after a severe stroke treated with mechanical clot removal, about one third of stroke survivors resumed work three months later. Women were about half as likely to return to work three months after a severe stroke compared to men. The likelihood of returning to work for both men and women after a severe stroke was higher if they were treated with combined mechanical clot
12h
Spatial distribution of pores helps determine where carbon is stored in the soil
Soils store more carbon than all the vegetation on the Earth's surface. However, there are still many unanswered questions about precisely which processes favor accumulation in the soil. Soil scientists have now developed a new method to show where and under what conditions carbon is stored f in the soil. It turns out, it is primarily the network of soil pores that controls the spatial distributio
12h
Intense exercise while dieting may reduce cravings for fatty food
In a study that offers hope for human dieters, rats on a 30-day diet who exercised intensely resisted cues for favored, high-fat food pellets. The experiment was designed to test resistance to the phenomenon known as 'incubation of craving,' meaning the longer a desired substance is denied, the harder it is to ignore signals for it. The findings suggest that exercise modulated how hard the rats we
12h
Genetic breakthrough may control Africa's East Coast fever, which kills a million cattle a year
A serendipitous discovery has led researchers from the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) in Kenya and the Roslin Institute at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland to identify a genetic marker that accurately predicts whether an individual cow is likely to survive infection with East Coast fever—making possible breeding programs that could improve the livelihoods of millions of s
12h
Dividing walls: How immune cells enter tissue
To get to the places where they are needed, immune cells not only squeeze through tiny pores. They even overcome wall-like barriers of tightly packed cells. Researchers at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (ISTA) have now discovered that cell division is key to their success. Together with other recent studies, their findings published in Science give the full picture of a process ju
12h
Genetic breakthrough may control Africa's East Coast fever, which kills a million cattle a year
A serendipitous discovery has led researchers from the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) in Kenya and the Roslin Institute at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland to identify a genetic marker that accurately predicts whether an individual cow is likely to survive infection with East Coast fever—making possible breeding programs that could improve the livelihoods of millions of s
12h
Dividing walls: How immune cells enter tissue
To get to the places where they are needed, immune cells not only squeeze through tiny pores. They even overcome wall-like barriers of tightly packed cells. Researchers at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (ISTA) have now discovered that cell division is key to their success. Together with other recent studies, their findings published in Science give the full picture of a process ju
12h
Sleep apnea can make driving dangerous for older drivers
Chronic tiredness brought on by sleep apnea can be dangerous when it comes to driving, especially for older adults, new research shows. People with sleep apnea wake up tired in the morning, no matter how many hours they actually sleep. The condition causes them to briefly stop and restart breathing dozens or even hundreds of times a night. Even though such breathing interruptions often don't awak
12h
Elon Musk Claims He Has the Money to Buy the Entirety of Twitter
Funding Secured? In a new filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission, SpaceX and Tesla CEO Elon Musk claims to have secured $46.5 billion in financing to buy Twitter. It's yet another surprising twist in the billionaire's quest to take over the platform and turn it into what he says will be an "inclusive arena for free speech." Almost half of that amount, $21 billion, will come out of his
13h
Brains and brawn helped crows and ravens take over the world
Crows and ravens have great flying ability, which allows them to gain access to new places more easily. While these skills were key to their success, new research also shows that big bodies and big brains played an important role in helping crows and ravens survive in the new climates they occupied.
13h
For cooperative teams, modesty leaves the best impression
People may forgo displaying luxury brands and other signals of status when they want to convince others that they will collaborate well with a team, as people who signal their wealth and social status could be perceived as uncooperative, according to new research.
13h
Unexpected light behavior may be harnessed to improve optical communications and sensors
Shine a flashlight into a murky pond water and the beam won't penetrate very far. Absorption and scattering rapidly diminishes the intensity of the light beam, which loses a fixed percentage of energy per unit distance traveled. That decline—known as exponential decay—holds true for light traveling through any fluid or solid that readily absorbs and scatters electromagnetic energy.
13h
Therapeutic target for aggressive blood cancer
Researchers have found that the KLF4 gene is reprogrammed at the onset of acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL), an aggressive type of blood cancer that is responsible for 5-15% of all types of leukemia. Overexpressing KLF4 suppressed the self-renewal traits of cancerous cells and reversed the effects caused by the actions of oncofusion events that cause the disease. The findings pave the way for th
13h
Helping prevent transmission of HIV from mother to child during breastfeeding
The antibody function known as antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and the ADCC sensitivity of HIV strains may influence the transmission of HIV from mother to child during breastfeeding. These data imply that enhancing ADCC, through a vaccine, for example, may not be sufficient to prevent transmission because chronically infected individuals can harbor ADCC-resistant strains. The find
13h
New research reveals the complexity of improving rangeland management in Africa
Herding communities across northern Namibia are afflicted by poverty and overgrazed rangelands, but international funding to improve the situation hasn't always translated into direct benefits for people or the land. New research explores the reasons why there is a disconnect. The reasons for the failures, up to now, have remained something of a puzzle.
13h
Microdrones with light-driven nanomotors
A hand-held laser pointer produces no noticeable recoil forces when it is "fired"—even though it emits a directed stream of light particles. The reason for this is its very large mass compared to the very small recoil impulses that the light particles cause when leaving the laser pointer.
13h
Environmental DNA reveals secret reef inhabitants
An international research team uses a global sampling of seawater to reveal which tropical reef fish occur where. To identify species and families, they successfully used the residual DNA shed by the animals present in the water. But not all fish can be traced in this way.
13h
Pluto's orbit is surprisingly unstable
In 1930, astronomer Clyde Tombaugh discovered the fabled "Ninth Planet" (or "Planet X") while working at the Lowell Observatory in Flagstaff, Arizona. The existence of this body had been predicted previously based on perturbations in the orbit of Uranus and Neptune. After receiving more than 1,000 suggestions from around the world, and a debate among the Observatory's staff, this newfound object w
13h
Cortisol in shelter dog hair shows signs of stress
Despite the good care, a shelter can be a stressful environment for dogs. Researchers at Utrecht University investigated if the amount of the hormone cortisol in hair indicates the levels of stress that dogs experience before, during and after their stay in the shelter.
13h
Deepest sediment core collected in the Atlantic Ocean
A team of scientists, engineers, and ship's crew on the research vessel Neil Armstrong operated by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) recently collected a 38-foot-long cylindrical sediment sample from the deepest part of the Puerto Rico Trench, nearly 5 miles below the surface. The sample core is breaking records as the deepest ever collected in the Atlantic Ocean, and possibly the de
13h
Researchers detect coronavirus particles with 'slow light'
Despite all the bad news the COVID-19 pandemic brought upon the world, it has helped us gain a better perspective of our readiness to fend off highly contagious diseases. Rapid diagnostic test kits and PCR testing quickly became essential tools when the pandemic hit, helping with timely diagnoses. However, these tools have inherent limitations. PCR tests are complex and require expensive equipment
13h
Godfrey Fowler obituary
My friend Godfrey Fowler, who has died aged 90, was a leading and reforming family doctor for 30 years; he was warm, modest and convivial. For much of his career he also headed a department of medical general practice at Oxford University, training students and undertaking research into preventive medicine. Godfrey was founding clinical reader in the new department from 1978, having been persuade
14h
Tourists Have Been Trapped on the Space Station for a Hilariously Long Time
Programmed to Receive For the first entirely private group of space tourists aboard the International Space Station, the orbital outpost is starting to seem a bit like " Hotel California ." The team of "civilian astronauts" departed for the ISS on April 8 , and were supposed to return to terra firma on April 19, which would have given them a full 10 days of drinking recycled pee in zero gravity.
14h
Elon Musk Says Tesla Is Working on a Car With No Steering Wheel
Take the Wheel After regularly promising fully self driving cars for over half a decade, Tesla CEO Elon Musk still isn't giving up hope. During the company's earnings call on Wednesday, Musk promised to have a "dedicated robotaxi," with no steering wheel, ready for "volume production" as soon as 2024. "It's fundamentally optimized for trying to achieve the lowest fully considered cost per mile, c
14h
A New Billion-Year History of Earth's Interior Reveals Colossal 'Blobs' Merging and Breaking Apart Like Continents
Deep in the Earth beneath us lie two blobs the size of continents. One is under Africa, the other under the Pacific Ocean. The blobs have their roots 2,900 kilometers below the surface, almost halfway to the center of the Earth. They are thought to be the birthplace of rising columns of hot rock called " deep mantle plumes " that reach Earth's surface. When these plumes first reach the surface, g
14h
These hackers showed just how easy it is to target critical infrastructure
Daan Keuper has hacked under a bright spotlight before. In 2012, he hacked a brand-new iPhone and took home $30,000 while on center stage at Pwn2Own, the biggest hacking contest in the world. Driven by curiosity, Keuper and his colleague Thijs Alkemade then hacked a car in 2018. Last year, motivated by the pandemic, they hacked videoconferencing software and coronavirus apps. This week, the two D
14h
Smartwatches can track COVID symptoms via heart rate
If you become ill with COVID-19, your smartwatch can track the progression of your symptoms, and could even show how sick you become. That's according to a new study that examined the effects of COVID-19 with six factors derived from heart rate data. The same method could be used to detect other diseases such as influenza , and the researchers say the approach could be used to track disease at ho
14h
Life history: Scholars call for greater collaboration between zoos, museums
The animal collections housed at zoos and natural history museums — living specimens in the first case, preserved in the other — constitute an exhaustive trove of information about Earth's biodiversity. A new paper lays out a pathway to increasing collaboration between these groups that would enhance our understanding of the animal kingdom.
14h
'Dative epitaxy': A new way to stack crystal films
Scientists have grown thin films of two different crystalline materials on top of each other using an innovative technique called 'dative epitaxy.' The researchers discovered the method by surprise. As a physicist explains, dative epitaxy holds layers of different materials together via a weak attractive force between the materials, paired with occasional chemical bonds called 'dative bonds.'
14h
Automated cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia delivered over the internet shown to be highly effective in Black women
Black women are disproportionately affected by poor sleep, which is associated with increased risk of adverse outcomes such as cardiovascular disease, depression and worse quality of life. The gold standard treatment for insomnia is cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I), which specifically targets the individual's problematic sleep behaviors and beliefs.
14h
Marine microbes swim towards their favorite food
Although invisible to us, every teaspoon of seawater contains more than a million marine bacteria. These tiny microbes play pivotal roles in governing the chemical cycles that control our climate and shape the health of the global ocean, but are they passive drifters or purposeful hunters?
14h
There's more than one way to grow a baby
In his 1989 book Wonderful Life, evolutionary biologist Stephen Jay Gould famously argued that, if we could "replay the tape," life on Earth would evolve to be fundamentally different each time.
14h
'Dative epitaxy': A new way to stack crystal films
Scientists have grown thin films of two different crystalline materials on top of each other using an innovative technique called 'dative epitaxy.' The researchers discovered the method by surprise. As a physicist explains, dative epitaxy holds layers of different materials together via a weak attractive force between the materials, paired with occasional chemical bonds called 'dative bonds.'
14h
How is air quality measured at home?
As more of us have spent greater amounts of time indoors, the quality of the air we breathe while in enclosed spaces has become ever more important. But how is air quality measured at home?
14h
Best Routers for Verizon FiOS in 2022
The best routers for Verizon FiOS let you take complete advantage of your internet package and home devices. Models with dual or tri-band let you assign devices to specific bands to keep traffic moving even during heavy use. Gaming routers may have settings that enhance your gaming experience or prioritize certain devices. The size of your home, the specifics of your internet service provider (IS
15h
Huge Crypto Exchange Releases Emoji That's Clearly a Swastika
Doesn't Feel Reich Binance, the largest cryptocurrency exchange in the world by trading volume, released a new emoji on Twitter this week — and as people online quickly pointed out, Vice reports , it clearly looks like a swastika . And on Adolf Hitler's birthday, no less. The logo accompanying the hashtag was meant to be a marketing ploy, but quickly backfired after Twitter users pointed out the
15h
Abraham Yoffe obituary
My grandfather Abraham Yoffe, who has died aged 102, was an explosives expert, a research physicist at Cambridge University's Cavendish laboratory, and a founding fellow of Darwin College, Cambridge. Abe was born in Jerusalem to Haim Yoffe, a rabbi, and his wife, Leah (nee Kreindal). He lived in Australia as a child, attending Melbourne high school. He studied chemistry at the University of Melbo
15h
African cities can do more to protect children from climate change
Six in 10 people will be living in cities by 2030. This is concerning. Cities are responsible for over 70% of global greenhouse gas emissions. Yet cities can also do a lot to mitigate climate change and help people adapt to its impacts. Cities can use renewable energy sources, promote greener transport, and get industries to cut pollution and adopt cleaner production techniques. Also, they can for
15h
Expert: Putin has made a 'tragic mistake' with Ukraine war
Vladimir Putin "made a tragic mistake," by embarking on war with Ukraine, says Randall Stone. At the same time, Stone , a political science professor and the chair of the political science department at the University of Rochester, stresses that the West must be careful to avoid escalation; in particular, NATO must not send air forces into Ukraine. "It appears credible that Putin would be willing
15h
In western floodplains, species adapt to bullfrog, sunfish invaders
Non-native bullfrogs and sunfish species, introduced for consumer and sport purposes, are known to alter ecosystems and hinder native amphibians and fish in the Pacific Northwest highlands. But scant research exists about how these introductions affect native species in lowland floodplains.
15h
A light-controlled nanomedicine for precise drug delivery to treat colorectal cancer
A research team from Department of Pharmacology and Pharmacy, LKS Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong (HKUMed), has developed a photo-responsive nanomedicine for light-controlled colorectal cancer therapy. The nanoparticles are simply made by self-assembly of a near-infrared dye and a prodrug. After intravenous injection, the nanoparticles can target colon tumors and release drugs to
15h
Still rare in Iowa, electric car powers Des Moines family's home during blackouts
By Ayurella Horn-Muller (Climate Central) and Amber Alexander (NBC WHO 13 Des Moines) Kerri Johannsen was less than a week from giving birth to her second child when a derecho wielding winds up to 100 mph swept through Iowa. Johannsen's power went out for four days. "It was hot," she said. "We were just trying to manage." The Des Moines household was among 480,000 in Iowa that lost power during t
15h
Haber-Bosch at the atomic scale
Industrial production of NH3 has been performed by the Haber-Bosch process for more than 100 years, in which dissociation of N2 feedstock molecules promoted by alkali atom co-catalyst is thought to be the rate limiting step. The Haber-Bosch synthesis consumes 1% of the world's total energy consumption, and accounts for 1.4% of the global CO2 emissions. Therefore, the atomic scale insights into the
15h
New materials for storing flammable industrial gases
How do I store more, and better? This summarizes the challenge of transporting flammable gases. To ensure industrial safety, these gases must be handled at defined temperature and pressure conditions that do not allow for optimal storage and release cycles. Existing porous materials can facilitate the capture of certain gases, but their high affinity for these molecules complicates their release:
15h
Study illustrates nuances of gravitational pull of ice sheets
It is well known that global warming is causing sea levels to rise via two processes: thermal expansion, when water expands because of its increased temperature, and melting of land-based ice, when meltwater flows into the ocean. Less known, regarding the latter, is the nuanced phenomenon of gravitational pull. When a large ice sheet begins to melt, global-mean sea level rises, but local sea level
15h
Astronaut in space successfully controls ground-based rover
If man's best friend is a dog, then in the future astronauts' closest companions might well be rovers. A technique allowing astronauts in orbit to control rovers exploring planetary surfaces has been developed by a research team from ESA, the German Aerospace Center DLR and European academia and industry, culminating in an Earth-based rover session commanded from the International Space Station. A
15h
Large Hadron Collider to restart and hunt for a fifth force of nature
Latest run is expected to scrutinise findings from last year that may turn into another blockbuster discovery The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will restart on Friday after a three-year hiatus and is expected to resolve a scientific cliffhanger on whether a mysterious anomaly could point to the existence of a fifth fundamental force of nature. The tantalising findings reported last year have reigni
15h
The Cutest Thermonuclear Explosion in the Universe
The first known record of an exploding star comes from Chinese astronomers in the second century. A radiant object, bursting with color, appeared suddenly in the night sky and glowed for about eight months before fading away. In the 11th century, the glow of an exploding star hung around for two whole years, appearing brighter than the moon in the beginning. A few centuries have passed since one
15h
Researchers biosynthesize anti-cancer compound found in venomous Australian tree
The Australian stinging tree (Dendrocnide moroides) is a plant that many people avoid at all costs. The tree, which is a member of the nettle family, is covered in thin silicon needles laced with one of nature's most excruciating toxins, a compound called moroidin. "It's notorious for causing extreme pain, which lingers for a very long time," said Whitehead Institute Member Jing-Ke Weng.
15h
Researchers biosynthesize anti-cancer compound found in venomous Australian tree
The Australian stinging tree (Dendrocnide moroides) is a plant that many people avoid at all costs. The tree, which is a member of the nettle family, is covered in thin silicon needles laced with one of nature's most excruciating toxins, a compound called moroidin. "It's notorious for causing extreme pain, which lingers for a very long time," said Whitehead Institute Member Jing-Ke Weng.
15h
A new economic model for protecting tropical forests | Nat Keohane
To solve the climate crisis, we need to make tropical forests worth more alive than dead, says environmental economist Nat Keohane. Highlighting the urgent need to stop deforestation and the carbon pollution it brings, he details the work of the LEAF Coalition — a first-of-its-kind public-private partnership that's channeling one billion dollars into protecting tropical forests — and shares thre
15h
Scholars seek greater collaboration among zoos and museums
The animal collections housed at zoos and natural history museums—living specimens in the first case, preserved in the other—constitute an exhaustive trove of information about Earth's biodiversity. Yet, zoos and museums rarely share data with each other.
15h
New Proof Illuminates the Hidden Structure of Common Equations
In a recent paper, Manjul Bhargava of Princeton University has settled an 85-year-old conjecture about one of math's most ancient obsessions: the solutions to polynomial equations such as x2 – 3x + 2 = 0. "It's a great problem, famous old question," said Andrew Granville, a professor at the University of Montreal. " had an interesting, somewhat different approach, which was very creative. Source
15h
Researchers detect coronavirus particles with 'slow light'
Existing methods for detecting and diagnosing COVID-19 are either expensive and complex or inaccurate. Now, scientists have developed a novel biosensing platform to detect and quantify viral particles using a simple optical microscope and antibody proteins. Their versatile approach, based on slowing down light, could pave the way to new diagnostic tools and next-generation detection platforms that
15h
Symptom data help predict COVID-19 admissions
Researchers are conducting one of the largest citizen science projects in Sweden to date. Since the start of the pandemic, study participants have used an app to report how they feel daily even if they are well. This symptom data could be used to estimate COVID-19 infection trends across Sweden and predict hospital admissions due to COVID-19 a week in advance.
15h
New Cryptocurrency Makes You Exercise to Mine Coins
Cardiocoins Wellness culture has really gone too far this time. A South Korea-based company with the on-the-nose name Cardio Healthcare Company is not only launching a metaverse that you access atop a bespoke stationary bike, but it's also created an in-world cryptocurrency that you have to, per a press release , "move to earn." The concept behind the "Metabike," as Cardio Healthcare calls its gl
16h
Sound tech partly destroys liver tumors in rats
Noninvasive sound technology breaks down liver tumors in rats, kills cancer cells, and spurs the immune system to prevent further spread, researchers report. It's an advance that could lead to improved cancer outcomes in humans. By destroying only 50% to 75% of liver tumor volume, the rats' immune systems were able to clear away the rest, with no evidence of recurrence or metastases in more than
16h
DNA nanostructures for targeting cellular surface receptors
A broad subset of parameters, which include cell signaling modulation and receptor binding efficiency, can be explored using programmable DNA nanostructures. Glenn Cremers shows how these structures can uncover important cell signaling mechanisms, provide insights for the design of synthetically engineered communication networks and facilitate the synthesis of precision medicines.
16h
Exploring the potential food contamination routes of a newly identified foodborne pathogen
People must consume enough safe and nutritious food to remain alive and healthy. Consumption of unsafe foods, contaminated with harmful bacteria, viruses, parasites, or chemical substances, is responsible for more than 200 diseases, ranging from diarrhea to cancer. Diarrheal diseases are the most common illnesses caused by contaminated food, affecting 550 million people and killing 230 thousand pe
16h
Bonds from the past: A journey through the history of protein synthesis
The genetic information stored in DNA is "decoded" to form proteins via the process of translation. This involves the formation of peptide bonds between amino acids bound to transfer RNA (tRNA) molecules that glide over the ribosome in very close proximity to each other, and elongate the peptide chain, which later undergoes conformational change, forming a protein. In contrast to the codon-depende
16h
DNA nanostructures for targeting cellular surface receptors
A broad subset of parameters, which include cell signaling modulation and receptor binding efficiency, can be explored using programmable DNA nanostructures. Glenn Cremers shows how these structures can uncover important cell signaling mechanisms, provide insights for the design of synthetically engineered communication networks and facilitate the synthesis of precision medicines.
16h
Exploring the potential food contamination routes of a newly identified foodborne pathogen
People must consume enough safe and nutritious food to remain alive and healthy. Consumption of unsafe foods, contaminated with harmful bacteria, viruses, parasites, or chemical substances, is responsible for more than 200 diseases, ranging from diarrhea to cancer. Diarrheal diseases are the most common illnesses caused by contaminated food, affecting 550 million people and killing 230 thousand pe
16h
How game-theory logic underpins many of our seemingly odd and irrational decisions
Why do people wear Rolex watches or drive Bentleys, when less expensive goods can perform better? Why does anyone fight the crowds at the Louvre to see the "Mona Lisa" for 30 seconds, when they could view it online for hours? Well, they may be engaging in "costly signaling," in which people display their wealth to seem desirable, even if it costs money to show they have money. And it's not only pe
16h
Water processing: Light helps degrade hormones
Micropollutants in water often are hormones that accumulate in the environment and may have negative impacts on humans and animals. Researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and Leibniz Institute of Surface Engineering (IOM) in Leipzig have now developed a process for the photocatalytic degradation of these pollutants when they flow through polymer membranes. It is presented in Nature
16h
Designing the perfect piece of chocolate
We like some foods, and dislike others. Of course, the way food tastes is important, but mouthfeel, and even the sound that food makes when we bite it, also determine whether we enjoy the eating experience. Is it possible to design edible materials that optimize this enjoyment? Physicists and food researchers show that indeed it is.
16h
Bonds from the past: A journey through the history of protein synthesis
The genetic information stored in DNA is "decoded" to form proteins via the process of translation. This involves the formation of peptide bonds between amino acids bound to transfer RNA (tRNA) molecules that glide over the ribosome in very close proximity to each other, and elongate the peptide chain, which later undergoes conformational change, forming a protein. In contrast to the codon-depende
16h
Wealthy cybercriminals are using zero-day hacks more than ever
Organized cybercriminals with money to burn are fueling a spike in the use of powerful, expensive zero-day hacking exploits, new research has found. Zero-days exploits, which help grant a hacker access to a chosen target, are so called because cyber-defenders have had zero days to fix the newly discovered holes—making the tools extraordinarily capable, dangerous, and valuable. At the highest end,
16h
The changing economics of open source
Early 2022 has brought with it an unusually high level of commotion in the open-source community, largely focused on the economics of who—and how we—should pay for "free" software. But this isn't just some geeky flame war. What's at stake is critical for vast swaths of the business world. To understand what the fuss is all about, it helps to consider what open source means. In its earliest days,
16h
Flexibility is key when navigating the future of 6G
Mobile providers are accelerating their rollout of the flexible, low-latency, multi-gigabit-per-second communications network known as 5G. The technology promises to deliver not just faster data rates, but a more flexible and programmable network. This will be combined with the high reliability and low latency required to create secure, reliable wireless ecosystems to benefit industries beyond tr
16h
High Schooler Creates Tote Bag That Transforms Into Kevlar Vest
(Photo: LifeTote) In "impressive inventions we wish people didn't need," a high schooler from Boulder, Colorado has created a tote bag that can be changed into a bulletproof vest. Eighteen-year-old Trent Bush Jr. created the bag shortly after a tragic shooting at Boulder's King Soopers grocery store. Bush felt that it would be worthwhile to come up with something that could help people in a simil
16h
COVID patients with pneumonia face higher dementia risk
Patients hospitalized with COVID-19 pneumonia have a higher risk of developing dementia than those with other types of pneumonia, according to a new study. The researchers pulled Cerner Real World Data from 1.4 billion medical encounters prior to July 31, 2021. They selected patients hospitalized with pneumonia for more than 24 hours. Among 10,403 patients with COVID-19 pneumonia, 312 (3%) develo
16h
99 Degree Heat Is Too Much for the Survivalists | Naked and Afraid
Stream Naked and Afraid on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/naked-and-afraid #NakedAndAfraid #Discovery #Survival Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discover
16h
How bacteria evade bacteriophages in vivo
Phage therapy, which uses viruses known as bacteriophages to treat bacterial infections, is a long-standing medical procedure whose mechanisms of action are still poorly understood. Scientists from the Institut Pasteur and CNRS have demonstrated in vivo in a murine model that bacteria are capable of regulating their gene expression to evade the numerous bacteriophages present in the gut environmen
16h
Lab grown, self-sustainable muscle cells repair injury and disease, mouse study shows
In proof-of-concept experiments, Johns Hopkins Medicine scientists say they have successfully cultivated human muscle stem cells capable of renewing themselves and repairing muscle tissue damage in mice, potentially advancing efforts to treat muscle injuries and muscle-wasting disorders in people.
16h
From 'biologically dead' to chart-toppingly clean: How the Thames made an extraordinary recovery over 60 years
It might surprise you to know that the River Thames is considered one of the world's cleanest rivers running through a city. What's even more surprising is that it reached that status just 60 years after being declared "biologically dead" by scientists at London's Natural History Museum. Yet despite this remarkable recovery, there's no room for complacency—the Thames still faces new and increasing
16h
How bacteria evade bacteriophages in vivo
Phage therapy, which uses viruses known as bacteriophages to treat bacterial infections, is a long-standing medical procedure whose mechanisms of action are still poorly understood. Scientists from the Institut Pasteur and CNRS have demonstrated in vivo in a murine model that bacteria are capable of regulating their gene expression to evade the numerous bacteriophages present in the gut environmen
16h
Revolutionary images of the birth of crystals
At the interface between chemistry and physics, the process of crystallization is omnipresent in nature and industry. It is the basis for the formation of snowflakes but also of certain active ingredients used in pharmacology. For the phenomenon to occur for a given substance, it must first go through a stage called nucleation, during which the molecules organize themselves and create the optimal
16h
Researchers demonstrate label-free super-resolution microscopy
Researchers have developed a new measurement and imaging approach that can resolve nanostructures smaller than the diffraction limit of light without requiring any dyes or labels. The work represents an important advance toward a new and powerful microscopy method that could one day be used to see the fine features of complex samples beyond what is possible with conventional microscopes and techni
16h
Second alien world detected in the planetary system HD 83443
Astronomers report the discovery of another exoplanet around a nearby star known as HD 83443. The newfound extrasolar world is a Jupiter-mass planet orbiting its host on a highly eccentric 22-year orbit. The finding was detailed in a paper published April 12 on the arXiv pre-print server.
16h
Glass transition meets Fickian-non-Gaussian Diffusion
Glass transition is a Grand Challenge in condensed matter physics and still reveals surprises, despite decades of intense research. For instance, diffusion in glassy liquids was until now thought to be qualitatively similar to that in conventional, "hot" liquids, at least for long observation times. New research published in Physical Review Letters demonstrates that this is not the case: long-time
16h
Paired gas measurements: A new biogeochemical tracer?
Soil respiration is fundamental in terrestrial ecosystems, where plants and microbes dominate the production of carbon dioxide released to the atmosphere. The scientific understanding of the processes underpinning soil respiration remains incomplete, limiting our ability to accurately predict how the global carbon cycle will respond to the changing climate.
16h
Study introduces loss-free matter-wave polaritons in an optical lattice system
Polaritons are quasiparticles that are formed when photons couple strongly with excitations of matter. These quasi-particles, which are half-light and half-matter, underpin the functioning of a wide range of emergent photonic quantum systems, including semiconductor-based nanophotonic devices and circuit quantum electrodynamic systems.
16h
Ethical communication in the age of information
To comprehensively understand the ethical issues involved when communicating with research participants through the Internet, researchers developed an ethical framework and practical guidelines to implement findings from their research. This is the first such framework and accompanying guidelines for the use of electronic methods for communication with research participants, and is anticipated to
16h
The Download: Opting out of the crypto hype, and the gig workers resisting oppressive algorithms
This is today's edition of The Download , our weekday newsletter that provides a daily dose of what's going on in the world of technology. It's okay to opt out of the crypto revolution. Crypto advertising is everywhere. Billboards surround the Bay Area and line LA highways, and you can't catch a train in NYC without running into an ad for a coin or exchange. A-listers like Gwyneth Paltrow are pus
17h
The Punt Presidency
At the start of his career, Joe Biden was a young man in a hurry: the sixth-youngest senator, an ambitious force in Washington, and a repeat presidential candidate. Now, at the pinnacle and close of his career, the president prefers to procrastinate. Although every leader comes to a decision he or she would rather not make, delay has become a signature tactic of this presidency. Biden is currentl
17h
For cooperative teams, modesty leaves the best impression
People may forgo displaying luxury brands and other signals of status when they want to convince others that they will collaborate well with a team, as people who signal their wealth and social status could be perceived as uncooperative, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.
17h
Study explores academic success among Jewish girls
Girls raised by Jewish parents are 23 percentage points more likely to graduate college than girls with a non-Jewish upbringing, even after accounting for their parents' socioeconomic status. Girls raised by Jewish parents also graduate from more selective colleges, according to a newly published study by Tulane University professor Ilana Horwitz.
17h
What Happened to Jon Stewart?
This article was featured in One Story to Read Today, a newsletter in which our editors recommend a single must-read from The Atlantic , Monday through Friday. Sign up for it here. I n March 2021 , shortly after Jon Stewart joined Twitter, he tapped the microphone and used his new pulpit to make amends for an infamous act of aggression from his distant past. "I called Tucker Carlson a dick on Nat
18h
The Skeptics' Guide to the Future
I am happy to announce that pre-orders are open for my upcoming book, , which will be released by Grand Central Publishing on September, 27th. Also, today and tomorrow only(4/21-22), Barnes & Noble is offering a 25% discount on all preorders for the hardcover and the ebook . This was a particularly fun book to write, with my two brothers, Bob and Jay (who also co-host the SGU podcast with me). T
18h
Fagfolk, fejltagelser og folkesundhed
Man kan være taknemmelig for, at helseopfordringer ikke automatisk bliver til påbud, fordi der er et politisk flertal for det. Før eller senere viser det sig, at ansvaret for helbredet heller ikke kan deles med fagfolk, skriver dr.phil og censor i Folkesundhedsvidenskab og Molekylær biomedicin, Per Betzonich-Wilken.
18h
Daily briefing: The big promise of brain-reading implants
Nature, Published online: 20 April 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01103-5 Interest is surging in brain–computer interfaces that can help paralysed people to move, talk and touch. Plus, why longer-lived animals don't get more cancer and why NASA should spearhead a mission to Uranus.
18h
Psykisk ohälsa syns i blodet
Schizofreni, utmattningssyndrom eller depression. Idag bygger alla psykiatriska diagnoser på bedömning av patientens beteende. Objektiva test skulle underlätta – och minska stigmat kring psykisk ohälsa, menar forskare. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
18h
Så upplever patienter måltider i livets slutskede
Mat och hunger får inte samma innebörd i livets slutskede. Maten smakar inte som förr och många får svårt att äta. Måltiderna blir därför snarare en källa till oro och stress än till glädje och samvaro för både patienter och anhöriga. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
18h
The Playacting Over Masks Really Needed to End
Sign up for Tom's newsletter, Peacefield, here. The U.S.-government mandate requiring mask wearing on transportation is now dead, and it was killed in the worst way possible. A judge deemed "not qualified" by the American Bar Association wrote a muddled decision that invalidated a regulation hated by the president who picked her, while overriding the authority of the executive branch and its expe
18h
'Workcations' Aren't an Escape. They're Practice.
Mikaela Miller had never pictured herself stuck in an office, but, perhaps as with many people, it happened anyway. In her 20s she chose a career in biomedical-data analysis—a deskbound job certainly, but one she hoped she could perform from anywhere. Instead, after grad school she found herself commuting to a cubicle in Kansas City, hoarding her vacation time to take an annual two-week internati
19h
Nye stjernekiggere kan begynde her
PLUS. Ny bog indeholder oplysninger om hvilke stjerner og galakser, man kan se med en almindelig kikkert, og giver gode, praktiske råd til både udstyr og observationer.
19h
The gig workers fighting back against the algorithms
In the Bendungan Hilir neighborhood, just a stone's throw from Jakarta's glitzy central business district, a long row of makeshift wooden stalls crammed onto the sidewalk serves noodle soup, fried rice, and cigarettes to locals. One place stands out in particular, buzzing with motorcycle drivers clad in green. It's an informal "base camp," or meeting point, for drivers with Gojek, Indonesia's lar
20h
Bottlenecks and opportunities for synthetic biology biosafety standards
Nature Communications, Published online: 21 April 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-29889-y The lack of innovative standards for biosafety in synthetic biology is an unresolved policy gap that limits many potential applications in synthetic biology. We argue that a massive support for standardization in biosafety is required for synthetic biology to flourish.
20h
Toward azo-linked covalent organic frameworks by developing linkage chemistry via linker exchange
Nature Communications, Published online: 21 April 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-29814-3 Exploring new linkage chemistry for covalent organic frameworks (COFs) provides a strong driving force to promote the development of this class porous materials. Here, the authors report a strategy to synthesize COFs with azo linkages based on an in situ linker exchange strategy which transforms imine-linked CO
20h
Redesigning regulatory components of quorum-sensing system for diverse metabolic control
Nature Communications, Published online: 21 April 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-29933-x Existing quorum sensing (QS) circuits are less sophisticated for regulating multiple sets of genes or operons. Here, the authors redesign the luxR-luxI intergenic sequence of the lux-type QS system and apply it to achieve diverse metabolic control in salicylic acid and 4-hydroxycoumarin biosynthesis in E. coli.
20h
Niche expansion and adaptive divergence in the global radiation of crows and ravens
Nature Communications, Published online: 21 April 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-29707-5 Traits that facilitate adaptive responses to novel environments may facilitate global radiations. Here, the authors describe diversification dynamics of crows, finding that their global radiation coincides with high rates of phenotypic and climatic niche evolution.
20h
App-based COVID-19 syndromic surveillance and prediction of hospital admissions in COVID Symptom Study Sweden
Nature Communications, Published online: 21 April 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-29608-7 The app-based COVID Symptom Study was launched in Sweden in April 2020 to contribute to real-time COVID-19 surveillance using daily symptom reports from study participants. Here, the authors show how syndromic surveillance can be used to estimate regional COVID-19 prevalence and to predict later COVID-19 hospit
20h
Cooperative catalysis by a single-atom enzyme-metal complex
Nature Communications, Published online: 21 April 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-29900-6 Single atom catalysts have been described for efficient and selective metal catalysis, while enzymes have been known for their recognition and binding. In this manuscript, the authors develop a photochemical method to combine the two platforms in one, and demonstrate it by anchoring Pd atoms on Candida Antarcti
20h
Why Marine Le Pen Is So Close to Power
The French far right is closer to power now than it has been at any time since World War II. When Jean-Marie Le Pen qualified for the second round of presidential elections in 2002, the whole country was shocked. But the outcome of the runoff was a foregone conclusion. In the end, Jacques Chirac won the most lopsided victory in the history of the French Republic, with his extremist rival garnerin
20h
10 Practical Ways to Improve Happiness
" How to Build a Life " is a weekly column by Arthur Brooks, tackling questions of meaning and happiness. Click here to listen to his podcast series on all things happiness, How to Build a Happy Life . H ere's some very bad happiness advice based on very solid happiness research: Feel important . Be happily married . Be Danish . Depending on how happiness is measured, all of these things really a
20h
Woman, 31, catches Covid twice within three weeks in Spain
Scientists report shortest known gap between infections in fully vaccinated healthcare worker A 31-year-old woman in Spain caught Covid twice within 20 days, the shortest known gap between infections, scientists have reported. Researchers in Spain gave details of the healthcare worker, who tested positive a few days before Christmas in December 2021 and again in January 2022. The case is further
20h
Astronomers Discover New Type of Stellar Explosion
Astronomers have learned an almost unfathomable amount about stars in recent decades, but the heavens still manage to surprise us on occasion. A team of scientists using the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope have discovered a completely new type of stellar explosion, which has been labeled a "micronova." As the name implies, a micronova is not as violent as a nova, but we're st
21h
Trojan trout: could turning an invasive fish into a 'super-male' save a native species?
In western US waterways, invasive and voracious brook trout are outcompeting native species – but a modified variant could tip the scales On a golden morning in early October, two graduate students from New Mexico State University plunge into the icy current of Leandro Creek. The small waterway flows through the 550,000 acre Vermejo park ranch, a reserve in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains, and the
21h
It's okay to opt out of the crypto revolution
If sheer square footage of advertising space is any indication, crypto has arrived. Crypto billboards surround the Bay Area and line LA highways, and you can't catch a train in NYC without running into an ad for a coin or exchange. A-listers like Gwyneth Paltrow are pushing crypto platforms, and this year's Super Bowl broadcast was studded with big-budget crypto spots, each trumpeting the opportu
21h
How 'Big Disinformation' Can Overcome Its Skeptics
Sign up for Conor's newsletter here. D uring a recent conference at the University of Chicago, former President Barack Obama reflected on the role disinformation played during his presidency. He was subject to flagrant lies—that he was born in Kenya, for instance, and put "death panels" in his health-care overhaul. But he served relatively early in the era of the smartphone and social-media, and
21h
Mind that satellite! The mission to clean up dangerous space junk
As soon as we left the planet, we began leaving rubbish in orbit. Now it is putting space stations and astronauts at risk. What can be done about the millions of pieces of debris? In November last year, the five astronauts and two cosmonauts on the International Space Station (ISS) were ordered to suit up and take refuge in their capsules for fear their spaceship might be struck by flying debris.
21h
Insteon Kills Servers Without Warning, Bricks Smart Home Devices
Adding a few smart home gadgets can help you automate your day-to-day life in useful ways, but they aren't as foolproof as a good old-fashioned light switch. People who invested in Insteon's smart home gear are learning that the hard way today, as the company has apparently killed its cloud service without warning . With the servers shut down, the company's smart switches, sensors, and outlets ha
21h
It's the pore that counts: Spatial distribution of pores helps determine where carbon is stored in the soil
Soils store more carbon than all the vegetation on the Earth's surface. However, there are still many unanswered questions about precisely which processes favor accumulation in the soil. Under the leadership of the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ), a team of soil scientists has developed a new method to show where and under what conditions carbon is stored in the soil. As they wri
21h
Let Ukraine In
After suffering embarrassing defeats in the past couple of months, Vladimir Putin is doubling down on his war. He is rearming, resupplying, and repositioning Russian forces for a major new onslaught in eastern Ukraine. Even if his troops are finally able to dislodge Ukraine's, however, that's unlikely to be enough to satisfy him. He may agree to a cease-fire or a negotiation to give his military
21h
Ny kunskap om viruspartiklar i luften kan minska smittspridning på sjukhus
Risken att exponeras för viruspartiklar från covid-19 ökar ju närmare en patient man befinner sig, ju mer smitta en patient bär på och om ventilationen är otillräcklig. Mätningar av virus i luften på sjukhus som gjorts av forskare vid Lunds universitet ger ny kunskap om hur man bäst anpassar vården för att minska risken för smittspridning. Förhoppningen är att de internationella riktlinjer som fin
22h
Skeptical Science New Research for Week #16 2022
Water packing heat: it's not only the oceans It's often remarked that we don't directly notice or feel most global warming because most excess energy being retained by the planet is ending up "stored" in Earth's oceans. Given its high specific heat capacity , liquid water is an effective sponge for a tremendous amount of heat energy. In a WIREs Climate Change perspective piece, Tom Matthews and a
23h
Ranking the reasons why the Larsen C ice shelf is melting
This is a re-post from Carbon Brief by Ella Gilbert, John King, and Ian Renfrew Scientists know the surface of the Larsen C ice shelf in Antarctica is melting, making it vulnerable to collapse. For the first time, we can rank the most important causes of melting over the recent past. In a new two-part paper in Journal of Geophysical Research: A tmospheres, we show how the amount of energy reachin
23h
Aboard MOSAiC: Hardy fish, powerful waves, shrinking ice floes
This is a re-post from Yale Climate Connections by Kristen Pope Hundreds of researchers from around the globe took turns collecting data in the Arctic aboard the German icebreaker RV Polarstern on an expedition that lasted over a year. Now, this data is rewarding the researchers with important and surprising insights about this vast, mysterious region that is warming more than twice as fast as Ea
23h
New bird app spreads its wings
Researchers from The University of Queensland have helped design an app to protect birds at risk of extinction across the world by breaking down language barriers between scientists.
23h
Space junk – how should we clean up our act? – podcast
This week, the US became the first country to ban anti-satellite missile tests, in an effort to protect Earth's orbit from dangerous space debris. There could be millions of pieces of old satellites and spent rockets zooming around above our atmosphere, at speeds where collisions can be catastrophic. Guardian science editor Ian Sample talks to Prof Don Pollacco and Prof Chris Newman about the thr
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Space junk – how should we clean up our act?
This week, the US became the first country to ban anti-satellite missile tests, in an effort to protect Earth's orbit from dangerous space debris. There could be millions of pieces of old satellites and spent rockets zooming around above our atmosphere, at speeds where collisions can be catastrophic. Guardian science editor Ian Sample talks to Prof Don Pollacco and Prof Chris Newman about the thre
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Tvillingar kan ha svaret till orsakerna bakom ätstörningar
Marina och Tania är enäggstvillingar men bara en av dem har utvecklat anorexia, trots att risken att drabbas av en ätstörning delvis är genetisk. Nu vill forskare ta reda på hur det kunnat bli så. – Enäggstvillingar har, på alla väsentliga punkter, samma dna. De kan säga oss så mycket om orsakerna bakom sjukdomen, säger professorn Cynthia Bulik.
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Making a game of it: Contests help new moms increase their steps
Fun and games could be a solution to serious problems like preeclampsia and hypertension among pregnant people and holds promise for significant progress, according to a new study. Researchers found that gamification—broadly defined as the use of specially engineered games to stimulate learning and behavioral change—could generate greater levels of exercise in postpartum individuals who developed
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Clearing up biases in artificial intelligence
Scientists have noticed grave disparities in artificial intelligence, noting that the methods are not objective, especially when it comes to geodiversity. AI tools, whether forecasting hail, wind or tornadoes, are assumed to be inherently objective, says one of the researchers. They aren't, she says.
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Weapon against tumors, boost for the immune system
Radiation therapy is a proven approach to destroying tumors. However, it is possible that it might be able to do even more in the future — namely stimulate the immune system at the same time and so fight cancer even more intensively. The foundations for this have now been laid. Researchers have found that x-rays trigger a calcium signalling cascade in cells of the immune system.
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African dust crosses the Atlantic
A beautiful sunset over the Atlantic off the Florida coast, or an orangey glow in the Texas sky at dusk may be caused by dust from West Africa, according to researchers who are looking at the paths of particulate matter in the skies over the Sahara desert and the semi-arid Sahel.
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More than 300 at once: Publisher retracts entire conference proceedings
The tip came from the leadership of another scientific conference. Did the Association for Computing Machinery know that they had published the proceedings of a conference with essentially the same name as that organization, IEEE, on the same dates, in the same venue, and with lots of overlapping authors? The two versions of the meeting … Continue reading
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Gastric inflammation: How a bacterial infection causes tissue changes
When the bacterium Helicobacter pylori infects the stomach, it causes gastric inflammation and increases the risk of stomach cancer. Researchers have been able to elucidate characteristic changes which occur inside the gastric glands during an H. pylori infection. The researchers discovered a novel mechanism which, by restricting cell division in healthy stomach tissue, protects the stomach agains
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Are children ready for a 4 day school week
I've been thinking about this for a while as studies have proven a 4 Day work week increases productivity in adults especially those working from home could this be implemented in schooling submitted by /u/Novaz0000 [link] [comments]
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NASA Head: Things Are Fine on ISS Despite Russian "Slaughter"
You Better Work The military tensions between the US and Russia amid the latter's invasion of Ukraine on Earth have not harmed the countries' relationship aboard the International Space Station — according to NASA's incessant messaging , at least. During an event unveiling the new Peregrine Lunar Lander, NASA administrator Bill Nelson reiterated to the press that the "working relationship" betwee
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African dust crosses the Atlantic
A beautiful sunset over the Atlantic off the Florida coast, or an orangey glow in the Texas sky at dusk may be caused by dust from West Africa, according to researchers who are looking at the paths of particulate matter in the skies over the Sahara desert and the semi-arid Sahel.
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Multiple treatments to slow age-related muscle wasting
Everyone wants to stay fit and healthy as they grow old. But as we age, our body degrades, our muscles shrink and strength declines. Some older people suffer from excessive muscle loss, a condition known as sarcopenia. Researchers show that a combination therapy could delay the onset of sarcopenia.
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What Masks Off on Public Transit Means for the Pandemic
Updated at 6:50 p.m. ET on April 20, 2022 If you commuted to work today on a bus, train, or metro system, you probably saw more mouths and noses than usual. On Monday, a Trump-appointed federal judge struck down a CDC rule that mandated masks on all U.S. transportation networks, including in airports and on planes. Airline passengers who were mid-flight when the news broke cheered and ripped thei
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The Northman Is an Unsentimental Portrait of a Hero
The magic of Robert Eggers's breakout first film, The Witch , a horror fable about a Puritan family besieged by supernatural forces, lay in its authenticity. Not from the close attention to period detail, though that was itself impressive, but from the earnestness of its tone, which presented every supernatural element as matter-of-factly as the grim realities of corn farming in 17th-century New
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Why Is Inflammation a Dangerous Necessity?
We've heard a lot about the immune system over the last couple of years of the COVID-19 pandemic, but of course our immune system fights off much more than the coronavirus. And while the immune system protects us brilliantly from countless pathogens every day, sometimes it can also attack our own bodies, causing harmful and even deadly inflammation. In this episode, host Steven Strogatz speaks…
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The moon, where no satnav has gone before
The test version of a unique satellite navigation receiver has been delivered for integration testing on the Lunar Pathfinder spacecraft. The NaviMoon satnav receiver is designed to perform the farthest ever positioning fix from Earth, employing signals that will be millions of times fainter than those used by our smartphones or cars.
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NASA Contractor Unveils First US Lunar Lander Since Apollo Missions
Peregrine Lander Pennsylvania-based space company Astrobotic has unveiled its Peregrine Lander, the first US lunar lander designed to touch down on the Moon since the last Apollo mission almost half a century ago, a collaboration with NASA. The mission is part of the space agency's Commercial Lunar Payload Services initiative, designed to leverage contractors to deliver cargo to the surface of th
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Architects Propose Lighter-Than-Air Buildings That Hover Over City Streets
Cloudscapes Have you ever been on a city street and looked up at the space above you and thought, "they should really do something with that?" No, this isn't a 4/20 bait question. As Fast Company reports , Framlab eco-architect Andreas Tjeldflaat is proposing actual floating buildings that would use hover, zeppelin-like, in the empty space above municipal roadways and even fight climate change wh
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New accelerator at Fermilab approved for construction start
The U.S. Department of Energy has formally approved the start of full construction for the PIP-II project, an essential upgrade to the accelerator complex at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The heart of the project is a powerful new superconducting linear accelerator that will enable the world's most intense high-energy neutrino beam.
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In noisy situations, your words and gestures help you to be understood
Communication seems natural to us, but there are plenty of situations where background noise makes it hard for us to understand each other. In those moments, gesturing can come in handy, particularly if conversations in your native language are taking place in the background. This has been shown in research by psycholinguist Veerle Wilms in cooperation with Susanne Brouwer and Linda Drijvers. Thei
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Sun releases moderate and strong solar flares
The Sun emitted two solar flares on April 19, 2022, one moderate peaking at 9:35 p.m. EST and one strong peaking at 11:57 p.m. EST. NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, which watches the Sun constantly, captured an image of both events.
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Stem cell-based biomaterial can help regenerate tissue associated with low back pain and spinal issues
Researchers developed a biomaterial using stem cells aiming to reverse a condition called intervertebral disk (IVD) degeneration, which is associated with back pain and certain spinal issues. The stem cells were induced into chondrocytes — cells producing collagen that supports cartilage tissue. Implanting this biomaterial into a rat model of IVD degeneration brought the spinal mechanical propert
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Women's earnings drop after childbirth, study finds
When U.S. couples have their first child, mothers' earnings still drop substantially relative to fathers', and new research demonstrates the stubborn, decades-old pattern isn't changing despite broad increases in other aspects of gender equality.
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Everyday plastic products release trillions of microscopic particles into water
Plastics surround us, whether it's the grocery bags we use at the supermarket or household items such as shampoo and detergent bottles. Plastics don't exist only as large objects, but also as microscopic particles that are released from these larger products. These microscopic plastics can end up in the environment, and they can be ingested into our bodies.
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Best Bookshelf Speakers in 2022
The best bookshelf speakers solve a question every music lover has had to face: How do I get great sound without taking up a lot of space? In the speaker world, bigger typically means better because the space is used for larger drivers (the part of a speaker that produces sound). Bigger speakers, typically called floor-standing speakers, also have the luxury of having multiple drivers — one dedic
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These Chopsticks Make Your Food Taste Better By Electrocuting Your Tongue
Electric Chopsticks Meiji University professor Homei Miyashita, inventor extraordinaire, is expanding beyond TVs that allow you to taste what you're watching — and has developed a set of special electric chopsticks that he says can enhance the taste of food. The chopsticks, a collaboration between beverage company Kirin Holdings and the Miyashita Laboratory, are aimed at people who follow a low-s
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Hiring friends and family might actually be good for business—new research
Mark Zuckerberg, the CEO of Meta/Facebook, recently remarked in a podcast interview that when it came to hiring new staff, his preference was people whose "values aligned in the things that you care about". This, he said, was akin to "choosing a friend or a life partner". He went on to state that many young people were too "objective-focused" and "not focused enough on connections and … people".
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New research reveals the complexity of improving rangeland management in Africa
The world is a wickedly complex place, especially when people have a need to share limited resources. Herding communities in northern Namibia, for instance, are afflicted by poverty, drought and degraded landscapes. International groups want to help—development agencies have made several attempts to improve conditions in these communities with outside investments, but without much success. The rea
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Cities are driving evolutionary change in the cosmopolitan white clover, a new global study finds
Over half of the world's population now lives in an urban area, according to a recent report by the United Nations. And that number is expected to grow to two-thirds by the middle of this century. Rapid urbanization's effects on local ecosystems and their biodiversity are not yet fully understood. But the Global Urban Evolution Project (GLUE), an ongoing international collaboration involving hundr
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New research reveals the complexity of improving rangeland management in Africa
The world is a wickedly complex place, especially when people have a need to share limited resources. Herding communities in northern Namibia, for instance, are afflicted by poverty, drought and degraded landscapes. International groups want to help—development agencies have made several attempts to improve conditions in these communities with outside investments, but without much success. The rea
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Cities are driving evolutionary change in the cosmopolitan white clover, a new global study finds
Over half of the world's population now lives in an urban area, according to a recent report by the United Nations. And that number is expected to grow to two-thirds by the middle of this century. Rapid urbanization's effects on local ecosystems and their biodiversity are not yet fully understood. But the Global Urban Evolution Project (GLUE), an ongoing international collaboration involving hundr
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Lowering the temperature on a hot topic: A climate change primer
Climate changes. It has done so, often dramatically, over the course of Earth's geologic timescales, measured in hundreds of thousands and millions of years. Some of these changes might have caused a phenomenon called snowball Earth, a period in which the entire planet froze over. Other changes have taken the planet in the opposite direction.
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The case of Brazil: How policymakers may reduce avoidable deaths due to COVID-19
There is much disinformation surrounding the preventative measures that have been implemented across the globe in order to reduce the spread of the coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, and deaths from the disease it causes COVID-19. However, the research suggests that many of the measures, including social distancing, lockdown, face-covering mandates, and vaccination, all help reduce infection rates, hospital
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The Simple Anti-COVID Measures We're Not Taking
This is an edition of Up for Debate, a newsletter by Conor Friedersdorf. On Wednesdays, he rounds up timely conversations and solicits reader responses to one thought-provoking question. Soon after, he publishes some thoughtful replies. Sign up for the newsletter here. Question of the Week Say you received $1 billion to spend on improving the world. How would you spend it? Why? Email your thought
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Pondering the Bits That Build Space-Time and Brains
In 1989, the renowned physicist John Wheeler, popularizer of the term "black hole," proposed a radical new way to think about the universe. Quantum particles may shape-shift and disappear, but we can always count on information: the answers revealed when we ask questions through measurements. Wheeler speculated that bits of information — whether something is present or absent, up or down, 0 or 1
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Lasers trigger magnetism in atomically thin quantum materials
Researchers have discovered that light — from a laser — can trigger a form of magnetism in a normally nonmagnetic material. This magnetism centers on the behavior of electrons 'spins,' which have a potential applications in quantum computing. Scientists discovered that electrons within the material became oriented in the same direction when illuminated by photons from a laser. By controlling and
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Lasers trigger magnetism in atomically thin quantum materials
Researchers have discovered that light — from a laser — can trigger a form of magnetism in a normally nonmagnetic material. This magnetism centers on the behavior of electrons 'spins,' which have a potential applications in quantum computing. Scientists discovered that electrons within the material became oriented in the same direction when illuminated by photons from a laser. By controlling and
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Delta CEO Says Airline Is Testing SpaceX Starlink Internet in Flights
Inflight Starlink Right now, getting online on a flight is not only extremely expensive but also clunky and slow. But thanks to SpaceX's satellite-based broadband internet service Starlink, that might soon start to change. Delta Air Lines CEO Ed Bastian revealed in an interview with The Wall Street Journal this week that the airline is looking to add Starlink connectivity to its commercial flight
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Scientists set out to map the world's genomic diversity
An international consortium of scientists has launched a new effort to create a reference genome that captures the genetic diversity of all the peoples of the world. The researchers describe the initiative, called the Human Pangenome Project, in a paper published Wednesday, April 20, in the journal Nature.
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NASA's Perseverance rover captures video of solar eclipse on Mars
NASA's Perseverance Mars rover has captured dramatic footage of Phobos, Mars' potato-shaped moon, crossing the face of the Sun. These observations can help scientists better understand the moon's orbit and how its gravity pulls on the Martian surface, ultimately shaping the Red Planet's crust and mantle.
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Dying stars' cocoons might explain fast blue optical transients
Using a newly developed model, astrophysicists present a new theory to explain fast blue optical transients, a new class of transients that has boggled researchers since their discovery in 2018. In the new study, astrophysicists find that FBOTs could result from the actively cooling cocoons that surround jets launched by dying stars.
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Astronomers identify likely location of medium-sized black holes
Intermediate-mass black holes are notoriously hard to find but a new study indicates there may be some at the center of dense, star clusters located throughout the universe. A study now sheds new light on when and where black holes of about 100-100,000 solar masses could form and how they came into being.
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Study predicts climate change accelerates ocean currents
An international team led by researchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego used computer model simulations to find that climate change is altering the mechanics of surface ocean circulations, making them become faster and thinner.
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Are you tired of your job or is it actually burnout?
You might be tired of your nine-to-five, but are you actually experiencing burnout? An expert breaks down how to tell and what you can do about it. After two years of extraordinary stresses and pressures—and way too many back-to-back Zoom calls—many American employees are exhausted and heading for the exit door . A 2021 American Psychological Association study found 79% of workers had experienced
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Uniform single atomic sites anchored in graphdiyne for benzene hydroxylation to phenol
For single-atom catalysts (SACs), the catalyst supports are not only anchors for single atoms, but also modulators for geometric and electronic structures, which has an important impact on the catalytic performance. Selecting an appropriate support to prepare SACs with uniform coordination environments is critical for achieving optimal performance and clarifying the relationship between the struct
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How do our eyes stay focused on what we reach for?
Keeping our eyes focused on what we reach for, whether it be an item at the grocery store or a ground ball on the baseball field, may appear seamless, but, in fact, is due to a complex neurological process involving intricate timing and coordination. Researchers now shed additional light on the machinations that ensure we don't look away from where we are reaching.
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Let the Fantastic Beasts Movies Die
This article contains spoilers for Fantastic Beasts: The Secrets of Dumbledore . The final showdown in Fantastic Beasts: The Secrets of Dumbledore is supposed to be epic. Albus Dumbledore, the mighty wizard played by Jude Law, comes face-to-face with his former lover turned nemesis, Gellert Grindelwald (Mads Mikkelsen), breaking the pact they'd made as young men never to fight each other. But whe
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Should Couples Merge Their Finances?
When Americans marry, their finances usually do too: The majority of married couples put all their income into shared accounts . In the 1970s and '80s, not doing that was sometimes considered a bad omen for a relationship. But that's no longer the case today. The share of committed couples, married or not, who keep at least some of their finances separate has risen in recent decades , in part bec
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Remember When the Sun Shot a Ball of Plasma at the Earth? It Hit and Caused a Beautiful Aurora
The Chronic Turns out that when the Sun spits plasma at the Earth, the results can be beautiful. Earlier this month, when a sunspot shot plasma at Earth for the second time in two weeks, astronomers knew it was likely to result in a stunning aurora borealis light show here on Earth — and boy were they right. Multiple photos, like those taken by "Aurora Hunter" Todd Salat , show the majestic north
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Multifunctional graphene-based composites oriented by roles of graphene in photocatalysis
Graphene (GR), a single-layer carbon sheet with a hexagonal packed lattice structure, has displayed attractive potential in artificial photocatalysis due to its enchanting properties in enhancing light absorption, electron transfer dynamics, and surface reactions. Nowadays, multifunctional GR-based photocatalysts, such as GR-semiconductor, GR-metal, and GR-organics have been widely employed in pho
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How your eyes stay focused when you reach for stuff
New research sheds light on what's going on in the brain to ensure we don't look away from where we are reaching. Keeping our eyes focused on what we reach for, whether it be an item at the grocery store or a ground ball on the baseball field, may appear seamless, but, in fact, is due to a complex neurological process involving intricate timing and coordination. The work centers on a form of coor
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Women's earnings found to drop after childbirth
When U.S. couples have their first child, mothers' earnings still drop substantially relative to fathers', and new Cornell research demonstrates the stubborn, decades-old pattern isn't changing despite broad increases in other aspects of gender equality.
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Black holes raze thousands of stars to fuel growth
In some of the most crowded parts of the universe, black holes may be tearing apart thousands of stars and using their remains to pack on weight. This discovery, made with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, could help answer key questions about an elusive class of black holes.
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GM Just Patented a Self-Driving Car That Teaches People How to Drive
For more than a decade, people have been trying to teach cars how to drive. In the not-too-distant future, this effort may come full circle, with cars teaching people how to drive; last week, General Motors applied for a patent on an autonomous vehicle equipped to "train drivers." Self-driving cars have taken a lot longer to come about than was predicted, with complications relating to technology
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Who's Watching RuPaul's Drag Race Now?
At a time of mounting repression and censorship , the march for equality presses forward—at least for cisgender straight men on reality TV. This year, RuPaul 's Drag Race , for the first time in its 14 seasons, welcomed one such man to don a wig and compete in the stereotypically queer art of drag. During a season-kickoff talent pageant, in which other cast members flaunted their ballet and burle
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Researchers reveal RNA elements that enhance the cleavage of pre-miRNAs/shRNAs by DICER
A research team led by scientists from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) has revealed how secondary structure RNA elements control the cleavage activity of the DICER enzyme in both pre-miRNA and short-hairpin RNAs, improving the understanding of the DICER cleavage mechanism and providing a foundation for the design of accurate and efficient short-hairpin RNAs for gene-sile
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Researchers predict active hurricane season
The 2022 Atlantic hurricane season will see 17 to 21 named storms forming in the Atlantic basin, according to researchers at North Carolina State University. The Atlantic basin includes the entire Atlantic Ocean, the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean Sea.
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Robotic swimmer sheds light on microorganisms in motion
Just by moving around, microorganisms like bacteria and sperm are performing a remarkable feat. The effects of viscosity are amplified at small scales, which means a microorganism swimming in water is a bit like a person trying to do the backstroke in a tar pit. Scientists still don't have a complete picture of how they do it.
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Researchers reveal RNA elements that enhance the cleavage of pre-miRNAs/shRNAs by DICER
A research team led by scientists from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) has revealed how secondary structure RNA elements control the cleavage activity of the DICER enzyme in both pre-miRNA and short-hairpin RNAs, improving the understanding of the DICER cleavage mechanism and providing a foundation for the design of accurate and efficient short-hairpin RNAs for gene-sile
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Dashboard reveals migration paths of billions of birds
The BirdCast program at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology is exploring bird migration—one of the greatest, mostly unseen spectacles of nature—with its new Migration Dashboard, which reveals bird movements in localized detail previously unavailable to the general public.
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Scientists discover potential key missing link protein bridging eukaryotes and prokaryotes
All modern organisms fall into two classes, eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Eukaryotes (from the Greek meaning "true kernel") have a cell nucleus that harbors most of the cell's genetic information and includes organisms such as humans, plants and fungi. In prokaryotes, the cell's contents, including its genetic material, are diffusely distributed. Eukaryotes typically have much larger genomes, which
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Scientists discover potential key missing link protein bridging eukaryotes and prokaryotes
All modern organisms fall into two classes, eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Eukaryotes (from the Greek meaning "true kernel") have a cell nucleus that harbors most of the cell's genetic information and includes organisms such as humans, plants and fungi. In prokaryotes, the cell's contents, including its genetic material, are diffusely distributed. Eukaryotes typically have much larger genomes, which
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Developing a low-cost, high-precision fabrication method for thin mirrors and silicon wafers
Technologies that depend on lightweight, high-precision optical systems, like space telescopes, X-ray mirrors, and display panels, have developed significantly over the past several decades, but more advanced progress has been limited by seemingly simple challenges. For example, the surfaces of mirrors and plates with microstructures that are necessary in these optical systems can be distorted by
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Scientists build microporous MOF traps for mitigating toxic gases
Nitrogen dioxide and sulfur dioxide (NO2 and SO2) are toxic gases harmful to the environment and human health. Once they enter the atmosphere, they can travel hundreds of miles, polluting the air and causing acid rain which in turn damages buildings, trees, and crops. Exposure to the toxic gases can also lead to respiratory infections, asthma, and chronic lung disease.
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A biological motor that consumes chiral fuel drives rotation in one direction around a single covalent bond
A team of researchers at the University of Manchester has created a molecular motor that consumes chiral fuel to drive rotation around a single covalent bond. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group describes their work in developing a chemically powered directionally rotating motor and why they believe their efforts will result in similar systems being developed with other mater
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Russia tests nuclear-capable missile in warning to enemies
Putin boasts new intercontinental ballistic weapon will provide rivals with 'food for thought' Russia-Ukraine war: latest updates Russia has said it had test-launched its Sarmat intercontinental ballistic missile, a new addition to its nuclear arsenal, which Vladimir Putin said would give Moscow's enemies something to think about. The Russian president was shown on television being told by the mi
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Is Netflix Trying to Blow Itself Up?
Since the dawn of time — or at least 2007, when Netflix first launched its streaming service — humans have shared their logins to the site with their friends and family, a loophole that has arguably contributed greatly to the company's rise to become the service in the space. But things are looking a lot bleaker for Netflix these days. The company's shares have cratered over the past 24 hours, dr
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Chemotaxis shapes the microscale organization of the ocean's microbiome
Nature, Published online: 20 April 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04614-3 In situ experiments have demonstrated chemotaxis of marine bacteria and archaea towards specific phytoplankton-derived dissolved organic matter, which leads to microscale partitioning of biogeochemical transformation in the ocean.
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Intron-mediated induction of phenotypic heterogeneity
Nature, Published online: 20 April 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04633-0 Experiments in yeast show that introns have a role in inducing phenotypic heterogeneity and that intron-mediated regulation of ribosomal proteins confers a fitness advantage by enabling yeast populations to diversify under nutrient-scarce conditions.
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Somatic genomic changes in single Alzheimer's disease neurons
Nature, Published online: 20 April 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04640-1 Analyses of single-cell whole-genome sequencing data show that somatic mutations are increased in the brain of individuals with Alzheimer's disease compared to neurotypical individuals, with a pattern of genomic damage distinct from that of normal ageing.
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Protected areas have a mixed impact on waterbirds, but management helps
Nature, Published online: 20 April 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04617-0 Using a combined before–after control–impact approach shows that existing studies using either before–after or control–intervention methods incorrectly estimate the effectiveness of protected areas in maintaining waterbird populations.
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Specification of CNS macrophage subsets occurs postnatally in defined niches
Nature, Published online: 20 April 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04596-2 Single-cell profiling and fate-mapping experiments in the developing brain of mice and humans show that microglia and meningeal macrophages originate from a common prenatal precursor, but that perivascular macrophages are derived postnatally from meningeal macrophages.
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Revitalizing interface in protonic ceramic cells by acid etch
Nature, Published online: 20 April 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04457-y A simple acid treatment can improve high-temperature annealed electrolyte surfaces, resulting in improved performance and stability at lower temperatures for protonic ceramic fuel/electrolysis cells, offering new understanding for sustainable energy infrastructures.
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Multi-qubit entanglement and algorithms on a neutral-atom quantum computer
Nature, Published online: 20 April 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04603-6 A programmable neutral-atom quantum computer based on a two-dimensional array of qubits led to the creation of 2–6-qubit Greenberger–Horne–Zeilinger states and showed the ability to execute quantum phase estimation and optimization algorithms.
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Localized thermonuclear bursts from accreting magnetic white dwarfs
Nature, Published online: 20 April 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04495-6 The identification and characterization of rapid bursts in three accreting white dwarfs have shown that magnetically confined thermonuclear runaways resembling type-I X-ray bursts may occur in the surface layers of white dwarf atmospheres.
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Generation of 3D lacrimal gland organoids from human pluripotent stem cells
Nature, Published online: 20 April 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04613-4 Organoids originating from human multipotent ocular surface epithelial stem cells are similar to native lacrimal glands and undergo functional maturation when transplanted adjacent to the eyes of recipient rats, developing lumina and producing tear-film proteins.
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Opening of glutamate receptor channel to subconductance levels
Nature, Published online: 20 April 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04637-w Cryo-EM structures of AMPA receptor with the subunit γ2 in non-desensitizing conditions at low glutamate concentrations disprove the one-to-one link between the number of glutamate-bound subunits and ionotropic glutamate receptor conductance.
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Global seasonal forecasts of marine heatwaves
Nature, Published online: 20 April 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04573-9 Climate forecast systems are used to develop and evaluate global predictions of marine heatwaves (MHWs), highlighting the feasibility of predicting MHWs and providing a foundation for operational MHW forecasts to support climate adaptation and resilience.
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Marine heatwaves are reliably forecast by climate models
Nature, Published online: 20 April 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01028-z Climate models can provide accurate seasonal forecasts of unusually warm ocean temperatures, enabling the models' predictions to guide decisions made by stakeholders in the marine industries and conservation.
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Versatile neutral atoms take on quantum circuits
Nature, Published online: 20 April 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01029-y Neutral atoms are fast becoming prime candidates for use in quantum computers. Two studies involving multiple quantum bits show how this platform enables creative solutions for building quantum circuits.
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A colourful view of the origin of dinosaur feathers
Nature, Published online: 20 April 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01036-z Birds and their dinosaur ancestors had feathers, and now it seems that a distantly related group called pterosaurs had them, too. The finding extends the origins of feathers back to long before birds evolved, and sheds light on their role.
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When severe infection causes long-term mood disorders: A promising avenue to prevent mental illness following a transient infection
Scientists used pharmacogenetic techniques to identify a dedicated neural circuit comprising the central nucleus of the amygdala and the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis. The activation of this circuit in the first few hours of sepsis induces anxious behavior two weeks after the infection has cleared. This behavior observed in mice mimics the post-traumatic stress disorder observed in patients
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The BMW i7 EV Has a Fold-Down Movie Screen
This full-electric flagship can go 388 miles on a charge, hit 62 mph in 4.7 seconds, and has a 31-inch 8K ultra-wide TV that unfolds from the cabin roof.
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MPs to get scientific briefing on climate after activist's hunger strike
Angus Rose, 52, ends 37-day hunger strike as parliamentary group agrees to host briefing by Sir Patrick Vallance Sir Patrick Vallance, the government's chief scientific adviser, will address MPs about the climate crisis after a protester's hunger strike campaign. Angus Rose, 52, refused to eat for 37 days during his vigil outside parliament as he demanded the scientific adviser give a public addr
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Fetal exposure to meds may affect infants' brain development
A new study demonstrates that in utero exposure to mother's antiepileptic or antidepressant medication may affect development of the newborn brain networks. In the study, novel mathematical methods were developed to allow future research on how commonly used drugs or other environmental conditions affect the newborn brain.
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Jupiter's Icy Moon May Be Way More Habitable Than We Thought
Waterworld Scientists have found that Jupiter's moon Europa could be home to even more pockets of liquid water than previously thought, meaning that it's an even better candidate in our solar system to look for alien life. In a new study published in the journal Nature Communications this week, a team of scientists at Stanford University found that Europa's icy shell could be more porous than bel
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Our Favorite Sustainable Home Goods
When you think about it, the home goods you use could very well be the weak link when it comes to your personal sustainability goals. It's easy to clean up a spill with a single-use paper towel, leave the water running while cleaning dishes, and throw away food waste instead of composting it. Those habits, which can be incredibly hard to break, fit hand-in-hand with the environmental impact cause
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The Download: How AI capitalizes on catastrophe, and the Bitcoin cities of Central America
This is today's edition of The Download , our weekday newsletter that provides a daily dose of what's going on in the world of technology. How the AI industry profits from catastrophe It was meant to be a temporary side job—a way to earn some extra money. Oskarina Fuentes Anaya signed up for Appen, an AI data-labeling platform, when she was still in college studying to land a well-paid position i
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Chinese team breaks distance record for quantum secure direct communication
A team of researchers at Tsinghua University in China, has broken the distance record for quantum secure direct communication (QSDC) by sending information using their protocol a distance of 102.2 km. In their paper published in the journal Light: Science and Applications, the group describes how they devised a new QSDC protocol and used it to send secure signals over a fiber cable to extend the d
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Switching cable news channels can change political views
A new study of Fox News and CNN viewers offers evidence evidence of the influence partisan media outlets wield over people's attitudes on the major issues of the day. Millions of Americans count right-leaning Fox News as their primary source of information about politics and current events. For the study, researchers conducted an experiment in which they recruited a sample of regular Fox News vie
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Following a Mediterranean-style diet during pregnancy may reduce the risk of preeclampsia
An analysis of health and dietary data for more than 8,500 pregnant women found that greater adherence to a Mediterranean-style eating plan was associated with a lower risk of preeclampsia, which is a pregnancy complication characterized by severe high blood pressure that can be serious or even fatal for both mother and child. The reduction in risk of preeclampsia was greatest among Black women —
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