Search Posts

Nyheder2022april23

Two largest marsquakes to date recorded from planet's far side
The seismometer placed on Mars by NASA's InSight lander has recorded its two largest seismic events to date: a magnitude 4.2 and a magnitude 4.1 marsquake. The pair are the first recorded events to occur on the planet's far side from the lander and are five times stronger than the previous largest event recorded.
48min

LATEST

NASA Says One of Mars' Moons Is Going to Crash Into Its Surface
Death Spiral Ever seen a Moon doomed to crash and burn into the Martian surface create a solar eclipse? Now you have. NASA's Perseverance rover captured and posted a video this week that shows Phobos, one of two Martian satellites that NASA describes as being distinctly potato-shaped, as it crossed the Sun's surface. In a press release , the space agency said the clip will help scientists better
17h
Jeff Bezos is worth $160bn – yet Congress might bail out his space company | Bernie Sanders
If we are going to send more humans to the Moon and eventually to Mars, will the goal be to benefit the people of the US and the world, or to make billionaires even richer? On 20 July 1969, 650 million people throughout the world watched with bated breath as Neil Armstrong successfully fulfilled President Kennedy's vision. The United States achieved what had seemed impossible just a few decades b
23h
Facebook Employees Say Mark Zuckerberg Is Weirdly Obsessed With the Metaverse
Ready or Not The metaverse is looking less and less exciting all the time with brands hosting bizarre events nobody wants to attend , but the slew of companies bringing VR realities to life certainly aren't failing for a lack of trying. In fact, employees at Facebook say founder and company head Mark Zuckerberg obsessed. "[It's] the only thing Mark wants to talk about," an anonymous former direct
13h
Researchers take a step toward creating an axle-rotor nanomachine
A large team of researchers at the University of Washington, working with colleagues from Université Montpellier and the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, has taken a major step toward the creation of an axle-rotor nanomachine. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes how they used DNA coding to customize E. coli to push them into creating proteins that assembled
21h
Topological synchronization of chaotic systems
Can we find order in chaos? Physicists have shown, for the first time that chaotic systems can synchronize due to stable structures that emerge from chaotic activity. These structures are known as fractals, shapes with patterns which repeat over and over again in different scales of the shape. As chaotic systems are being coupled, the fractal structures of the different systems will start to assim
19h
Discovery sheds light on why Pacific islands were colonized
The discovery of pottery from the ancient Lapita culture by researchers at The Australian National University (ANU) has shed new light on how Papua New Guinea (PNG) served as a launching pad for the colonization of the Pacific—one of the greatest migrations in human history.
1d
Tigers: The world's largest cats
Tigers are the biggest cats in the world, but their populations are struggling. With only 3,200 left in the wild, there are now more living in captivity than in the wild.
19h
Kevin McCarthy's Sloppy, Artless Lie
Almost all politicians lie, but only some are demonstrably liars. House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy is not only a demonstrable liar; he's also a sloppy and inartful one. The clever dissembler knows that it's wiser to sow doubt and confusion than to deny something outright—and that if you must deny it, be sure the denial can't be definitively and humiliatingly debunked within hours. McCarthy br
13h
Two Russian Oligarchs Die Suddenly Under Mysterious Circumstances
Dark Times In just two days two former gas industry executives, both Russian oligarchs worth millions, have turned up dead alongside their entire families under extremely suspicious circumstances. According to a Daily Beast report published yesterday , 55-year-old Sergei Protosenya, formerly the chief accountant at Russian gas giant Novatek, was found dead along with his wife and daughter at a Ba
15h
'Like fingerprints at a crime scene': study finds new clues about causes of cancer
For first time it is possible to detect patterns in cancers' DNA – opening up to possible personalised treatments Analysis of thousands of tumours has unveiled a treasure trove of clues about the causes of cancer, representing a significant step towards the personalisation of treatment. Researchers say that for the first time it is possible to detect patterns – called mutational signatures – in t
1d
Community Input Is Bad, Actually
Development projects in the United States are subject to a process I like to call "whoever yells the loudest and longest wins." Some refer to this as participatory democracy. Across the country, angry residents and neighborhood associations have the power to delay, reshape, and even halt entirely the construction of vital infrastructure. To put a fine point on it: Deference to community input is
23h
How young people are taking action against climate change
Xiye Bastida was raised in the highlands of Mexico with an understanding that she had to thank the Earth for everything it provided. Now, she's dedicated her entire life to the issue of protecting it. (Image credit: Ashanti Fortson for NPR)
1d
A new vision of artificial intelligence for the people
In the back room of an old and graying building in the northernmost region of New Zealand, one of the most advanced computers for artificial intelligence is helping to redefine the technology's future. Te Hiku Media, a nonprofit Māori radio station run by life partners Peter-Lucas Jones and Keoni Mahelona, bought the machine at a 50% discount to train its own algorithms for natural-language proce
23h
The Experiment Podcast: The Resurgence of the Abortion Underground
Listen and subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Podcasts There's a common story about abortion in this country, that people have only two options to intentionally end a pregnancy: the clinic or the coat hanger. They can choose the safe route that's protected by Roe v. Wade— a doctor in a legal clinic—or, if Roe is overturned, endure a dangerous back-alley abortion, symbolized b
1d
AI tool accurately predicts tumour regrowth in cancer patients
Exclusive: Tool predicts how likely tumours are to grow back in cancer patients after they have undergone treatment Doctors and scientists have developed an artificial intelligence tool that can accurately predict how likely tumours are to grow back in cancer patients after they have undergone treatment. The breakthrough, described as "exciting" by clinical oncologists, could revolutionise the su
4h
Orbital space around Earth must be protected amid rise in satellites, say scientists
Calls for rules akin to environmental regulations to reduce risk of collisions and preserve night sky The orbital space around Earth must urgently be protected by environmental rules and regulations akin to those that safeguard the planet's land, seas and air, leading scientists say. An international team of researchers warn that a dramatic rise in the number of satellites is polluting the night
18h
The Inner Lives of Animals
Not very long ago, eagles were rats in America's public imagination. Despite the bald eagle's position as a national symbol, the actual bird was widely despised until about the mid-20th century. Before that point, many people treated them like rodents and killed them without discretion—while also unselfconsciously admiring the bird's likeness on government seals, coins, and memorabilia. In The Ba
20h
Two teams use neutral atoms to create quantum circuits
Two teams of researchers working independently have shown the viability of using neutral atoms to create quantum circuits—both have published outlines of their work in the journal Nature. One of the groups, with members from the University of Wisconsin, Madison, ColdQuanta and Riverlane, successfully ran an algorithm on a cold atom quantum computer for the first time. The second group, with member
20h
Spilling Silicon Valley's secrets, one tweet at a time
Shortly after midnight on May 4, 2018, Jane Manchun Wong tweeted her first "finding" ever. "Twitter is working on End-to-End Encrypted Secret DM!" she wrote. A young woman of color, then just 23, exposing the plans of a Big Tech firm without any tools apart from her own ability to reverse-engineer code was (and is) pretty radical—and it's changed the way tech companies work. The tweet was the fir
22h
A Cozy, Whimsical Film About Growing Up
In the early scenes of Céline Sciamma's gentle new film, Petite Maman , 8-year-old Nelly (played by Joséphine Sanz) is exploring a haunted house of sorts—the quiet abode of her recently deceased grandmother. The location is mundane. Nonetheless, it's tinged with melancholy, a feeling that someone Nelly's age would have trouble articulating, but that Sciamma expresses easily with every emptied-out
17h
The Atlantic Daily: The Case for Letting Ukraine Into NATO
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox. Russia, which has killed thousands of soldiers and civilians in its so-far largely futile invasion, reinvigorated its assault on Ukraine this week. Vladimir Putin claimed victory in the besieged c
16h
The Deep Roots of Sexual Policing in America
Misdemeanors—minor offenses typically punishable by no more than a year in prison—account for more than 80 percent of criminal cases in the United States. In three large municipalities, just 4 percent of a typical police officer's shift is spent on violent crimes, while the majority of their time is devoted to duties like responding to traffic incidents or other disturbances, according to a 2020
22h
We can make COVID-19 the last pandemic | Bill Gates
Building a pandemic-free future won't be easy, but Bill Gates believes that we have the tools and strategies to make it possible — now we just have to fund them. In this forward-looking talk, he proposes a multi-specialty Global Epidemic Response and Mobilization (GERM) team that would detect potential outbreaks and stop them from becoming pandemics. By investing in disease monitoring, research a
19h
Atomic terahertz-vibrations solve the enigma of ultrashort soliton molecules
Stable packets of light waves—called optical solitons—are emitted in ultrashort-pulse lasers as a chain of light flashes. These solitons often combine into pairs with very short temporal separation. Introducing atomic vibrations in the terahertz range, researchers at the Universities of Bayreuth and Wrocław have now solved the puzzle of how these temporal links are formed. They report on their dis
19h
Researchers reveal cellular diversity of esophageal tissue
In a study published today in the journal Nature Communications, researchers at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University defined 11 subsets of cells found in the esophagus of mice, information that could potentially help clinicians diagnose or treat certain types of cancer.
22h
Head of NASA Completely Bemused by Question from "Angry Astronaut"
Runaround The head of NASA really didn't seem like he wanted to answer YouTuber Jordan Wright's question in a new clip posted to Reddit yesterday. The 3-minute video shows Wright, who calls himself the "Angry Astronaut" and has a space news channel with more than 77,000 subscribers, ask NASA administrator Bill Nelson how the space agency could cut costs on its expensive and thus-far-not-working u
13h
How Two Internet Nemeses Became Friends
Each installment of " The Friendship Files " features a conversation between The Atlantic 's Julie Beck and two or more friends, exploring the history and significance of their relationship. This week she talks with two former online adversaries who became friends. They met arguing in the comment section of a Facebook forum dedicated to promoting science, where each thought the other was misguide
20h
How engineered microbes could cut aviation emissions
A startup using genetically engineered microbes, light, and carbon dioxide in an attempt to make an alternative to petroleum-based products has caught the attention of United, one of the world's largest airlines. Aviation accounts for about 3% of global carbon dioxide emissions— nearly 1 gigaton in 2019. That number is growing, and there are few solutions in sight. Other modes of transportation h
1d
Marine mollusk shells reveal how prehistoric humans adapted to intense climate change
Current global climatic warming is having, and will continue to have, widespread consequences for human history, in the same way that environmental fluctuations had significant consequences for human populations in the past. The so-called "8.2 ka event" has been identified as the largest and most abrupt climatic event of the past 11,700 years, caused by cool meltwater from North American lakes flo
19h
COVID-19-vitamin D paper retracted by Springer Nature journal
A journal has retracted a 2021 paper claiming that vitamin D "significantly reduced the inflammatory markers associated with COVID-19 without any side effects" following criticism that led them to "no longer have confidence in the conclusions." The paper "Impact of daily high dose oral vitamin D therapy on the inflammatory markers in patients with COVID … Continue reading
16h
Antarctic sea-ice expansion in a warming climate
Antarctic sea-ice has expanded over the period of continuous satellite monitoring, which seemingly contradicts ongoing global warming resulting from increasing concentrations of greenhouse gasses. In a study, published in Nature Climate Change, an international team of scientists from the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and South Korea shows t
1d
Letter: Hungary Defends Orbán's Reelection
The Other Threat to Democracy in Europe Earlier this month, Viktor Orbán won his fourth consecutive term as Hungary's prime minister. Orbán, Yasmeen Serhan wrote , "has overseen the steady destruction of his country's democracy, transforming Hungary into what some scholars refer to as a ' soft ' or ' competitive ' autocracy, in which elections are held but the opposition's ability to compete in t
23h
Fossilized pollen may reveal 'fingerprints' of environmental stress
It's around this time every year that we start to remember the existence of pollen, the microscopic reproductive cells of cone-bearing and flowering plants. Airborne pollen may induce annoying congestion for some, but a new paper shows that these grains may provide a new way of looking at the climate over 300 million years into the fossil record.
22h
Doxxing Means Whatever You Want It To
The Twitter account @libsoftiktok has gained a significant and influential following by reposting TikTok videos of LGBTQ teachers and suggesting that they may be guilty of "grooming" or other forms of sexual predation. In The Washington Post on Tuesday, the reporter Taylor Lorenz identified the previously pseudonymous woman behind Libs of TikTok as the Brooklyn real-estate salesperson Chaya Raich
18h
Book Excerpt: What Elephant Seals Tell Us About Power Dynamics
Every year, a complex and chaotic struggle for power plays out among 4,000-pound male elephant seals, with the top-ranked victors standing guard before clusters of female seals. This "living soap opera" of breeding season on the California coast offers an evolutionary window into group power hierarchies.
1d
Hubble explores galactic wings
This image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope features two merging galaxies in the VV-689 system, nicknamed the Angel Wing. Unlike chance alignments of galaxies, which only appear to overlap when viewed from our vantage point on Earth, the two galaxies in VV-689 are in the midst of a collision. The galactic interaction has left the VV-689 system almost completely symmetrical, giving the impr
20h
The Download: Language-preserving AI, and hackers showed it's frighteningly easy to breach critical infrastructure
This is today's edition of The Download , our weekday newsletter that provides a daily dose of what's going on in the world of technology. A new vision of artificial intelligence for the people In the back room of an old building in New Zealand, one of the most advanced computers for artificial intelligence is helping to redefine the technology's future. Te Hiku Media, a nonprofit Māori radio sta
21h
Psykiska symptom vid Alzheimers sjukdom
Förutom minnessvårigheter och andra kognitiva symptom lider de flesta som drabbas av Alzheimers sjukdom också av psykiska besvär. Länge har det varit oklart om dessa uppstår på grund av vävnadsförändringarna i hjärnan, eller om de utgör psykologiska reaktioner till följd av de kognitiva symptomen. En studie vid Lunds universitet har gett nya insikter om de psykiska symptomens uppkomst vid Alzheim
22h
The US Is Spending $6 Billion to Keep Its Aging Nuclear Reactors Running
For the last several decades, nuclear power has been viewed by many in the US and abroad as an energy source that's too risky, not "green" enough, or otherwise undesirable. But with climate change alarm bells clanging and countries around the world looking to cease imports of Russian oil and gas, nuclear's starting not to look so bad. This week the Biden administration launched a six-billion-doll
20h
Selective synthesis of meta isomers now possible
In a recent study published in Science, four RIKEN organic chemists have come up with a way to selectively synthesize isomers of an important group of aromatic compounds. This promises to make it possible to manufacture chemicals for drugs, fertilizers and polymers without the need to perform costly separation procedures.
19h
The vision collector: the man who used dreams and premonitions to predict the future
In 1966, a British psychiatrist had an idea: to change the course of history by asking the public to share their eerie intuitions On the morning of 21 October 1966, a dark, glistening wave of coal waste burst out of the hillside above the Welsh village of Aberfan and poured down. People later compared the roar of the collapsing mine tip to a low-flying jet aircraft or thunder or a runaway train.
3min
Pill to control 'sudden urge to pee' could be sold over the counter in UK
Sufferers urged to join consultation after Aquiette pills deemed safe to buy without prescription Millions of women suffering from an overactive bladder have been urged to take part in a consultation that could make a treatment available over the counter for the first time. The call for evidence, launched on Saturday, could lead to the medicine Aquiette being reclassified so that it can be bought
21min
'If Macron Loses, Putin Wins.'
In a rematch of the 2017 election, France will decide tomorrow between the erstwhile centrist disrupter Emmanuel Macron and the far-right fixture Marine Le Pen . Although this contest once seemed inevitable, the emergence last fall of the wild-card extreme-right media personage Éric Zemmour —whose campaign outflanked Le Pen's and threatened to cannibalize it—meant that Le Pen had to struggle just
1h
Ugens debat: Knastørt tømmer og brændbart skum
En tagbrand i Vanløse spredte sig med hidtil uset hast, og på kort tid var 90 lejligheder væk. Teknikere undrer sig over, hvordan flammerne så hurtigt kunne passere brandmuren. En del af læserne på ing.dk hjalp til med bud på forklaringer, mens teknikerne endnu arbejder på en rapport.
2h
What is the meaning of life to you? (nonprofit poll)
hi guys 😀 I'm a highschooler in Hong Kong, currently collecting responses (no word limit) about the meaning of life for my nonprofit to celebrate the diversity of the human experience – may i ask if anyone would help share their thoughts by filling in this form? https://forms.gle/WVrbyV4sMrx24s4V7 Our goal is to compile 100 or even more responses from various countries: selected responses will b
6h
An ocean in your brain: Interacting brain waves key to how we process information
For years, the brain has been thought of as a biological computer that processes information through traditional circuits, whereby data zips straight from one cell to another. While that model is still accurate, a new study shows that there's also a second, very different way that the brain parses information: through the interactions of waves of neural activity. The findings help researchers bett
13h
Making 3D printing truly 3D
Don't be fooled by the name. While 3D printers do print tangible objects (and quite well), how they do the job doesn't actually happen in 3D, but rather in regular old 2D.
13h
Best Ceiling Speakers in 2022
The best ceiling speakers are perfect for anyone looking to build a low-profile sound system. Relegating speakers to the ceiling is a good way to keep any entertainment center or home theater from looking cluttered, with wires poking out of every corner. Sure, installing them is no picnic, but the awesome home aesthetics dividends pay off almost instantly. Here's a compilation of the best ceiling
14h
Climate change is upping hurricane rainfall totals
New findings from a computer modeling study of the 2020 Atlantic hurricane season may be a dire indicator of future storms. The researchers analyzed the entire 2020 North Atlantic hurricane season in conjunction with human activity that affects climate change. They found that hourly hurricane rainfall totals were up to 10% higher compared to hurricanes that took place in the pre-industrial (1850)
14h
Scientists turn a hydrogen molecule into a quantum sensor
Using a scanning tunneling microscope equipped with a femtosecond terahertz laser, scientists have exploited the quantum properties of a two-atom hydrogen molecule to observe changes in the electrostatic field of a target sample, turning the hydrogen molecule into a quantum sensor.
16h
Do people pick empathy for animals or other humans?
New research digs into whether people are more likely to feel empathy for animals than other humans. In short, the answer is complicated. The findings could have implications for framing messages to the public about issues like new environmental policies, among others. The researchers found that when people had to choose between empathizing with a human stranger or an animal—in this case, a koala
16h
Less prostate cancer screening reduces overdiagnosis but may miss aggressive cases
Over the past 15 years, public health authorities have downgraded recommendations for the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test as a screening tool to reduce the overdiagnosis and overtreatment of men with low-grade prostate cancer. Now, researchers have found that while these efforts have been effective, the incidence of higher-grade disease and metastasis at diagnosis have risen.
16h
New experiment gives insight into the chaotic behavior of flows in planets
Flows in planets like Earth are characterized by many features, such as rotation and the difference in temperature between the hot core and the cold surface. These flows have very large dimensions and it is very hard to investigate them. To study them, Ph.D. student Matteo Madonia set up a unique experiment called TROCONVEX, a rotating cylinder with a temperature difference between bottom and top,
17h
Cell-Free DNA as Disease Biomarkers
In this webinar, Stella Goulopoulou and Iwijn de Vlaminck will discuss how they analyze cell-free DNA to identify biomarkers of various diseases and their complications, including preeclampsia, COVID-19, and transplant rejections.
17h
The physics of a singing saw
Researchers have used the singing saw to demonstrate how the geometry of a curved sheet, like curved metal, could be tuned to create high-quality, long-lasting oscillations for applications in sensing, nanoelectronics, photonics and more.
17h
Establishment of a pancreatic cancer animal model using the pancreas-targeted hydrodynamic gene delivery method
Pancreatic cancer has a significantly poor prognosis; therefore, the development of effective treatments is an unmet clinical need. The major drawback in this field was the lack of useful model animals, which delayed the establishment of markers for early diagnosis and therapeutic options. The research group established an effective carcinogenesis method with wild-type rats by selectively introduc
18h
Development of new magnet that reduces use of rare-earth element by 30%
A research team led by Dr. Jung-Goo Lee and Dr. Tae-Hoon Kim of the Department of Magnetic Materials in the Powder Materials Division at the Korea Institute of Materials Science (KIMS), a government-funded research institute under the Ministry of Science and ICT, succeeded in developing rare-earth-saving permanent magnets that can replace the 42M-graded commercial magnets while reducing the amount
18h
A luminescent material that shines brighter when stretched or electrified
Scientists at Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology (DGIST) in Korea have fabricated a flexible material that lights up brightly when stretched and/or when an electric field is applied. The results were published in the journal Applied Physics Reviews and show promise for the development of bright, sustainable, stretchable devices for use, for example, as interactive skin displays an
18h
Deformation of hydrogel used to measure the negative pressure of water
Water, unexpectedly, has the potential to withstand a massive stretching force or tension due to its internal cohesive force. Under extreme tension, the hydrostatic pressure of the water would display as absolute negative. The comprehension of such a unique thermodynamic non-equilibrium state in the phase diagram of water is still blurry, which has sparked a lot of curiosity in the field. Neverthe
18h
Using melt polymerization to fabricate robust covalent organic framework foams
Adsorption-based (e.g., gas or liquid molecules) separation technologies have shown unique economic and environmental advantages in specific applications. In industrial applications, ideal high-efficiency adsorbents require not only high adsorption capacity/selectivity, but also good machinability, cycling, and mechanical stability. Thus, it is necessary to assemble the adsorbents into high-stabil
18h
A majority of Americans support mask mandates on planes
and public transit, a new survey finds. Fifty-six percent of Americans favor requiring the public wearing masks on planes, trains, buses, and other means of public transportation, compared with 24% who oppose and 20% who don't have an opinion. People over 60 years old were more likely to support mask mandates. The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research released the poll days af
18h
Understanding arteriosclerosis: How blood vessels restructure under pressure
Hypertension, a very common condition worldwide, can lead to arteriosclerosis through alterations in the structure of blood vessel walls known as 'vascular remodeling.' In a recent study, an international team of scientists unveiled a molecular pathway for the development of arteriosclerosis for the first time. This could pave the way to better medication for preventing and treating hypertension a
18h
Water processing: Light helps degrade hormones
Micropollutants in water often are hormones that accumulate in the environment and may have negative impacts on humans and animals. Researchers have now developed a process for the photocatalytic degradation of these pollutants when they flow through polymer membranes. Irradiation with light triggers a chemical reaction, as a result of which steroid hormones are degraded on the membranes coated wi
18h
Big brains and bodies let crows and ravens take over the planet
Big bodies and big brains have helped crows and ravens survive in a variety of climates and habitats all over the world, new research finds. Crows and ravens, well known for their black color and the harsh " caw " sound they make, are intelligent birds that use tools, solve complex abstract problems, and speak a volume of words. But what is less well appreciated is how diverse they are. They are
18h
What is decarbonization, and how do we make it happen?
To keep the planet from warming more than 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels, most countries, including the U.S., have goals to reach net zero by 2050. Net zero means that all greenhouse gas emissions produced are counterbalanced by an equal amount of emissions that are eliminated. Achieving this will require rapid decarbonization.
19h
NASA's Perseverance Rover Captures Video of a Solar Eclipse on Mars
NASA's Perseverance rover has captured a spectacular video of an April solar eclipse on Mars. The video clearly depicts Phobos as it eclipses the sun, as seen from the Martian surface. "You can see details in the shape of Phobos' shadow, like ridges and bumps on the moon's landscape," said planetary astronomer Mark Lemmon in a statement. Lemmon, of the Space Science Institute in Boulder, has orch
19h
Strong light-matter coupling in organic crystals
Organic semiconductors are an emerging class of materials for opto-electronic devices such as solar cells and organic light emitting diodes. As a result, it's important to tune materials properties for specific requirements like efficient light absorption and emission, long excited state lifetimes, or more exotic properties (such as singlet fission). One of the advantages of these organic semicond
19h
Nuclear expert cautions against unfamiliar new nuclear age
High-tech advances in weapons technologies and a return of 'great power nuclear politics', risk the world 'sleepwalking' into a nuclear age vastly different from the established order of the Cold War, according to new research undertaken at the University of Leicester.
19h
Advanced digital signal processing for ultra-high-capacity optical transmission
Today's society generates ever more internet data traffic for applications such as ultra-high-definition video, cloud services and 5G mobile connections. This decades-long continual exponential growth of data traffic has been underpinned by optical fibers. Sjoerd van der Heide explored how the spatial dimension in optical and digital transmission techniques can be used in future ultra-high-capacit
19h
New study on water resources in Himalaya
A new study featuring contributions from British Antarctic Survey (BAS) scientists has identified 100 pressing research questions on climate change and water resources in the Upper Indus Basin (UIB) that must be answered to protect the communities that live there.
19h
Europe saw warmest summer on record in 2021
Scientists say last summer was the hottest summer on record in Europe, with temperatures a full 1 degree Celsius (1.8 degrees Fahrenheit) higher than the average for the previous three decades.
19h
Volcanoes at fault if the Earth slips
The 2016 Kumamoto earthquakes shocked inhabitants of the western island of Kyushu, causing hundreds of casualties and serious damage to vital infrastructure. The epicenter of the quake was traced to the Futagawa fault in a region neighboring Mount Aso, an active volcano in Kumamoto Prefecture that last erupted in October 2021.
19h
YouTuber Trevor Jacob Really Did Crash His Plane On Purpose, FAA Finds
(Image: Trevor Jacob) The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has confirmed what many already suspected: influencer Trevor Jacob really did crash his plane on purpose back in January. The crash was questionable from the beginning. Jacob, a YouTuber known for posting shocking content to his channel, said he lost control of his Taylorcraft BL64 during a flight over California's Los Padres Nationa
19h
Bear Grylls Eats Maggots and Live Fish | Man vs. Wild
Stream Man vs. Wild on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/man-vs-wild #ManVsWild #BearGrylls #Survival Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery From: Disco
20h
Snag the Best Earth Day Deals from Amazon, eBay, Samsung, and Walmart
Earth: what a planet. Easily in the top three in the entire solar system. Earth Day is a good time to reflect not only on small steps we can take to live more sustainably but celebrate a planet we call home. To ring in the day right, Amazon, Home Depot, eBay, Samsung, and Walmart offering tons of great deals on everything from sustainable home goods to tech. But like any deal tied to a holiday, t
20h
Scientists develop novel circulating tumor DNA biosensor
Nucleic acids analysis is mainly used in pathogen detection, genetic disease identification and early cancer diagnosis. For example, quantitative analysis of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA), a free DNA fragment derived from malignant cells which carries tumor specific sequence changes, can help obtain abundant information about tumors, including gene point mutation, genome integrity. Therefore, ctDN
20h
Guns are now the #1 cause of death for kids and teens
Firearms have surpassed motor vehicles as the leading cause of death among children and adolescents in the United States, according to a new analysis of federal data. The study in the New England Journal of Medicine quantifies the leading causes of death nationwide for people ages 1 to 19. Based on the analysis of data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, firearm-related deaths am
20h
Turning exercise into a game gets new moms to move more
Fun and games could be a solution to serious problems like preeclampsia and hypertension among pregnant people, according to a new study. Researchers found that gamification—broadly defined as the use of specially engineered games to stimulate learning and behavioral change—could generate greater levels of exercise in postpartum individuals who developed these types of conditions. In turn, the in
20h
Machine-learning model can distinguish antibody targets
A new study shows that it is possible to use the genetic sequences of a person's antibodies to predict what pathogens those antibodies will target. The new approach successfully differentiates between antibodies against influenza and those attacking SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.
22h
Klassamhället syns i studenters Facebookgrupper
Går det att göra en klassresa med hjälp av högre utbildning? En forskare har följt Facebookgrupper med förskollärar-, statsvetar- och konst- och designstudenter, och konstaterar att grupperna kan bidra till social och kulturell "inlåsning". Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
22h
Negativa utsläpp nollar flygets klimatpåverkan
Redan idag skulle vi kunna flyga med biobaserade flygbränslen som helt eliminerar flygets klimatpåverkan, menar forskare vid Chalmers tekniska universitet. Tricket är att fånga och lagra kol när biobränslet produceras. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
22h
Fler fall av covid-19 efter exponering för PFAS?
Under pandemins första år var det 19 procent fler bekräftade fall av covid-19 i Ronneby än i grannkommunen Karlshamn. Detta slog forskare vid Lunds universitet fast efter en epidemiologisk studie som slutfördes under hösten 2021. Samtidigt poängterar de att det inte går att påvisa att det är miljökatastrofen i Kallinge som är orsaken bakom. Nu inleds fler studier för att ta reda på mer. Inlägget
22h
Tysta fläktar kan göra oss friskare
En doktorand vid Chalmers har lokaliserat skadliga ljud från fläktarna i våra ventilationssystem. Och skapat en helt tyst fläkt – utan de farliga tonala ljuden. Brus i inomhusmiljö är en hälsorisk och kan påverka barns kognitiva utveckling. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
22h
Development of magnetic cooling materials that enable efficient hydrogen liquefaction
National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Tohoku University and Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI) have developed a series of Er(Ho)Co2-based magnetic cooling alloys that can be used to efficiently cool hydrogen from 77 K to 20 K: its liquefaction temperature. These alloys show excellent cyclic durability and can be used to develop a high performance magnetic refrigerati
22h
The right cornbread
Nature, Published online: 22 April 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01119-x A taste of home.
23h
Comparing COVID-19-related hospitalization rates among individuals with infection-induced and vaccine-induced immunity in Israel
Nature Communications, Published online: 22 April 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-29858-5 The relative degree of immunity to SARS-CoV-2 provided by combinations of natural infection, vaccination, and booster doses is unknown. Here, the authors show that infection-induced immunity provides more protection against COVID-19-related hospitalization than non-recent vaccine immunity, but less than booster
23h
Machine learning-based global maps of ecological variables and the challenge of assessing them
Nature Communications, Published online: 22 April 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-29838-9 The recent wave of published global maps of ecological variables has caused as much excitement as it has received criticism. Here we look into the data and methods mostly used for creating these maps, and discuss whether the quality of predicted values can be assessed, globally and locally.
23h
Genetic analysis of over half a million people characterises C-reactive protein loci
Nature Communications, Published online: 22 April 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-29650-5 Inflammation is associated with a variety of diseases. Here, the authors identify 266 genetic loci associated with C-reactive protein levels, a marker of inflammation, in >500,000 Europeans, along with associated pathways, clinical outcomes and potential causal associations with disease.
23h
A targetable CoQ-FSP1 axis drives ferroptosis- and radiation-resistance in KEAP1 inactive lung cancers
Nature Communications, Published online: 22 April 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-29905-1 KEAP1 mutations are frequently observed in NSCLC and lead to drug resistance. Here, the authors show that KEAP1 mutations in lung cancer cells leads to FSP1 upregulation through NRF2, resulting in ferroptosis resistance and radioresistance.
23h
CinA mediates multidrug tolerance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis
Nature Communications, Published online: 22 April 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-29832-1 Drug tolerance complicates the treatment of tuberculosis. Here, Kreutzfeldt et al. show that the protein CinA mediates drug tolerance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis by cleaving NAD-drug adducts, suggesting CinA as a potential target to shorten tuberculosis treatment by potentiating the efficacy of currently used
23h
Supraphysiological activation of TAK1 promotes skeletal muscle growth and mitigates neurogenic atrophy
Nature Communications, Published online: 22 April 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-29752-0 TGF-β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) is essential for the maintenance of skeletal muscle mass through incompletely understood mechanisms. Here the authors show that supraphysiological activation of TAK1 leads to muscle hypertrophy through the elongation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) involved in protein synthesis, and
23h
ZNF117 regulates glioblastoma stem cell differentiation towards oligodendroglial lineage
Nature Communications, Published online: 22 April 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-29884-3 Improved treatment of glioblastoma (GBM) can be achieved by inducing differentiation of glioblastoma stem cells (GSCs). Here, the authors show that zinc finger protein 117 (ZNF117) is a regulator of GSC differentiation via Notch signaling through interaction with JAG2, and can be targeted for therapy.
23h
Frenkel-defected monolayer MoS2 catalysts for efficient hydrogen evolution
Nature Communications, Published online: 22 April 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-29929-7 While material defect sites are active for chemical reactions, it is important to understand how different defect types impact reactivity. Here, authors prepare Frenkel-defected MoS2 monolayers and demonstrate improved performances for H2 evolution electrocatalysis than pristine or doped MoS2.
23h
Novo Nordisk Fonden: »Hvis du har en kvote, sætter du også et loft på og skaber en ekstra vurderingsfaktor«
Lederen af Novo Nordisk Fondens medical science-programområde, Martin Ridderstråle, er ikke tilhænger af at øremærke midler til forskning i kvindesygdomme for at skabe balance på området. Han siger, at fonden generelt ønsker at støtte forskning, der kan mindske ulighed i sundhed, også blandt kvinder, men er åben overfor, at der er potentiale for forbedring.
1d
Ecotourism giving rare iguanas a sweet tooth
Ecotourists feeding grapes to rock iguanas on remote islands in the Bahamas have given them a sweet tooth and high blood sugar, researchers said Thursday, warning of unknown effects on the health of the vulnerable reptiles.
1d
Protected areas can be the beating heart of nature recovery in the UK, but they must be more than lines on a map
A new report launched today (22 April) by the British Ecological Society (BES) says that the UK government's commitment to protect 30% of land and sea by 2030 offers the opportunity to revitalize the contribution of protected areas to nature recovery. But it also warns that this ambitious pledge will fail if we don't make radical, transformative changes.
1d
New ASM Academy report shows critical role microbes play in climate change
The American Society for Microbiology (ASM) has issued a new report, Microbes and Climate Change: Science, People, & Impacts, examining the relationship between microbes and climate change. As major drivers of elemental cycles and producers and consumers of 3 of the gases responsible for 98% of increased global warming (carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide), microbes have a pivotal impact on
1d
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Leave a Reply